What does Baali mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Baali
My lord, a title the prophet (Hosea 2:16 ) reproaches the Jewish church for applying to Jehovah, instead of the more endearing title Ishi, meaning "my husband."
Holman Bible Dictionary - Baali
(bay' uhl i) Form of address meaning, “my lord,” or “my Baal.” Hosea used a play on words to look to a day when Israel would no longer worship Baal (Hosea 2:16 ). He said Israel, the bride, would refer to Yahweh, her God and husband, as “my man” (Hebrew, ishi ) but not as “my lord” (Hebrew, baali ). Even though baal was a common word for lord or husband, Israel could not use it because it reminded them too easily of Baal, the Canaanite god. See Baal ; Canaan.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Baali
My idol; lord over me
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Baali
Israel had attributed to Baalim the blessings Jehovah had given them: Jehovah said He would strip them of those mercies to show them their folly. In the last days a remnant will be brought into the wilderness, and be spoken comfortably to. Self judgement will be the door of hope — (Valley of Achor). God will no longer be called 'my Master,' as the word Baali signifies, but 'Husband,' and He will take away the names of their idolatrous masters, Baalim, and they shall no more be remembered. Hosea 2:16 : cf. vers. 8,13,17.

Sentence search

Ishi - My husband, a symbolical name used in Hosea 2:16 (See Baali
Ishi (1) - ]'>[1] instead of Baali (‘my lord’)
Ishi - Ishi (ĭsh'î or î'shî), Hosea 2:16, signifying my husband, and Baali (bâ'al-î), in the same passage, signifying my Lord, are figuratively used to denote that Israel once played the whore in serving idols, but would now serve the living God
Baal (2) - "At that day, saith Jehovah, thou shalt call Me Ishi, and shalt call Me no more Baali. " Though both express "my husband," yet Baali by being used for the images of Baal whose name ought not to be taken up into the lips (Psalms 16:4), was to be renounced for the unambiguous Ishi
Baali - He said Israel, the bride, would refer to Yahweh, her God and husband, as “my man” (Hebrew, ishi ) but not as “my lord” (Hebrew, Baali )
Baali - Israel had attributed to Baalim the blessings Jehovah had given them: Jehovah said He would strip them of those mercies to show them their folly. God will no longer be called 'my Master,' as the word Baali signifies, but 'Husband,' and He will take away the names of their idolatrous masters, Baalim, and they shall no more be remembered
Ishi - Transliteration of Hosea's wordplay between “my man” or “my husband” (Hebrew, ishi ) and “my master” or “my lord” (Hebrew, Baali ) (Hosea 2:16 KJV, NAS)
Baal - And when more than a single idol is spoken of, the word is made plural, Baalim. "And it shall be in that day, saith the Lord, that thou shalt call me Ishi, and shalt call me no more Baali. For I will take away the names of Baalim out of her mouth. The reader will have a full apprehension of the grace and loving kindness of the Lord in this ordination, when he is told, that as the word Baal, Lord; or Baali, my lord, was a general name to imply lordship, or sovereignty: the Lord JEHOVAH had been considered as Israel's Baal, to distinguish him from the nations' Baal around
Husband - " Jehovah responds, "Thou shalt call me Ishi ," that is 'husband;' "and shalt call me no more Baali ," 'master
Tammuz - Adoni means my lord, like Baali
Ishi - ...
Let the reader first observe, that the prophet was commissioned to tell the church, that in the gospel-day, when the glorious Messiah, whom the church had been all along expecting, should come, the church should know the Lord by this name Ishi, my husband, or my man; and should drop the common name of Baali, my Lord: as if this was not sufficiently expressive of the nearness and dearness between them
Name - " (Exodus 23:13) And hence we find, in after-ages of the church, the Lord again interposing with his grace on this occasion, and saying: "And it shall be at that day, saith the Lord, that thou shalt call me Ishi, and shalt call me no more Baali; for I will take away the names of Baalim out of her mouth. " (Hosea 2:16-17) The Israelites were not only in danger from using the same name of Baali, which signifies Lord, as their idolatrous neighbours did, when speaking of their gods, but they had been upon numberless occasions infected also with their idolatry. Hence the Lord graciously promised, in this sweet and condescending Scripture, to remove the temptation to this sin, by taking the names of Baal and Baalim out of their mouths
Keilah - " All "the inhabitants of Keilah" probably did not join in the treachery against David, only the Baalites, Hebrew: Baali for "men" of Keilah (Joshua 15:11-12), i
Baal (1) - BAAL (BAALI, BaaliM)
Hosea - She will be able to call Jehovah Ishi , 'husband,' and not Baali , 'master
Song of Solomon - " This declaration is associated with a day when she will call Jehovah Ishi (that is, husband), and shall no more call Him Baali (that is, master)
Idol - Hosea 2:16-17; "thou shalt call Me Ishi (my Husband, the term of affection), no more Baali" (my Lord, the term of rule, defiled by its application to Baal, whose name ought never to be on their lips: Exodus 23:13; Zechariah 13:2), etc
Gods, Pagan - Fifty-eight times Baal is used as a divine name in the singular, but eighteen times it appears in the plural form (RSV “Baalim,” NIV “Baals”). While the Hebrew word baal was not in itself considered pagan, perhaps its use as a divine title in Canaanite religion is behind God's rejection of the appellation Baali, “my master” (Hosea 2:16-17 ). A great deal of syncretism must have occurred, mixing elements of Baalism with worship of God. ” Baalism reached its peak in the northern nation of Israel under King Ahab and his wife Jezebel who aggressively sponsored worship of Baal in Samaria (1618647312_18 )