What does Benhadad mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Benhadad
Son of Hadad
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Benhadad
This appears to be the royal title of the kings of Syria. There are three mentioned in scripture bearing this name, and the last apparently not a relative of the other two. The title may signify 'son of Adad' one of the gods of Syria.
1. Son of Tabrimon. He was induced, by a present from Asa king of Judah, to attack Baasha king of Israel. 1 Kings 15:18,20 ; 2 Chronicles 16:2,4 .
2. Another king of Syria in the time of Ahab. He fought against Israel, but was defeated and taken prisoner. Ahab called him 'brother,' and spared his life, for which he was rebuked by a prophet: God had devoted Ben-hadad to death and Ahab's life should go for his life. Benhadad again besieged Samaria in the reign of Jehoram, causing a great famine, but God made the Syrians flee when no man pursued, leaving plentiful provisions for His people. Afterwards when Ben-hadad was sick he sent Hazael to Elisha, who had come to Damascus, to know whether he would recover. Elisha said Hazael could tell the king he might surely recover, though Elisha knew he would die. He also told Hazael that he would be king of Syria. Hazael told the king that he would certainly recover; but the next day smothered him with a wet cloth, and reigned over Syria in his stead. 1 Kings 20:1-33 ; 2 Kings 6:24 ; 2 Kings 8:7-15 .
3. Son of the above-named Hazael. Because of Israel's sin, God delivered them into the hands of this king; but eventually Ben-hadad was defeated three times and the cities of Israel were recovered. 2 Kings 13:3,24,25 ; Jeremiah 49:27 ; Amos 1:4 .
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Benhadad
King of Syria; the son of Hadad. (1 Kings 20:1)
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Benhadad
the son of Tibrimon, king of Syria, came to the assistance of Asa, king of Judah, against Baasha, king of Israel, obliging the latter to return home and succour his own country, and to abandon Ramah, which he had undertaken to fortify, 1 Kings 15:18 . This Benhadad is thought by some to have been the same person with Hadad the Edomite, who rebelled against Solomon toward the end of that prince's reign, 1 Kings 11:25 .
2. BENHADAD, king of Syria, son of the preceding, made war upon Ahab, king of Israel, but was defeated. In the following year, however, he came with a most powerful army to Aphek, where Ahab again engaged him, killed a hundred thousand of his men, and the remainder endeavouring to take refuge in Aphek, the walls of the city fell upon them, and killed twenty-seven thousand more. Thus completely defeated, Benhadad submitted to beg his life of the king of Israel, who not only granted his request, but gave him his liberty, and restored him to his crown upon certain conditions, 1 Kings 20. Twelve years afterward, A.M. 3115, Benhadad declared war against Jehoram, the son and successor of Ahab, 2 Kings 6:8 ; but his designs were made known to Jehoram by the Prophet Elisha, and they were accordingly frustrated. Suspecting some treachery in this affair, Benhadad was informed that all his projects were revealed to his enemy by Elisha, and getting intelligence that the latter was at Dothan, he sent a detachment of his best troops to invest the city and apprehend the prophet; but they were struck with blindness at Elisha's prayer, so that they were unable to distinguish him, when he was in the midst of them and held a conversation with them. He then led them into the city of Samaria, and having conducted them safely there, he prayed to God again to open their eyes, and induced Jehoram to dismiss them without violence. Generous as this conduct was, it produced no salutary effect on the infatuated Benhadad; for about four years afterward, he laid close siege to Samaria, and reduced the city to such distress that the head of an ass, which the Israelites considered to be an unclean animal, was sold for fourscore pieces of silver, about 2 l . 9 s . sterling; and the fourth part of a cab of dove's dung, or rather three quarters of a pint of chick pease, as Bochart understands the word, for five pieces of silver. In fact, such was the pressure of the famine at this time in Samaria, that mothers were constrained to eat their own children. Jehoram, hearing of these calamities, attributed them to Elisha, and sent orders to have him put to death; but before his messengers could reach the prophet's house, he came thither himself. Elisha predicted that the next day, about the same hour, a measure of fine flour would be sold at the gate of Samaria for a shekel, which, however incredible at the moment, proved to be the case; for in the night, a general panic, supernaturally induced, pervaded the Syrian camp; they imagined that Jehoram had procured an army of Egyptians to come to his assistance, and, abandoning their horses, tents, and provisions, they all took to flight. Four lepers, whose disease did not permit them to live within the city, and being ready to perish with hunger, ventured into the Syrian camp; and finding it deserted, and at the same time abounding with all sorts of provisions, communicated the information to Jehoram. The king immediately rose, though in the middle of the night; but reflecting that probably it was only a stratagem of Benhadad to draw his people out of the town, he first sent parties to reconnoitre. They, however, speedily returned, and informed him that the enemy was fled, and that the roads were every where strewed with arms and garments which the Syrians had abandoned to facilitate their flight. As soon as the news was confirmed, the Samaritans went out, pillaged the Syrian camp, and brought in such quantities of provisions, that a measure of fine flour was, at the time specified by Elisha, sold at the gate of Samaria for a shekel, 2 Kings 7.
The following year, A.M. 3120, Benhadad fell sick, and sent Hazael, one of his officers, with forty camels, loaded with valuable presents, to the Prophet Elisha, to interrogate him, whether or not he should recover of his indisposition. Elisha fixed his eyes steadfastly on Hazael, and then burst into tears: "Go," said he, "and tell Benhadad, Thou mayest certainly recover; though the Lord hath showed me that he shall assuredly die." He at the same time apprised Hazael that he himself would reign in Syria, and do infinite mischief to Israel. Hazael on this returned and told Benhadad that his health should be restored. But on the next day he took a thick cloth which having dipped in water, he spread over the king's face and stifled him. He then took possession of the kingdom of Syria, according to the prediction of Elisha, 2 Kings 8.
3. BENHADAD, the son of Hazael, mentioned in the preceding article, succeeded his father as king of Syria, 2 Kings 13:24 . During his reign, Jehoash, king of Israel, recovered from him all that his father Hazael had taken from Jehoahaz, his predecessor. He defeated him in three several engagements, and compelled him to surrender all the country beyond Jordan, 2 Kings 13:25 .

Sentence search

Tabrimmon - The father of Benhadad ( 1 Kings 15:18 )
Hezion - Grandfather of Benhadad king of Syria
Tabrimon - Good is Rimmon, the father of Benhadad, king of Syria (1 Kings 15:18 )
Tabrimon - Father of Benhadad I, (1 Kings 15:18)
Benbadad - Benhadad I. Benhadad II. Some time after the death of Ahab, Benhadad renewed the war with Israel, attacked Samaria a second time, and pressed the siege so closely that there was a Terrible famine in the city. Soon after Benhadad II. On the day after Hazael's return Benhadad was murdered, probably by some of his own servants. Benhadad III
Ben-Hadad - Benhadad I . For this service Benhadad received from Asa costly treasures from the Temple and royal palace ( 1 Kings 15:17-20 ). Benhadad II . On the resumption of hostilities in the third year thereafter, Benhadad was victorious ( 1 Kings 22:1-53 ). Benhadad III
Hezion - King of Syria, father of Tabrimon: grandfather of Benhadad
Tabrimon - The father of Benhadad, King of Syria, made memorable from his wars with Israel
Bazaar - Benhadad of Damascus gave Ahab permission to set up bazaars in Damascus as Ben-hadad's father had done in Samaria (1 Kings 20:34 )
Cinneroth, All - " Laid waste by Benhadad king of Damascus, ally of Asa king of Judah (1 Kings 15:20)
Hezion - Father of Tabrimmon, and grandfather of Benhadad, the Syrian king ( 1 Kings 15:18 )
Benhadad - This Benhadad is thought by some to have been the same person with Hadad the Edomite, who rebelled against Solomon toward the end of that prince's reign, 1 Kings 11:25 . Benhadad, king of Syria, son of the preceding, made war upon Ahab, king of Israel, but was defeated. Thus completely defeated, Benhadad submitted to beg his life of the king of Israel, who not only granted his request, but gave him his liberty, and restored him to his crown upon certain conditions, 1 Kings 20. 3115, Benhadad declared war against Jehoram, the son and successor of Ahab, 2 Kings 6:8 ; but his designs were made known to Jehoram by the Prophet Elisha, and they were accordingly frustrated. Suspecting some treachery in this affair, Benhadad was informed that all his projects were revealed to his enemy by Elisha, and getting intelligence that the latter was at Dothan, he sent a detachment of his best troops to invest the city and apprehend the prophet; but they were struck with blindness at Elisha's prayer, so that they were unable to distinguish him, when he was in the midst of them and held a conversation with them. Generous as this conduct was, it produced no salutary effect on the infatuated Benhadad; for about four years afterward, he laid close siege to Samaria, and reduced the city to such distress that the head of an ass, which the Israelites considered to be an unclean animal, was sold for fourscore pieces of silver, about 2 l . The king immediately rose, though in the middle of the night; but reflecting that probably it was only a stratagem of Benhadad to draw his people out of the town, he first sent parties to reconnoitre. 3120, Benhadad fell sick, and sent Hazael, one of his officers, with forty camels, loaded with valuable presents, to the Prophet Elisha, to interrogate him, whether or not he should recover of his indisposition. Elisha fixed his eyes steadfastly on Hazael, and then burst into tears: "Go," said he, "and tell Benhadad, Thou mayest certainly recover; though the Lord hath showed me that he shall assuredly die. Hazael on this returned and told Benhadad that his health should be restored. Benhadad, the son of Hazael, mentioned in the preceding article, succeeded his father as king of Syria, 2 Kings 13:24
Naaman - Pleasantness, a Syrian, the commander of the armies of Benhadad II. He was afflicted with leprosy; and when the little Hebrew slave-girl that waited on his wife told her of a prophet in Samaria who could cure her master, he obtained a letter from Benhadad and proceeded with it to Joram
Asa - Politically he took a mistaken course when he submitted to Benhadad of Damascus to secure his aid against Baasha of Israel, who had captured Ramah. The Temple treasures were sent to Benhadad, who thereupon invaded Israel, and Baasha was compelled to evacuate the threatening fortress ( 1 Kings 15:9 ff
Ijon - A town in the north part of the mountains of Naphtali, noticed in 1 Kings 15:20 (= 2 Chronicles 16:4 ) as taken by Benhadad
Hanani - ...
A prophet who was sent to rebuke king Asa for entering into a league with Benhadad I
Proverb - Ahab's defiant words in answer to the insolent demands of Benhadad, "Let not him that girdeth on his harness boast himself as he that putteth it off," is a well known instance of a proverbial saying (1 Kings 20:11 )
Aphek - A city five miles east of the sea of Galilee, the walls of which fell upon twenty-seven thousand Syrians under Benhadad, after his defeat by the Israelites, 1 Kings 20:26-34
Ben-ha'Dad - Benhadad I. Some time after the death of Ahab, Benhadad renewed the war with Israel, attacked Samaria a second time, and pressed the siege so closely that there was a terrible famine in the city
Hazael - An officer of Benhadad king of Syria, whose future accession to the throne was revealed to the prophet Elijah, then at Damascus, as to his recovery from sickness, and on the next day smothered the king with a wet cloth, 2 Kings 8:7-15 , B
Ahab - ...
Ahab fought three campaigns against Benhadad II. A prophet told Ahab that Jehovah should deliver to him by the young men of the princes of the provinces (compare 1 Corinthians 1:27-29) the Syrian multitude of which Benhadad vaunted, "The gods do so to me and more also, if the dust of Samaria shall suffice for handfuls for all the people that follow me" (1 Kings 20). Again Benhadad, according to the prevalent idea of local gods, thinking Jehovah a god of the hills (His temple being on mount Zion and Samaria being on a hill) and not of the plains, ventured a battle on the plains at Aphek, E. This disobedience, like Saul's in the case of Amalek, owing to his preferring his own will to God's, coupled with his treacherous and covetous murder of Naboth, brought on him his doom in his third campaign against Benhadad three years subsequently. Benhadad's chief aim was to slay Ahab, probably from personal hostility owing to the gratuitousness of the attack. The same Benhadad whom duty to God ought to have led him to execute as a blasphemer, drunkard, and murderer, was in retribution made the instrument of his own destruction (1 Kings 20:10; 1 Kings 20:16; 1 Kings 20:42). ...
The Assyrian Black Obelisk mentions "Ahab of Jezreel," his ordinary residence, and that he furnished the confederacy, including Benhadad, against, Assyria 10,000 footmen and 2000 chariots, and that they were defeated. At first sight this seemingly contradicts Scripture, which makes Benhadad Ahab's enemy. In it Ahab doubtless allied himself to Benhadad against the Assyrians. Fear of them was probably among his reasons for granting Benhadad easy terms when in his power (1 Kings 20:34). When the Assyrians came in the interval that followed, Ahab was confederate with Benhadad. Hence arose his exasperation at the terms granted to Benhadad, whereby he gained life and liberty, being violated in disregard of honor and gratitude (1 Kings 22:3)
Hadadezer - under the more Aramaic form Adadidri , as the equivalent of Benhadad of Damascus, who led the great combination, including Ahab of Israel, against the Assyrians in b
Abelbethmaachah - It was taken with other cities by Benhadad, 1 Kings 15:20 , and subsequently by Tiglath-pileser, 2 Kings 15:29 , when its inhabitants were carried away captive to Assyria
Jehoahaz - In punishment for his sins and those of his people, Israel was invaded and reduced to great extremities by the Syrians under Hazael and Benhadad
Hazael - Elisha coming to Damascus, the capital of Syria, Benhadad, the reigning monarch, being then indisposed, sent Hazael, who was one of his principal officers, to wait upon the prophet, and consult him as to the issue of his disorder, 2 Kings 8:7-13 . On his return home, Hazael concealed from his master Benhadad the prophet's answer, and inspired him with hopes of recovery; but on the following day, he took effectual means to prevent it, by stifling the king with a thick cloth dipped with water; and, as Benhadad had no son, and Hazael was a man much esteemed in the army, he was, without difficulty, declared his successor, A
Abel-Beth-Maacha - Its northern border position made it an early prey to Syria under Benhadad, and 200 years later to Assyria: 2 Kings 15:29. Sheba, son of Bichri, the rebel against David, 80 years before the Syrian invasion under Benhadad, Asa's ally, was here besieged by Joab; and the city was saved by the proverbial shrewdness of its inhabitants, who hearkened to their fellow townswoman's wise advice to sacrifice the one man Sheba to the safety of the whole inhabitants
Hazael - Sent by his master Benhadad originally to Elisha to ask if he would recover from his sickness. ...
Hazael having murdered Benhadad became king, and fought with Ahaziah king of Judah, and Jehoram of Israel, for Ramoth Gilead (2 Kings 8:28). ...
A black marble obelisk of the central palace of Nimrud, now in the British Museum, is inscribed with the names of Hazael and Benhadad of Syria, and Jehu of Israel, mentioned as tributaries of Shalmauubar king of Assyria. Benhadad means on the contrary "worshipper of Hadad," the Syrian idol. Jehoash, son of Jehoahaz, recovered from Benhadad, Hazael's son, the cities taken by Hazael
Baasha - The only incident preserved to us is his capture and fortification of Ramah, which led to the interference of Benhadad, as already recounted in the article Asa
Abel-Beth-Maachah - It was besieged by Joab (2 Samuel 20:14 ), by Benhadad (1 Kings 15:20 ), and by Tiglath-pileser (2 Kings 15:29 ) about B
Aphik - ...
...
A town on the road from Damascus to Palestine, in the level plain east of Jordan, near which Benhadad was defeated by the Israelites (1 Kings 20:26,30 ; 2 Kings 13:17 )
Jehoahaz - The Syrians, under Hazael and Benhadad, prevailed over him, but were at length driven out of the land by his son Jehoash (13:1-9,25)
Aphek - The place where Ahab defeated Benhadad ( 1 Kings 20:26 ; 1 Kings 20:30 ), in the Mîshôr , probably the modern Fîq , or Afîq , on the brow of the plateau, overlooking the Sea of Galilee
Arimathea - There was another Ramah, about six miles north of Jerusalem, in a pass which separated the kingdoms of Israel and Judah, which Baasha, king of Israel, took and began to fortify; but he was obliged to relinquish it, in consequence of the alliance formed between Asa, king of Judah, and Benhadad, king of Syria, 1 Kings 15
Ahab - Ahab made two attacks on Benhadad king of Syria and was helped by God so that he obtained the victory; on the second occasion instead of destroying Benhadad (whom the Lord had doomed to destruction) he made a treaty with him
Ahab - Benhadad, the king of that country, was so successful that he claimed suzerainty over Israel a claim which Ahab was at first disposed to admit (1 Kings 20:2 ff. But when Benhadad went so far as to threaten Samaria with indiscriminate plunder, Ahab resisted. The Syrian war had again broken out apparently because Benhadad had not kept his agreement
Damascus - ...
Hadad's family recovered the throne; or else (See Benhadad I, who helped Baasha against Asa and afterward Asa against Baasha, was grandson of Rezon. His son, Benhadad II, who besieged Ahab (1 Kings 20:1), is the Ben-idri of the Assyrian inscriptions. Hazael, taking advantage of his subjects' disaffection owing to their defeats, murdered Benhadad (2 Kings 8:10-15; 1 Kings 19:15). )...
Benhadad his son continued to exercise a lordship over Israel (2 Kings 13:3-7; 2 Kings 13:22) at first; but Joash, Jehoahaz' son, beat him thrice, according to Elisha's dying prophecy (2 Kings 13:14-19), for "the Lord had compassion on His people . ...
Isaiah (Isaiah 17:1) and Amos (Amos 1:4) had prophesied that Damascus should be "taken away from being a city, and should be a ruinous heap," that Jehovah should "send a fire into the house of Hazael, which should devour the palaces of Benhadad"; and Jeremiah (Jeremiah 49:24-25) that "Damascus is waxed feeble
Jehoahaz - The kings of Syria, Hazael and Benhadad, oppressed and spoiled the country
Jehoahaz - His submission to Syria continued under Benhadad
Inability - Hazael could not have If a dutiful, affectionate son smothered Benhadad, if had been waiting on Benhadad in he had not been suffered Hazael's stead, he could not to enter his chamber
Samaria - In the days of Ahab, Benhadad II. A second time, next year, he assailed it; but was again utterly routed, and was compelled to surrender to Ahab (20:28-34), whose army, as compared with that of Benhadad, was no more than "two little flocks of kids. " ...
In the days of Jehoram this Benhadad again laid siege to Samaria, during which the city was reduced to the direst extremities
Naaman - general of the army of Benhadad, king of Syria, mentioned 2 Kings 5. But in the following account of the wars between Syria and Israel, Benhadad seems to have commanded his army in person; from whence Mr. But the premises are not sufficient to support the conclusion; for it appears that Benhadad had commanded his army in person twice before; once in the siege of Samaria, 1 Kings 20:1 , and once at Aphek, 1 Kings 20:26
Ramoth Gilead - Keenly fought for by the Israelites and their enemies the Syrians under Ahab and Joram (1 Kings 22:4; it had been seized by Benhadad I from Omri; Josephus Hanani - , for buying the alliance of Benhadad I
a'sa - To stop this Asa purchased the help of Benhadad I
Naaman - " Benhadad therefore promoted him to be captain of the Syrian host and the lord in waiting nearest his person, on whose arm the king leant in entering Rimmon's temple (compare 2 Kings 7:2; 2 Kings 7:17)
Aphek - City east of Jordan near the Sea of Galilee where Benhadad led Syria against Israel about 860 but met defeat as a prophet predicted for Israel (1 Kings 20:26-30 )
Aphek - City east of Jordan near the Sea of Galilee where Benhadad led Syria against Israel about 860 but met defeat as a prophet predicted for Israel (1 Kings 20:26-30 )
Asa - When Asa was informed of this, he sent to Benhadad, king of Damascus, all the gold and silver of his palace, and of the temple, to induce him to break his alliance with Baasha, and to assist him against the king of Israel. Benhadad accepted Asa's presents, and invaded Baasha's country, where he took several cities belonging to the tribe of Naphtali. This application to Benhadad for assistance was inexcusable
Rama - Asa, king of Judah, employed Benhadad the Syrian king to drive Baasha from this city (1 Kings 15:18,20 )
Benhadad - Benhadad again besieged Samaria in the reign of Jehoram, causing a great famine, but God made the Syrians flee when no man pursued, leaving plentiful provisions for His people
Asa - To stop this Asa paid a large sum of money to Benhadad king of Syria to invade Israel
Hazael - (2 Kings 8:15) The circumstance of Hazael's spreading a cloth dipped in water over the face of Benhadad, hath been thought by some to have been done not with the design to kill him
Omri - To strengthen his dynasty he allied himself to Benhadad I of Damascus, surrendering cities as the price of the alliance (1 Kings 20:34), including Ramoth Gilead (1 Kings 22:3)
Hadad - ’ The name of this deity is not found alone in the Bible, but appears in several compounds, Benhadad, Bildad , and those which follow this article
Naphtali - Instigated by Asa, Benhadad the elder, king of Syria, terribly ravaged the land of Naphtali; and what it suffered in after invasions by the Syrians we are partly told, 1 Kings 15:20
Naphtali, Tribe of - ...
This tribe was the first to suffer from the invasion of Benhadad, king of Syria, in the reigns of Baasha, king of Israel, and Asa, king of Judah (1 Kings 15:20 ; 2 Chronicles 16:4 )
Alliance - Asa and Baasha contended for alliance with Benhadad ( 1 Kings 15:19 ), and Judah and Israel themselves are allied during the reigns of Jehoshaphat and Ahab
Micaiah - Consulted by Ahab at Jehoshaphat's request when undertaking the joint expedition against Ramoth Gilead, which Benhadad had engaged to restore (1 Kings 20:34). 6) says that it was Micaiah who predicted ("in the word of Jehovah," Haggai 1:13) death by a lion to the neighbor who would not smite him, and who, disguised with ashes, under the parable of one letting go a prisoner entrusted to him made Ahab in his hour of triumph, when the mortification would be the greater, condemn himself out of his own mouth, to lose his life for letting Benhadad escape (1 Kings 20:35-43)
Naaman - —The famous captain of Benhadad ii
Elisha - Some time after, Benhadad, king of Syria, having besieged Samaria, the famine became so extreme, that a certain woman ate her own child. Benhadad being at that time indisposed, and hearing that Elisha was come into his territories, sent Hazael, one of his principal officers, to the prophet to consult him, and inquire of him whether it were possible for him to recover. Hazael, though offended at the time at being thought capable of such atrocities, did but too clearly verify these predictions; for at his return, having murdered Benhadad, and procured himself to be declared king, he inflicted the greatest miseries upon the Israelites
Dan (2) - " The city was smitten by Benhadad (1 Kings 15:20, the last place of mentioning it)
Elisha - Benhadad, with oriental absolutism, wrote as though the Israelite king could at will (compare Matthew 8:9) command Elisha's services. ...
Joram showed no less want of faith, than Benhadad showed want of religious knowledge. Benhadad, while Elisha resided at Dothan, half-way between Samaria and Jezreel, tried to surprise Israel from different points, but was foiled by Elisha warning the Israelite king, "beware that thou pass not such a place. " Benhadad suspecting treachery was informed (probably by one who had witnessed Elisha's cure of Naaman)," the prophet in Israel telleth the king of Israel the words that thou speakest in thy bedchamber" (2 Kings 6:12); compare Christ's ministers, Luke 12:3. Untaught by this lesson, Benhadad, in disregard of gratitude and prudence, tried, instead of the previous marauding forays, a regular siege of Samaria. Benhadad respectfully inquired by Hazael, who brought a kingly present, 40 camels laden with every good thing of Damascus, "thy son (regarding Elisha as a father and lord) saith, Shall I recover of this disease?" "Then mayest certainly (i. Hazael, in the common view, murdered Benhadad with a wet cloth, whether "the bath mattress" (Ewald) or the thick woolen quilt or mosquito net. Others, from "Hazael" being named at the end of 2 Kings 8:15 as if distinct from the previous "he," think Benhadad placed it wet on himself to cool the fever, and died of the sudden chill
Alliances - Asa's alliance with Benhadad against Baasha was the turning point from good to evil in his life (2 Chronicles 14:15-16; 1 Kings 15:16, etc
Camel - Benhadad of Damascus also sent a present to Elisha, "forty camels' burden" (2 Kings 8:9 )
Naphtali - " Tiglath Pileser swept away its people to Assyria; Benhadad of Syria had previously smitten all Naphtali (1 Kings 15:20; 2 Kings 15:29)
Samaria - Benhadad, king of Syria, built public places, called "streets," in Samaria, 1 Kings 20:34 ; probably bazaars for trade, and quarters where his people dwelt to pursue commerce. His son Benhadad besieged this place under the reign of Ahab, 1 Kings 20, A
Damascus - About 30 years after this Benhadad II
Naphtali - Under the Syrian king Bir-idri (Benhadad), ‘all the land of Naphtali,’ together with certain cities of Israel, were smitten with the sword ( 1 Kings 15:20 )
Angel - , we read that Ben-hadad sent messengers with the terms of surrender: “He sent messengers to Ahab king of Israel into the city, and said unto him, Thus saith Benhadad …” (1 Kings 20:2)
Build - Ben-hadad’s servant Hazael took gifts to Elisha, saying, “Thy son Benhadad king of Syria hath sent me to thee” (2 Kings 8:9)
Jehoahaz - )...
Hazael of Syria and his son Benhadad, as his commander in chief, scourged the people all Jehoahaz' (not as KJV "their") days (Exodus 20:3; Exodus 20:22), leaving him only 50 horsemen, 10 chariots, and 10,000 footmen, "making the people like the dust by threshing": (Amos 1:3) "they have threshed Gilead with threshing instruments of iron," i
Samaria, Samaritans - ...
On two occasions, Benhadad, the king of Syria, besieged the city of Samaria; but both times he was unsuccessful (1 Kings 20:1 ; 2 Kings 6:1 )
Dibon - Moab is omitted in the list of Syrian independent states confederate with Benhadad of Damascus against Shalmaneser of Nineveh
Assur - Cuneiform scholars all agree that Benhadad and Hazael, of Damascus, are mentioned as opposed to him in his Syrian wars, and that he took tribute from Jehu of Israel. his advance into Hamath was interrupted by the leagued forces of Syria and Palestine, 85,000 in all, under Benhadad. , when Moab had revolted from Israel and the league of Syria and Israel was dissolved, Shalmaneser attacked Hazael, Benhadad's successor, at the mountains of Saniru (Shenir) in Lebanon, and completely defeated him
Judah, Kingdom of - Asa hired Benhadad I, of Damascus, to counteract him, for which Hanani reproved him
Assyria - If the names are correctly interpreted he mentions as allied against him Benhadad king of Syria and Ahab king of Israel
Assyria - encounters Benhadad of Damascus, and probably Ahab of Israel
Jehoram - Benhadad besieged Samaria; a terrible famine ensued
Nineveh - " His son Shalmaneser II took tribute from Tyre and Sidon and fought Benhadad and Hazael
Kings, Books of - This chapter introduces Benhadad as though we knew him, when in fact we have not heard of him
Government - Sometimes the encounter took the form of an alliance, as with Asa of Judah and Benhadad (1 Kings 15:18-20 ), but also occurred as a peace treaty or as a coalition against a common enemy (2 Kings 3:6-9 )