What does Bethany mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
βηθανίαν a village at the Mount of Olives 6
βηθανίᾳ a village at the Mount of Olives 3
βηθανίας a village at the Mount of Olives 2
βηθανία a village at the Mount of Olives 1

Definitions Related to Bethany

G963


   1 a village at the Mount of Olives, about two miles (3 km) from Jerusalem, on or near the normal road to Jericho.
   2 a town or village on the east bank of the Jordan, where John was baptising.
   Additional Information: Bethany = “house of dates” or, “house of misery”.
   

Frequency of Bethany (original languages)

Frequency of Bethany (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Bethany
(Hebrew: house of mercy).
(1) Ancient village of Palestine, 1.75 miles east of Jerusalem, at the base of the Mount of Olives. It was prominent as the home of Mary, Martha, and Lazarus, and the scene of the raising of Lazarus to life (John 11). From Bethany Our Lord sent two of His disciples to find the ass that was to bear Him on His triumphant entry into Jerusalem (Luke 19) and near this village. He ascended into heaven (Luke 24).
(2) Bethany beyond the Jordan, mentioned as the place of Our Lord's baptism (John 1), is of doubtful location.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Bethany
A place ever dear and memorable to the followers of the Lord Jesus, from being so sacred to the Lord's solemn moments of suffering. Perhaps the name is compounded of Beth, an house; and hanah, affliction. It lay about fifteen furlongs (nearly two of our miles) from Jerusalem, at the foot of the mount of Olives. See John 11:1-57 and John 12:1-50.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Bethany
House of dates.
The Revised Version in John 1:28 has this word instead of Bethabara, on the authority of the oldest manuscripts. It appears to have been the name of a place on the east of Jordan.
A village on the south-eastern slope of the Mount of Olives ( Mark 11:1 ), about 2 miles east of Jerusalem, on the road to Jericho. It derived its name from the number of palm-trees which grew there. It was the residence of Lazarus and his sisters. It is frequently mentioned in connection with memorable incidents in the life of our Lord (Matthew 21:17 ; 26:6 ; Mark 11:11,12 ; 14:3 ; Luke 24:50 ; John 11:1 ; 12:1 ). It is now known by the name of el-Azariyeh, i.e., "place of Lazarus," or simply Lazariyeh. See n from a distance, the village has been described as "remarkably beautiful, the perfection of retirement and repose, of seclusion and lovely peace." Now a mean village, containing about twenty families.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Bethany
("house of dates".) Bethabara, though dates have long disappeared from the locality, and only olives and figs remain (whence Olivet and Bethphage are named). (See BETHABARA.) Bethany is not mentioned until the New Testament time, which agrees with the Chaldee hinee being the word used for "dates" in the composition of the name, Beth-any. Associated with the closing days of the Lord Jesus, the home of the family whom He loved, Mary, Martha. and Lazarus where He raised Lazarus froth the dead; from whence He made His triumphal entry into Jerusalem; His nightly abode each of the six nights preceding His betrayal; where at the house of Simon the leper He was anointed by Mary (Mark 14:3); and where, most of all, we are introduced to the home circle of His private life. In John 11:1 His arrival at Bethany is recorded, namely, in the evening.
The sending of the two disciples for the colt was evidently on the following morning, to allow time for the many events of the day of His triumphal entry and visiting the temple, after which it was "eventide" (Mark 11:11), which coincides with John's (John 12:12) direct assertion, "the next day"; at the eventide of the day of triumphal entry He "went out unto Bethany with the twelve," His second day of lodging there. On the morrow, in coming from Bethany, He cursed the figtree (Mark 11:12-13), cast out the money-changers from the temple, and at "even" "went out of the city" (Mark 11:19), lodging at Bethany for the third time, according to Mark.
"In the morning" they proceeded by the same route as before (as appears from their seeing the dried up fig tree), and therefore from Bethany to Jerusalem (Mark 11:27; Mark 12:41) and the temple, where He spoke parables and answered cavils, and then "went out of the temple" (Mark 13:1), to return again to Bethany, as appears from His speaking with Peter, James, Jehu, and Andrew privately "upon the mount of Olives" (Mark 13:3), on the S.E. slope of which Bethany lies, 15 stadia or less than two miles from Jerusalem (John 11:18), the fourth day, according to Mark, who adds, "after two days was the feast of the Passover" (Mark 14:1). Thus Mark completes the six days, coinciding (with that absence of design which establishes truth) exactly with John, "Jesus six days before the Passover came to Bethany" (John 12:1.)
Though John does not directly say that Jesus went in the evenings to Bethany, yet he incidentally implies it, for he says, "they made Him a supper" at Bethany, i.e. an evening meal (John 12:2). The anointing by Mary, introduced by Mark, after mention of the chief priests' plot "two days" before the Passover, is not in chronological order, for it was six days before the Passover (John 12), but stands here parenthetically, to account for Judas' spite against Jesus. Judas "promised and sought opportunity to betray Him unto them in the absence of the multitude " (Luke 22:6); Matthew (Matthew 26:5) similarly represents the chief priests, in compassing His death, as saying," Not on the feast day, lest there be an uproar among the people." Jesus therefore in the day could clear the temple of the money-changers, but at night He was exposed to stratagem; so the very first night that He did not retire to Bethany, but remained in Jerusalem, He was seized.
It is striking how God's ordering brought about the offering of the true Paschal Lamb on the feast day, though the opposite was intended by the Jewish rulers. From the vicinity of Bethany, on the wooded slopes beyond the ridge of Olivet, He ascended to heaven, still seen to the moment of His being parted from His disciples, and carried up from their "steadfast gaze," blessing them with uplifted hands (Luke 24:50-51; Acts 1:9-12). Bethany was "at" the mount of Olives (Mark 11:1; Luke 19:1-29), near the usual road from Jericho to Jerusalem (Mark 10:46; Mark 11:1), close to Bethphage ("the house of figs"), frequently named with it.
Now el-Azariyeh, named so from Lazarus; on the E. of the mount of Olives, a mile beyond the summit, near the point at which the road to Jericho makes a sudden descent toward the Jordan valley; a hollow, wooded with olives, almonds, pomegranates, oaks, and carobs; lying below a secondary ridge which shuts out the view of the summit of Olivet. The village is a miserable one, of some 20 families of thriftless inhabitants. The house and tomb of Lazarus, and the house of Simon the leper, exhibited here, are of very doubtful genuineness.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Bethany
(behth' uh nee) Known primarily in the Gospels as the home of Mary, Martha, and Lazarus, ancient Bethany occupied an important place in the life of Jesus. Jesus often found Himself staying in Bethany at the home of his closest friends as He ministered in Jerusalem.
Background of the City Located on the Mt. of Olives' eastern slope, Bethany sat “about two miles” (John 11:18 , NIV) southeast of Jerusalem. Bethany became the final stop before Jerusalem just off the main east-west road coming from Jericho. Being at the foot of the mountain, the people could not see Jerusalem , thus giving Bethany a sense of seclusion and quietness. The road between Bethany and Jerusalem provided a ready avenue for travel across Olivet with the journey taking about fifty-five minutes to walk.
Since A.D. 333, Bethany primarily boasted of being the home of Lazarus' tomb. Over this site a church called the “Lazareion” (“shrine of Lazarus”) was erected which later aided in providing a new name for the town. El-Aziriyeh, the Arabic name of the present-day village, preserved the traditional connection of Lazarus with Bethany.
Role of the City in the Bible The primary event in the New Testament taking place in Bethany involved the raising of Lazarus from the dead (John 11-12 ). This magnificent miracle by Jesus demonstrated His authority, prepared for His resurrection, and was even magnified through the name of His friend, Lazarus (an abbreviation of Eleazar, “God has helped”).
Following a message sent to Him in Perea by Lazarus' sisters, Mary and Martha, Jesus returned to Bethany four days after the burial of Lazarus. After spending time with Martha and Mary individually, Jesus' love for Lazarus and His family became evident in His tears. Then in a public display of prayer and power Jesus raised His good friend from the dead.
Another significant event in Jesus' life occurred in Bethany at the home of Simon the Leper (Matthew 26:6 ; Mark 14:3 ). Late on the Tuesday night of Jesus' last week, a woman (recognized as Mary in John 12:3 ) gave Jesus His “burial anointment.” Coming to Jesus in the sight of all, she brought a costly alabaster vial of perfume and emptied its contents upon Jesus' head (“feet” in John 12:3 ).
Besides a number of smaller references to Bethany, one final event took place there. Bethany provided the location for Jesus' final blessing to His disciples and His subsequent parting. This encounter made up the final scene of ascension in Luke's Gospel (Luke 24:50-53 ).
Larry McGraw
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Bethany
BETHANY . A village about 15 stadia (2910 yards or about 1⅝ mile) from Jerusalem ( John 11:18 ) on the road from Jericho, close to Bethphage and on the Mount of Olives ( Mark 11:1 , Luke 19:29 ). It was the lodging-place of Christ when in Jerusalem ( Mark 11:11 ). Here lived Lazarus and Martha and Mary ( John 11:1 ), and here He raised Lazarus from the dead ( John 11:1-57 ). Here also He was entertained by Simon the leper, at the feast where the woman made her offering of ointment ( Matthew 26:6 , Mark 14:3 ). From ‘over against’ Bethany took place the Ascension ( Luke 24:50 ). In this case the topographical indications agree exceptionally with the constant tradition which fixes Bethany at the village of el-‘Azariyeh , on the S.E. of the Mount of Olives beside the Jericho road. The tomb of Lazarus and the house of Martha and Mary are definitely pointed out in the village, but of course without any historical authority. For a possible Bethany in Galilee, see Bethabara.
R. A. S. Macalister.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Bethany
The house of song; the house of affliction
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Bethany
Luke 24:50 (c) Here our blessed Lord reminded His disciples of incidents that had taken place in that little village.
These were so important that He took them there for their final lesson before going back to His Father. He wanted them to remember, and never forget, that only the Lord JESUS CHRIST can give life to those who are dead (Example of Lazarus).
He also reminded them that only He Himself could dry the tears of deep and real sorrow. (Example Mary and Martha at the grave) He reminded them that only He Himself could cleanse from the leprosy of sin. (Example Simon, the leper) He would have them remember that only He Himself should occupy the heart's affections rather than the service which we render, (Example Martha who was cumbered). He wanted them to know that He desired worship above service. (Example the woman who brought the alabaster box of ointment in Mark 14:3) He wanted them to remember that they must endure the neglect of His children. (Example He returned from Bethany hungry because no one invited Him home for breakfast) He wanted them to be convinced that only He Himself could set the captive free from the bondage of tradition and habit. (Example Lazarus brought out of the tomb though wrapped in grave clothes).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Bethany
The 'house of dates,' a village on the eastern slope of the Mount of Olives, about 2 miles from Jerusalem, near the road to Jericho. It was where Lazarus, Martha, and Mary resided, in whose house the Lord found a resting place, amidst those whom He loved, and who were ever ready to welcome Him, and to devote the best of their substance to Him. It was from or near Bethany that the Lord ascended. Matthew 21:17 ; Matthew 26:6 ; Mark 11:1,11,12 ; Mark 14:3 ; Luke 19:29 ; Luke 24:50 ; John 11:1,18 ; John 12:1 . It is now a ruinous and wretched hamlet called el Azariyeh, or 'Lazariyeh,' from Lazarus, 31 46' N, 35 15' E .
Some of the Greek MSS read BETHANY in John 1:28 where John was baptizing on the east of the Jordan.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Bethany
BETHANY.—2. See Bethabara.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Bethany
a considerable place, situated on the ascent of the mount of Olives, about two miles from Jerusalem, John 11:18 ; Matthew 21:17 ; Matthew 26:6 , &c. Here it was that Martha and Mary lived, with their brother Lazarus, whom Jesus raised from the dead; and it was here that Mary poured the perfume on our Saviour's head. Bethany at present is but a very small village. One of our modern travellers tells us, that, at the entrance into it, there is an old ruin, called the castle of Lazarus, supposed to have been the mansion house where he and his sisters resided. At the bottom of a descent, not far from the castle, you see his sepulchre, which the Turks hold in great veneration, and use it for an oratory, or place for prayer. Here going down by twenty-five steps, you come at first into a small square room, and from thence creep into another that is smaller, about a yard and a half deep, in which the body is said to have been laid. About a bow-shot from hence you pass by the place which they say was Mary Magdalene's house; and thence descending a steep hill, you come to the fountain of the Apostles, which is so called because, as the tradition goes, these holy persons were wont to refresh themselves there between Jerusalem and Jericho,—as it is very probable they might, because the fountain is close to the roadside, and is inviting to the thirsty traveller. Bethany is now a poor village, but pleasantly situated, says Dr. Richardson, on the shady side of the mount of Olives, and abounds in trees and long grass.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Bethany
Bethany (bĕth'a-ny), house of dates, or, of misery. A village on the eastern slope of Mount Olivet, about one and a half to two miles ("15 furlongs") east of Jerusalem, John 11:18, toward Jericho; the home of Mary and Martha, whither Jesus often went. Matthew 21:17; Mark 11:11-12. It was the home of Simon, Mark 14:3, the place where Lazarus was raised from the dead. John 11:18-44; and near it Jesus ascended to heaven, Luke 24:50; named in the Gospels eleven times only. See Beth-abara.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Bethany
A village on the eastern slope of the Mount Olivet, about two miles east-south-east of Jerusalem, and on the road to Jericho. It was often visited by Christ, Matthew 21:17 ; Mark 11:1,12 ; Luke 19:29 . Here Martha and Mary dwelt, and Lazarus was raised from the dead, John 11:1-57 Here Mary anointed the Lord against the day of his burying, John 12:1-50 ; and from the midst of his disciples near this village which he loved, he ascended to heaven, Matthew 24:50 . Its modern name, Aziriyeh , is derived from Lazarus. It is a poor village of some twenty families.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Bethany
BETHANY.—2. See Bethabara.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Bethany
There are two places called Bethany in the New Testament. The better known of the two was the village near Jerusalem, on the eastern slopes of the Mount of Olives. This was the village where Jesus’ friends Mary, Martha and Lazarus lived, and where Jesus was anointed a few days before his crucifixion (Matthew 26:6-13; Mark 11:1-11; John 11:1; John 11:18; John 12:1-7).
The other Bethany (‘Bethany beyond Jordan’, sometimes called Bethabara) was in Perea, on the eastern side of the Jordan River. It was one of the places where John the Baptist preached and baptized (John 1:28).

Sentence search

Beth-Abara - ” KJV reading for Bethany in John 1:28 following some Greek manuscripts. See Bethany
Bethany - (behth' uh nee) Known primarily in the Gospels as the home of Mary, Martha, and Lazarus, ancient Bethany occupied an important place in the life of Jesus. Jesus often found Himself staying in Bethany at the home of his closest friends as He ministered in Jerusalem. of Olives' eastern slope, Bethany sat “about two miles” (John 11:18 , NIV) southeast of Jerusalem. Bethany became the final stop before Jerusalem just off the main east-west road coming from Jericho. Being at the foot of the mountain, the people could not see Jerusalem , thus giving Bethany a sense of seclusion and quietness. The road between Bethany and Jerusalem provided a ready avenue for travel across Olivet with the journey taking about fifty-five minutes to walk. 333, Bethany primarily boasted of being the home of Lazarus' tomb. El-Aziriyeh, the Arabic name of the present-day village, preserved the traditional connection of Lazarus with Bethany. ...
Role of the City in the Bible The primary event in the New Testament taking place in Bethany involved the raising of Lazarus from the dead (John 11-12 ). ...
Following a message sent to Him in Perea by Lazarus' sisters, Mary and Martha, Jesus returned to Bethany four days after the burial of Lazarus. ...
Another significant event in Jesus' life occurred in Bethany at the home of Simon the Leper (Matthew 26:6 ; Mark 14:3 ). ...
Besides a number of smaller references to Bethany, one final event took place there. Bethany provided the location for Jesus' final blessing to His disciples and His subsequent parting
Bethphage - Village on the Mount of Olives near to Bethany. Identified with Kefr el Tor, on the mount half way between Bethany and the top
Bethany - BETHANY
Bethany - BETHANY
Bethany - There are two places called Bethany in the New Testament. ...
The other Bethany (‘Bethany beyond Jordan’, sometimes called Bethabara) was in Perea, on the eastern side of the Jordan River
Bethphage - so called from its producing figs, a small village situated in Mount Olivet, and, as it seems, somewhat nearer Jerusalem than Bethany. Jesus being come from Bethany to Bethphage, commanded his disciples to seek out an ass for him that he might ride, in his triumphant entrance into Jerusalem, Matthew 21:1 , &c
Bethany - Bethany . From ‘over against’ Bethany took place the Ascension ( Luke 24:50 ). In this case the topographical indications agree exceptionally with the constant tradition which fixes Bethany at the village of el-‘Azariyeh , on the S. For a possible Bethany in Galilee, see Bethabara
Bethphage - Close to Bethany, E. The traditional site is above Bethany, between it and the mountain's top. of Bethany, on the S
Betane - A place apparently south of Jerusalem, and not Bethany
Bethany - ) Bethany is not mentioned until the New Testament time, which agrees with the Chaldee hinee being the word used for "dates" in the composition of the name, Beth-any. In John 11:1 His arrival at Bethany is recorded, namely, in the evening. ...
The sending of the two disciples for the colt was evidently on the following morning, to allow time for the many events of the day of His triumphal entry and visiting the temple, after which it was "eventide" (Mark 11:11), which coincides with John's (John 12:12) direct assertion, "the next day"; at the eventide of the day of triumphal entry He "went out unto Bethany with the twelve," His second day of lodging there. On the morrow, in coming from Bethany, He cursed the figtree (Mark 11:12-13), cast out the money-changers from the temple, and at "even" "went out of the city" (Mark 11:19), lodging at Bethany for the third time, according to Mark. ...
"In the morning" they proceeded by the same route as before (as appears from their seeing the dried up fig tree), and therefore from Bethany to Jerusalem (Mark 11:27; Mark 12:41) and the temple, where He spoke parables and answered cavils, and then "went out of the temple" (Mark 13:1), to return again to Bethany, as appears from His speaking with Peter, James, Jehu, and Andrew privately "upon the mount of Olives" (Acts 1:9-121), on the S. slope of which Bethany lies, 15 stadia or less than two miles from Jerusalem (John 11:18), the fourth day, according to Mark, who adds, "after two days was the feast of the Passover" (Mark 14:1). Thus Mark completes the six days, coinciding (with that absence of design which establishes truth) exactly with John, "Jesus six days before the Passover came to Bethany" (John 12:1. )...
Though John does not directly say that Jesus went in the evenings to Bethany, yet he incidentally implies it, for he says, "they made Him a supper" at Bethany, i. " Jesus therefore in the day could clear the temple of the money-changers, but at night He was exposed to stratagem; so the very first night that He did not retire to Bethany, but remained in Jerusalem, He was seized. From the vicinity of Bethany, on the wooded slopes beyond the ridge of Olivet, He ascended to heaven, still seen to the moment of His being parted from His disciples, and carried up from their "steadfast gaze," blessing them with uplifted hands (Luke 24:50-51; 1618401285_13). Bethany was "at" the mount of Olives (Mark 11:1; Luke 19:1-29), near the usual road from Jericho to Jerusalem (Mark 10:46; Mark 11:1), close to Bethphage ("the house of figs"), frequently named with it
Bethphage - Place of figs, a little village at the eastern foot of the Mount of Olives, near to Bethany, Matthew 21:1 ; Mark 11:1 ; Luke 19:29
Bethphage - A place near Bethany, Matthew 21:1; Mark 11:1; Luke 19:29, and possibly west of that place
Bethabara - Most Editors of the Greek Testament read Bethany
Secacah - It has been identified with the ruin Sikkeh, east of Bethany
Bethania - From Bethany Our Lord sent two of His disciples to find the ass that was to bear Him on His triumphant entry into Jerusalem (Luke 19) and near this village. ...
(2) Bethany beyond the Jordan, mentioned as the place of Our Lord's baptism (John 1), is of doubtful location
Bethany - From Bethany Our Lord sent two of His disciples to find the ass that was to bear Him on His triumphant entry into Jerusalem (Luke 19) and near this village. ...
(2) Bethany beyond the Jordan, mentioned as the place of Our Lord's baptism (John 1), is of doubtful location
Martha - was sister of Lazarus and Mary, and mistress of the house where our Saviour was entertained, in the village of Bethany
Ananiah - It may be located at Bethany, east of Jerusalem
en-She'Mesh - (fountain of the sun ), a spring which formed one of the landmarks on the north boundary of Judah, ( Joshua 15:7 ) and the south boundary of Benjamin, (Joshua 18:17 ) perhaps Ain Haud or Ain-Chot --the "well of apostles" --about a mile below Bethany
Mithan - Greek translation understood this as Bethany
Lazarus - He dwelt at Bethany with his sisters, near Jerusalem; and the Lord Jesus did him the honour sometimes of lodging at his house when he visited the city
en-Shemesh - It is located at ain el-Hod, “the spring of the apostles,” about two miles east of Jerusalem on the eastern edge of Bethany
Martha, Saint 29 Jul - She was the sister of Lazarus, and Mary of Bethany, and shared the honor of Christ's friendship when He stayed as their Guest in Bethany
Bethany - It was from or near Bethany that the Lord ascended. ...
Some of the Greek MSS read Bethany in John 1:28 where John was baptizing on the east of the Jordan
Beth-Abara - Many of the best Greek manuscripts and recent editions have Bethany, also unknown, instead of Beth-abara
Bethphage - It must have been close to Bethany, and is traditionally identified with Abu Dis , a village that satisfies this condition
Beth-Phage - House of the unripe fig, a village on the Mount of Olives, on the road from Jerusalem to Jericho (Matthew 21:1 ; Mark 11:1 ; Luke 19:29 ), and very close to Bethany
Beth-Abara - and some of the best manuscripts read Bethany for Beth-abara; possibly it was at Beth-nimrah, or Nimrîn; or, as Conder thinks, at ʾAbarah, a leading ford of the Jordan on the road to Gilead
Lazarus -
The brother of Mary and Martha of Bethany
Martha - A disciple whom Jesus loved: she was apparently the head of the household at Bethany, which Jesus at times visited. But in John 12 , when the Lord was again at Bethany, and they made a supper for Him, Martha's service is in no way qualified, the raising up by the Lord of her brother Lazarus, and His dealings with herself, having doubtless taught her the needed lesson
Spikenard - The ointment with which our Lord was anointed in Simon's house at Bethany was this nêrd, and was very costly
Lazarus - ...
The brother of Martha and Mary of Bethany, and a beloved friend of Jesus (John 11)
Bethab'Ara - The Revised Version reads Bethany , which see below
Bethabara - The Revised Version reads "Bethany beyond Jordan
Nard - The term appears twice in the Song of Solomon (Romans 1:12 ; Romans 4:13-14 ) and in two of the gospel accounts of the woman anointing Jesus at Simon's house in Bethany (Mark 14:3 ; John 12:3 ; “spikenard,” KJV)
Bethabara - ]'>[1] , here read Bethany
Enshemesh - Now Ain Haud or Chot, "the well of the apostles," a mile below Bethany on the way from Jerusalem to Jericho
Martha - Sister of Lazarus and Mary, at Bethany
Laz'Arus -
Lazarus of Bethany, the brother of Martha and Mary. Lazarus is "of Bethany, of the village of Mary and her sister Martha
en-Shemesh - , the "well of the apostles" about a mile east of Bethany, the only spring on the road to Jericho
Bethabara - ]'>[1] (including א* ABC*) the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 has retained here the reading ‘Bethany,’ with marginal alternatives ‘Bethabarah’ and ‘Betharabah. 24) that Bethany is found in almost all copies and in Heracleon, but after personal investigation of the district (γενόμενοι ἐν τοῖν τόποις ἐπὶ ἱστορίαν τῶν ἰχνῶν Ἰησοῦ καὶ τῶν μαθητῶν αὐτοῦ) he prefers ‘Bethabara’ on the twofold ground of the distance of Bethany, the country of Lazarus and Martha and Mary, from the Jordan, and of the non-existence of any place bearing the latter name within the Jordan Valley. LXX Septuagint in Exodus 35:24), Bethany being οἶκος ὑπακοῆς, adding a play upon the name as befitting the spot where the messenger sent to prepare (κατασκευάζειν, Matthew 11:10) the way of the Lord should baptize. According to Chrysostom, for instance, the more accurate copies read ‘Bethabara,’ a result that might readily be conceived to follow from Origen’s criticism; and he adds that Bethany was neither across the Jordan nor in the wilderness, but near Jerusalem. It is clear, however, that either ‘Bethany’ or ‘Bethabara’ would lend itself readily to duplication. ’ And if Bethabara or Bethany is the scene of the Baptism, then it would seem that the site must be looked for in the northern part of the Jordan Valley, since Christ comes hither apparently direct from Galilee (Matthew 3:13, Mark 1:9). of Beisân, and at a distance of four or five miles from the latter place: and he explains the name ‘Bethany’ as equivalent to Batanea, Basanitis, or Bashan, the district immediately east of the Jordan, south and south-east of the Sea of Galilee (see C. The inference, moreover, which has been drawn from John 2:1, that Bethabara or Bethany lay not more than a day’s journey from Cana of Galilee, is precarious
Bethany - Bethany (bĕth'a-ny), house of dates, or, of misery
Beth'Any - Bethany was the home of Mary and Martha and Lazarus, and is now known by a name derived from Lazarus-- el-Azariyeh or Lazarieh . Bethany has been commonly explained "house of dates," but it more probably signifies "house of misery
Beth'Any - Bethany was the home of Mary and Martha and Lazarus, and is now known by a name derived from Lazarus-- el-Azariyeh or Lazarieh . Bethany has been commonly explained "house of dates," but it more probably signifies "house of misery
Ointment - It seems quite certain that this is the nard sed by Mary of Bethany to anoint Our Lord (Matthew 6; Mark 14; John 12)
Lazarus - A person of Bethany residing with his two sisters, in whose household Christ was a frequent guest
Gethsemane - Bethany lay on the E. In Luke 24:50 the sense is, He led them to the side of the hill where the road strikes downward to Bethany; for Acts 1:12 shows He ascended from the mount of Olives. ...
"Bethany probably includes not only the village but the district and side of the mount adjoining it; even still the adjoining mountain side is called by the same name as the village, el-Azariyeh
Olives, Mount of - Over this ridge passes the road to Bethany, the most frequented road to Jericho and the Jordan. Gethsemane lay at its foot on the west, and Bethany on its eastern slope, Matthew 24:3 Mark 13:3 . It was probably near Bethany, and not as tradition says on the middle summit, that our lord ascended to heaven, Luke 24:50 Acts 1:12 , though superstition has built the "Church of the Ascension" on the pretended spot, and shows the print of his feet on the rock whence he ascended! From the summit, three days before his death, he beheld Jerusalem, and wept over it, recalling the long ages of his more than parental care and grieving over its approaching ruin
Lazarus - Lazarus (a shortened form of Eleazer) of Bethany was a personal friend of Jesus and the brother of Mary and Martha (John 11:1-3 ). Lazarus was at the Passover celebration in Bethany six days later
Bethabara - " The Sinaiticus, Vaticanus, and Alexandrinus, the three oldest manuscripts, read "Bethany," which also may mean "house of a ferryboat," i. Some explain Bethany = boathouse, virtually = Bethabara
Martha - One of the family at Bethany whom Jesus loved
Bethphage - ” A small village located on the Mount of Olives near Bethany on or near the road between Jerusalem and Jericho
ma'ry, Sister of Lazarus, - The treasured alabaster box of ointment was brought forth at the final feast of Bethany
Lazarus - Brother of Martha and Mary, and a resident at Bethany. When his sisters made the Lord a supper at Bethany, Lazarus was one of those who sat with Him
Bethany - Bethany at present is but a very small village. Bethany is now a poor village, but pleasantly situated, says Dr
Lazarus - A friend and disciple of Christ, brother of Martha and Mary, with whom he resided at Bethany near Jerusalem. " The Savior reached Bethany after he had lain four days in his grave, and restored him to life by a word, "Lazarus, come forth
Mount of Olives - the road which runs to Bethany forms a convenient if somewhat arbitrary division, cutting off Olivet from the so-called ‘Mount of Offence’ and from other spurs to the south. Acts 1:12) for including within the limits the projecting spur on which Bethany stands. Probably the limits were never defined geographically, but the whole area was distinguished, as it is to some extent to-day, by its thick plantations of olives, figs, and palms,—hence the names Bethphage (house of figs) and Bethany (house of dates). ]'>[2] , on which stands the wretched, half-ruined village of el-‘Azarîyeh, on the site of Bethany, should, for reasons given, be included in the Mount. part of the hill is filled with a vast number of graves, those from the valley bottom till a little above the Bethany road being Jewish, while higher up are some Christian cemeteries. It runs along the depression between the two summits, and is the direct route for travellers crossing the Mount from or to Bethany. ’ Whether the first or second of these lies most in the direction of our Lord’s frequent passages from the city to the Mount of Olives and to Bethany, it is difficult to say, but it can hardly be supposed that He came by such a path on the morning of His triumphal entry into the city. The only likely course for the highroad of Roman times must have been in the general direction of the present Bethany and Jericho road; and, as Dean Stanley has suggested, the most natural site for the scene of the lamentation over the city is the point where this highroad crosses the S. More in the foreground a few houses of Bethany appear, and behind them the village of Abu Dîs—inhabited by the hereditary robbers of the Jericho road. Once we read of His approach to the Mount from the Eastern side ‘unto Bethphage and Bethany, at the Mount of Olives’ (Mark 11:1 || Matthew 21:1 || Luke 19:29). During the whole of that week ‘in the daytime he was teaching in the temple; and at night he went out and abode in the Mount that is called of Olives’ (Luke 21:37)—the special locality on the Mount being Bethany (Matthew 21:18-19 Mark 11:11). Crossing over from Bethany, Jesus illustrated His teaching by the sign of the withering of the barren fig-tree (Matthew 21:17, || Mark 11:12-14; Mark 11:20-22), and on the slopes of this hill, with the doomed city spread out before them, Christ delivered to His disciples His wonderful eschatological discourse (Matthew 24:3 f. Lastly, on the Mount, not on the summit where tradition places it, but near Bethany, occurred the Ascension (Luke 24:50-52, Acts 1:12). ...
To these incidents where the Mount of Olives is expressly mentioned may be added the scene in the house of Martha and Mary (Luke 10:38-42), the raising of Lazarus (John 11), and the feast at the house of Simon (Matthew 26:6-13, Mark 14:3-9, John 12:1-19); for, as has been shown, Bethany was certainly a part of the Mount of Olives
Olves, Mount of - The road from Jerusalem to Bethany runs as of old over this mount. And when the cup of God's wrath had been drunk, and death and the grave conquered, he led his disciples out again over Olivet as far as to Bethany, and after a parting blessing ascended to heaven (Luke 24:50,51 ; Acts 1:12 ). " ...
This mount, or rather mountain range, has four summits or peaks: (1) the "Galilee" peak, so called from a tradition that the angels stood here when they spoke to the disciples (Acts 1:11 ); (2) the "Mount of Ascension," the supposed site of that event, which was, however, somewhere probably nearer Bethany (Luke 24:51,52 ); (3) the "Prophets," from the catacombs on its side, called "the prophets' tombs;" and (4) the "Mount of Corruption," so called because of the "high places" erected there by Solomon for the idolatrous worship of his foreign wives (1 Kings 11:7 ; 2 Kings 23:13 ; Vulg
Mar'Tha - In the supper at Bethany (John 12:2 ) the old character shows itself still, but it has been freed from evil
Olives - Over Olivet he passed to and fro visiting Bethany. Christ did not ascend from the spot where now stands the church of the Ascension: it was rather from some point over the summit, near to Bethany
Spikenard - in ( Song of Solomon 1:12 ; 4:13,14 ) The ointment with which our Lord was anointed as he sat at meat in Simon's house at Bethany consisted of this precious substance, the costliness of which may be inferred from the indignant surprise manifested by some of the witnesses of the transaction
Simon - Simon ‘the leper,’ in whose house the anointing of our Lord by Mary of Bethany took place (Matthew 26:6, Mark 14:3)
Olives, Mount of - Turning the summit he passed Bahurim (2 Samuel 16:5), probably near Bethany, then through a "dry and weary (Hebrew hayeephim ) land where no water was," as he says Psalms 63:1; 2 Samuel 16:2; 2 Samuel 16:14 (the same Hebrew), 2 Samuel 17:2. ...
It was also the Lord's route between Bethany and Jerusalem (Luke 19:28-37), and that whereby the apostles returned to Jerusalem after the ascension. )...
On the eastern side, descending from the ascension church to Bethany, are the field of the fruitless figtree, Bethphage, Bethany, Lazarus' house, Lazarus' tomb, stone on which Christ sat when Martha and Mary came to Him. The real place of ascension was Bethany, on the eastern slope, a mile beyond the traditional site (Luke 24:50-51; Acts 1:6-11). The "sabbath day's journey" (about six furlongs) specified for the information of Gentiles not knowing the locality in Acts 1 is from Olivet's main part and summit (or from Kefr et Tur, Bethphage according to Ganneau: see below), not from the place of actual ascension, Bethany, which is more than twice a sabbath day's journey. The retired and wooded slopes of Bethany on the contrary were the fit scene of that crowning event. "The Mount of Olives" is similarly used in a general sense for Bethany (Luke 21:37, compare Matthew 21:17; Matthew 26:6). "Bethany" does not mean (as Alford says) the district of Bethany extending to the summit, but the village alone. from Bethany where the city bursts into view. The road in the hollow between it and the hill of "the tomb of the prophets" is the road from Bethany whereby Christ in triumph entered Jerusalem. No date palms (from which Bethany took its name) are to be seen for miles
Bahurim - Ganneau identifies with Fakhoury, a locality between Olivet, Siloam, Bethany, and Abou Dis
Simon - ...
Descendant of Juda (1Paralipomenon 4)
Simon, surnamed Thasi, brother of Judas Machabeus (1Machabees 2)
Simon of the tribe of Benjamin; governor of the Temple (2Machabees 3)
Simon who is called Peter, the Apostle (Matthew 4)
Simon the Cananean, the Apostle (Matthew 10)
one of the relatives of Our Lord, identified erroneously with the preceding (Matthew 13)
Simon the leper, a resident of Bethany (Matthew 26)
a Pharisee at whose house the penitent woman washed the feet of Jesus (Luke 7)
Simon the Cyrenean, who helped Our Lord carry the Cross (Matthew 27)
the father of Judas (John 6)
Simon Magus, a magician in the time of the Apostles (Acts 8)
Simon the tanner, a Christian of Joppe, in whose house Peter had the vision commanding him to receive the Gentiles into the faith (Acts 10)
Simon called Niger, a Christian living at Antioch in the time of the Apostles (Acts 13)
Martha - Martha, Mary and their brother Lazarus lived in the village of Bethany, just outside Jerusalem (John 11:1; John 11:18). When, during the last few days before the crucifixion, Jesus and his disciples went out to Bethany at night to sleep, this house was probably the place where they slept (Mark 11:11-12; Mark 11:19; Matthew 21:17)
Palm Palm Tree - The names of many places show that palms were abundant: Elim, Elath, Hazezon-tamar—"felling of palm tree"—Genesis 14:6; Bethany, "house of dates
Alabaster - ...
In Matthew 26:6-7 , we read that Jesus being at table in Bethany, in the house of Simon the leper, a woman came thither and poured an alabaster box of ointment on his head
Martha - MARTHA (of Bethany, sister of Lazarus and Mary). ]'>[1] She appears in the Gospel-story on three occasions: (1) when she entertained Jesus on His way to Jerusalem at the season of the Feast of Tabernacles (Luke 10:38-42); (2) when Lazarus died and was revived by Jesus (John 11:1-46); and (3) when Jesus, on His way to the Passover from His retreat at Ephraim (John 11:54), was honoured with a public entertainment at Bethany in the house of a leading man named Simon the Leper (John 12:1-11 = Matthew 26:6-13 = Mark 14:3-9). And when Jesus came to Bethany in tardy response to the sisters’ appeal, ‘Lord, behold, he whom thou lovest is sick,’ Mary was in the darkened home overwhelmed with grief, but Martha had repressed her emotion, and, when word was brought her that Jesus had been sighted making His toilsome approach by the Ascent of Blood, the steep and robber-haunted road up the eastern slope of Olivet, she went out and met Him ere He entered the village. ...
It is no slight attestation of the historicity of the Lukan and Johannine narratives of the family of Bethany that they faithfully accord in their delineations of the two sisters. John says that the village where Martha and her sister dwelt was Bethany; but St
Olives, Olivet, Mount of - Apparently the Lord ascended to heaven from a low part of the mount near to Bethany, Luke 24 :50; Acts 1:12 ; and, as noticed above, He will again stand on that mount on His return. The other road, from the same gate but farther south, led to Bethany and thence to Jericho
Martha - We know from John 11:1 ; John 12:1 that they afterwards lived with Lazarus, their brother, in Bethany; the village, then, may be either Bethany or where they lived before moving there. ...
The sisters appear again, and finally, in John 12:1-50 , at the Supper given to our Lord at Bethany (see art
Chronology of the New Testament - ...
April 1...
Supper at Bethany
Lazarus - Of Bethany; brother of Mary and Martha (John 11:1). (See Bethany. Lazarus was "of (apo , 'belonging to at that time') Bethany, from (ek , implying his original settlement) the village of Mary and Martha" (still it is likely the same village is meant in both Luke 10 and John 11, namely, Bethany). Curiously, Ganneau found close to Bethany a tomb, probably of the first century, containing the names all together of Simon, Martha, and Lazarus. At the time of Lazarus' sickness and the sisters' call, Jesus was in Peraea beyond Jordan, on His way to Jerusalem, two days' journey from Bethany. Such an impression was made by this miracle that many Jews flocked to Bethany to see both Jesus and Lazarus. Judas and the eleven expected, that the feast in John 12:2 was the farewell feast of Lazarus, renouncing his former life and obeying Christ's command, "sell that thou hast, and give to the poor"; hence, Judas' bitter objection, "why was not this ointment sold for 300 pence and given to the poor?"...
On the night of Christ's betrayal Lazarus, whose Bethany home was near and was Christ's lodging on the previous night, in the hasty night alarm rushed eagerly with "the linen cloth (the term applied to graveclothes always, the same which he had on when the Lord raised him from the grave (John 11:44), sindon ) cast about his naked body" (Mark 14:51-52; Mark 15:46), and was seized by the high priest's servants as a second victim (John 12:10), whereas they let the other disciples escape
Martha - Bitterness, the sister of Lazarus and Mary, and probably the eldest of the family, who all resided at Bethany (Luke 10:38,40,41 ; John 11:1-39 )
Bethany - (Example He returned from Bethany hungry because no one invited Him home for breakfast) He wanted them to be convinced that only He Himself could set the captive free from the bondage of tradition and habit
Kidron or Cedron - By this route probably David fled from Absalom, 2 Samuel 15:23 ; and the Savior often passed this way in going to Bethany, Mount Olivet, and Gethsemane, John 18:1-2
Martha - ” Sister of Mary and Lazarus of Bethany and one of Jesus' best-loved disciples
Simon - The leper; that is, who had been a leper; a resident of Bethany, with whom also Jesus supped, Matthew 26:6 Mark 14:3
Lazarus - Lazarus of Bethany, brother of Martha and Mary. It was unsafe for Him to remain among them, and He retired to Bethany beyond Jordan (John 10:40, cf. He saw not the way, but He was waiting for God to open it up; and suddenly a message reached Him from the other Bethany that Lazarus was sick (John 11:3). ’ He did not hasten to Bethany and lay His hand upon the sick man, nor did He, abiding where He was, ‘send forth His word and heal him,’ as He had done to the courtier’s son (John 4:46-54) and the Syrophœnician woman’s daughter (Matthew 15:21-28 = Mark 7:24-30). On His arrival at Bethany, Lazarus was dead and buried, and a large company, including many of the rulers from the adjacent capital (Mark 7:19), had gathered, in accordance with Jewish custom, to testify their esteem for the good Lazarus and condole with his sisters. Six days before the Feast began, He reached Bethany, and in defiance of the Sanhedrin’s order received an ovation from the townsfolk. The news that Jesus was at Bethany reached Jerusalem, and next day a great multitude thronged out to meet Him and escorted Him with Messianic honours into the city. Their silence in this instance, however, is merely part of a larger problem—their silence regarding the Lord’s Judaean ministry generally, and their peculiar reticence regarding the family of Bethany. ‘Lazarus of Bethany’; the standard Lives of Christ; Elmslie, Expository Lectures and Sermons, p
Olives - Luke, who says that our Lord led out his disciples "as far as Bethany, and lifted up his hands, and blessed them. Bethany is a small village to the east of the Mount of Olives, on the road to Jericho, not farther from Jerusalem than the pinnacle of the hill. The village of Bethany is small and poor, and the cultivation of the soil is much neglected; but it is a pleasant and somewhat romantic spot, sheltered by Mount Olivet on the north, and abounding with trees and long grass
Lazarus - The family lived at Bethany, a village within two miles of Jerusalem just over the brow of Olivet. In the last year of His ministry Jesus sojourned at Jerusalem from the Feast of Tabernacles in October to that of the Dedication in December; and, on being driven out by the violence of the rulers ( John 10:31 ; John 10:39 ), He retired to ‘Bethany beyond Jordan’ ( John 10:40 ; cf. Six days before it began (John 12:1 ), He reached Bethany, and despite the Sanhedrin’s decree He received a great ovation. The news of His arrival at Bethany reached Jerusalem, and next day the multitude thronged out and escorted Him in triumph into the city
Mary - Mary of Bethany. John tells us that it was Bethany, and that they had a brother named Lazarus (John 11:1-46). Some months later, when Jesus was at the other Bethany beyond Jordan, whither He had retired from Jerusalem to escape the fury of the rulers (John 10:40; cf. ...
Mary appears a third time six days before the Passover, when Jesus was entertained in the house of Simon the Leper at Bethany, and she came in during the feast and anointed His feet (John 12:1-11; cf
Mary - Mary of Bethany. John tells us that it was Bethany, and that they had a brother named Lazarus (John 11:1-46). Some months later, when Jesus was at the other Bethany beyond Jordan, whither He had retired from Jerusalem to escape the fury of the rulers (John 10:40; cf. ...
Mary appears a third time six days before the Passover, when Jesus was entertained in the house of Simon the Leper at Bethany, and she came in during the feast and anointed His feet (John 12:1-11; cf
Zaretan - If with oldest manuscripts we read "Bethany," John 1:28, the name will connect itself with Bashan and Batanaea, and the 'Abarah ford is near the hills of Bashan, whereas the Jericho fords are far away
Mary, Sister of Lazarus And Martha - They resided at Bethany, where they were privileged to welcome the Lord Jesus as a guest
Judea - Judea was little frequented by our Lord, except Jerusalem, Bethlehem, and Bethany (compare John 7:1 for the reason in part)
Lazarus - This was Lazarus of Bethany, the brother of Mary and Martha (John 11:1-44)
Anointing (2) - —On His way up to the last Passover, Jesus stopped at the village of Bethany, where, a few weeks before, He had raised Lazarus; and, in defiance of the Sanhedrin’s edict (John 11:57), He was received with grateful reverence. On the ground of these discrepancies it was generally maintained by the Fathers that there were two anointings at Bethany, the incidents recorded by Matthew-Mark and John being distinct. ); (c) at Bethany by Mary (Jn. ’...
It hardly admits of reasonable doubt that there were two anointings, one in the house of Simon the Pharisee, and the other by Mary in the house of Simon the Leper at Bethany. (1) Matthew-Mark’s omission of the names of Lazarus and his sisters belongs to the larger question of the Synoptic silence regarding the family at Bethany. In Mark 14:8 Jesus says of the gracious act of Mary of Bethany in anointing Him at the feast, ‘She hath anointed (μυρίζω fr
Simon - Simon the Leper, our Lord’s host at Bethany ( Matthew 26:6 , Mark 14:3 ; cf
Thomas - It was he who, when tidings of Lazarus’ sickness were brought to Bethany beyond Jordan, and the rest, fearing the rage of the rulers, were disposed to let the Master venture alone into Judæa, put their cowardice to shame: ‘Let us also go, that we may die with him!’ ( John 11:16
Ointment (2) - ...
In the account of the anointing of Jesus at Bethany, St
Fig - Our Lord's cursing the fig-tree near Bethany (Mark 11:13 ) has occasioned much perplexity from the circumstance, as mentioned by the evangelist, that "the time of figs was not yet
California - ...
The early Spanish missionaries left their mark on Californian place-names, including ...
Bethany
Camp Angelus
Carmel
Concepción
Cupertino
Guadalupe
Los Angeles (The Angels)
Sacramento
San Andreas
San Anselmo
San Ardo
San Benito
San Bernardino
San Bruno
San Carlos
San Clemente
San Diego
San Dimas
San Fernando
San Francisco
San Gabriel
San Geronimo
San Gregorio
San Jacinto
San Joaquin
San Jose
San Juan Bautista
San Juan Capistrano
San Leandro
San Lorenzo
San Lucas
San Luis Obispo
San Luis Rey
San Marcos
San Marino
San Martin
San Mateo
San Miguel
San Onofre
San Pablo
San Pedro
San Quentin
San Rafael
San Ramon
San Simeon
San Ysidro
Santa Ana
Santa Anita
Santa Barbara
Santa Clara
Santa Cruz (Holy Cross)
Santa Fe (Holy Faith)
Santa Margarita
Santa Maria
Santa Monica
Santa Paula
Santa Rosa
Santa Susana
Santa Ynez
Santa Ysabel
Trinidad
Many of the above names, and several similar ones, occur also in California as names of counties, and of natural features such as islands, mountains, bays, rivers, etc
Rest (2) - Such was the lesson given in the home at Bethany (Luke 10:42)
Lazarus - LAZARUS of Bethany comes as near to Jesus of Nazareth, both in his character, and in his services, and in his unparalleled experiences, as mortal man can ever come. 'He is a sheep,' said the men and the women of Bethany. All Bethany was quite right, Lazarus was a perfect sheep. And God's work stands still in our hands, and all around us, just because He has no men like-minded with Jesus of Nazareth and Lazarus of Bethany. Some self-emptying and self-sacrifice like that He asked of the glorified Lazarus also, when He sent him back to Bethany which was so nigh unto Jerusalem. Are you able? Are you ready? Are you willing to be made able and ready? Let your answer be the answer of Jesus of Nazareth, and of Lazarus of Bethany: "Lo, I come
Mary - ...
...
Mary the sister of Lazarus is brought to our notice in connection with the visits of our Lord to Bethany. On the occasion of our Lord's last visit to Bethany, Mary brought "a pound of ointment of spikenard, very costly, and anointed the feet of Jesus" as he reclined at table in the house of one Simon, who had been a leper (Matthew 26:6 ; Mark 14:3 ; John 12:2,3 ). It would appear from this act of Mary's, and from the circumstance that they possessed a family vault (11:38), and that a large number of Jews from Jerusalem came to condole with them on the death of Lazarus (11:19), that this family at Bethany belonged to the wealthier class of the people
Martha - Bethany was the home of Martha (probably the oldest), Mary, and Lazarus
Ascension - Leading His eleven apostles out as far as Bethany, on the eastern slope of the Mount of Olives, in the act of blessing them He ascended up to heaven, and a cloud hid Him from their sight
Ascension of Christ - Our Saviour, having repeatedly conversed with his Apostles after his resurrection, and afforded them many infallible proofs of its reality, led them from Jerusalem to Bethany, and was raised up to heaven in their sight; there to continue till he shall descend at the last day to judge the quick and the dead
Banquet - A feast provided for the entertainment of a company of guests (Esther 5 ; 7 ; 1 Peter 4:3 ); such as was provided for our Lord by his friends in Bethany (Matthew 26:6 ; Mark 14:3 ; Compare John 12:2 )
Simon - ...
...
A leper of Bethany, in whose house Mary anointed our Lord's head with ointment "as he sat at meat" (Matthew 26:6-13 ; Mark 14:3-9 )
Peraea - It furnished the retreat from Jewish enmity, whence He was summoned by the distress at Bethany ( John 10:40 etc
John, Gospel of - (John 10:22-42 ) ...
Seventh journey, in Judea towards Bethany, ch
Passion Week - It is there stated that Jesus ‘six days before the Passover (πρὸ ἒξ ἡμερῶν τοῦ πάσχα) came to Bethany’; and (John 12:12 f. ’ If it is included, Jesus must have arrived in Bethany on the 9th Nisan; if not, then on the 8th. on the very day the religious authorities held their conference? And must we suppose the Anointing at Bethany (Mark 14:3 καὶ ὄντος αὐτοῦ ἐν Βηθανίᾳ) to have taken place that day also, i. , to begin His great work), He went out to Bethany with His disciples. to give a sharper distinction to the two days (Mark 11:12-19 and Mark 11:20 to Mark 13:1) by means of the two morning walks from Bethany to Jerusalem (Mark 11:12; Mark 11:20)
Hospitality - Since Jesus Himself ‘had not where to lay his head’ (Matthew 8:20), He depended much upon the hospitality of the friendly disposed, as of Andrew and Peter at Capernaum (Matthew 8:14), and of Mary, Martha, and Lazarus at Bethany (John 11:1-5); and frequently accepted the hospitality of house-holders (Matthew 26:6, Luke 5:29; Luke 7:36 ff; Luke 19:5)
Hospitality - Since Jesus Himself ‘had not where to lay his head’ (Matthew 8:20), He depended much upon the hospitality of the friendly disposed, as of Andrew and Peter at Capernaum (Matthew 8:14), and of Mary, Martha, and Lazarus at Bethany (John 11:1-5); and frequently accepted the hospitality of house-holders (Matthew 26:6, Luke 5:29; Luke 7:36 ff; Luke 19:5)
Mary - Mary (of Bethany), the sister of Martha and Lazarus. Mary from Bethany played a primary role in the episode of Lazarus' resurrection from the dead in John 11:1
Gilead - Towns of the region that feature in the New Testament story are Gadara, Gerasa and Bethany-beyond-Jordan (Matthew 4:25; Matthew 8:28; Mark 5:1; Mark 7:31; John 1:28; see DECAPOLIS; PEREA)
Jesus Christ - He raised Lazarus at Bethany. He arrived at Bethany six days before the passover. During 40 days he taught them, and then, near Bethany, ascended to heaven in their sight
Jericho - The Lord's visit to Bethany appropriately follows His parable of the good Samaritan who relieved the man robbed between Jerusalem and Jericho, for Jesus was then traveling from Jericho to Jerusalem, and Bethany was only a little way short of Jerusalem (Luke 10:25; Luke 10:38; John 11:1)
Olives, Mount of - Over this He rode on His triumphal entry to Jerusalem; and wept over the city as it came into view (Luke 19:41 ); and during the days when He lodged in Bethany and visited Jerusalem He must necessarily have passed over it daily ( Luke 21:37 )
Tower - 279) of a stone tower in the Hauran constructed of black basalt, with a stone loft at the height of 14 feet, reached by a spiral staircase (see also Porter, Jerusalem, Bethlehem, and Bethany, p
Jordan - Our Lord was baptized probably at the ford near Bethabara or Bethany
Palm Tree - " (Ezekiel 47:19 ) Bethany means the "house of dates
Nard - The word is found in the OT (Song of Solomon 1:12; Song of Solomon 4:13-14) and twice in the Gospels (Mark 14:3-5, John 12:3-5), occurring in both cases in the account of the anointing of our Lord, in a house at Bethany, by a woman whom St
Philip - The Apostle ( Matthew 10:3 = Mark 3:18 = Luke 6:14 ); one of the disciples whom Jesus won at Bethany beyond Jordan in the morning of His ministry ( John 1:28-51 )
Nicodemus - I cannot put you back into Nicodemus's state of mind as he stumbled out to Bethany in the dark that night. But, King of the kingdom of heaven as He was that night in Bethany, even He could not make the door of the kingdom one inch wider, or one atom easier, than it was out at Bethabara. And this evangelist, after that ever-memorable day at Bethabara, and that equally memorable midnight and morning at Bethany, never lets Nicodemus out of his sight. And it could only be good, surely, and to Nicodemus's credit, that he went out to Bethany at an hour most convenient for a ruler of the Jews
Woman - John 19:26 ) and the sisters of Bethany, or sinful and outcast as some women of the Gospels were ( Luke 7:37 ff; Luke 8:2 , John 4:1-54 )
Thom'as - The latter trait was shown in his speech when our Lord determined to face the dangers that awaited him in Judea on his journey to Bethany
Journey, Journeyings - In regard to Acts 1:12 , there is no discrepancy between this and Luke 24:50 , where the RV rightly translates by "over against Bethany," which does not fix the exact spot of the Ascension
Home (2) - Homely joys are illustrated in the marriage at Cana (John 2), in the sojourn of Jesus as a guest in the home at Bethany (Luke 10:28, John 12:1-2). ), for Jesus would be welcome in the houses of many friends, as He was notably in the home at Bethany
John, Gospel of - At Bethany, just outside Jerusalem, he raised Lazarus from death, declaring himself to be the resurrection and the life (11:1-44). ...
After an anointing at Bethany (12:1-8), Jesus entered Jerusalem triumphantly (12:9-19) and gave his final public teaching (12:20-50)
si'Mon - ...
Simon, a resident at Bethany, distinguished as "the leper
Fig - Fig trees overhanging the road from Jerusalem to Bethany still grow out of the rocks of the mountain which, the Lord said, faith could remove to the distant sea (Matthew 21:21)
Salim - A definite result has not been reached as yet; the identity of aenon and Bethany (John 1:28 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ) is not improbable
Jericho - The site of Bethany or Bethabara (wh
Palmtree - Bethany means "house of dates"; thence the multitude took the palm branches to honor Christ (John 12:13), and from Olivet the people under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 8:15) took palms, the tree named in instituting the feast of tabernacles (Leviticus 23:40)
Fig Tree - I should not think it necessary to notice this article in our Concordance, but for the occasion that offers thereby of making an observation on the fig tree which the Lord Jesus blighted near Bethany
New Testament - John 10:40-42 ...
The raising of Lazarus at Bethany
Mary - The character of the two sisters was well contrasted at the supper in Bethany, after the resurrection of Lazarus
Jericho - The site of Bethany or Bethabara (wh
Mary - She lived with her brother and her sister Martha at Bethany; and Jesus Christ, having a particular affection for this family, often retired to their house with his disciples. Six days before the passover, after having raised Lazarus from the dead, he came to Bethany with his disciples, and was invited to sup with Simon the leper, John 12:1 , &c; Matthew 26:6 , &c; Mark 14:3 , &c
Mary - The three lived at Bethany, just outside Jerusalem, and were close friends of Jesus (John 11:1; John 11:5)
Feet (2) - ); and Mary of Bethany showed her great love and gratitude in a similar fashion, when she lavished the contents of her alabaster cruse of precious spikenard (John 11:2; John 12:3; cf
Olives, Mount of - The cedars commemorated by the Talmud sad the date-palms implied in the name Bethany have fared still worse; there is not one of either to be found within many miles
Guest-Chamber - ); the later anointing by Mary of Bethany in the house of Simon the Leper (John 12:1 ff
Sisters - On the sisters of Bethany see artt
Abide, Abode - ...
A — 9: αὐλίζομαι (Strong's #835 — Verb — aulizomai — ow-lid'-zom-ahee ) "to lodge," originally "to lodge in the aule, or courtyard," is said of shepherds and flocks; hence, to pass the night in the open air, as did the Lord, Luke 21:37 ; "to lodge in a house," as of His visit to Bethany, Matthew 21:17
Jordan - John the Baptist "first" baptized at the lower ford near Jericho, where all Jerusalem and Judea resorted, being near; where too our Lord took refuge from Jerusalem, and where many converts joined Him, and from from whence He went to Bethany to raise Lazarus (John 10:39-40; John 11:1). John's next baptisms were (John 1:29-34) at Bethabara (or "Bethany") the upper ford, within reach of the N
Loneliness - lxxx); in the last visit to Jerusalem He sought retirement at night by leaving the city either for Bethany or the Mount of Olives (Matthew 21:17, Mark 11:19, Luke 21:37)
Graciousness - This same characteristic is revealed in His intimate association with the household at Bethany, and His special affection for John and Lazarus, as well as in such exquisitely human touches as His longing look of love given to the young questioner (Mark 10:21)
Ascension - is somewhat more circumstantial, and, though the chronology is uncertain, mentions the journey to the neighbourhood of Bethany and the disappearance of Christ in the act of blessing, together with the return of the disciples to Jerusalem ( Luke 24:50-52 )
Friends Friendship - There are some who hesitate to speak of the relationship of Jesus to the Twelve and to the wider circle of disciples which included the household at Bethany, the goodman of Jerusalem at whoso house the Last Supper was eaten, and the women who so affectionately ministered to the Master, as one of friendship
Dates (2) - ]'>[10] , אABC, read ‘Bethany,’ has been identified by Conder with a ford called Aburah, N. ‘Bethany’ follows Sir G. Beth-nimrah, now known as Nimrîn, is ‘beyond Jordan,’ τἐραν τοῦ Ἰορδάνου (John 1:28; John 3:26); it is well supplied with water, and accessible both from Jericho and Jerusalem, and may have produced the variants ‘Bethahara’ and ‘Bethany. ’ Origen advocated Bethabara because he could find no Bethany beyond Jordan
Mark, Gospel of - ...
After his anointing at Bethany (14:1-11), Jesus prepared for the Passover, instituted the Lord’s Supper, then went and prayed in the Garden of Gethsemane (14:12-42)
Giving - ), and the supper at Bethany (John 12:2)
Golgotha - According to this view, the soldiers, instead of taking their prisoner across the city towards the west, or out in the direction of the Roman road, hurried Him through the nearest gate and crucified Him near the road leading to Bethany. Two objections are urged against this: (a) that the Gospel narratives imply that the road passing Golgotha was a more frequented thoroughfare than this road to Bethany, and that the great highways of Jerusalem are all on the north and west of the city; and (b) that there is no skull-shaped site in this region. Luke (Luke 24:50-51) that ‘he led them out until they were over against Bethany, and … he parted from them and was carried up into heaven
Reality - Prompt and warm, too, was His approval of the genuine feeling which He found struggling to assert itself in any soul, even when others condemned, as when He threw the shield of His graeiousness over Zacchaeus of Jericho (Luke 19:9), the erring woman amid her penitence (Luke 7:44-48), and Mary of Bethany in the scene of the anointing (John 12:5-7). Even during the triumphal entry into Jerusalem He detached His mind from the ringing hosannas, and thought of the sins of the nation and the threatening doom (Luke 19:41); and when the ovation was over He withdrew to the quiet of Bethany (Matthew 21:17), maintaining His spirit clear and true
Womanliness - ‘We have a lovely group of female disciples and friends around the Lord: Mary, the wife of Clopas; Salome, the mother of James and John; Mary of Bethany, who sat at Jesus’ feet; her busy and hospitable sister Martha; Mary of Magdala, whom the Lord healed of a demoniacal possession; the sinner, who washed His feet with her tears of penitence and wiped them with her hair; and all the noble women who ministered to the Son of Man in His earthly poverty with the gifts of their love (Luke 8:3, Matthew 27:55, Mark 15:41), lingered last around His Cross (John 19:25), and were first at His open sepulchre on the morning of the resurrection (Matthew 28:1, John 20:1)’ Tears - And no doubt while on this occasion in Bethany He was about to turn sorrow to joy and heaviness to mirth, yet He was aware that there were multitudes who would have to sorrow without hope, and bewailed that he who had the power of death must claim so many victims ere he was himself destroyed
Jesus, the Lord - During that period He visited Bethany to raise Lazarus, but again retired into the wilderness till six days before the Passover
Almsgiving - contains the incidents of the Rich Young Man whom He told, ‘Yet one thing thou lackest: go, sell all that thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven’ (Mark 10:21); the Widow’s Mite (Mark 12:43); and the emphatic praise of Mary of Bethany (Mark 14:7)
John the Baptist - " By his testimony at Bethany (so oldest manuscripts for Bethabara) beyond Jordan, "Behold the Lamb of God," he led two of his disciples to Him, Andrew and John the apostle and evangelist (John 1:35 ff; John 3:23-36; John 4:1-2; Acts 19:3)
Self-Control - During the week of the Passion the nights were spent at Bethany (the village or its neighbourhood: Matthew 21:17, Mark 11:11), in part probably with a view to bodily rest after the busy days. Sympathy was full at Bethany (John 11:35) and on the approach to Jerusalem (Luke 19:41), but not allowed to become so sentimental or overwhelming as to interfere with service
Priest, Christ as - Jesus left the temple and went out of the city to Bethany, the village of Simon the Leper (Mark 14:3 ) and the resurrected Lazarus (John 11:1 ; 12:2 )
Ascension - It was ‘over against Bethany’ (Luke 24:50), and therefore on the far or S. side of the hill, looking down on Bethany, which lies in a hollow; the reputed site overlooks Jerusalem, and is unlikely to have been the real one (Swete, Appearances, p
John the Baptist - ; and see Bethany, Salim)
Appreciation (of Christ) - He sees through the pure-minded hesitancy of Nathanael (John 1:47), He recognizes the true value of the widow’s mite (Luke 21:1-4), He draws Nicodemus the timid to Him (John 3:1), He knows what will satisfy Thomas (John 20:27), and what will please and win Zacchaeus (Luke 19:5); and His immediate followers include a Mary Magdalene as well as a Mary of Bethany, a Judas as well as a John
Poverty (2) - The same thing may be gathered of the household at Bethany (Luke 10:38; and still more John 11:3; John 11:45; John 12:3); certain women, including the wife of Herod’s steward, ‘minister’ to Him (Mark 15:40, Luke 8:3)
Woman - The later, similar actions of Mary of Bethany elicit Jesus' praise in language evocative of the memorializing of Jesus himself in the Lord's Supper (Mark 14:9 )!...
Women play an important role among Jesus' followers. Jesus specifically praises Mary of Bethany for choosing to "sit at his feet" and learn from him (Luke 10:38-42 )a quasi-technical reference to a disciple being trained by a rabbi and a practice usually denied to women in Jewish circles
Peter - ...
At Bethabara (RSV, John 1:28 , "Bethany"), beyond Jordan, John the Baptist had borne testimony concerning Jesus as the "Lamb of God" (John 1:29-36 )
Inn - Yet the only recorded cases in which He accepted it are those of Peter’s house at Capernaum and the house at Bethany
Stone - ‘Take ye away the stone,’ Jesus said (John 11:39); and when they had done so, another word of command turned that gravestone at Bethany into a parable to all the ages of the rolling away from human hearts of the crushing bondage of death (Hebrews 2:14 f
Ave Maria - The bereaved sisters at Bethany repeat the conviction that if He had been there, their brother would not have died (John 11:21; John 11:32)
Simeon - In his house at Bethany Mary anointed the Lord's feet (Matthew 26:6, etc
Peter - ...
Simon first met with Jesus at Bethany beyond Jordan (John 1:28 RV John the Apostle - The full narrative of Lazarus' restoration to life (John 11) shows that he was an eye witness, and probably was intimate with the sisters of Bethany
John, Gospel of - As examples we may mention Bethany beyond Jordan ( John 1:28 ), Ænon ( John 3:23 ), Ephraim ( John 11:54 ), the treasury ( John 8:20 ), the pool of Siloam ( John 9:7 ), Solomon’s porch ( John 10:23 ), the Kidron ( John 18:1 ). It is in it that we read of the Saviour’s weariness by the well and His thirst upon the Cross, of the personal affection of Jesus for the family at Bethany, and His tender care of His mother in the very hour of His last agony
Keeping - Once more, in the report given in John’s Gospel of the anointing by Mary in Bethany, we read that Jesus said of Mary’s action, ‘Suffer her to keep (τηρέω) it against the day of my burying’ (John 12:7 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 )—the meaning of ‘keep it’ evidently being to ‘celebrate this as a rite
Family (Jesus) - Luke is introduced another home, that of Lazarus and his sisters at Bethany, in which the Lord was an honoured guest
Luke, the Gospel According to - This period begins with His journey in October to the feast of tabernacles, and ends with His arrival in Bethany six days before the Passover
Thomas - And the occasion of his first melancholy utterance was this: Lazarus was sick unto death in Bethany
Sympathy - ) shows sympathy for the ordinary needs of the body; the raising of Jairus’ daughter, of the widow’s son at Nain, and of Lazarus at Bethany, illustrates His sympathetic interest in family life with all its joys and sorrows
Gestures - ), the rich young man (Mark 10:17), the blind man (John 9:38), Mary of Bethany (John 11:32), the lunatic’s father (Matthew 17:14, not || Mk
Night (2) - ’ ‘This freedom Jesus had from childhood’ in Nazareth, Capernaum, Bethany, and other resting-places
Matthew, Gospel According to - , as in the case of the anointing at Bethany ( Matthew 26:6 ff
Entry Into Jerusalem - of Olives’ (ἤδη πρὸς τῇ καταβάσει), from which, Dean Stanley states, the first view is caught of the south-eastern corner of the city as the road from Bethany begins to descend
Man (2) - But when Jesus expressed His determination to go up to Bethany and wake His friend Lazarus out of his sleep, it was Thomas who first saw his Master’s danger, and that death was near at hand, and who exclaimed with vehemence, ‘Let us go up also with him, that we may die with him’ (John 11:16)
Friendship - The house at Bethany was a second home to Him, and His love for ‘our friend Lazarus’ was manifested in His visit to the sisters, and in the grief that overwhelmed Him at the grave (John 11)
Lord's Prayer (i) - leads into the neighbourhood of Bethany (Luke 10:38-42) or Gethsemane; see J
Ministry - The first notice is in the account of John’s baptism as taking place at Bethany beyond Jordan (John 1:28)
Leprosy - ...
Of lepers mentioned in the NT we have but one named, Simon of Bethany (Matthew 26:6, Mark 14:3), probably a grateful recipient of the Saviour’s mercy
Property (2) - There is no condemnation of the settled life which Martha, Mary, and Lazarus lived at Bethany (Luke 10:38 ff
Death of Christ - Intimations of his death are also given in his words about his anointing in Bethany being a preparation for his burial (Matthew 26:12 ; Mark 14:8 ; Hebrews 2:14-1592 ), in the parable of the wicked tenants (Matthew 21:33-39 ; Mark 12:1-12 ; Luke 20:9-17 ), at the transfiguration when Moses and Elijah spoke with him "about his departure, which he was about to bring to fulfillment at Jerusalem" (Luke 9:31 ), in the words about the bridegroom being taken away (Matthew 9:15 ; Mark 2:20 ; Luke 5:35 ), and right back in the words of Simeon to Mary about the anguish that would come to her (Luke 2:35 )
Gospels - His route was through Samaria into Galilee from Ephraim (Luke 9:51; John 11:54) as the starting point, then along the border between Galilee and Samaria into Peraea (Luke 17:11; Luke 13:31), so by Jericho to Bethany and Jerusalem (Birks' Horae Evangel
Asceticism (2) - He accepted the hospitality of rich men and poor, He was present at meals, He contributed to the gaiety of a marriage-feast, He permitted very precious ointment to be poured upon His feet, He had a love for children, welcomed the society of women, and clearly enjoyed the domestic life of the home in Bethany
Judas Iscariot (2) - ...
The Fourth Gospel also makes the Anointing at Bethany (John 12:4 f
Jesus Christ - He spent some time in Bethany, where another notable miracle took place (the raising of Lazarus from the dead)
John the Baptist - If the scene of the baptism was the same as that of John’s subsequent witness to Jesus recorded in the Fourth Gospel, it took place at ‘Bethany beyond Jordan’ (John 1:28), a site which has been much discussed, but cannot be said to have been certainly identified (see art
Complacency - As He showed pleasure in the faith of His immediate disciples, so also He welcomed that of others, as when He spoke with signal approbation of the devotion of Mary of Bethany (Luke 10:42), who had ‘chosen the good part,’ and of whose offering of gratitude at the supper in the house of Simon the leper He said that she had wrought a good work upon Him which could not be forgotten (Matthew 26:12 || Mark 14:6-9 || John 12:3-5)
Ascension (2) - Bethany lay on the further or eastern slope of the Mt
John, the Gospel by - The godly remnant at Bethany is distinguished by the place He had in their hearts, and Mary by her deep appreciation of His worth
Moravians - Jan; Bethany, Emmaus
Gospels - ]'>[6] ), probably natives of Kerioth in Judæa; Joseph of Arimathæa, ‘a city of the Jews’ ( Luke 23:51 ); the household at Bethany; and Simon the leper ( Mark 14:3 )
Apostles - ...
After the Temptation our Lord returned to Bethany in Peraea