What does Basket mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
μόδιον a dry measure holding 16 sextarii (or 1/6 of the Attic medimnus) 3
בַּסָּ֑ל basket. 2
סַ֣ל basket. 2
טַנְאֲךָ֖ basket. 2
כְּל֣וּב cage 1
וְסַ֣ל basket. 1
בְּסַ֣ל basket. 1
וּמִסַּ֨ל basket. 1
סַ֥ל basket. 1
בַּסַּ֔ל basket. 1
הַסַּ֖ל basket. 1
וּבַסַּ֣ל basket. 1
מִסַּל֙ basket. 1
וְהֻנִּ֥יחָה to rest. 1
כְּל֥וּב cage 1
σαργάνῃ a braided rope 1
הַטֶּ֖נֶא basket. 1
בַטֶּ֑נֶא basket. 1
וְהַדּ֣וּד pot 1
הַדּ֣וּד pot 1
؟ הָאֵיפָֽה ephah. 1
הָ֣אֵיפָ֔ה ephah. 1
הָֽאֵיפָ֑ה ephah. 1
הָאֵיפָֽה ephah. 1
הָֽאֵיפָה֙ ephah. 1
σπυρίδι a reed basket 1
הַסַּ֔ל basket. 1

Definitions Related to Basket

G3426


   1 a dry measure holding 16 sextarii (or 1/6 of the Attic medimnus), about a peck (9 litres).
   

H5536


   1 Basket.
   

H2935


   1 Basket.
   

H1731


   1 pot, jar, Basket, kettle.
      1a pot, kettle.
      1b Basket, jar.
      

H3619


   1 cage, Basket, dog cage.
   

H374


   1 ephah.
      1a a dry measure of quantity, equal to 3 seahs, 10 omers; the same as the liquid measure bath; (about 9 imperial gallons (40 l), rabbinical writings give sizes of one-half this amount).
      1b the receptacle for measuring or holding that amount.
      

G4711


   1 a reed Basket, (a plaited Basket, a lunch Basket, hamper).
   

H3240


   1 to rest.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to rest, settle down and remain.
         1a2 to repose, have rest, be quiet.
      1b (Hiphil).
         1b1 to cause to rest, give rest to, make quiet.
         1b2 to cause to rest, cause to alight, set down.
         1b3 to lay or set down, deposit, let lie, place.
         1b4 to let remain, leave.
         1b5 to leave, depart from.
         1b6 to abandon.
         1b7 to permit.
      1c (Hophal).
         1c1 to obtain rest, be granted rest.
         1c2 to be left, be placed.
         1c3 open space (subst).
         

G4553


   1 a braided rope, a band.
   2 a Basket, a Basket made of ropes, a hamper.
   

Frequency of Basket (original languages)

Frequency of Basket (English)

Dictionary

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Basket
Genesis 40:16; "I had three white (margin 'full of holes,' i.e. of open work, or rather 'baskets of white bread') baskets on my head." The Bible accurately represents Egyptian custom (Herodotus, 2:35), whereby men carried burdens on the head, women on the shoulders. In the distinct miracles of feeding the 5,000 and the 4,000 the KJV uses the stone term "baskets" for distinct Greek words. In Matthew 14:20; Mark 6:43; Luke 9:17; John 6:13, the disciples took up twelve kophinoi of fragments at the feeding of the 5,000. In feeding the 4,000 with seven loaves recorded by two evangelists, the disciples took up seven spurides (Matthew 15:37; Mark 8:8). Now kofinoi is always used by the evangelists when the miracle of the 5,000 is spoken of, spurides when that of the 4,000 is spoken of.
Thus also in referring back to the miracle (Matthew 16:9-10) Jesus says: "Do ye not ... remember the five loaves of the 5,000, and how many kofinoi) ye took up? Neither the seven loaves of the 4,000, and how many spurides) ye took up?" That the spurides) were of large size appears from Paul's having been let down in one from the wall (Acts 9:25). The kofinoi being twelve probably answers to the twelve disciples, a provision basket for each, and so are likely to have been smaller. The accurate distinction in the use of the terms so invariably made in the record of the miracles marks both events as real and distinct, not, as rationalists have guessed, different versions of one miracle.
The coincidence is so undesigned that it escaped our translators altogether; it therefore can only be the result of genuineness and truth in the different evangelists' accounts. In traveling through Samaria or Gentile regions the Jews used kofinoi , not to be defiled by eating Gentile unclean foods. Smith's Bible Dictionary wrongly makes the kofinos larger than the spuris .
Webster's Dictionary - Basket
(1):
(n.) The two back seats facing one another on the outside of a stagecoach.
(2):
(v. t.) To put into a basket.
(3):
(n.) The contents of a basket; as much as a basket contains; as, a basket of peaches.
(4):
(n.) The bell or vase of the Corinthian capital.
(5):
(n.) A vessel made of osiers or other twigs, cane, rushes, splints, or other flexible material, interwoven.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Basket
Five kinds of baskets are mentioned in the Old Testament. The precise distinctions of size and shape are not clear. Some had handles, others lids, some both, others neither. The most common term always refers to a container for carrying food (Genesis 40:16-18 ). Another term is used to signify a cage or “bird net” (Amos 8:1-2 ). A third type basket is the common household utensil used in harvesting grain (Deuteronomy 26:2 ; Deuteronomy 28:5 ). A fourth term refers to a larger basket used for heavy burdens such as clay for bricks or even the heads of the seventy sons of Ahab delivered to Jehu (2 Kings 10:7 ). The final term was used to describe both the basket (ark) in which Moses was placed as an infant (Exodus 2:3 ,Exodus 2:3,2:5 ) and the ark which Noah built (Genesis 6:14-16 ). The New Testament uses two words for basket. The smaller basket is referred to in the story of the feeding of the 5000 (Matthew 14:20 ). The larger basket is mentioned in the feeding of the 4000 (Matthew 15:37 ). The apostle Paul also used the larger basket as a means of escape over the wall of Damascas (Acts 9:25 ). It might logically be considered a hamper. See Ark .
C. Dale Hill
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Basket
There are five different Hebrew words so rendered in the Authorized Version:
A basket (Heb. sal, a twig or osier) for holding bread (Genesis 40:16 ; Exodus 29:3,23 ; Leviticus 8:2,26,31 ; Numbers 6:15,17,19 ). Sometimes baskets were made of twigs peeled; their manufacture was a recognized trade among the Hebrews.
That used (Heb. salsilloth') in gathering grapes (Jeremiah 6:9 ).
That in which the first fruits of the harvest were presented, Heb. tene, (Deuteronomy 26:2,4 ). It was also used for household purposes. In form it tapered downwards like that called Corbis by the Romans.
A basket (Heb. kelub) having a lid, resembling a bird-cage. It was made of leaves or rushes. The name is also applied to fruit-baskets ( Amos 8:1,2 ).
A basket (Heb. dud) for carrying figs (Jeremiah 24:2 ), also clay to the brick-yard (RSV, Psalm 81:6 ), and bulky articles (2 Kings 10:7 ). This word is also rendered in the Authorized Version "kettle" (1 Samuel 2:14 ), "caldron" (2 Chronicles 35:13 ), "seething-pot" (Job 41:20 ). In the New Testament mention is made of the basket (Gr. kophinos, small "wicker-basket") for the "fragments" in the miracle recorded Mark 6:43 , and in that recorded Matthew 15:37 (Gr. spuris, large "rope-basket"); also of the basket in which Paul escaped ( Acts 9:25 , Gr. spuris; 2 Corinthians 11 :: 33 , Gr. sargane, "basket of plaited cords").
Webster's Dictionary - Basket Ball
A game, usually played indoors, in which two parties of players contest with each other to toss a large inflated ball into opposite goals resembling baskets.
Webster's Dictionary - Buck-Basket
(n.) A basket in which clothes are carried to the wash.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Basket
BASKET . The names of a round score of baskets in use in NT times are known from the Mishna (see Krengel, Das Hausgerät in der Mishnah , pp. 39 45). They were made of willow, rush, palm-leaf, and other materials, and used in an endless variety of ways, for purely domestic purposes, in agriculture, in gathering and serving fruit, and for collecting the alms in kind for the poor, etc. Some had handles, others lids, some had both, others had neither. In OT times the commonest basket was the sal , made, at least in later times, of peeled willows or palm-leaves. It was large and flat like the Roman canistrum , and, like it, was used for carrying bread ( Genesis 40:16 ff.) and other articles of food ( Judges 6:19 ), and for presenting the meal-offerings at the sanctuary ( Exodus 29:3 ). Another ( dûd ), also of wicker-work, probably resembled the calathus , which tapered towards the bottom, and was used in fruit-gathering ( Jeremiah 24:1 ). In what respect it differed from Amos’ ‘basket of summer fruit’ ( Amos 8:1 ) is unknown. A fourth and larger variety was employed for carrying home the produce of the fields ( Deuteronomy 28:5 ‘blessed shall be thy basket and thy kneading-trough,’ RV [1] ), and for presenting the first-fruits ( Deuteronomy 26:2 ).
In NT interest centres in the two varieties of basket distinguished consistently by the Evangelists in their accounts of the feeding of the 5000 and the 4000 respectively, the kophinos and the sphyris . The kophinos ( Matthew 14:20 ) is probably to be identified with the exceedingly popular kûphâ of the Mishna, which ‘was provided with a cord for a handle by means of which it was usually carried on the back’ (Krengel), with provisions, etc., and which, therefore, the disciples would naturally have with them. The Jews of Juvenal’s day carried such a provision basket ( cophinus ). The sphyris or spyris ( Matthew 15:37 , Mark 8:8 ), from its use in St. Paul’s case ( Acts 9:25 ), must have been considerably larger than the other, and might for distinction be rendered ‘hamper.’
A. R. S. Kennedy.
King James Dictionary - Basket
B'ASKET, n.
1. A domestic vessel made of twigs, rushes,splinters or other 52 flexible things interwoven. The forms and sizes of baskets are very various, as well as the uses to which they are applied as corn-baskets, clothes-baskets, fruit-baskets, and work-baskets.
2. The contents of a basket as much as a basket will contain as, a basket of medlars is two bushels. But in general, this quantity is indefinite. In military affairs, baskets of earth sometimes are used on the parapet of a trench, between which the soldiers fire. They serve for defense against small shot.
B'ASKET, To put in a basket.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Basket
Deuteronomy 28:5 (c) Moses is telling us that GOD will give abundant increase for us to take home to ourselves and enjoy for ourselves if we let the Lord GOD command us, and if we give obedient service.
Deuteronomy 28:17 (c) Here we find the opposite truth expressed, for if we refuse to listen to GOD, and to walk with Him, we shall find that GOD withholds the blessing, and leaves us with empty hands and desolate hearts.
Jeremiah 6:9 (b) The figure here is that of the enemy who invades the land and gathers into his own possession the persons and the properties of disobedient Israel.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Basket
Various Hebrew words are translated 'basket,' and doubtless the size, shape and strength varied according to the purpose for which they were intended. In the N.T. there are three Greek words used: συργάνη, 'a hamper,' in which Paul was let down by the wall, 2 Corinthians 11:33 , though for the same occurrence another word is used in Acts 9:25 , σπυρίς,which also signifies 'a hamper,' and is used for the seven baskets of fragments remaining after the four thousand were fed. Matthew 15:37 ; Matthew 16:10 ; Mark 8:8,20 . When the five thousand were fed there were twelve baskets of fragments, but it was then the κόφινος,'a hand basket.' Matthew 14:20 ; Matthew 16:9 ; Mark 6:43 ; Mark 8:19 ; Luke 9:17 ; John 6:13 . The two perfect numbers seven and twelve show the inexhaustible supply the Lord furnishes when His purpose is to bless His own.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Basket (2)
BASKET.—All four Evangelists, in narrating the miracle of the feeding of the five thousand, describe the baskets in which the fragments were placed as κόφινοι (Matthew 14:20 = Mark 6:43 = Luke 9:17 = John 6:13); while the two who report the other miracle of feeding the four thousand, state that the fragments were placed in σπυρίδες (Matthew 15:37 = Mark 8:8). It is clear from Matthew 16:9 f. (= Mark 8:19 f.) that the variation is intentional. The baskets used on the one occasion differed either in size, shape, or material from those used on the other (cf. (Revised Version margin) in Matthew 16:9 f. and Mark 8:19 f.). Our Lord preserved the distinction, and our present Gospels have also done so.
‘Basket’ occurs in the Authorized and Revised Versions Gospels in the above passages only. The older English versions use the confusing rendering of ‘baskets’ for both words, except that Wyclif has ‘coffyns’ and ‘leepis.’ By ‘coffyn’ he evidently meant a small basket. Rheims renders στυρἰδων, ‘maundes,’ i.e. hand-baskets. Davidson (NT, 1875) at Mark 8:19-20 has ‘basketfuls’ for κοφίνους and ‘walletsful’ for σπυριδων, as if he had found τηρῶν.
The authors of such renderings as the above forgot that St. Paul (Acts 9:25) made his escape in a σπυρἱς. This fact at once excludes wallets or hand-baskets. If the distinction was one of size at all, which is not certain, we should perhaps have to assume that the σπυρίς was the larger. Bevan (Smith’s DB [1] 1 [2] i. 172) says that the κόφινος was the larger, quoting Etym. Mag., βαθὺ καὶ κοῖλον χώρημα, and the use of cophinus in Latin, e.g. Colum. xi. 3, p. 460, as containing manure enough to make a hotbed. Greswell (Diss. viii. pt. 4, vol. ii.) thought that the cophinus was big enough to sleep in. He probably misunderstood the passage in Juvenal quoted below; for though the hay may have been used as a bed, it is not said that it was in the cophinus. Nor is it clear that the Latin cophinus and the Greek κόφινος were at all times identical in meaning (so the French balle is not a cannon-ball but a musket bullet, while our cannon-ball is a boulet). Let us examine the two words more closely.
(1) κόφινος is said to be derived from κόττω; but this appears to be more than doubtful, and the grammarians considered it less Attic than ἅρριχοτ, which was clearly a wicker or flag basket. In the Gr. OT it is used by LXX Septuagint and Symm. [3] for Heb. dud in Psalms 80 [4]:6, and by Symm. [3] only in Jeremiah 24:1-2 (where LXX Septuagint has κάλαθος), and for sal by Aq. [6] in Genesis 40:16 (where LXX Septuagint has κανᾶ). Certainly in the two latter passages a small basket, carried in the hand, or on the head, would suit the contexts. Suidas defines κ. as ἀγγεῖον τλεκτὀν. In CIG [7] 1625, lines 44–46, it is clearly a corn-basket of a recognized size; cf. also CIG [7] 2347 k. In Xen. Anab. iii. 8. 6 it occurs as a dung-basket (see the Latin cophinus in Columella, as cited above). It is said that the Jews at Rome carried cophini about with them to avoid the chance of food contracting any Levitical pollution in heathen places. The reason given appears fanciful, and anyhow would hardly apply to the journeys of our Lord and His apostles. But the fact is vouched for by Juvenal (Sat. iii. 14: ‘Judaeis, quorum cophinus fœnumque supellex’; vi. 542: ‘Cophino fœnoque relicto | Arcanam Judaea tremens mendicat in aurem’) and Martial (Epig. v. 7).
(2) στυρίς (or σφυρις, as WH [9] prefer) is not found in the LXX Septuagint. It is generally connected with στεῖρα = anything twisted (Vulgate sporta, of which the diminutives sportella and sportula occur, as small fruit or provision-baskets). Hesychius explains σπυρίς as τὸ τῶν τυρῶν ἀγγος, as though from πυρός; cf. δεῖτνον ἀτὸ στυρίδος (Athenaeus, viii. 17). Hence Greswell thought that before Pentecost, the season of wheat harvest, when the second miracle took place, the disciples were able to use corn-baskets, while the first miracle happening before Passover time, they used another kind of basket! Besides the improbability of this, we may note that there is no proof that in either case the baskets belonged to or were carried about by the disciples, for they may have been borrowed when needed. Yet Trench (Miracles, p. 380 note 2) inquires why the apostles should have been provided with either kind, and mentions (a) that perhaps they carried their provisions with them while travelling through a polluted land, such as Samaria (yet cf. John 4:8; John 4:31; John 4:40, Luke 9:52); and (b) he also mentions Greswell’s theory, that the disciples carried these baskets in order to sleep in them sub dio. This all comes from applying to the Twelve in the Holy Land what Roman satirists said about Jewish beggars at Rome.
As στυρίς in Acts 9:25 = σαργἀνη in 2 Corinthians 11:33, and as the Vulgate has sporta in both places (and also in the Gospels for στυρίς but not for κόφινο;), we are led to inquire as to the force of σαργάνη. It is used of anything twisted like a rope, or woven of rope (aesch. Suppl. 791—πλἐγμα τι ἐκ σχοινίων Suid.). Fish-baskets were specially so made (ἀτὸ σχοιαἰων τλεγμάτων εἰς ὑποδοχὴν ἰχθὺων, Etym. Mag.), as rush-baskets are used in London.
Meyer considered the difference between σπυρίς and κόφινος to lie not in size, but in κόφινος being a general term, and σπυρίς specially a food-basket. Perhaps the true force of the words we have discussed is to be discovered in the use made of them by Greek-speaking working people at the present day. The writer of this article has therefore consulted a Greek priest, the Rev. H. A. Teknopoulos. In his reply he says: ‘In Asia Minor and in Constantinople our porters call κὁφινος that big and deep basket in which they carry different things. Σπυρίς is a smaller and round and shallow basket. Σαργάνη is a long bag, knitted by (i.e. of) rope, which is in one way very like the δίκτυον of fish, but is different from it in other way(s).’
One might ask whether the στυρἰς of Acts 9:25 is not an error of memory on the part of St. Luke. St. Paul in his own account of his escape would surely use the right word. If so, the supposed need for a στυρίς being big enough to hold a person disappears, and we may accept the decision of those who consider it the smaller of the two kinds mentioned in the Gospels.
George Farmer.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Basket
Two different words for ‘basket’ are used in connexion with St. Paul’s escape from Damascus, one, σφυρίς or σπυρίς (Acts 9:25), being the same as is found in the miracle of feeding the 4000 (Matthew 15:37, Mark 8:8), the other, σαργάνη, being peculiar to the Apostle’s own version of the incident (2 Corinthians 11:33). The former kind of basket plays an important part in relation to the miracles of feeding, and the argument for its larger size as compared with κόφινος is supported by a reference to its use in facilitating St. Paul’s escape (but see Dict. of Christ and the Gospels , article ‘Basket’). The latter calls for detailed treatment here. It has been thought of: (1) as flexible, coming near the idea of reticule or net; (2) as rigid: either braid-work (used especially of fish-baskets [1]), or wicker-work. This last seems to be nearest the truth. In Jewish usage the root סרנ (סרר) attaches to weaving in the rigid form (e.g. basket-making) as opposed to the flexible (e.g. spinning). One species of work-stool is called סרנין. The basket-making industry was located in the neighbourhood of the Sea of Galilee, with headquarters at Scythopolis, and a ready outlet for the manufactured article was found in Damascus (see S. Krauss, Talmud. Archäologie, ii. [2] 269f., where many kinds are specified).
In the absence of knowledge as to the nature and size of the window (θυρίς), and other details of St. Paul’s escape, we cannot hope to attain to a precise result regarding the structure of the σαργάνη. It need not be said that present-day tradition’s in Damascus are of little value. Only the lower half of the wall dates possibly from NT times (see Encyclopaedia Biblica , article ‘Damascus’). For the device of letting a person down through a window, see Joshua 2:15 and 1 Samuel 19:12; cf. also Josephus, Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) i. xvi. 4.
W. Cruickshank.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Basket, Basketful
1: κόφινος (Strong's #2894 — Noun Masculine — kophinos — kof'-ee-nos ) was "a wicker basket," originally containing a certain measure of capacity, Matthew 14:20 ; 16:9 ; Mark 6:43 (RV, "basketfuls"); 8:19; Luke 9:17 ; 13:8 in some mss.; John 6:13 .
2: σπυρίς (Strong's #4711 — Noun Feminine — spuris — spoo-rece' ) or sphuris, signifies "something round, twisted or folded together" (connected with speira, "anything rolled into a circle;" Eng., "sphere"); hence a reed basket, plaited, a capacious kind of hamper, sometimes large enough to hold a man, Matthew 15:37 ; 16:10 ; Mark 8:8,20 (RV, "basketfuls"); Acts 9:25 .
3: σαργάνη (Strong's #4553 — Noun Feminine — sargane — sar-gan'-ay ) denotes (a) "a braided rope or band," (b) "a large basket made of ropes, or a wicker "basket" made of entwined twigs, 2 Corinthians 11:33 . That the "basket" in which Paul was let down from a window in Damascus is spoken of by Luke as a spuris, and by Paul himself as a sargane, is quite consistent, the two terms being used for the same article.

Sentence search

Psychian - The larvae are called Basket worms. See Basket worm, under Basket
Tripitaka - ) The three divisions, or "baskets" (pitakas), of buddhist scriptures, - the Vinayapitaka [1] , or Basket of Discipline; Suttapitaka [2] , or Basket of Discourses; and Abhidhammapitaka [2] , or Basket of Metaphysics
Basket - ) To put into a Basket. ) The contents of a Basket; as much as a Basket contains; as, a Basket of peaches
Whisket - ) A Basket; esp. , a straw provender Basket
Basket - There are five different Hebrew words so rendered in the Authorized Version:
A Basket (Heb. Sometimes Baskets were made of twigs peeled; their manufacture was a recognized trade among the Hebrews. ...
...
A Basket (Heb. The name is also applied to fruit-baskets ( Amos 8:1,2 ). ...
...
A Basket (Heb. In the New Testament mention is made of the Basket (Gr. kophinos, small "wicker-basket") for the "fragments" in the miracle recorded Mark 6:43 , and in that recorded Matthew 15:37 (Gr. spuris, large "rope-basket"); also of the Basket in which Paul escaped ( Acts 9:25 , Gr. sargane, "basket of plaited cords")
Basket - The forms and sizes of Baskets are very various, as well as the uses to which they are applied as corn-baskets, clothes-baskets, fruit-baskets, and work-baskets. The contents of a Basket as much as a Basket will contain as, a Basket of medlars is two bushels. In military affairs, Baskets of earth sometimes are used on the parapet of a trench, between which the soldiers fire. ...
B'ASKET, To put in a Basket
Corf - ) A large Basket used in carrying or hoisting coal or ore. ) A Basket
Pannier - ) A bread Basket; also, a wicker Basket (used commonly in pairs) for carrying fruit or other things on a horse or an ass...
(2):...
(n. ) A shield of Basket work formerly used by archers as a shelter from the enemy's missiles
Basket - Five kinds of Baskets are mentioned in the Old Testament. A third type Basket is the common household utensil used in harvesting grain (Deuteronomy 26:2 ; Deuteronomy 28:5 ). A fourth term refers to a larger Basket used for heavy burdens such as clay for bricks or even the heads of the seventy sons of Ahab delivered to Jehu (2 Kings 10:7 ). The final term was used to describe both the Basket (ark) in which Moses was placed as an infant (Exodus 2:3 ,Exodus 2:3,2:5 ) and the ark which Noah built (Genesis 6:14-16 ). The New Testament uses two words for Basket. The smaller Basket is referred to in the story of the feeding of the 5000 (Matthew 14:20 ). The larger Basket is mentioned in the feeding of the 4000 (Matthew 15:37 ). The apostle Paul also used the larger Basket as a means of escape over the wall of Damascas (Acts 9:25 )
Chelub - A Basket
Serpet - ) A Basket
Cage - "coop;" rendered "basket" in Amos 8:1 ), a Basket of wicker-work in which birds were placed after being caught
Salcah - Thy Basket; thy lifting up
Wisket - ) A whisket, or Basket
Basket, Basketful - 1: κόφινος (Strong's #2894 — Noun Masculine — kophinos — kof'-ee-nos ) was "a wicker Basket," originally containing a certain measure of capacity, Matthew 14:20 ; 16:9 ; Mark 6:43 (RV, "basketfuls"); 8:19; Luke 9:17 ; 13:8 in some mss. , "sphere"); hence a reed Basket, plaited, a capacious kind of hamper, sometimes large enough to hold a man, Matthew 15:37 ; 16:10 ; Mark 8:8,20 (RV, "basketfuls"); Acts 9:25 . ...
3: σαργάνη (Strong's #4553 — Noun Feminine — sargane — sar-gan'-ay ) denotes (a) "a braided rope or band," (b) "a large Basket made of ropes, or a wicker "basket" made of entwined twigs, 2 Corinthians 11:33 . That the "basket" in which Paul was let down from a window in Damascus is spoken of by Luke as a spuris, and by Paul himself as a sargane, is quite consistent, the two terms being used for the same article
Crail - ) A creel or osier Basket
Eelbuck - ) An eelpot or eel Basket
Caleb - A dog; a crow; a Basket
Ped - ) A Basket; a hammer; a pannier
Basketful - ) As much as a Basket will contain
Kipe - ) An osier Basket used for catching fish
Punnet - ) A broad, shallow Basket, for displaying fruit or flowers
Buck-Basket - ) A Basket in which clothes are carried to the wash
Skep - ) A coarse round farm Basket
Workbasket - ) A Basket for holding materials for needlework, or the like
Hilted - ) Having a hilt; - used in composition; as, Basket-hilted, cross-hilted
Hask - ) A Basket made of rushes or flags, as for carrying fish
Corbell - ) A sculptured Basket of flowers; a corbel
Dosser - ) A pannier, or Basket
Willy - ) A large wicker Basket
Barathea - ) A soft fabric with a kind of Basket weave and a diapered pattern
Ark of Bulrushes - KJV translation of a Hebrew word in Exodus 2:3-5 usually translated Basket
Wastebasket - ) A Basket used in offices, libraries, etc
Sallu - (1 Chronicles 9:7) If from Salal, the name means Basket
Sallai - Basket-maker
Hanaper - ) A kind of Basket, usually of wickerwork, and adapted for the packing and carrying of articles; a hamper
Popper - ) A utensil for popping corn, usually a wire Basket with a long handle
Main-Hamper - ) A hamper to be carried in the hand; a hand Basket used in carrying grapes to the press
Corb - ) A Basket used in coal mines, etc
Cabas - ) A flat Basket or frail for figs, etc. ; hence, a lady's flat workbasket, reticule, or hand bag; - often written caba
Flasket - ) A long, shallow Basket, with two handles
Randing - ) A kind of Basket work used in gabions
Pottle - ) A vessel or small Basket for holding fruit
Euplectella - ) A genus of elegant, glassy sponges, consisting of interwoven siliceous fibers, and growing in the form of a cornucopia; - called also Venus's flower-basket
Voider - ) A tray, or Basket, formerly used to receive or convey that which is voided or cleared away from a given place; especially, one for carrying off the remains of a meal, as fragments of food; sometimes, a Basket for containing household articles, as clothes, etc
Bassinet - ) A wicker Basket, with a covering or hood over one end, in which young children are placed as in a cradle
Maund - ) A hand Basket
Ark of Moses - A small boat or Basket made of the papyrus, a reed which grows in the marshes of Egypt
Basket - Basket . The names of a round score of Baskets in use in NT times are known from the Mishna (see Krengel, Das Hausgerät in der Mishnah , pp. In OT times the commonest Basket was the sal , made, at least in later times, of peeled willows or palm-leaves. In what respect it differed from Amos’ ‘basket of summer fruit’ ( Amos 8:1 ) is unknown. A fourth and larger variety was employed for carrying home the produce of the fields ( Deuteronomy 28:5 ‘blessed shall be thy Basket and thy kneading-trough,’ RV
In NT interest centres in the two varieties of Basket distinguished consistently by the Evangelists in their accounts of the feeding of the 5000 and the 4000 respectively, the kophinos and the sphyris . The Jews of Juvenal’s day carried such a provision Basket ( cophinus )
Salu - (See Numbers 25:14) His name seems to be borrowed from Salah, signifying Basket
Kit - ) straw or rush Basket for fish; also, any kind of Basket
Carboy - one of green glass, inclosed in Basket work or in a box, for protection; - used commonly for carrying corrosive liquids; as sulphuric acid, etc
Creel - ) An osier Basket, such as anglers use
Bagworm - See Basket worm
Backsword - ) In England, a stick with a Basket handle, used in rustic amusements; also, the game in which the stick is used
Kettle, - (1 Samuel 2:14 ) The Hebrew word is also rendered "basket" in (Jeremiah 24:2 ) "caldron" in (2 Chronicles 35:13 ) and "pot" in (Job 41:20 )
Basket - Two different words for ‘basket’ are used in connexion with St. The former kind of Basket plays an important part in relation to the miracles of feeding, and the argument for its larger size as compared with κόφινος is supported by a reference to its use in facilitating St. of Christ and the Gospels , article ‘Basket’). It has been thought of: (1) as flexible, coming near the idea of reticule or net; (2) as rigid: either braid-work (used especially of fish-baskets [1]), or wicker-work. Basket-making) as opposed to the flexible (e. The Basket-making industry was located in the neighbourhood of the Sea of Galilee, with headquarters at Scythopolis, and a ready outlet for the manufactured article was found in Damascus (see S
Tiddledywinks - ) A game in which the object is to snap small disks of bone, ivory, or the like, from a flat surface, as of a table, into a small cup or Basket; - called also tiddlywinks
Nacelle - ) The Basket suspended from a balloon; hence, the framework forming the body of a dirigible balloon, and containing the machinery, passengers, etc
Kettle - The same Hebrew word (dud, "boiling") is rendered also "pot" (Psalm 81:6 ), "caldron" (2 Chronicles 35:13 ), "basket" (Jeremiah 24:2 )
Dagger - In fencing schools, a blunt blade of iron with a Basket hilt, used for defense
Fascet - ) A wire Basket on the end of a rod to carry glass bottles, etc
Taking - What a taking was he in, when your husband asked what was in the Basket? ...
Corban - , a wicker Basket. An alms-basket a vessel to receive gifts of charity a gift an alms a treasury of the church, where offerings are deposited
Wicker - ) A small pliant twig or osier; a rod for making Basketwork and the like; a withe. a Basket
Corban - ) An alms Basket; a vessel to receive gifts of charity; a treasury of the church, where offerings are deposited
Sieve - ) A kind of coarse Basket
Bill - An instrument used by plumbers, Basket makers and gardeners, made in the form of a crescent, and fitted with a handle
Cresset - ) An open frame or Basket of iron, filled with combustible material, to be burned as a beacon; an open lamp or firrepan carried on a pole in nocturnal processions
Canister - ) A small Basket of rushes, reeds, or willow twigs, etc
Craft - Several crafts were practiced in biblical times: carpentry, boatbuilding, carving (wood, ivory, ebony, and alabaster), metalworking (gold, silver, bronze, and iron), weaving and spinning, tanning, tentmaking, Basket weavers, potter's trade, fuller's trade, dyeing, sculpting, jeweler's trade, glassworking, perfumery, embroidering, masonry, plastering, etc
Crate - ) A large Basket or hamper of wickerwork, used for the transportation of china, crockery, and similar wares
Abion - ) A hollow cylinder of wickerwork, like a Basket without a bottom
Basket - Various Hebrew words are translated 'basket,' and doubtless the size, shape and strength varied according to the purpose for which they were intended. there are three Greek words used: συργάνη, 'a hamper,' in which Paul was let down by the wall, 2 Corinthians 11:33 , though for the same occurrence another word is used in Acts 9:25 , σπυρίς,which also signifies 'a hamper,' and is used for the seven Baskets of fragments remaining after the four thousand were fed. When the five thousand were fed there were twelve Baskets of fragments, but it was then the κόφινος,'a hand Basket
Tumbril - ) A kind of Basket or cage of osiers, willows, or the like, to hold hay and other food for sheep
Filigree - ) Relating to, composed of, or resembling, work in filigree; as, a filigree Basket
Yuman - ) Designating, or pertaining to, an important linguistic stock of North American Indians of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, nearly all agriculturists and adept potters and Basket makers
Skip - ) A Basket. ) A Basket on wheels, used in cotton factories
Prickle - ) A kind of willow Basket; - a term still used in some branches of trade
Osier - It is considered the best of the willows for Basket work
Coffin - ) A Basket
Basket (2) - BASKET. —All four Evangelists, in narrating the miracle of the feeding of the five thousand, describe the Baskets in which the fragments were placed as κόφινοι (Matthew 14:20 = Mark 6:43 = Luke 9:17 = John 6:13); while the two who report the other miracle of feeding the four thousand, state that the fragments were placed in σπυρίδες (Matthew 15:37 = Mark 8:8). The Baskets used on the one occasion differed either in size, shape, or material from those used on the other (cf. ...
‘Basket’ occurs in the Authorized and Revised Versions Gospels in the above passages only. The older English versions use the confusing rendering of ‘baskets’ for both words, except that Wyclif has ‘coffyns’ and ‘leepis. ’ By ‘coffyn’ he evidently meant a small Basket. hand-baskets. Davidson (NT, 1875) at Mark 8:19-20 has ‘basketfuls’ for κοφίνους and ‘walletsful’ for σπυριδων, as if he had found τηρῶν. This fact at once excludes wallets or hand-baskets. ...
(1) κόφινος is said to be derived from κόττω; but this appears to be more than doubtful, and the grammarians considered it less Attic than ἅρριχοτ, which was clearly a wicker or flag Basket. Certainly in the two latter passages a small Basket, carried in the hand, or on the head, would suit the contexts. ]'>[7] 1625, lines 44–46, it is clearly a corn-basket of a recognized size; cf. 6 it occurs as a dung-basket (see the Latin cophinus in Columella, as cited above). It is generally connected with στεῖρα = anything twisted (Vulgate sporta, of which the diminutives sportella and sportula occur, as small fruit or provision-baskets). Hence Greswell thought that before Pentecost, the season of wheat harvest, when the second miracle took place, the disciples were able to use corn-baskets, while the first miracle happening before Passover time, they used another kind of Basket! Besides the improbability of this, we may note that there is no proof that in either case the Baskets belonged to or were carried about by the disciples, for they may have been borrowed when needed. John 4:8; John 4:31; John 4:40, Luke 9:52); and (b) he also mentions Greswell’s theory, that the disciples carried these Baskets in order to sleep in them sub dio. Fish-baskets were specially so made (ἀτὸ σχοιαἰων τλεγμάτων εἰς ὑποδοχὴν ἰχθὺων, Etym. ), as rush-baskets are used in London. ...
Meyer considered the difference between σπυρίς and κόφινος to lie not in size, but in κόφινος being a general term, and σπυρίς specially a food-basket. In his reply he says: ‘In Asia Minor and in Constantinople our porters call κὁφινος that big and deep Basket in which they carry different things. Σπυρίς is a smaller and round and shallow Basket
Naughtiness - The other Basket had very naughty figs
Frail - A Basket made of rushes. A rush for weaving Baskets
Hamper - ) A large Basket, usually with a cover, used for the packing and carrying of articles; as, a hamper of wine; a clothes hamper; an oyster hamper, which contains two bushels
Frail - ) A Basket made of rushes, used chiefly for containing figs and raisins. ) A rush for weaving Baskets
Braided - 1: πλέγμα (Strong's #4117 — Noun Neuter — plegma — pleg'-mah ) signifies "what is woven" (from pleko, "to weave, plait"), whether a net or Basket (Josephus uses it of the ark of bulrushes in which the infant Moses was laid), or of a web, plait, braid
Firstfruits - The individual presentation of the first-fruits in a Basket took place at the temple or tabernacle. " The priest took the Basket and set it down before the altar of the Lord. Each presented his Basket, reciting the formula in Deuteronomy 26. King Agrippa, it is stated, once carried his Basket as others
Hive - ) A box, Basket, or other structure, for the reception and habitation of a swarm of honeybees
Car - ) The Basket, box, or cage suspended from a balloon to contain passengers, ballast, etc
Sower - seed to be drawn out by him from the seed Basket, Amos 9:13 margin) coming he shall come with rejoicing (joyous cry), bearing his sheaves"; the long continued sorrow and the consequent longer joy are happily expressed by the repetitions
Cram - To press or drive, particularly in filling or thrusting one thing into another to stuff to crowd to fill to superfluity as, to cram any thing into a Basket or bag to cram a room with people to cram victuals down the throat
Receptacle - ) That which serves, or is used, for receiving and containing something, as a Basket, a vase, a bag, a reservoir; a repository
Winnowing - This was accomplished in the open air, by throwing upthe grain with a shovel, or a fan (λίκνος, really a kind of shallow Basket); the wind carried away the chaff
Sale - A wicker Basket
Sower, Sowing - The sower held the vessel or Basket containing the seed in his left hand, while with his right he scattered the seed broadcast
Storehouse - There is no Scripture at all, nor suggestion, that all the money which is given by GOD's people should be put into one Basket to be spent by others
Aretas - 2 Corinthians 11:32; "in Damascus the governor ethnarch) under Aretas the king kept the city of the Damascenes with a garrison, desirous to apprehend me; and through a window in a Basket was I let down by the wall, and escaped his hands. The incidental way in which Paul alludes to Aretas' kingship over Damascus at the time of his escape from the ethnarch under him, by being let down in a Basket from a house on the city wall (compare Acts 9:23-25), is a strong presumption for the truth of the Acts and Second Epistle to Corinthians
First-Fruits - (Numbers 15:19,21 ) ...
The first-fruits of the land were to be brought in a Basket to the holy place of God's choice, and there presented to the priest, who was to set the Basket down before the altar
Cram - ) To press, force, or drive, particularly in filling, or in thrusting one thing into another; to stuff; to crowd; to fill to superfluity; as, to cram anything into a Basket; to cram a room with people
Fan - It was possibly a measure or Basket, in which to receive the grain
Scuttle - ) A broad, shallow Basket
Leap - ) A Basket
Rate - ) A frame or bed, or kind of Basket, of iron bars, for holding fuel while burning
Anthony, Saint - Patron of Hospitallers, domestic animals, butchers, brush-makers, Basket-makers, grave-diggers, and graveyards
Galley - The Latin word signifies a helmet,the top of a mast, and a galley and the name of this vessel seems to have been derived from the head-piece, or kind of Basket-work, at mast-head
Rate - ) A frame or bed, or kind of Basket, of iron bars, for holding fuel while burning
Philip (st.) And st. James' Day - Philip is variously represented; with a Basket in his hand;with two loaves and a cross; with a tall cross and book, etc
Nisroch - " Nisroch is apparently the eagle headed winged figure, with cone in one hand and Basket in the other, taken from the N
Upset - ) To turn upwards the outer ends of (stakes) so as to make a foundation for the side of a Basket or the like; also, to form (the side) in this manner
Willows - Another tradition makes Pope to have raised the first specimen from green twigs of a Basket sent to Lady Suffolk from Spain (Linnaean Transactions, 10:275)
Ephah - The vision of Zechariah 5:7 of a woman sitting in an ephah Basket contains the imaginative images of visions, for any ephah would be far too small for a woman to sit in
Leap - A Basket a weel for fish
Pad - ) A measure for fish; as, sixty mackerel go to a pad; a Basket of soles
Evidence: Experimental - Instead of reasoners, an old lady, carrying a Basket, wearing an ancient bonnet, and altogether dressed in an antique fashion, which marked both her age and her poverty, came upon the platform. Putting down her Basket and umbrella, she began and said, 'I paid threepence to hear of something better than Jesus Christ, and I have not heard it
Shoulder - ) To take upon the shoulder or shoulders; as, to shoulder a Basket; hence, to assume the burden or responsibility of; as, to shoulder blame; to shoulder a debt
Cradle - ) The Basket or apparatus in which, when a line has been made fast to a wrecked ship from the shore, the people are brought off from the wreck
That - That, as a demonstrative, may precede the noun to which it refers; as, that which he has said is true; those in the Basket are good apples
Basket - of open work, or rather 'baskets of white bread') Baskets on my head. In the distinct miracles of feeding the 5,000 and the 4,000 the KJV uses the stone term "baskets" for distinct Greek words. The kofinoi being twelve probably answers to the twelve disciples, a provision Basket for each, and so are likely to have been smaller
Firstfruits - According to Deuteronomy 26:1-11 , the offering was brought in a Basket to the sanctuary for presentation
Wear - An instrument or kind of Basket work for catching fish
Firstfruits - This offering may have been in the form of a cake made from the cereal, or in the form of a Basket of cereal or fruit (Numbers 15:17-21; Deuteronomy 26:2)
Mistakes: Our Aptness to Make - He happened to be the essence of gentleness and liberality, and seeing two very poor peasant women trudging along with huge empty Baskets strapped on their backs, he thought it would delight them if he dropped the bottle into one of their receptacles; a bottle being far more a godsend there than in England. Alas, for our friend's happiness during the whole of the next twenty-four hours! The motion of the carriage made him miss his aim, and the bottle fell on the head of the woman instead of into her Basket
Moses - When the baby could no longer be hidden, the mother constructed an ark, a Basket of bulrushes made waterproof with bitumen and pitch. She placed the child in the Basket and the Basket in the river. A sister stood watch over the Basket to know what might happen
Syria, Syrian - In connection with Rebekah the wife of Isaac, Laban (grandson of Nahor, Abraham's brother) 'the Syrian' is introduced, Genesis 25:20 ; Genesis 28:5 ; Genesis 31:20,24 ; and an Israelite, in presenting his Basket of first-fruits, was instructed to confess before the Lord, "A Syrian ready to perish was my father," followed by a rehearsal of what God had done for the descendants of Jacob, and how He had brought them into the promised land
Dove - ...
In art it is the emblem of the following saints, ...
Saint Agnes of Rome - woman with a dove holding a ring in its beak
Saint Ambrose of Milan
Blessed Ambrose Sansedoni of Siena - Dominican with a dove (the Holy Spirit) whispering in his ear as he preaches
Saint Augustine of Hippo
Saint Basil the Great - the dove is near the supernational fire that indicates descent of the Holy Spirit on Basil
Saint Colman of Lindisfarne - the name Colman means dove
Saint Colomba of Rieti - Dominican tertiary with a dove indicating the Holy Spirit
Saint Dathus - chosen as bishop when a dove descended on him and those present took it as a sign
Saint David of Wales - as proof of the truth of his preaching, a dove settled on his shoulder as he spoke
Saint Devota - as her martyred body was being taken home, a storm threatened to wreck the boat; a dove emerged from her mouth, and the storm stopped
Saint Dunstan of Canterbury - man writing with a dove (the Holy Spirit) nearby
Saint Eulalia of Merida
Pope Saint Fabian - chosen pope when a dove settled on his head and the people took it as a sign
Pope Saint Gregory the Great
Saint Ida of Herzfield - woman with a dove hovering over her head
Saint Ivo of Kermartin - lawyer surrounded by doves (the Holy Spirit)
Saint Joachim - elderly man carrying a Basket of doves
Saint John Chrysostom
Saint Oliva
Saint Oswald
Saint Remigius
Saint Scholastica - at her death, her brother, Saint Benedict of Nursia, saw her soul ascend to heaven as a dove
Saint Teresa of Avila - Carmelite nun with a dove (the Holy Spirit) nearby while she writes
Saint Thomas Aquinas - Dominican with a dove (the Holy Spirit) speaking in his ear as he writes
Pope Saint Zachary - with a dove and olive branch to indicate his work as a peace maker
Fill - Hence, to put or pour in, till the thing will hold no more as, to fill a Basket, a bottle, a vessel
Wall - Basket), so that the tradition has little value
Jehoshaphat - He enjoyed a great measure of peace and prosperity, the blessing of God resting on the people "in their Basket and their store
Bread - The loaves used to be taken to the oven in a Basket upon the head (Genesis 40:16), which exactly accords with Egyptian usage, men carrying burdens on their heads, women on their shoulders. The "white Baskets" may mean "baskets of white bread
High - This word indicates the “uppermost” (as opposed to the lower): “… I had three white Baskets on my head: And in the uppermost Basket there was of all manner of bakemeats …” ( Loaf - The Christian should go forth to the day's work with his bread Basket filled for the hungry
Damascus - He escaped from his enemies by being let down by the wall in a Basket
Damascus, Damascenes - Paul’s escape from conspirators by his being let down over the city wall in a Basket (q
Amos - Amos 7:1-9:10; Amos's visions of grasshoppers devouring the grass, and fire the land and deep, both removed by his intercession; the plumb line marking the buildings for destruction; Amaziah's interruption at Bethel, and foretold doom; the Basket of summer fruits marking Israel's end by the year's end; the Lord standing upon the altar, and commanding the lintel to be smitten, symbolizing Israel's destruction as a kingdom, but individually not one righteous man shall perish
Ark - arca , ‘a chest,’ is the rendering of two Hebrew words, of which one ( tçbhâh , probably a loan-word) is applied both to the Basket of bulrushes in which the infant Moses was exposed, and to the ark built by Noah (see Deluge)
the Man Which Sowed Good Seed in His Field But His Enemy Came And Sowed Tares Among the Wheat - And when the night fell he filled his seed-basket, and went out under cover of night and sowed the whole field over with his diabolical seed. You can with difficulty get a book of the past, and much less a magazine, or a journal, or a newspaper of the passing day, that is not all sown over with the author's own seed-basket; all sown over, now with partiality, and now with antipathy. Newman vindicates the study of the great classics-Greek, Latin, and English-in spite of the Basketfuls of impurity that are sown so broadcast in some of them. And in nothing more so than in Satan and his satanic seed-basket
Arts - For Basket-making, see article Basket
mo'Ses - Then his mother placed him in a small boat or Basket of papyrus, closed against the water by bitumen. She saw the Basket in the flags, and despatched divers, who brought it
Damascus - He had to escape from Damascus in a Basket to begin his ministry (2 Corinthians 11:32 )
Damascus - " The traditional localities of Acts 9:3; Acts 9:25; 2 Corinthians 11:33 (Paul's conversion on his way to Damascus, and his subsequent escape in a Basket let down from the wall) are more than doubtful
Supper - In keeping with Greek custom among certain gilds, each one brought with him his Basket of provisions, and these were spread indiscriminately before, and partaken of by, the company present as a corporate body
Damascus - see), the governor, by being lowered in a Basket over the wall ( Acts 9:25 , 2 Corinthians 11:32-33 ), and hither he returned after his Arabian retirement ( Galatians 1:17 )
Ark - In older English versions of the Bible, the word is used of Noah’s floating animal-house (Genesis 7:8-9), of the floating Basket made for the baby Moses by his parents (Exodus 2:3-5), and of the sacred box in the inner shrine of Israel’s tabernacle (Exodus 26:33)
Oil - These were pounded in a mortar, after which the pulp was poured into a Basket of rushes or wickerwork. Here it was placed in Baskets piled one above the other
Feeding the Multitudes - This is contrary to the text in all four of the Gospels, which unite in saying that twelve Baskets of fragments were taken up. Basket), thus virtually affirming the multiplication. The question of Jesus concerning the number of loaves, the remarkable circumstance that a second time the disciples had so little food with them, the seating of the people on the ground, the distribution to the Twelve for redistribution among the multitude, the eating until they were filled, the gathering of the broken pieces into Baskets, are suspiciously like the feeding of the 5000
Hold - Here is an empty Basket that holds two bushels
Bread - It appears, from some places in Scripture, (see Exodus 29:32 , and Numbers 6:15 :) that there was always near the altar a Basket full of bread, in order to be offered together with the ordinary sacrifices
Altar - They were presented in Baskets to the priest who set the Basket before the altar (Deuteronomy 26:2-4 )
Trade And Commerce - The corbita, or Basket-shaped vessel (from corbis, ‘basket’), was, as its name indicates, a much dumpier structure and a very heavy craft
Weights And Measures - The basic unit of dry measure was the ephah which means Basket
Amos - The visions are ( a ) the devouring locusts ( Amos 7:1-3 ); ( b ) the consuming fire ( Amos 7:4-6 ); ( c ) the plumb-line ( Amos 3:15 ); ( d ) the Basket of summer fruit ( Amos 8:1-3 ); ( e ) the smitten sanctuary, and destruction of the worshippers ( Amos 9:1-10 )
Work - The finished product of the worker is also known as ma‛ăśeh: “And in the uppermost Basket there was of all manner of bakemeats [6] for Pharaoh
Trade And Commerce - The corbita, or Basket-shaped vessel (from corbis, ‘basket’), was, as its name indicates, a much dumpier structure and a very heavy craft
Cup - ) speaks of ‘a wicker Basket’ and ‘a glass’ as in use for communion purposes
the Sower Who Went Forth to Sow - And it being now the seed-time of the year, as the sower that day sowed, some of the seed fell under the feet of the twelve disciples, while flocks of hungry birds swooped down and devoured whole Basketfuls of the sower's best sowing. The true preacher must put nothing else into his seed-basket every Sabbath morning, but the pure and unadulterated Word of God
Zechariah, Theology of - The prophet also sees iniquity and wickedness being transported from Judah to Babylon in the vision of the measuring Basket (5:5-11)
Agriculture - ...
The sower carries the seed in a Basket or bag, from which he scatters it broadcast
Balaam - Two or three inches of a sufficiently red rag drawn over a sufficiently sharp hook, and, with half an hour of a sufficiently strong and supple wrist, the fool is in your Basket
Paul - Then on their watching to kill him lie was "let down by the wall in a Basket," under Aretas (2 Corinthians 11:32; Galatians 1:15-18)
Paul - Knowing this, the disciples took him by night and let him down in a Basket from the wall
Rome - It was there that the Basket was found containing the twins Romulus and Remus, after it had been washed ashore by the Tiber
Art - Such descriptions bear out the general impression that the early Church made free use of whatever richness of art her opportunities could provide, though when necessity required she was content, as Jerome says, ‘to carry the body of Christ in a Basket of osiers and His blood in a cup of glass