What does Baal mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
הַבַּ֔עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 14
הַבַּ֖עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 6
הַבַּ֗עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 4
בָּ֑עַל a town on the river Arnon in Moab. 4
הַבָּ֑עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 3
לַבָּֽעַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 3
הַבַּ֜עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 3
לַבָּ֑עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 3
הַבָּֽעַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 3
חָנָ֖ן an early king of Edom. / one of David’s officers 3
לַבַּ֗עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 3
אֶשְׁבָּֽעַל the fourth son of Saul 2
פְּע֑וֹר the deity worshipped at Peor with probable licentious rites. 2
זְב֖וּב a Philistine deity worshipped at Ekron. 2
פְּרָצִים֮ the site of a victory of David over the Philistines 2
פְּרָצִֽים the site of a victory of David over the Philistines 2
בַבַּ֔עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 2
גָּד֙ a city noted for Baal-worship 2
לַבַּ֖עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 2
וּבַ֥עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 2
מְעֽוֹן a city in the territory of Reuben. 2
הַבַּ֙עַל֙ supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 2
לַבַּ֔עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 2
מְע֖וֹן a town in Reuben 1
מְע֛וֹן a town in Reuben 1
בַּ֗עַל a city on the northern boundary of Judah and on the western and southern boundaries of Benjamin. 1
פְּע֔וֹר the deity worshipped at Peor with probable licentious rites. 1
פְּע֗וֹר the deity worshipped at Peor with probable licentious rites. 1
בַ֖עַל another name for Mephibosheth. 1
בַּ֖עַל another name for Mephibosheth. 1
פְּעֽוֹר the deity worshipped at Peor with probable licentious rites. 1
חֶרְמ֛וֹן a city near or on Mount Hermon 1
בָּ֖עַל a place in which dwelt Arabians; probably lying between Palestine and the Arabian peninsula. 1
צְפֹ֔ן a place in Egypt near the Red Sea where Pharaoh and his army were destroyed during the Exodus. 1
צְפֹֽן a place in Egypt near the Red Sea where Pharaoh and his army were destroyed during the Exodus. 1
צְפ֑וֹן a place in Egypt near the Red Sea where Pharaoh and his army were destroyed during the Exodus. 1
שָׁלִ֗שָׁה a place in Ephraim near Gilgal. 1
תָּמָ֑ר a place near Gibeah in Benjamin. 1
חֶרְמ֔וֹן a city near or on Mount Hermon 1
βάαλ the supreme male divinity of the Phoenician and Canaanitish nations 1
חָצ֖וֹר a town on the border between Ephraim and Benjamin 1
בַּבָּ֑עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 1
בַּ֔עַל a town on the river Arnon in Moab. 1
בַּ֥עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 1
הַ֠בַּעַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 1
הַבַּ֣עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 1
הַבַּ֡עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 1
לַבַּ֣עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 1
בַּבַּ֖עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 1
בַּבָּֽעַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 1
חָנָ֣ן an early king of Edom. / one of David’s officers 1
؟ לַבַּ֗עַל supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites. / a Reubenite. / the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul. / a town of Simeon 1
בְּרִ֖ית a god of the Philistines. 1
בְּרִ֑ית a god of the Philistines. 1
גָּ֔ד a city noted for Baal-worship 1
הָמ֔וֹן the site of Solomon’s vineyard. 1
זְבוּב֙ a Philistine deity worshipped at Ekron. 1
זְבוּב֮ a Philistine deity worshipped at Ekron. 1
חָנָ֔ן an early king of Edom. / one of David’s officers 1
בַּ֙עַל֙ a city on the northern boundary of Judah and on the western and southern boundaries of Benjamin. 1

Definitions Related to Baal

H1168


   1 supreme male divinity of the Phoenicians or Canaanites.
   2 a Reubenite.
   3 the son of Jehiel and grandfather of Saul.
   4 a town of Simeon, probably identical to Baalath-beer.
   Additional Information: Baal = “lord”.
   

H1188


   1 the site of a victory of David over the Philistines, and of a great destruction of their images; also called ‘Mount Perazim’.
   Additional Information: Baal-perazim = “lord of the breaks”.
   

H1177


   1 an early king of Edom.
   2 one of David’s officers, a Gederite, who had the superintendence of his olive and sycamore plantations.
   Additional Information: Baal-hanan = “Baal is gracious”.
   

H1176


   1 a Philistine deity worshipped at Ekron.
   Additional Information: Baal-zebub = “lord of the fly”.
   

H4807


   1 another name for Mephibosheth.
      1a son of Jonathan and grandson of Saul.
      Additional Information: Merib-Baal = “Baal is my advocate”.
      

H792


   1 the fourth son of Saul, also called Ishbosheth.
   Additional Information: Eshbaal = “a man of Baal”.
   

H1187


   1 the deity worshipped at Peor with probable licentious rites.
   Additional Information: Baal-peor = “lord of the gap”.
   

H1171


   1 a city noted for Baal-worship, located at the most northern or northwestern point to which Joshua’s victories extended.
   Additional Information: Baal-gad = “lord of fortune”.
   

H1186


   1 a town in Reuben, mentioned in connection with Nebo, and in the time of Ezekiel, Moabite.
   Additional Information: Baal-meon = “lord of the habitation”.
   

H7154


   1 a city on the northern boundary of Judah and on the western and southern boundaries of Benjamin.
      1a also ‘Kirjath-jearim’ and ‘Baalah’.
      Additional Information: Kirjath-Baal = “city of Baal”.
      

H1120


   1 a town on the river Arnon in Moab.
   Additional Information: Bamoth = “high places” or “great high place”.
   

H1193


   1 a place near Gibeah in Benjamin.
   Additional Information: Baal-tamar = “lord of the palms”.
   

H1179


   1 a city near or on Mount Hermon, named as a seat of Baal worship.
   Additional Information: Baal-hermon or Baal-chermon = “lord of destruction”.
   

H1170


   1 a god of the Philistines.
   Additional Information: Baal-berith = “lord of the covenant”.
   

H1189


   1 a place in Egypt near the Red Sea where Pharaoh and his army were destroyed during the Exodus.
   Additional Information: Baal Tsphon or Baal-zephon = “lord of the north”.
   

H1174


   1 the site of Solomon’s vineyard.
   Additional Information: Baal-hamon = “lord (possessor) of abundance”.
   

H4810


   1 another name for Mephibosheth.
      1a son of Jonathan and grandson of Saul.
      Additional Information: Merib-Baal = “Baal is my advocate”.
      

H1485


   1 a place in which dwelt Arabians; probably lying between Palestine and the Arabian peninsula.
   Additional Information: Gur-Baal = “dwelling of Baal”.
   

H1190


   1 a place in Ephraim near Gilgal.
   Additional Information: Baal-shalisha = “thrice-great lord”.
   

H1178


   1 a town on the border between Ephraim and Benjamin, apparent location of a sheep farm of Absalom and location of Amnon’s murder.
   Additional Information: Baal-hazor = “lord of the village”.
   

G896


   1 the supreme male divinity of the Phoenician and Canaanitish nations, as Ashtoreth was their supreme female divinity.
   Additional Information: Baal = “lord”.
   

Frequency of Baal (original languages)

Frequency of Baal (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Baal-Hazor
(bay' uhl-hay' zawr) Place name meaning “Baal of Hazor.” Village where David's son Absalom held celebration of sheepshearing (2 Samuel 13:23 ). During festivities, Absalom had his employees kill his brother Amnon, who had violated his sister Tamar. The village is modern Jebel Asur, five miles northeast of Bethel.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Baal-Hermon
(bay' uhl-huhr mahn) Place name meaning, “Baal of Hermon” or “lord of Hermon.” A mountain and village Israel could not take from the Hivites, whom God left to test Israel (Judges 3:3 ). It marked the Hivites' southern border and Manasseh's northern border (1 Chronicles 5:23 ). Its location is unknown. Some would equate it with Baal-gad. Others, modern Baneas or Caesarea Philippi.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Gur-Baal
(guhr-bay' uhl) Place name meaning, “foreign sojourner of Baal” or “young animal of Baal.” An Arabian or bedouin city which God helped King Uzziah of Judah (792-740 B.C.) attack (2 Chronicles 26:7 ). Greek manuscript evidence does not have Baal in the name. This would mean the city was Gur, also mentioned in the Amarna letters and situated east of Beersheba. Other scholars would identify the town with Jagur (Joshua 15:21 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Merib-Baal
Contender with Baal, (1 Chronicles 8:34 ; 9:40 ), elsewhere called Mephibosheth (2 Samuel 4:4 ), the son of Jonathan.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Baal-Zebub
So called from Baal, lord, and Zebub, a fly. And this was the ridiculous idol worshipped at Ekron, to whom Ahaziah, king of Israel, sent to enquire concerning his recovery from a fall he had from his terrace. (See 2 Kings 1:2-3) How very sadly this weak prince answered to his name! The man that was called Ahaziah should have had better views of the Lord, Achaz and Jah, meant, vision of the Lord. Whereas, his was a vision of folly! The Egyptians, it should seem, as well as the being near neighbours, paid divine to this contemptible idol. It is possible, the folly of this idolatry might take its rise from the plague of the flies, which Egypt suffered on account of Israel. (See Exodus 8:20, etc.) But it said also by historians, that the rivers of Egypt abound with flies whose sting is very painful. It is worthy remark, that the name of this idol changed only from Baal-zebub in Hebrew, to Beel-zebub in Greek, was given to the devil, in the days of our Lord's ministry upon earth. It doth not appear that was worshipped at that time; but it is evident so generally known and acknowledged by this name, that the Pharisees made use of it as a well known, and in a daring blasphemy, the miracles of the Lord Jesus to his power (See Matthew 12:24)
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Baal-Zephon
Some have thought that this was only the name of a place. And some have concluded that it was the name of an idol. The words together may be read, the lord of secret, meaning one that inspects, and discovers what is hidden. One thing however is certain concerning it, that it was over against Baal-zephon, the Lord directed Israel to encamp, when the Egyptians were pursuing them after their departure from Egypt. I beg the reader to consult the Scripture concerning it, (Exodus 14:2) Piha-hiroth it should seem was so called, because it formed the mouth or gullet of entrance to the sea. And Migdol, which means a tower, was a watch-place, where it is probable that this idol was placed to watch, or pretend to watch, at the extremity of the kingdom of Egypt, on this part to the sea, by way of deterring runaway servants, or slaves, like Israel, from attempting their escape. It was in this very spot, as if, at once, to shew Israel the folly of such ridiculous idols; and to shew Egypt of what little avail their dunghill deities were; Israel was commanded to encamp, from whence they should behold the arm of the Lord displayed for their deliverance, and at the same time Egypt's destruction. (See Exodus 12:12, etc. Numbers 32:4)
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Eth-Baal
With Baal, a king of Sidon (B.C. 940-908), father of Jezebel, who was the wife of Ahab (1 Kings 16:31 ). He is said to have been also a priest of Astarte, whose worship was closely allied to that of Baal, and this may account for his daughter's zeal in promoting idolatry in Israel. This marriage of Ahab was most fatal to both Israel and Judah. Dido, the founder of Carthage, was his granddaughter.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Baal Perazim
"lord of breaches", where Jehovah broke forth on David's enemies, the Philistines, as a breach ("bursting forth") of waters (2 Samuel 5:20; 1 Chronicles 14:11). Compare Isaiah 28:21, "Mount Perazim"; once the idol Baal's high place, henceforth it was to be noted for Jehovah's bursting forth on David's idolatrous foes.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Esh-Baal
("Baal's man".) Saul's youngest son (1 Chronicles 8:33; 1 Chronicles 9:39); Bosheth ("shame") being substituted for Baal through the believing Israelites' contempt of idols, Ishbosheth is its equivalent (Isaiah 44:9, etc.; Hosea 9:10),
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Baal Hazor
("Baal's village".) A Canaanite idol sanctuary on the borders of Ephraim and Benjamin. There Absalom had his sheep farm, and invited all David's sons to feast at his sheepshearing, and killed Amnon (2 Samuel 13:23).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Bamoth-Baal
("high places of Baal.") (Joshua 13:17, called "Bamoth in the valley" Numbers 21:20; Numbers 22:41.) Baal Meon or Beth Baal Meon was near, sacred to the same idol. Bajith, "the temple," in close proximity to Bamoth, "high places:" Isaiah 15:2.) (See BAJITH.) Beth Bamoth occurs on the Moabite stone. Mesha says, on the stone, he rebuilt Beth Bamoth, it having been probably destroyed in the struggles between Moab and Reuben or Gad. Israel's halt at Bamoth is identical with that in Numbers 33:45, connected with Dibon Gad, for Dibon and Bamoth Baal were near (Joshua 13:17). Bamoth was "in the valley" or ravine (Numbers 21:20). In the wady Waleh, two miles N. of Dibon, a detached knoll on the right bank of the rivulet contains a quadrangle of rude stones put together without cement; this was one of the Bamoth or high places; others, whence Balsam could have seen Israel, were probably to the W., where are the ruins Keraum Abu el Hossein, or on jebel Attarus.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Baal Tamar
("lord of a palm tree".) (Judges 20:33), near Gibeah of Benjamin. Deborah's palm tree (Judges 4:4) was between Ramah and Bethel, in this neighborhood. The battle at Baal Tamar was prior to her time, 1406 B.C.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Baal Shalisha
("lord of Shalisha".) (2 Kings 4:42; 1 Samuel 9:4). Not far from Gilgal, Baith Sarisain the Septuagint. The Onomasticon places it about 15 Roman miles N. of Lydda (Diospolis). The ruin Sirisia exactly corresponds to this; the fellahin often interchange "l" and "r." It lies in the low district, where, as the Talmud says, the fruits ripen early.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Baal Meon
("owner of an habitation".) Reuben in occupying it along with Nebo (Numbers 32:38) changed the names, probably for the idol name Baal substituting Beth Meon. Ezekiel (Ezekiel 25:9) calls it a city on Moab's frontiers, and with Beth-jeshimoth and Kiriathaim, "the glory of the country." The reputed birthplace of Elisha. Jerome describes it as a very large village, nine miles from Heshbon. The famous Moabite stone of Dibon mentions that as Omri made Medeba a military center for opposing Moab, so Mesha occupied Baal Meon as his center for assailing Israel; "I Mesha, son of Kamos (Chemosh), fortified Baal Meon, and I besieged and took Kiriathaim and Nebo," etc.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Baal-Hamon
("the owner of a multitude".) Tthe sun god, and a city where Solomon had a vineyard with a multitude of vines. In Mount Ephraim, not far N. of Samaria (compare Isaiah 28:1; Song of Solomon 8:11).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Esh-Baal
(ehssh-bay' uhl) Personal name meaning, “man of Baal.” Son of Saul, the first king of Israel (1 Chronicles 8:33 ; 1 Chronicles 9:39 ). In 2 Samuel 2:8 the name is Ish-bosheth, “man of shame,” apparently an intentional corruption in the Hebrew tradition to avoid the name of the Canaanite god and to characterize the person with such a name. 1 Samuel 14:49 lists Ishui or Ishvi as Saul's son, possibly another way of respelling the name to avoid Baal. In Saul's day “baal” may have been a title applied to Yahweh indicating, “He is Lord or Master.” In this case Esh-baal would mean, “the man of the Lord.” Otherwise, Saul's name for his son would seem to indicate some devotion to the Canaanite god Baal at the period in his life when he named the son. Saul's son Jonathan named his son Merib-baal. See Ish-bosheth ; Ishvi ; Merib-baal; Jonathan .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Eth-Baal
(ehth- bay' uhl) Personal name meaning, “with him is Baal.” King of Sidon and father of Jezebel (1 Kings 16:31 ), who married Jeroboam II, king of Israel (793-753 B.C.). Through her influence Baal worship pervaded the Northern Kingdom. See Jezebel .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Beth Baal Meon
(See BAALMEON.) On the downs or "plain" E. of Jordan (Joshua 13:17), in Reuben. Contracted into Been (Numbers 32:3; Numbers 32:38), Bethmeon in Jeremiah 48:23. Now the ruin called "the fortress of Miun," S.W. of Hesban, in the wady Zerka Maein.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Baal Gad
A Canaanite sanctuary of Baal, as "the lord of fortune." The N.W. limit of Joshua's victories, as Hamath was the N.E. limit (Joshua 11:17; Joshua 12:7; Joshua 13:5). "Under mount Hermon, in the valley of Lebanon," still retaining the Hebrew name for "the valley," 'el buka , between Lebanon and Antilebanon. Probably now Banias, at the fountain which is one of the Jordan's sources, formerly a sanctuary of Pan. Baalbek ("the city of the sun") is situated too far N. at the lowest declivity of Antilibanus to be identified with Baal.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Baal (3)
A town of Simeon (1 Chronicles 4:33), identical with BAALATH BEER (Joshua 19:8), i.e. "Baal of the well", "holy well". Also called RAMATH (NEGEB, "the heights (Ramath) of the S." (Negeb), a parched region (Joshua 19:8).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Baal (2)
BAAL as applied to places. It sometimes refers to Baal's worship there; sometimes it means that the place possesses some attribute denoted by the other part of the compound. It is a Canaanite not Hebrew term: applied to the men of Jericho while Canaanites (1 Samuel 23:11-1269), "the men (baliy , possessors, occupants) of Jericho." Also "the men (baliy , occupants) of Shechem," the ancient city of the Hivite Hamor (Judges 9:2-51); the occupants of Keilah, bordering on pagandom (1618648017_7); Uriah the Hittite; "lords of the pagan" (Isaiah 16:8).
So strong was Israelite orthodox feeling against the name, that they altered names in which it occurred: Jerubbaal into Jerubbesheth, Merib-baal into Mephibosheth: compare Hosea 2:16. "At that day, saith Jehovah, thou shalt call Me Ishi, and shalt call Me no more Baali." Though both express "my husband," yet Baali by being used for the images of Baal whose name ought not to be taken up into the lips (Psalms 16:4), was to be renounced for the unambiguous Ishi.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Baal-Perazim
Baal having rents, bursts, or destructions, the scene of a victory gained by David over the Philistines (2 Samuel 5:20 ; 1 Chronicles 14:11 ). Called Mount Perazim (Isaiah 28:21 ). It was near the valley of Rephaim, west of Jerusalem. Identified with the modern Jebel Aly.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Baal-Zephon
Baal of the north, an Egyptian town on the shores of the Gulf of Suez (Exodus 14:2 ; Numbers 33:7 ), over against which the children of Israel encamped before they crossed the Red Sea. It is probably to be identified with the modern Jebel Deraj or Kulalah, on the western shore of the Gulf of Suez. Baal-zapuna of the Egyptians was a place of worship.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Baal-Berith
Covenant lord, the name of the god worshipped in Shechem after the death of Gideon (Judges 8:33 ; 9:4 ). In 9:46 he is called simply "the god Berith." The name denotes the god of the covenant into which the Israelites entered with the Canaanites, contrary to the command of Jehovah (Exodus 34:12 ), when they began to fall away to the worship of idols.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Baal-Zebub
Fly-lord, the god of the Philistines at Ekron (2 Kings 1:2,3,16 ). This name was given to the god because he was supposed to be able to avert the plague of flies which in that region was to be feared. He was consulted by Ahaziah as to his recovery.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Baal-Hazor
Having a courtyard, or Baal's village, the place on the borders of Ephraim and Benjamin where Absalom held the feast of sheep-shearing when Amnon was assassinated (2 Samuel 13:23 ). Probably it is the same with Hazor (Nehemiah 11:33 ), now Tell' Asur, 5 miles north-east of Bethel.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Bamoth-Baal
Heights of Baal, a place on the river Arnon, or in the plains through which it flows, east of Jordan (Joshua 13:17 ; Compare Numbers 21:28 ). It has been supposed to be the same place as Bamoth.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Baal Zephon
In Egypt, where Israel encamped before Pharaoh overtook them at the Red Sea (Ezekiel 14:2; Ezekiel 14:9; Numbers 33:7), W. of the gulf of Suez, below its head. Migdol and Baal Zephon were opposite one another, Baal Zephon being behind Pihahiroh in relation to the Israelites. Gesenius explains the name is sacred to Typhon; others from the root tsaphah , "to watch" equating to "watchtower," as Migdol also means "tower."
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Baal Hermon
Judges 3:3; 1 Chronicles 5:23 (translate Baal Hermon, even Senir, even Mount Hermon.") The mountain had three names (Deuteronomy 3:9); Baal Hermon was probably one used among the Phoenician worshippers of Baal, whose sanctuary Baal Gad was at the base of the mountain. (See BAAL GAD.)
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Baal-Meon
Lord of dwelling, a town of Reuben (Numbers 32:38 ), called also Beth-meon (Jeremiah 48:23 ) and Beth-baal-meon (Joshua 13:17 ). It is supposed to have been the birth-place of Elisha. It is identified with the modern M'ain, about 3 miles south-east of Heshbon.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Baal-Gad
Lord of fortune, or troop of Baal, a Canaanite city in the valley of Lebanon at the foot of Hermon, hence called Baal-hermon (Judge 3:3; 1 Chronicles 5:23 ), near the source of the Jordan (Joshua 13:5 ; 11:17 ; 12:7 ). It was the most northern point to which Joshua's conquests extended. It probably derived its name from the worship of Baal. Its modern representative is Banias. Some have supposed it to be the same as Baalbec.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Baal-Hanan
Lord of grace.
A king of Edom, son of Achbor (Genesis 36:38,39 ; 1 Chronicles 1:49,50 ).
An overseer of "the olive trees and sycomore trees in the low plains" (the Shephelah) under David (1 Chronicles 27:28 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Baal-Hermon
Lord of Hermon.
A city near Mount Hermon inhabited by the Ephraimites (1 Chronicles 5:23 ). Probably identical with Baal-gad (Joshua 11:17 ).
A mountain east of Lebanon (Judges 3:3 ). Probably it may be the same as Mount Hermon, or one of its three peaks.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Baal-Tamar
Lord of palm trees, a place in the tribe of Benjamin near Gibeah of Saul (Judges 20:33 ). It was one of the sanctuaries or groves of Baal. Probably the palm tree of Deborah (Judges 4:5 ) is alluded to in the name.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Baal-Shalisha
Lord of Shalisha, a place from which a man came with provisions for Elisha, apparently not far from Gilgal (2 Kings 4:42 ). It has been identified with Sirisia, 13 miles north of Lydda.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Baal-Peor
Lord of the opening, a god of the Moabites (Numbers 25:3 ; 31:16 ; Joshua 22:17 ), worshipped by obscene rites. So called from Mount Peor, where this worship was celebrated, the Baal of Peor. The Israelites fell into the worship of this idol (Numbers 25:3,5,18 ; Deuteronomy 4:3 ; Psalm 106:28 ; Hosea 9:10 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Baal
Lord.
The name appropriated to the principal male god of the Phoenicians. It is found in several places in the plural BAALIM (Judges 2:11 ; 10:10 ; 1 Kings 18:18 ; Jeremiah 2:23 ; Hosea 2:17 ). Baal is identified with Molech (Jeremiah 19:5 ). It was known to the Israelites as Baal-peor (Numbers 25:3 ; Deuteronomy 4:3 ), was worshipped till the time of Samuel (1 Samuel 7:4 ), and was afterwards the religion of the ten tribes in the time of Ahab (1 Kings 16:31-33 ; 18:19,22 ). It prevailed also for a time in the kingdom of Judah (2 Kings 8:27 ; comp 11:18; 16:3; 2 Chronicles 28:2 ), till finally put an end to by the severe discipline of the Captivity (Zephaniah 1:4-6 ). The priests of Baal were in great numbers (1 Kings 18:19 ), and of various classes (2 Kings 10:19 ). Their mode of offering sacrifices is described in 1 Kings 18:25-29 . The sun-god, under the general title of Baal, or "lord," was the chief object of worship of the Canaanites. Each locality had its special Baal, and the various local Baals were summed up under the name of Baalim, or "lords." Each Baal had a wife, who was a colourless reflection of himself.
A Benjamite, son of Jehiel, the progenitor of the Gibeonites (1 Chronicles 8:30 ; 9:36 ).
The name of a place inhabited by the Simeonites, the same probably as Baal-ath-beer (1 Chronicles 4:33 ; Joshua 19:8 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Baal-Hamon
Place of a multitude, a place where Solomon had an extensive vineyard (Song of Solomon 8:11 ). It has been supposed to be identical with Baal-gad, and also with Hammon in the tribe of Asher (Joshua 19:28 ). Others identify it with Belamon, in Central Palestine, near Dothaim.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Baal (1)
The chief male deity, as Ashtoreth is the chief goddess, of the Canaanites and Phoenicians. Baalim, the plural form, expresses the various aspects of Baal, as different localities viewed him. Baal is also associated with Aaherah, inaccurately translated "THE GROVE" or "groves" (Judges 3:7; 2 Chronicles 33:3; 2 Chronicles 34:4; 2 Kings 23:5-6). (See ASHERAH.) Baal means lord, in the sense of owner, possessor; but Αdown means lord, master. The Hebrew article distinguishes the proper name Baal from the common noun; Bel, the Babylonian idol (Isaiah 46:1), is related. Midian and Moab, as early as Moses' time, tempted Israel, by Balaam's devilish counsel (Revelation 2:14; Joshua 13:22; Numbers 25:18), to worship the phase of the deity called Baal-peor (Numbers 25), from peor , "aperire hymenem virgineum " corresponding to the Latin, Ρriapus .
Terrible licentiousness not only was sanctioned, but formed part of the worship. A plague from Jehovah destroyed 24,000 Israelites in consequence, and was only stopped by the zeal of Phinehas. Moses subsequently, when warning the people from this example, notices no circumstance of it but one, which, though in the original narrative not stated, was infinitely the most important to advert to, but which none but spectators of the fact, perfectly acquainted with every individual concerned in it, could possibly feel the truth of. "Your eyes have seen what Jehovah did because of Baal-peor, for all the men that followed Baal-peor the Lord thy God hath destroyed them from among you. But ye that did cleave unto the Lord your God are alive every one of you this day" (Deuteronomy 4:3). For Moses to have used this argument was extremely natural but if a forger had asserted this at hazard, and put it in Moses' mouth it seems very strange that it is the only circumstance he should forget to notice in the direct narrative, and the only one he should notice in his reference to it (Graves, Pentateuch, 1:4).
Baal worship prevailed much in Israel, except during Gideon's judgeship (hence called Jerubbaal, "let Baal plead"), up to Samuel's time (Judges 2:10-13; Judges 6:26-32; Judges 8:33; Judges 10:6-10). At Samuel's reproof they put away this worship (1 Samuel 7:4). Solomon brought back Ashtoreth worship to please his foreign wives. Ahab, king of Israel, under Jezebel's influence (daughter of Ethbaal, priest of Baal and king of Zidon), established the worship of Baal and Asherah ("the groves"): 1 Kings 16:31-33; 1 Kings 18:19-22. Elijah successfully for a time resisted it. His influence and that of king Jehoshaphat produced its effect in the following reign and that of Jehu. It was laid aside for Jeroboam's calves, under Jehoram, Ahab's son (2 Kings 3:2), and under Jehu (2 Kings 10:28); but for the most part prevailed until the Lord in vengeance removed the ten tribes from their land (2 Kings 17:16).
Baal worship also in Judah found entrance under Ahaz (2 Chronicles 28:2-3), but was suppressed by Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:4). Manasseh sought to bring Judah to the same state of Baal worship as Israel had been under Ahab (2 Kings 21:3; compare Micah 6:16). Josiah made a thorough eradication of it (2 Kings 23:4-14). A remnant of it and an effort to combine idolatry with Jehovah worship still in part survived until the final purgation of all tendency to idols was effected by the severe discipline of the Babylonian captivity (Zephaniah 1:4-6). The Hebrew for "Sodomites" (1 Kings 14:24; 1 Kings 15:12; 1 Kings 22:46; 2 Kings 23:7) is qideshim , "those consecrated" to the vilest filthiness, which constituted part of the sacred worship! Flat roofs at Jerusalem were often used as altars (Jeremiah 32:29).
"Standing images," or possibly pillars or obelisks (matsebah ) were his symbols (1 Kings 14:23; 2 Kings 18:4; 2 Kings 23:14; Micah 5:13). "Sun images" (hammanim ; Isaiah 17:8; Isaiah 27:9; 2 Chronicles 34:4) "were on high above the altars" of Baal (Jeremiah 43:13); "the images of Bethshemesh," literally "the pillars (obelisks) of the house of the sun." At Tyre one title was Malqereth "King of the city." In a Maltese inscription, Melkart, lord of Tyre, is identified with "Hercules, the prince leader" of the Greeks; from melek "king," and qereth "of the city." Tyre's colonies (Carthage, etc.) honored Melkart, the god of the mother city; the name appears in Hamilcar. An inscription at Palmyra names him Baal Shemesh, owner of the sun. Philo says his title among the Phoenicians was Beelsamen (shamain), "owner of the heavens."
Plautus also in his Poenulus calls him Bal-samen. Contrast Melchizedek's title for Jehovah, "Possessor Qoneh ; not Βaal of heaven and earth" (Genesis 14:19). High places were chosen for Baal worship, and human victims were sometimes offered as burnt offerings (Jeremiah 19:5). The worshippers wore peculiar vestments (2 Kings 10:22). They gashed themselves with knives at times to move his pity (1 Kings 18:26-28). The name appears in Asdrubal ("help of Baal"), Hannibal ("grace of Baal"), Adherbaal, Ethbaal. His generating, vivifying power is symbolized by the sun (2 Kings 23:5), as Ashtoreth is by the moon, Venus, and the heavenly hosts.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Baal-Berith
Worshipped at Shechem by Israel after Gideon's death (Judges 8:33; Judges 9:4) "Baal in covenant", namely, with his worshippers; or perhaps a compromise, to combine Baal with the "covenant" of Jehovah.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Beth-Baal-Meon
(behth-bay' uhl-mee' ahn) Place name meaning, “house of Baal's residence.” City allotted tribe of Reuben (Joshua 13:17 ). Same as Baal-meon. See Baal-meon .
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Baal
See Gods and Goddesses, Pagan
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Baal-Zebub
See Gods and Goddesses, Pagan
Webster's Dictionary - Baal
(1):
(n.) The supreme male divinity of the Phoenician and Canaanitish nations.
(2):
(n.) The whole class of divinities to whom the name Baal was applied.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Bamoth-Baal
(ba' muhth- bay' uhl) Place name meaning, “high places of Baal.” Mesha, king of Moab about 830 B.C., mentioned it in the Moabite stone. Numbers 22:41 speaks of Bamoth or high places of Baal near the Arnon River. There Balak and Balaam could see all Israel. Joshua 13:17 lists it as a city Moses gave the tribe of Reuben. It may be modern gebel Atarus.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Mount Baal-Hermon
(bay' uhl huhr' muhn) A variant name for Mount Hermon (Judges 3:3 ), perhaps indicating its use as a worship place for Baal.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Baal-Berith
(bay' uhl-beerihth) In Judges 8:33 , a Canaanite deity whom the Israelites began to worship following the death of Gideon. The name means “lord of covenant,” and the god's temple was located at Shechem. The precise identity of this deity cannot be determined. The designation, “lord of covenant,” may mean that a covenant between the Israelites and the Shechemites was agreed to and annually renewed in his shrine. See Shechem .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Baal-Gad
(bay' uhl-gad) Place name meaning, “Baal of Gad” or “lord of Gad.” Town representing northern limit of Joshua's conquests (Joshua 11:17 ) in Valley of Lebanon at foot of Mount Hermon. It has been variously located at modern Hasbeya and at Baalbek, over 50 miles east of Beirut where imposing ruins of Greek and Roman worship remain.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Baal-Hamon
(bay' uhl-hay' mohn) Place name meaning, “lord of abundance.” Location of Solomon's vineyard according to Song of Song of Solomon 8:11 .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Baal-Hanan
(bay' uhl-hay' nan) Personal name meaning, “Baal was gracious.” 1. King of Edom prior to any king ruling in Israel (Genesis 36:38 ). 2 . Official under David in charge of olive and sycamore trees growing in Judean plain or Shephalah (1 Chronicles 27:28 ).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Baal-Meon
(bay' uhl-mee' uhn) Place name meaning, “lord of the residence” or “Baal of the residence.” City tribe of Reuben built east of Jordan (Numbers 32:36 ), probably on the tribe's northern border. Mesha, king of Moab about 830 B.C., claims to have rebuilt Baal-meon, meaning he had captured it from Israel at that date. Ezekiel 25:9 pronounces judgment on Baal-meon as a city of Moab about the time of the Exile in 587. Baal-meon is located at modern Main, ten miles southwest of Heshbon and ten miles east of the Dead Sea.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Baal-Peor
(bay' uhl-pee' ohr) In Numbers 25:3 , a Moabite deity that the Israelites worshiped when they had illicit sexual relations with Moabite women. The guilty Israelites were severely punished for this transgression, and the incident became a paradigm of sin and divine judgment for later generations of Israelites (Deuteronomy 4:3 ; Psalm 106:28 ; Hosea 9:10 ). See Moab; Peor .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Baal-Perazim
(bay' uhl-pehr' uh zim) Place name meaning, “Lord of the breakthroughs” or “Baal of the breaches.” Place of David's initial victory over the Philistines after he became king of all Israel at Hebron, then captured and moved to Jerusalem (2 Samuel 5:20 ). The location is not known. It is probably identical with Mount Perazim (Isaiah 28:21 ).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Baal-Shalishah
(bay' uhl-sshal' ih' sshah) Place name meaning, “Baal of Shalishah” or “lord of Shalishah.” Home of unnamed man who brought firstfruits to Elisha, who used them to feed a hundred men (2 Kings 4:42-44 ). The “land of Shalishah” was evidently in the tribal territory of Ephraim (1 Samuel 9:4 ). Baal-shalishah may be modern Kefr Thilth, twenty miles southwest of Shechem. See Shalishah.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Baal-Tamar
(bay' uhl-tay' mahr) Place name meaning, “Baal of the palm tree” or “lord of the palm tree.” Place where Israelites attacked and defeated tribe of Benjamin for killing concubine of traveling Levite (Judges 20:33 ). It must have been near Gibeah. It may be ras et-Tawil north of Jerusalem.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Baal-Zebub
(bay' uhl-zee' buhb) Deity's name meaning, “lord of the flies.” In 2 Kings 1:2 , a Philistine deity from which the Israelite King Ahaziah sought help after injuring himself in a fall. Though the Philistines themselves may have used this name, it is more probable that it is intentionally used to distort the god's actual name. The problem of identification is further complicated by references in the New Testament. Jesus is reported to have used the name Beel-zebub in reference to the prince of demons (Matthew 10:25 ). Beel-zebub is clearly a variation of Baal-zebub. However, the Greek text of the New Testament has Beelzebul. The meaning of Beelzebul is disputed. One suggestion is “lord of the dwelling.” A second, and more likely possibility is “lord of dung.” Regardless of the exact meaning of the name, Jesus clearly used it in reference to Satan. See Baal ; Philistines; Satan .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Baal-Zephon
(bay' uhl-zee' fawn) Place name meaning, “lord of the north” or “Baal of the north.” Place in Egypt near which Israel camped before miracle of crossing the sea (Exodus 14:2 ,Exodus 14:2,14:9 ). The exact location is not known. Some suggest tell Defenneh known in Egypt as Tahpanhes in the eastern Nile delta. See Exodus .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Baal
(bay' uhl) Lord of Canaanite religion and seen in the thunderstorms, Baal was worshiped as the god who provided fertility. He proved a great temptation for Israel. “Baal” occurs in the Old Testament as a noun meaning, “lord, owner, possessor, or husband,” and as a proper noun referring to the supreme god of the Canaanites, and often to the name of a man. According to 1 Chronicles 5:5 , Baal was a descendant of Reuben, Jacob's firstborn son, and the father of Beerah. Baal was sent into exile by Tiglath-pileser, king of Assyria. The genealogical accounts of Saul's family listed in 1 Chronicles 9:35-36 indicates that the fourth son of Jehiel was named Baal.
The noun comes from a verb that means to marry or rule over. The verb form occurs in the Hebrew text 29 times, whereas the noun occurs 166 times. The noun appears in a number of compound forms which are proper names for locations where Canaanite deities were worshiped, such as Baal-peor (Numbers 25:5 ; Deuteronomy 4:3 ; Psalm 106:28 ; Hosea 9:10 ), Baal-hermon (Judges 3:3 ; 1 Chronicles 5:23 ), and Baal-gad (Joshua 11:17 ; Joshua 12:7 ; Joshua 13:5 ).
Baal Worship in Canaan Baal worship revolved around two themes that represented the conception of Baal his worshipers held. Baal was both the sun-god and storm-god. He was worshiped as sun-god when the people wished to express thanks and gratitude for light and warmth and fertility. Worship of Baal as storm-god took place to appease the destructive nature of Baal, demonstrated by drought and storms that devastated the vegetation of the worshipers. The efforts to appease Baal whenever adverse conditions prevailed culminated in the sacrifice of human beings, usually the firstborn of the one offering the sacrifice. The victims were burnt alive, a practice in the Old Testament termed “to pass through the fire” (2 Kings 16:3 ; 2 Kings 21:6 ). Baal worship was as diverse as the communities in which he was worshiped. Each locality had its own Baal, who was named after the city or place to which he belonged. Baal was considered the owner or possessor of the land on which his followers lived.
Baal Worship in Israel The Northern Kingdom of Israel, under the leadership of Ahab of the household of Omri, was led to worship Baal as the state god (1 Kings 16:31 ). The prophets Elijah and Elisha delivered the condemnation of God concerning Baal worship and tried to rid the land of the idolatry (1 Kings 18:17-40 ; 2 Kings 1:9-16 ).
The worship of Baal infiltrated the Southern Kingdom of Judah. The reform movement of Hezekiah was reversed when Manasseh became king (2 Kings 21:2-16 ), as he reinstated Baal worship, along with worship of Assyrian gods and other gods.
The conflict between Baal worship and the worship of the Lord God is described in the Book of Hosea. The judgment of the people of God for their idolatry, and their restoration is disclosed in Hosea 2:1 . The Bible writers affirmed the supremacy of Yahweh and condemned the worship of any other gods beside Yahweh. See Canaan.
James Newell
Holman Bible Dictionary - Kiriath-Baal
(kihr' ih ath-bay' uhl) Place name meaning, “city of Baal.” Another name for Kiriath-Jearim in Joshua 15:60 ; Joshua 18:14 . See Kiriath-Jearim .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Kirjath-Baal
(kihr' jath-ba' uhl) KJV spelling of Kiriath-Baal. See Kiriath-Baal .
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Beth-Baal-Meon
BETH-BAAL-MEON ( Joshua 13:17 ). See Baal-Meon.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Baal-Perazim
God of divisions
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Baal-Zebub
God of the fly
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Baal-Gad
Idol of fortune or felicity
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Baal-Berith
Idol of the covenant
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Baal-Meon
Idol or master of the house
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Baal-Peor
Master of the opening
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Baal-Tamar
Master of the palm-tree
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Baal
Master; lord
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Baal-Hermon
Possessor of destruction or of a thing cursed
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Baal-Shalisha
The god that presides over three; the third idol
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Baal-Zephon
The idol or possession of the north; hidden; secret
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Baal-Hamon
Who rules a crowd
King James Dictionary - Baal
BA'AL, n. An idol among the ancient Chaldeans and Syrians, representing the sun. The word signifies also lord, or commander and the character of the idol was varied by different nations, at different times. Thus Baal Berith is supposed to signify the Lord of the Covenant Baal Peor, or rather Baal Phegor, the Lord of the dead. Psalms 106Baal Zebub, the god of flies, &c.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Baal, Baalim
The name signifies 'master, possessor;' and whether singular or plural it always has the article. The chief male god of the Phoenicians and the Canaanites, as ASHTORETH was the chief female goddess. The Israelites in coming into the land doubtless found temples, groves, altars and high places set apart to Baal: incense was offered and offerings burnt, and children were sacrificed to him, whilst a great retinue of prophets and priests was maintained in his service, as is manifest by its revival afterwards. Numbers 22:41 ; 1 Kings 18:22 ; Jeremiah 11:13 ; Jeremiah 19:5 ; Jeremiah 32:29 .
The children of Israel were soon led away to the worship of Baal, Judges 2:11,13 ; Judges 3:7 ; Judges 6:31,32 ; Judges 8:33 ; Judges 10:6,10 ; and though under Samuel they relinquished it, 1 Samuel 7:4 ; 1 Samuel 12:10 , yet after the division of the kingdom it was by Ahab fully established in Israel. 1 Kings 16:32 . Elijah however stood for Jehovah, and raised the question with Israel whether Jehovah was God, or whether Baal, and established the rights of Jehovah by fire from heaven. This led to the destruction of all the prophets of Baal, 1 Kings 18:17-40 ; but his idolatrous worship continued until the days of Jehu, who slew his worshippers and destroyed his house and images. 2 Kings 10:18-28 . It however revived again in Israel, and under Ahaziah and Athaliah extended also to Judah, and during the reigns of Ahaz and Manasseh worshippers of Baal are found there. 2 Kings 11:18 ; 2 Kings 16:3,4 ; 2 Kings 17:16,17 ; 2 Kings 21:3 . Thus did Satan succeed in leading aside to idolatry God's favoured people for whom He had done so much. Balaam's advice was only too successful, the women of Canaan being the snare that led to idolatry.
The word Baal is used in several compounds, at times referring to the god and in other cases to persons or places.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Baal
1. City in the tribe of Simeon, 1 Chronicles 4:33 : apparently the same as Baalath-Beer (q.v. ) Joshua 19:8 .
2. Descendant of Reuben. 1 Chronicles 5:5 .
3. Descendant of Benjamin. 1 Chronicles 8:30 ; 9:36 .
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Baal, Master
Ba‛al (בַּעַל, Strong's #1167), “master; baal.” In Akkadian, the noun belu (“lord”) gave rise to the verb belu (“to rule”). In other northwest Semitic languages, the noun ba‛al differs somewhat in meaning, as other words have taken over the meaning of “sir” or “lord.” (Cf. Heb. ‘adon.) The Hebrew word ba‛al seems to have been related to these homonyms.The word ba‛al occurs 84 times in the Hebrew Old Testament, 15 times with the meaning of “husband” and 50 times as a reference to a deity. The first occurrence of the noun ba‛al is in Gen. 14:13: “And there came one that had escaped, and told Abram the Hebrew; for he dwelt in the plain of Mamre the Amorite, brother of Eshcol, and brother of Aner: and these were confederate with [1] Abram.”
The primary meaning of ba‛al is “possessor.” Isaiah’s use of ba‛al in parallel with qanah clarifies this basic significance of ba‛al: “The ox knoweth his owner [2], and the ass his master’s [3] crib: but Israel does not know, my people doth not consider” (Isa. 1:3). Man may be the owner [4] of an animal (Exod. 22:10), a house (Exod. 22:7), a cistern (Exod. 21:34), or even a wife (Exod. 21:3).
A secondary meaning, “husband,” is clearly indicated by the phrase ba‛al ha-ishshah (literally, “owner of the woman”). For example: “If men strive, and hurt a woman with child, so that her fruit depart from her, and yet no mischief follow: he shall be surely punished, according as the woman’s husband [5] will lay upon him; and he shall pay as the judges determine” (Exod. 21:22). The meaning of ba‛al is closely related to ish (“man”), as is seen in the usage of these two words in one verse: “When the wife of Uriah heard that Uriah her husband [6] was dead, she mourned for her husband [3]” (2 Sam. 11:26).
The word ba‛al with another noun may signify a peculiar characteristic or quality: “And they said one to another, Behold, this dreamer cometh” (Gen. 37:19); the KJV offers a literal translation of the Hebrew — “master of dreams” — as an alternative.
Thirdly, the word ba‛al may denote any deity other than the God of Israel. Baal was a common name given to the god of fertility in Canaan. In the Canaanite city of Ugarit, Baal was especially recognized as the god of fertility. The Old Testament records that Baal was “the god” of the Canaanites. The Israelites worshiped Baal during the time of the judges (Judg. 6:25-32) and of King Ahab. Elijah stood as the opponent of the Baal priests at Mount Carmel (1 Kings 18:21ff.). Many cities made Baal a local god and honored him with special acts of worship: Baal-peor (Num. 25:5), Baal-berith at Shechem (Judg. 8:33), Baal-zebub (2 Kings 1:2-16) at Ekron, Baal-zephon (Num. 33:7), and Baalhermon (Judg. 3:3).
Among the prophets, Jeremiah and Hosea mention Baal most frequently. Hosea pictured Israel as turning to the baals and only returning to the Lord after a time of despair (Hos. 2:13, 17). He says that the name of ba‛al will no longer be used, not even with the meaning of “Lord” or “master,” as the association was contaminated by the idolatrous practices: “And it shall be at that day, saith the Lord, that thou shalt call me Ishi; and shalt call me no more Ba-a-li [3]. For I will take away the names of Ba-alim out of her mouth, and they shall no more be remembered by their name” (Hos. 2:16- 17). In Hosea’s and Jeremiah’s time, the ba‛al idols were still worshiped, as the peoples sacrificed, built high places, and made images of the ba‛alim (plural).
In the Septuagint, the word ba‛al is not uniformly translated: kurios (“lord, owner”); aner (“man, husband”); the simple transliteration; and ba‛al. The KJV has these translations: “Baal, man, owner, husband, master.”
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Kirjath-Baal
City of Baal
CARM Theological Dictionary - Baal
A Canaanite god. The word means "lord" or "husband." He was a god of weather, associated with thunder, which appointed the times of the rains, and was considered to be the son of the pagan god Dagon. The ancient Jews were often tempted to follow Baal because so much of their lives depended upon the rain that fed the crops.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Baal
Baal (Romans 11:4 in a quotation from 1 Kings 19:18) was a generic name for a god among Semitic peoples, the literal meaning being ‘owner’ or ‘lord.’ Attempts have been made to show that this was the original name of the Sun-god, or that it represents the Supreme Being worshipped by the Canaanites. Neither of these contentions can be proved; indeed it is evident that the Baal of one place differed from that of another. Thus the reference in the text is to Melkart, the Baal of Tyre. The feminine article (τῇ Βαάλ) in the Greek of Romans 11:4 is due to the frequent substitution of bôsheth (in Greek αἰσχύνη), ‘shame,’ for Baal by the Hebrews.* [1]
Literature.-A. S. Peake, article ‘Baal’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) ; G. F. Moore in Encyclopaedia Biblica ; L. B. Paton in Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics ; W. R. Smith, RS [2] 2, London, 1894, p. 93ff.
F. W. Worsley.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Baal
A name generally used for an idol. And when more than a single idol is spoken of, the word is made plural, Baalim. The children of Israel, from being surrounded with idolatrous neighbours, too often were led away by their allurements to the same idolatry. (See Numbers 22:41; Judges 2:13; 1 Kings 16:31; 2 Kings 10:19; Hosea 2:8.)
I cannot take a more effectual method to shew the Lord's watchful care over his Israel, to preserve them from this contagion, than what the Lord himself hath manifested in that beautiful chapter, the second of the prophecy of Hosea. If the reader will turn to it, and peruse it from beginning to end, he will observe, that at that time the tribes of the Lord were much disposed to idolatry. The Lord sets himself therefore to bring them back, and in opening to them the prospects of salvation, shews how he will bring them under afflictions, in wilderness dispensations, and then having hedged their way up with thorns, compels them, by his grace, to return to him their first lover. And to keep them from revolting again, he will open to them a new name, whereby they shall know him and delight in him. "And it shall be in that day, saith the Lord, that thou shalt call me Ishi, and shalt call me no more Baali. For I will take away the names of Baalim out of her mouth." (Hosea 2:16-17.) In the margin of the Bible, Ishi is rendered my husband. The reader will have a full apprehension of the grace and loving kindness of the Lord in this ordination, when he is told, that as the word Baal, Lord; or Baali, my lord, was a general name to imply lordship, or sovereignty: the Lord JEHOVAH had been considered as Israel's Baal, to distinguish him from the nations' Baal around. But as there was not distinction enough in those general names, to preserve Israel in a proper sense of reverence between JEHOVAH, and those dunghill gods, being all alike called Baal, or Lord; the Lord graciously saith, in this sweet Scripture, that he will be no more called Baal, but will lose as it were, the name of Lord, in that of husband. Thou shalt call me Ishi; that is, my husband, my man. Was there ever an instance of such rich grace and condescension and love?
I beg the reader to pause over it, and ponder it well. And when he hath duly contemplated the unequalled subject, let him add to it the farther consideration, how the Lord Jesus Christ hath really, and indeed, fulfilled all he here promised, in becoming the Husband of his church and people. Hence the prophet sings, "For thy Maker is thine husband, the Lord of hosts is his name: and thy Redeemer the Holy One of Israel, the God of the whole earth shall he be called." (Isaiah 54:5.) Surely, nothing can be wanting to give the most finishing testimony to the grace that is in Christ Jesus. Blessed Husband of thy church; be thou my Ishi for ever!
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Baal-Tamar
A place near Gibeah. (Judges 20:33) It might be famous for palm-trees; for so Tamar means.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Baal-Perazim
At this spot, the Philistines were put to flight by David, (2 Samuel 5:20; 1 Chronicles 14:11) The margin of the Bible hath rendered this name, the plain of breaches. And, consequently, David was the lord or master of it.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Baal-Hamon
I am inclined to think that this was not an idol, but a place; for the church, celebrating the glories of her Solomon, saith, that he had a vineyard at Baal-hamon (Song of Song of Solomon 8:11) Hamon, is people, multitudes, or riches. So that Baal-hamon may be rendered, lord or master of a troop, or people. We all apprehend, that "the vineyard of the Lord of hosts is the house, of Israel; and the men of Judah his pleasant plant." (Isaiah 5:7)
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Baal-Berith
Judges 8:33; Jdg 9:4 This dunghill god was made the idol of the children of Israel, after the death of Gideon. The name Berith means the Lord of the covenant. But what covenant? Was Israel so far gone in idolatry, as not only to set up an idol, but to insult JEHOVAH in his gracious covenant? To what an awful state is our nature reduced by the fall! Into what an awful apostacy may, and will, every man sink, void of grace! Reader, turn to that sweet covenant promine, Jeremiah 32:40.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Kirjath-Baal
The city of Baal, Joshua 15:60.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Baal-Gad
This was another of the heathen idols, and as we learn from the book of Joshua, (Joshua 11:17) was set up in the valley of Lebanon.. Gad means fortune; so that Baal-gad means a lord of fortune.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Baal-Peor
This was the famous, or rather infamous dunghill idol of Moab; and which they tempted the Israelites worship. The Psalmist mournfully speaks of it, (Psalms 106:18) "they joined themselves unto Baal-peor, and ate the offerings of the dead." (Numbers 25:1-3; Hosea 9:10) From what this prophet saith of their shame; and from the impure name of this strumpet idol; there is reason to believe that the greatest indecency was joined with idolatry, in the, worship of this Baal-peor.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Baal-Meon
This was the idol of Beth-jesimoth, and is rendered, "the Lord of the house." (Ezekiel 25:9)
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Baal-Shalisha
We meet with mention of this place, 2 Kings 4:42, but whether there was an idol there, is not said. Shalesh is the Hebrew for three. So that it may be read the lord of three. But the cause for the name is difficult to explain.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Baal Zebub
BEELZEBUB, or BELZEBUB, signifies the god of flies, and was an idol of the Ekronites. It is not easy to discover how this false deity obtained its name. Some commentators think that he was called Baal Samin, or the lord of heaven; but that the Jews, from contempt, gave him the name of Baal-zebub. Others with greater reason believe that he was denominated "the god of flies" by his votaries, because he defended them from flies, which are exceedingly troublesome in hot countries; in the same manner as the Eleans worshipped Hercules under the appellation of ‘Απομυιος , fly chaser. Pliny is of opinion, that the name of Achor, the god invoked at Cyrene against flies, is derived from Accaron, or Ekron, where Baal-zebub was worshipped, and where he had a famous temple and oracle. Winkelman has given the figures of two heads, "both of them images of Jupiter, called by the Greeks ‘Απομυιος , and by the Romans Muscarius; that is to say, fly driver; for to this Jupiter was attributed the function of driving away flies."
It is evident that Beelzebub was considered as the patron deity of medicine; for this is plainly implied in the conduct of Ahaziah, 2 Kings 1. The Greek mythology considered Apollo as the god of medicine, and attributed also to him those possessions by a pythonic spirit which occasionally perplexed spectators, and of which we have an instance in Acts 16:19 . Apollo, too, was the sun. Hence we probably see the reason why Ahaziah sent to Beelzebub to inquire the issue of his accident; since Beelzebub was Apollo, and Apollo was the god of physic. The Jews, who changed Beelzebub into Beelzebul, "god of a dunghill," perhaps had a reference to the Greek of pytho, which signifies putrefied. In Scripture Beelzebub is called "the prince of devils," Matthew 12:24 ; Luke 11:15 ; merely, it would seem, through the application of the name of the chief idol of the Heathen world to the prince of evil spirits. This was natural, since the Jews were taught in their own Scriptures to consider all the idols of the Heathens "devils." Those commentators who think that the idol of Ekron himself is intended, have indulged in an improbable fancy. See HORNET .
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Baal
BEL, or BELUS, denoting lord, a divinity among several ancient nations; as the Canaanites, Phoenicians, Sidonians, Carthaginians, Babylonians, Chaldeans, and Assyrians. The term Baal, which is itself an appellative, served at first to denote the true God, among those who adhered to the true religion. Accordingly, the Phoenicians, being originally Canaanites, having once had, as well as the rest of their kindred, the knowledge of the true God, probably called him Baal, or lord. But they, as well as other nations, gradually degenerating into idolatry, applied this appellation, to their respective idols; and thus were introduced a variety of divinities, called Baalim, or Baal, with some epithet annexed to it, as Baal Berith, Baal Gad, Baal Moloch, Baal Peor, Baal Zebub, &c. Some have supposed that the descendants of Ham first worshipped the sun under the title of Baal, 2 Kings 23:5 ; 2 Kings 23:11 ; and that they afterward ascribed it to the patriarch who was the head of their line; making the sun only an emblem of his influence or power. It is certain, however, that when the custom prevailed of deifying and worshipping those who were in any respect distinguished among mankind, the appellation of Baal was not restricted to the sun, but extended to those eminent persons who were deified, and who became objects of worship in different nations. The Phoenicians had several divinities of this kind, who were not intended to represent the sun. It is probable that Baal, Belus, or Bel, the great god of the Carthaginians, and also of the Sidonians, Babylonians, and Assyrians, who, from the testimony of Scripture, appears to have been delighted with human sacrifices, was the Moloch of the Ammonites; the Chronus of the Greeks, who was the chief object of adoration in Italy, Crete, Cyprus, and Rhodes, and all other countries where divine honours were paid him; and the Saturn of the Latins. In process of time, many other deities, beside the principal ones just mentioned, were distinguished by the title of Baal among the Phoenicians, particularly those of Tyre, and of course among the Carthaginians, and other nations. Such were Jupiter, Mars, Bacchus, and Apollo, or the sun.
The temples and altars of Baal were generally placed on eminences: they were places inclosed by walls, within which was maintained a perpetual fire; and some of them had statues or images, called in Scripture, "Chamanim." Maundrell, in his journey from Aleppo to Jerusalem, observed some remains of these enclosures in Syria. Baal had his prophets and his priests in great numbers; accordingly, we read of four hundred and fifty of them that were fed at the table of Jezebel only; and they conducted the worship of this deity, by offering sacrifices, by dancing round his altar with violent gesticulations and exclamations, by cutting their bodies with knives and lancets, and by raving and pretending to prophesy, as if they were possessed by some invisible power.
It is remarkable that we do not find the name Baal so much in popular use east of Babylonia; but it was general west of Babylonia, and to the very extremity of western Europe, including the British isles. The worship of Bel, Belus, Belenus, or Belinus, was general throughout the British islands; and certain of its rites and observances are still maintained among us, notwithstanding the establishment of Christianity during so many ages. A town in Perthshire, on the borders of the Highlands, is called Tilliebeltane or Tulliebeltane; that is, the eminence, or rising ground, of the fire of Baal. In the neighbourhood is a Druidical temple of eight upright stones, where it is supposed the fire was kindled. At some distance from this is another temple of the same kind, but smaller; and near it a well still held in great veneration. On Beltane morning, superstitious people go to this well, and drink of it; then they make a procession round it nine times. After this they in like manner go round the temple. So deep-rooted is this Heathenish superstition in the minds of many who reckon themselves good Protestants, that they will not neglect these rites, even when Beltane falls on the Sabbath.
In Ireland, Bel-tein is celebrated on the twenty-first of June, at the time of the solstice. There, as they make fires on the tops of hills, every member of the family is made to pass though the fire; as they reckon this ceremony necessary to ensure good fortune through the succeeding year. This resembles the rites used by the Romans in the Palilia. Bel-tein is also observed in Lancashire.
In Wales, this annual fire is kindled in autumn, on the first day of November; which being neither at the solstice nor equinox, deserves attention. It may be accounted for by supposing that the lapse of ages has removed it from its ancient station, and that the observance is kept on the same day, nominally, though that be now removed some weeks backward from its true station. However that may be, in North Wales especially, this fire is attended by many ceremonies; such as running through the fire and smoke, each participator casting a stone into the fire.
The Hebrews often imitated the idolatry of the Canaanites in adoring Baal. They offered human sacrifices to him in groves, upon high places, and upon the terraces of houses. Baal had priests and prophets consecrated to his service. All sorts of infamous and immodest actions were committed in the festivals of Baal and Astarte. See Jeremiah 32:35 ; 2 Kings 17:16 ; 2 Kings 23:4-5 ; 2 Kings 23:12 ; 1 Kings 18:22 ; 2 Kings 10:19 ; 1 Kings 14:24 ; 1 Kings 15:12 ; 2 Kings 23:7 ; Hosea 4:14 . This false deity is frequently mentioned in Scripture in the plural number, Baalim, which may intimate that the name Baal was given to several different deities.
There were many cities in Palestine, whose names were compounded of Baal and some other word: whether it was that the god Baal was adored in them, or that these places were looked upon as the capital cities,— lords of their respective provinces,—is uncertain.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Baal Zephon
or the god of the watch tower, was probably the temple of some idol, which served at the same time for a place of observation for the neighbouring sea and country, and a beacon to the travellers by either. It was situated on a cape or promontory on the eastern side of the western or Heroopolitan branch of the Red Sea, near its northern extremity, over against Pi-hahiroth, or the opening in the mountains which led from the desert, on the side of Egypt, to the Red Sea.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Baal Peor
Peor is supposed to have been a part of Mount Abarim; and Baal was the great idol or chief god of the Phoenicians, and was known and worshipped under a similar name, with tumultuous and obscene rites, all over Asia. He is the same as the Bel of the Babylonians. Baal, by itself, signifies lord, and was a name of the solar or principal god. But it was also variously compounded, in allusion to the different characters and attributes of the particular or local deities who were known by it, as Baal Peor, Baal Zebub, Baal Zephon, &c. Baal Peor, then, was probably the temple of an idol belonging to the Moabites, on Mount Abarim, which the Israelites worshipped when encamped at Shittim; this brought a plague upon them, of which twenty-four thousand died, Numbers 35. Chemosh, the abomination of Moab, to whom Solomon erected an altar, 1 Kings 11:7 , is supposed to have been the same deity. Baal Peor has been farther supposed by some to have been Priapus; by others, Saturn: by others, Pluto; and by others again, Adonis. Mr. Faber agrees with Calmet in making Baal Peor the same with Adonis; a part of whose worship consisted in bewailing him with funeral rites, as one lost or dead, and afterward welcoming, with extravagant joy, his fictitious return to life. He was in an eminent degree the god of impurity. Hosea, speaking of the worship of this idol, emphatically calls it "that shame," Hosea 9:10 . Yet in the rites of this deity the Moabite and Midianite women seduced the Israelites to join.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Baal Berith
the god of the Shechemites, Judges 8:33 ; Judges 9:4 ; Judges 9:46 .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Baal
Baal (bâ'al), lord. 1. A Reubenite. 1 Chronicles 5:5. 2. The eon of Jehiel, and grandfather of Saul. 1 Chronicles 8:30; 1 Chronicles 9:36.
Baal. The prevailing worship of the Phœnician and Canaanitish nations, as Ashtoreth was their prominent goddess. There can lie no doubt of the great antiquity of the worship of Baal. It prevailed in the time of Moses among the Moabites and Midianites, Numbers 22:41, and through them spread to the Israelites. Numbers 25:3-18; Deuteronomy 4:3. In the times of the kings it became the religion of the court and people of the ten tribes, 1 Kings 16:31-33; 1 Kings 18:19; 1 Kings 18:22, and appears never to have been wholly abolished among them. 2 Kings 17:16. Temples were erected to Baal in Judah, Numbers 25:1-18,17 and be was worshipped with much ceremony. 1 Kings 18:19; 1 Kings 18:26-28; 2 Kings 10:22. The religion of the ancient British islands resembled this ancient worship of Baal. The Babylonian Bel, Isaiah 46:1, or Belus, is supposed to be identical with Baal, though perhaps under some modified form. The plural, Baalim, is found frequently, and the singular, Baal, in different compounds, among which appear—
1. Baal-berith (bâ'al-bç'rith), the covenant Baal. Judges 8:33; Judges 9:4. The God who comes Into covenant with the worshippers.
2. Baal-hanan (bâ'al-hâ'nan). 1. The name of one of the early kings of Edom. Genesis 36:38-39; 1 Chronicles 1:49-50. 2. The name of one of David's officers, who had the superintendence of his olive and sycamore plantations. 1 Chronicles 27:28.
3. Baal-peor (bâ'al-pç'or), lord of the opening, i.e., for others to join in the worship. The narrative, 1618648017_6 seems clearly to show that this form of Baal-worship was connected with licentious rites.
4. Baal-zebub (bâ'al-zç'bub), lord of the fly, and worshipped at Ekron. 2 Kings 1:2-3; 2 Kings 1:16.
Baal also occurs as the prefix or suffix to the names of several places in Palestine. Rome of them are—
1. Baal, a town of Simeon, named only fn 1 Chronicles 4:33, which from the parallel list in Joshua 19:8 seems to have been identical with Baalath-beer.
2. Baalah (bâ'al-ah), mistress. 1. Another name for Kibjath-jearim, or Kirjath-baal, perhaps now Kuriet el Enab (?). Joshua 15:9-10; 1 Chronicles 13:6. 2. A town in the south of Judah, Joshua 15:29, which in 19:3 is called Balah, and in the parallel list, 1 Chronicles 4:29, Bilhah.
3. Baalath (bâ'al-ăth), mistress, a town of Dan named with Gibbethon, Gath-rimmon and other Philistine places. Joshua 19:44.
4. Baalath-beer (bâ'al-ăth-bç'er), lord of the well. A town in the south part of Judah, given to Simeon, which also bore the name of Ramath-negeb, or "the height of the south." Joshua 19:8.
6. Baal-gad (bâ'al-găd), lord of fortune, used to denote the most northern, Joshua 11:17; Joshua 12:7, or perhaps northwestern, 13:6, point to which Joshua's victories extended. Possibly it was a Phœnician or Canaanite sanctuary of Baal under the aspect of Gad, or Fortune.
6. Baal-hamon (bâ'al-hâ'mon), lord of a multitude. A place at which Solomon had a vineyard, evidently of great extent. Song of Solomon 8:11.
7. Baal-hazor (bâ'al-hâ'zor), village of Baal. A place where Absalom appears to have had a sheep-farm, and where Amnon was murdered. 2 Samuel 13:23.
8. Mount Baal-hermon (bâ'al-hêr'mon), lord of Hermon, Judges 3:3, and simply Baal-hermon, 1 Chronicles 5:23. This is usually considered as a distinct place from Mount Hermon; but we know that this mountain had at least three names, Deuteronomy 8:9, and Baal-hermon may have been a fourth in use among the Phœnician worshippers of Baal.
9. Baal-bieon (bâ'al-mç'on), lord of the house. One of the towns built by the Reubenites. Numbers 32:38. It also occurs in 1 Chronicles 5:8, and on each occasion with Nebo. In the time of Ezekiel it was Moabite, one of the cities which were the "glory of the country." Ezekiel 25:9.
10. Baal-perazim (bâ'al-pĕr'a-zĭm, or perâ'sim), lord of divisions. The scene of a victory of David over the Philistines, and of a great destruction of their images. 2 Samuel 5:20; 1 Chronicles 14:11. See Isaiah 28:21, where it is called Mount Perazim.
11. Baal-shalisha (bâ'al-shăl'i-shah), lord of Shalisha. A place named only in 2 Kings 4:42, apparently not far from Gilgal; Comp. 4:38.
12. Baal-tamar (bâ'al-tâ'mar), lord of the palm tree. A place named only in Judges 20:33, as near Gibeah of Benjamin. The palm tree (tâmâr) of Deborah, Judges 4:1-24; Judges 5:1-31, was situated somewhere in the locality.
13. Baal-zephon (bâ'al-zç'phon), lord of the north. A place in Egypt near where the Israelites crossed the Red Sea, Numbers 33:7; Exodus 14:2; Exodus 14:9, probably on the western shore of the Gulf of Suez, a little below its head.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Kirjath-Jearim, or Kirjath-Baal
Joshua 15:9,60 , a city of the Gibeonites afterwards given to Judah. It was on the confines of Benjamin, Joshua 18:14,15 , about nine miles from Jerusalem in the way to Lydda. Here the ark was lodged for many years, in the house of Abinadab, till David removed it to Jerusalem, 1 Samuel 7:2 2 Samuel 6:2 1 Chronicles 13:1-14 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Baal
(Hebrew: lord, owner; plural: Baale or Baalim) The chief divinity, the sun god, of the Chanaanites and the Arameans; also the name of the principal deity worshiped by certain nations or communities. The Israelites worshiped Baal in the days of King Achab or Ahab (4Kings, 3,10). In some places he had a female consort named Baaloth (Greek: Beltis).
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Baal-Gad'
A city in the valley of Lebanon at the foot of Hermon; the northernmost point, to which the wars of Joshua reached, Joshua 11:17 ; 12:7 ; 13:5 . It was perhaps the same as Baal-Hermon. Some have supposed it was Baalbek; but this lay further north.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Baal-Zephon
A town in Egypt, probably near the modern Suez. Its location is unknown, as are the details of the route of the Hebrews on leaving Egypt. They encamped "over against" and "before" Baal-zephon before crossing the Red Sea. Exodus 14:2 ; Numbers 33:7 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Baal
BAAL . 1 . A Reubenite ( 1 Chronicles 5:5 ). 2 . A Gibeonite, granduncle of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 8:33 = 1 Chronicles 9:36 ).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Baal (1)
BAAL (BAALI, BAALIM) . Used generally, the word ba’al means ‘possessor,’ ‘inhabitant,’ ‘controller.’ Thus, a married man is called ‘possessor of a woman’ ( 2 Samuel 11:26 ), a ram, ‘possessor of horns,’ and even the citizens of a locality are denoted by this word ( Judges 9:2 ; Judges 20:5 , 1 Samuel 23:11 f., 2 Samuel 21:12 ). With a similar meaning, it is applied to numerous Canaanitish local deities (pl. ba’alim , Judges 2:11 ; Judges 3:7 ; Judges 8:33 ; Jdg 10:10 , 1 Samuel 7:1 ; 1 Samuel 12:10 , 1 Kings 18:18 ; coll. sing. ba’al , Judges 2:13 , Jeremiah 11:13 etc.; cf. Baal-gad, Baalath-beer , and other compounds of this word). These gods were supposed to manifest themselves in the fertility, or in some startling natural formation, of the locality where they were worshipped. Such an animistic conception is evident from the fact that they were worshipped in high places and in groves, where such rites as prophecy ( Jeremiah 22:13 ), fornication ( Jeremiah 7:9 ), self-mutilation ( 1 Kings 18:28 ), and child-sacrifice ( Jeremiah 19:5 ) were practised under the guidance of kemârim or idolatrous priests ( Zephaniah 1:4 ). The same idea is also clear from the use of this word among the Arabs, who designate land irrigated by subterranean springs as ‘Ba’l land,’ i.e. land inhabited by a spirit. Gradually, however, some of these gods assimilated more abstract powers (cf. Baal-berith ), and as their votaries extended their powers over a greater area, became the Baal par excellence, i.e. the controller of the destiny of his worshippers (cf. Judges 6:25 , 1 Kings 16:31 ; 1Ki 18:26 ; 1 Kings 19:18 [1]).
So great a predilection for cults of such a nature was shown by the Israelites, from the time of their entrance into Canaan until the fall of the monarchy, that Jabweh was given this title. Thus Saul, a zealous worshipper of Jahweh, names (1 Chronicles 8:33 ) one of his sons Eshbaal , and one of David’s heroes is called ( 1 Chronicles 12:5 ) Bealiah (‘J″ [2] is Baal’); cf. also Meribbaal ( 1 Chronicles 9:40 ), Beeliada ( 1 Chronicles 14:7 ), Jerubbaal ( Judges 8:35 ). A confusion, however, of Jahweh and the Canaanitish deities seems to have taken place, to avoid which, Hosea ( Hosea 2:16-17 ) demands that Jahweh be no longer called Ba‘ali (‘my Baal’), but ’Ishi (‘my husband’). Under the influence of such prophecies the Israelites abandoned the use of Baal for Jahweh , and in later times developed so great an antipathy to this word that later revisers substituted bôsheth (‘shameful thing’), not only wherever Ba’al occurred for the Canaanitish deities ( Hosea 9:10 , Jeremiah 3:24 ; Jeremiah 11:13 ), but also, forgetful of its former application to Jahweh, in some of the above names (see Ishbosheth), supposing them to allude to local gods.
N. Koenig.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Baal-Berith
BAAL-BERITH (‘lord of the covenant’). The god of Shechem, where he had a temple ( Judges 8:33 ; Judges 9:4 ); called also El-berith ( Judges 9:46 ). The ‘covenant’ may be that amongst the Canaanite peoples or that between Canaanltes and Israelites; or the title may be parallel to Zeus Horkios , the god who presides over covenants.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Baal-Gad
BAAL-GAD (? ‘Baal of fortune’). A place under Hermon, in the valley of Lebanon, referred to only as the northern limit of the country conquered by Joshua ( Joshua 11:17 ; Joshua 12:7 ; Joshua 13:5 ). Various identifications have been suggested, all uncertain. Perhaps Banias is the most probable. See Cæsarea Philippi.
R. A. S. Macalister.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Baal-Hamon
BAAL-HAMON . The unknown site of Solomon’s vineyard ( Song of Solomon 8:11 ).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Baal-Hanan
BAAL-HANAN . 1 . A king of Edom ( Gen 36:38 f., 1 Chronicles 1:49 f.). 2 . A Gederite ( 1 Chronicles 27:28 ).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Baal-Hazor
BAAL-HAZOR . Beside Ephraim, where were Absalom’s sheep-shearers ( 2 Samuel 13:23 ). Identified by Conder with Tell ‘Asur , a mountain 4960 ft. above the sea, an hour’s ride N.E. of Beitin .
R. A. S. Macalister.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Baal-Hermon
BAAL-HERMON ( Judges 3:3 , 1 Chronicles 5:23 ). See Hermon.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Baal-Meon
BAAL-MEON . A city of Moah assigned to Reuhen. The name occurs in Numbers 32:38 as Baal-meon , but in Joshua 13:17 as Beth-baal-meon; both forms being found also on the Moahite Stone; cf. Ezekiel 25:9 , 1 Chronicles 5:8 ; also Beth-meon of Jeremiah 48:23 . It is to be identified with the modern Ma’in , about 5 miles S.W. of Medeba.
G. L. Robinson.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Baal-Peor
BAAL-PEOR . The local deity of Mt. Peor ( Deuteronomy 4:3 b, Numbers 25:6 ). In Deuteronomy 4:3 b and Hosea 9:10 it is perhaps the name of a place.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Baal-Perazim
BAAL-PERAZIM . An unidentified site near Jerusalem ( 2 Samuel 5:20 , 1 Chronicles 14:11 ).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Baal-Shalishah
BAAL-SHALISHAH ( 2 Kings 4:42 ). An unknown site, probably somewhere in Mt. Ephraim.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Baal-Tamar
BAAL-TAMAR . An unknown site near Bethel and Gibeah ( Judges 4:5 ).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Baal-Zephon
BAAL-ZEPHON . Exodus 14:2 , Numbers 33:7 ; the name of a place near the spot where the Israelites crossed the Red Sea, apparently a shrine of ‘Baal of the north.’ The corresponding goddess ‘Baalit of the north’ is named along with the god of Kesem (Goshen), in an Egyp. papyrus of the New Kingdom, as worshipped at Memphis.
F. Ll. Griffith.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Baal, Baalah, Baalath
BAAL, BAALAH, BAALATH . 1 . = Kiriath-jearim ( 1 Chronicles 13:6 , Joshua 15:9-10 ). 2 . Baalath-beer ( Joshua 19:8 , 1 Chronicles 4:33 [1]), a site in the Negeb. 3 . A city in the S. of Judah ( Joshua 15:29 ; Joshua 19:3 , 1 Chronicles 4:29 ). 4 . Mount Baalab, between Ekron and Jabneel ( Joshua 15:11 ), possibly, as M. Clermont-Gannean has suggested, the river (not mountain) of Baal (now Nahr Rubin ). 5 . An unknown town of Dan ( Joshua 19:44 ). 6 . An unknown town ( 1 Kings 9:18 = 2 Chronicles 8:6 ).
E. W. G. Masterman.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Bamoth, Bamoth-Baal
BAMOTH, BAMOTH-BAAL . Bamoth is mentioned in Numbers 21:19 f. as a station in the journey of Israel from the Arnon to the Jordan. It is prob. identical with Bamoth-baal of Numbers 22:41 (RVm [1] ; AV [2] and RV [3] ‘the high places of Baal’), to which Balaam was led by Balak. Bamoth-baal is mentioned as a Reubenite city in Joshua 13:17 .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Baal-Meon
In Reuben beyond the Jordan, Numbers 32:38 ; called also Bethmeon, Jeremiah 48:23 , and Beth-baal-meon, Joshua 13:17 . Its ruins are found two miles southeast of Heshbon. Ezekiel 25:9 , speaks of it as then a Moabitish town.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Baal
Lord,
1. In the Old Testament denotes an idol of the Phoenicians, and particularly of the Tyrians, whose worship was also introduced with great solemnities among the Hebrews, and especially at Samaria, along with that of Astarte, Judges 6:25-32 2 Kings 10:18,28 . See ASHTORETH, plural ASH'TAROTH. The plural, Baalim, signifies images or statues of Baal, Judges 2:11 10:10 . Of the extent to which the worship of this idol was domesticated among the Phoenicians and Carthaginians, we have an evidence in the proper names of persons; as, among the former, Ethbaal, Jerubbaal; and among the latter, Hannibal, Asdrubal, etc. Among the Babylonians, the same idol was worshipped under the name of Isaiah 46:1 Jeremiah 50:2 51:44 . The worship of Baal was established in Babylon in the famous tower of Babel, the uppermost room of which served at the same time as an observatory, and as the repository of a collection of astronomical observations.
That in the astronomical, or rather, astrological mythology of the East, we are to look for the origin of this worship in the adoration of the heavenly bodies, is conceded by all critics. The more common opinion has been, that Baal, or Bel, is the sun; and that, under this name, this luminary received divine honors. But the Greek and Roman writers give to the Babylonian Bel the name of Jupiter Belus, meaning the planet Jupiter, which was regarded, along with the planet Venus, as the guardian and giver of all good fortune; and formed, with Venus, the most fortunate of all constellations, under which alone fortunate sovereigns could be born. This planet, therefore, many suppose to have been the object of worship under the name of Baal, as also the planet Venus under that of Astarte. Not that the sun was not an object of idolatrous worship among these nations, but in that case he is represented under his own name; as 2 Kings 23:11 .
The temples and altars of Ball were generally on eminences. Manasseh placed in the two courts of the temple at Jerusalem altars to all the host of heaven, and in particular to Astarte, 2 Kings 21:5,7 . Jeremiah threatens the Jews who had sacrificed to Baal on the house-top, Jeremiah 32:29 ; and Josiah destroyed the altars which Ahaz had erected on the terrace of his palace, 2 Kings 23:12 .
Human victims were offered to Baal, as they were also to the sun. Jeremiah reproaches the inhabitants of Judah and Jerusalem with "building the high places of Baal, to burn their sons with fire for burnt-offerings unto Baal," Jeremiah 19:5 ; an expression which appears to be decisive as to the actual slaying by fire of the unhappy victims to Baal. See MOLOCH.
The children of Israel were prone to serve Baal. See Numbers 25:3 Judges 2:14 3:7 . Under Samuel they put away their idols, 1 Samuel 7:4 . This continued under David and Solomon; but under Ahab, whose wife Jezebel was a daughter of the Zidonian king Ethbaal, the worship of Baal was restored with great pomp, 1 Kings 16:31 .
Joined with other words, Baal signifies also other false gods. Baal-Berith, or the "lord of the covenant," was a god of the Shechemites, Judges 8:33 9:4 . Baal-Peor, or "the lord of Peor," was a filthy idol of the Moabites, Numbers 25:3,5 Hosea 9:10 . Baal-Zebub, "lord of flies," was a god of the Philistines at Ekron. See BEELZEBUB .
2. The word BAAL also occurs in many compound names of places, not always having any reference to the idol.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Baal-Perazim
Place of breaches, a name given by David to the scene of a battle with the Philistines, 2 Samuel 5:20 ; 1 Chronicles 14:11 ; Isaiah 28:21 . It was in the valley of Rephaim, not far southwest of Jerusalem.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Esh-Baal
The fire of the idol
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Baal-Hazor
Where Absalom kept his flocks, 2 Samuel 13:23 , was near Ephraim, a city of Judah, some eight miles east of Jerusalem.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Baal hatanya
"Author of the Tanya." Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi, 1745-1812, founder and first Rebbe of the Chabad branch of chassidism, known also as the "Alter Rebbe," and as �the Rav�; lived in Li'ozna and Liadi, White Russia; author of Tanya, a classic text of the chassidic tradition, and Shulchan Aruch HaRav, a code of Jewish law.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Baal korei
(colloq. form of baal keriah, lit., �master of reading�); one who reads from the Torah scroll during the synagogue prayer service
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Beth-Baal-me'on
(house of Baalmeon ), a place in the possessions of Reuben, on the downs (Authorized Version "plain") east of the Jordan. ( Joshua 13:17 ) At the Israelites' first approach is name was BAAL-MEON, (Numbers 32:38 ) or, in its contracted form, BEON (Numbers 32:3 ) to which the Beth was possibly a Hebrew addition. Later it would seem to have come into possession of Moab, and to be known either as Beth-meon, (Jeremiah 48:23 ) or Baal-meon. (Ezekiel 25:9 ) The name is still attached to a ruined place of considerable size a short distance to the southwest of Hesban , and bearing the name of "the fortress of Mi'un, " or Makin .
Chabad Knowledge Base - Baal tokea
(lit. "master of the blast"); the person sounding the Shofar in the synagogue
Chabad Knowledge Base - Baal shem tov, r. israel
(lit. �Master of the Good Name�); Rabbi Yisrael ben Eliezer (1698-1760), founder of Chassidism
Chabad Knowledge Base - Baal teshuvah
The: (lit. �master of return�); a person who turns to G d in repentance, after willful or unknowing transgression of the Torah�s commandments; a Jew of secular or not fully observant background who has decided to undertake full Torah observance
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Baal Gad
A Canaanite sanctuary of Baal, as "the lord of fortune." The N.W. limit of Joshua's victories, as Hamath was the N.E. limit (Joshua 11:17; Joshua 12:7; Joshua 13:5). "Under mount Hermon, in the valley of Lebanon," still retaining the Hebrew name for "the valley," 'el buka , between Lebanon and Antilebanon. Probably now Banias, at the fountain which is one of the Jordan's sources, formerly a sanctuary of Pan. Baalbek ("the city of the sun") is situated too far N. at the lowest declivity of Antilibanus to be identified with Baal.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Baal
Canaanite and Phoenician gods were known as Baals, or Baalim (the plural form of Baal in Hebrew; Judges 2:11; Judges 10:10; 1 Kings 16:31). Goddesses were known as Ashtaroth (plural of Ashtoreth; Judges 2:13; 1 Samuel 7:3-4; 1 Samuel 12:10) or Asherim (plural of Asherah; 1 Kings 15:13; 1 Kings 18:19; 2 Kings 23:4).
The word baal was a common Hebrew word meaning ‘master’, ‘husband’ or ‘owner’. When the Israelites entered Canaan and found that the local people believed every piece of land had a god as its ‘owner’, baal developed a particular use as a proper noun. It became the title or name of the god of the land, whether of the land as a whole or of a particular area of land. In some cases the local Baal took its name from the locality (Numbers 25:3; Deuteronomy 4:3), and in other cases a locality was named after the Baal (Joshua 11:17; Judges 3:3; 2 Samuel 5:20; 2 Samuel 13:23). A locality may also have been named after the Ashtaroth (Joshua 12:4).
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Sentence search

Baal Hermon - Judges 3:3; 1 Chronicles 5:23 (translate Baal Hermon, even Senir, even Mount Hermon. ") The mountain had three names (Deuteronomy 3:9); Baal Hermon was probably one used among the Phoenician worshippers of Baal, whose sanctuary Baal Gad was at the base of the mountain. (See Baal GAD
Beth-Meon - Apparently the same as Beth-baal-meon and Baal-meon. See Beth-baal-meon ; Baal-meon
Meribbaal - (meh rib buh' uhl) Personal name of disputed meaning: “opponent of Baal,” “obstinacy of Baal,” “beloved or hero of Baal,” or “Baal defends
Beth-Baal-Meon - BETH-BAAL-MEON ( Joshua 13:17 ). See Baal-Meon
Baalim - (bay' uh lim) Hebrew plural of Baal. See Baal ; Canaan
Jerubbaal - Contender with Baal; or, let Baal plead, a surname of Gideon; a name given to him because he destroyed the altar of Baal (Judges 6:32 ; 7:1 ; 8:29 ; 1 Samuel 12:11 )
Kirjath-Baal - (kihr' jath-ba' uhl) KJV spelling of Kiriath-Baal. See Kiriath-Baal
Baal - (bay' uhl) Lord of Canaanite religion and seen in the thunderstorms, Baal was worshiped as the god who provided fertility. “Baal” occurs in the Old Testament as a noun meaning, “lord, owner, possessor, or husband,” and as a proper noun referring to the supreme god of the Canaanites, and often to the name of a man. According to 1 Chronicles 5:5 , Baal was a descendant of Reuben, Jacob's firstborn son, and the father of Beerah. Baal was sent into exile by Tiglath-pileser, king of Assyria. The genealogical accounts of Saul's family listed in 1 Chronicles 9:35-36 indicates that the fourth son of Jehiel was named Baal. The noun appears in a number of compound forms which are proper names for locations where Canaanite deities were worshiped, such as Baal-peor (Numbers 25:5 ; Deuteronomy 4:3 ; Psalm 106:28 ; Hosea 9:10 ), Baal-hermon (Judges 3:3 ; 1 Chronicles 5:23 ), and Baal-gad (Joshua 11:17 ; Joshua 12:7 ; Joshua 13:5 ). ...
Baal Worship in Canaan Baal worship revolved around two themes that represented the conception of Baal his worshipers held. Baal was both the sun-god and storm-god. Worship of Baal as storm-god took place to appease the destructive nature of Baal, demonstrated by drought and storms that devastated the vegetation of the worshipers. The efforts to appease Baal whenever adverse conditions prevailed culminated in the sacrifice of human beings, usually the firstborn of the one offering the sacrifice. Baal worship was as diverse as the communities in which he was worshiped. Each locality had its own Baal, who was named after the city or place to which he belonged. Baal was considered the owner or possessor of the land on which his followers lived. ...
Baal Worship in Israel The Northern Kingdom of Israel, under the leadership of Ahab of the household of Omri, was led to worship Baal as the state god (1 Kings 16:31 ). The prophets Elijah and Elisha delivered the condemnation of God concerning Baal worship and tried to rid the land of the idolatry (1 Kings 18:17-40 ; 2 Kings 1:9-16 ). ...
The worship of Baal infiltrated the Southern Kingdom of Judah. The reform movement of Hezekiah was reversed when Manasseh became king (2 Kings 21:2-16 ), as he reinstated Baal worship, along with worship of Assyrian gods and other gods. ...
The conflict between Baal worship and the worship of the Lord God is described in the Book of Hosea
Baali - (bay' uhl i) Form of address meaning, “my lord,” or “my Baal. ” Hosea used a play on words to look to a day when Israel would no longer worship Baal (Hosea 2:16 ). He said Israel, the bride, would refer to Yahweh, her God and husband, as “my man” (Hebrew, ishi ) but not as “my lord” (Hebrew, Baali ). Even though Baal was a common word for lord or husband, Israel could not use it because it reminded them too easily of Baal, the Canaanite god. See Baal ; Canaan
Baalim - Plural of Baal; images of the god Baal (Judges 2:11 ; 1 Samuel 7:4 )
Eshbaal - The Hebrews, to avoid pronouncing the word Baal, "lord," used bosheth, "confusion. " Instead of Mephi-baal, they said Mephi-bosheth; and, instead of Esh-baal, they said Ish-bosheth, 2 Samuel 2:8
Jerubbaal - ) Judges 6:32 translated, "they (not Joash, but one, for the townsmen generally) called him Jeroboam, saying, Let Baal fight against him, because he hath thrown down his altar. " They took up Joash's words: "he that will fight for Baal (seeking to put to death the destroyer of his altar) shall be put to death (himself; let us wait) TILL morning (to see, will Baal avenge his own wrong); let Baal fight for himself. " When Baal did Gideon, no harm the title Jerub-Baal, the" Baal fighter," became an honourable one. Besheth, "shame," is substituted for the idol in Jerubbesheth (to comply literally with Exodus 23:13; 2 Samuel 11:21), as in Ishbosheth for Eshbaal (2 Samuel 2:8 ff; 1 Chronicles 8:33; 1 Chronicles 9:39)
Esh-Baal - (ehssh-bay' uhl) Personal name meaning, “man of Baal. 1 Samuel 14:49 lists Ishui or Ishvi as Saul's son, possibly another way of respelling the name to avoid Baal. In Saul's day “baal” may have been a title applied to Yahweh indicating, “He is Lord or Master. ” In this case Esh-baal would mean, “the man of the Lord. ” Otherwise, Saul's name for his son would seem to indicate some devotion to the Canaanite god Baal at the period in his life when he named the son. Saul's son Jonathan named his son Merib-baal. See Ish-bosheth ; Ishvi ; Merib-baal; Jonathan
Bamoth, Bamoth-Baal - BAMOTH, BAMOTH-BAAL . identical with Bamoth-baal of Numbers 22:41 (RVm [3] ‘the high places of Baal’), to which Balaam was led by Balak. Bamoth-baal is mentioned as a Reubenite city in Joshua 13:17
Bel - The Aramaic form of Baal, the national god of the Babylonians (Isaiah 46:1 ; Jeremiah 50:2 ; 51:44 ). " (See Baal
Baal - Baal (bâ'al), lord. ...
Baal. There can lie no doubt of the great antiquity of the worship of Baal. Temples were erected to Baal in Judah, 1 Kings 16:32, and be was worshipped with much ceremony. The religion of the ancient British islands resembled this ancient worship of Baal. The Babylonian Bel, Isaiah 46:1, or Belus, is supposed to be identical with Baal, though perhaps under some modified form. The plural, Baalim, is found frequently, and the singular, Baal, in different compounds, among which appear—...
1. Baal-berith (bâ'al-bç'rith), the covenant Baal. Baal-hanan (bâ'al-hâ'nan). Baal-peor (bâ'al-pç'or), lord of the opening, i. The narrative, Numbers 25:1-18, seems clearly to show that this form of Baal-worship was connected with licentious rites. Baal-zebub (bâ'al-zç'bub), lord of the fly, and worshipped at Ekron. ...
Baal also occurs as the prefix or suffix to the names of several places in Palestine. Baal, a town of Simeon, named only fn 1 Chronicles 4:33, which from the parallel list in Joshua 19:8 seems to have been identical with Baalath-beer. Baalah (bâ'al-ah), mistress. Another name for Kibjath-jearim, or Kirjath-baal, perhaps now Kuriet el Enab (?). Baalath (bâ'al-ăth), mistress, a town of Dan named with Gibbethon, Gath-rimmon and other Philistine places. Baalath-beer (bâ'al-ăth-bç'er), lord of the well. Baal-gad (bâ'al-găd), lord of fortune, used to denote the most northern, Joshua 11:17; Joshua 12:7, or perhaps northwestern, 13:6, point to which Joshua's victories extended. Possibly it was a Phœnician or Canaanite sanctuary of Baal under the aspect of Gad, or Fortune. Baal-hamon (bâ'al-hâ'mon), lord of a multitude. Baal-hazor (bâ'al-hâ'zor), village of Baal. Mount Baal-hermon (bâ'al-hêr'mon), lord of Hermon, Judges 3:3, and simply Baal-hermon, 1 Chronicles 5:23. This is usually considered as a distinct place from Mount Hermon; but we know that this mountain had at least three names, Deuteronomy 8:9, and Baal-hermon may have been a fourth in use among the Phœnician worshippers of Baal. Baal-bieon (bâ'al-mç'on), lord of the house. Baal-perazim (bâ'al-pĕr'a-zĭm, or perâ'sim), lord of divisions. Baal-shalisha (bâ'al-shăl'i-shah), lord of Shalisha. Baal-tamar (bâ'al-tâ'mar), lord of the palm tree. Baal-zephon (bâ'al-zç'phon), lord of the north
Baalhermon - Town or mount in connection with Mount Hermon: there was probably a shrine of Baal there: see Baal-GAD
Beth-Baal-Meon - (behth-bay' uhl-mee' ahn) Place name meaning, “house of Baal's residence. Same as Baal-meon. See Baal-meon
Beon - Probably a copyist's change from original Meon (Numbers 32:3 ), a short form of Beth-meon or Beth-baal-meon. See Beth-baal-meon
Baal-Meon - (bay' uhl-mee' uhn) Place name meaning, “lord of the residence” or “Baal of the residence. , claims to have rebuilt Baal-meon, meaning he had captured it from Israel at that date. Ezekiel 25:9 pronounces judgment on Baal-meon as a city of Moab about the time of the Exile in 587. Baal-meon is located at modern Main, ten miles southwest of Heshbon and ten miles east of the Dead Sea
Jerubbaal - JERUBBAAL . It is = ‘Baal strives,’ Baal being a name for J″ [1] , as in Ishbaal, Meribbaal ; it cannot = ‘one who strives with Baal,’ as Judges 6:32 would suggest. This name was altered to Jerubbesheth ( besheth = ‘shame’) when Baal could no longer be used of J″ Baal - Thus Baal Berith is supposed to signify the Lord of the Covenant Baal Peor, or rather Baal Phegor, the Lord of the dead. Psalms 106Baal Zebub, the god of flies, &c
Jerubba'al, - (contender with Baal ), the surname of Gideon, which he acquired in consequence of destroying the altar of Baal, when his father defended him from the vengeance of the Abiezrites
Baal-Berith - Worshipped at Shechem by Israel after Gideon's death (Judges 8:33; Judges 9:4) "Baal in covenant", namely, with his worshippers; or perhaps a compromise, to combine Baal with the "covenant" of Jehovah
Baal-Meon - Baal-MEON . The name occurs in Numbers 32:38 as Baal-meon , but in Joshua 13:17 as Beth-baal-meon; both forms being found also on the Moahite Stone; cf
Asherah, Asherim - Asherah was the name of a Canaanite Baal goddess of fertility (1 Kings 18:18-19; 2 Kings 23:4; 2 Kings 23:7). These idolatrous symbols often stood beside the Baal altars on the sacred hilltop sites known as high places, and were important in Baal rituals (Judges 6:25-26; 1 Kings 14:23; 1 Kings 15:13; Isaiah 27:9). For details see Baal
Shalisha(h) - ” Territory where Saul sought his father's lost donkeys (1 Samuel 9:4 ); probably the same as Baal Shalishah. See Baal Shalishah
Gur-Baal - (guhr-bay' uhl) Place name meaning, “foreign sojourner of Baal” or “young animal of Baal. Greek manuscript evidence does not have Baal in the name
Bel - [1]
Athaliah - When Athaliah, daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, married Jehoram of Judah, the Baalism that Ahab and Jezebel had established in Israel spread to Judah. ...
Six years later, Athaliah was killed in a fresh anti-Baal revolution, this one centred on Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 22:12; 2 Chronicles 23:1-15). The people then destroyed her Baal temple, Baal altars and Baal images, and restored the dynasty of David by placing her sole surviving grandson on the throne of Judah (2 Chronicles 23:16-21)
Baalim - See Baal
High Places - See Baal
Baal Peor - Peor is supposed to have been a part of Mount Abarim; and Baal was the great idol or chief god of the Phoenicians, and was known and worshipped under a similar name, with tumultuous and obscene rites, all over Asia. Baal, by itself, signifies lord, and was a name of the solar or principal god. But it was also variously compounded, in allusion to the different characters and attributes of the particular or local deities who were known by it, as Baal Peor, Baal Zebub, Baal Zephon, &c. Baal Peor, then, was probably the temple of an idol belonging to the Moabites, on Mount Abarim, which the Israelites worshipped when encamped at Shittim; this brought a plague upon them, of which twenty-four thousand died, Numbers 35. Baal Peor has been farther supposed by some to have been Priapus; by others, Saturn: by others, Pluto; and by others again, Adonis. Faber agrees with Calmet in making Baal Peor the same with Adonis; a part of whose worship consisted in bewailing him with funeral rites, as one lost or dead, and afterward welcoming, with extravagant joy, his fictitious return to life
ba'Moth-ba'al - (heights of Baal ), a sanctuary of Baal in the country of Moab ( Joshua 13:17 ) which is probably mentioned in (Numbers 21:19 ) under the shorter form of Bamoth, or Bamoth-in-the-ravine (20), and again in (Isaiah 15:2 )
Baalim - ) of Baal...
Berith - See Baal-BERITH
Kirjath-Baal - City of Baal
Beelzebub - See Baal-Zebub...
ba'Alah - ba'Alath - Baal-Gad - Lord of fortune, or troop of Baal, a Canaanite city in the valley of Lebanon at the foot of Hermon, hence called Baal-hermon (Judge 3:3; 1 Chronicles 5:23 ), near the source of the Jordan (Joshua 13:5 ; 11:17 ; 12:7 ). It probably derived its name from the worship of Baal. Some have supposed it to be the same as Baalbec
Eth-Baal - (ehth- bay' uhl) Personal name meaning, “with him is Baal. Through her influence Baal worship pervaded the Northern Kingdom
Jerubbaal - He that defends Baal
Bal'Amo - ba'Ale of Judah - Beeliada - (bee li' uh duh) Personal name meaning, “Baal knows” or “the Lord knows. In 2 Samuel 5:16 the Baal part of the name is replaced with “El,” a Hebrew word for God, becoming, “Eliada
Bethpeor - A sanctuary of Baal Poor, E. One of Israel's last halting places is called "the valley over against Baal-peor" (Deuteronomy 3:29; Deuteronomy 4:46)
Baal - The plural, Baalim, signifies images or statues of Baal, Judges 2:11 10:10 . Of the extent to which the worship of this idol was domesticated among the Phoenicians and Carthaginians, we have an evidence in the proper names of persons; as, among the former, Ethbaal, Jerubbaal; and among the latter, Hannibal, Asdrubal, etc. The worship of Baal was established in Babylon in the famous tower of Babel, the uppermost room of which served at the same time as an observatory, and as the repository of a collection of astronomical observations. The more common opinion has been, that Baal, or Bel, is the sun; and that, under this name, this luminary received divine honors. This planet, therefore, many suppose to have been the object of worship under the name of Baal, as also the planet Venus under that of Astarte. Jeremiah threatens the Jews who had sacrificed to Baal on the house-top, Jeremiah 32:29 ; and Josiah destroyed the altars which Ahaz had erected on the terrace of his palace, 2 Kings 23:12 . ...
Human victims were offered to Baal, as they were also to the sun. Jeremiah reproaches the inhabitants of Judah and Jerusalem with "building the high places of Baal, to burn their sons with fire for burnt-offerings unto Baal," Jeremiah 19:5 ; an expression which appears to be decisive as to the actual slaying by fire of the unhappy victims to Baal. ...
The children of Israel were prone to serve Baal. This continued under David and Solomon; but under Ahab, whose wife Jezebel was a daughter of the Zidonian king Ethbaal, the worship of Baal was restored with great pomp, 1 Kings 16:31 . ...
Joined with other words, Baal signifies also other false gods. Baal-Berith, or the "lord of the covenant," was a god of the Shechemites, Judges 8:33 9:4 . Baal-Peor, or "the lord of Peor," was a filthy idol of the Moabites, Numbers 25:3,5 Hosea 9:10 . Baal-Zebub, "lord of flies," was a god of the Philistines at Ekron. The word Baal also occurs in many compound names of places, not always having any reference to the idol
Meri - MERI(B)BAAL
Baalism - ) Worship of Baal; idolatry
Beth-Meon - See Baal-Meon
Meribbaal - He that resists Baal; rebellion
el-Berith - See Baal-berith
Baalah - BAALAH (the Canaanite designation) equates to KIRJATH JEARIM, or KIRJATH Baal, now Kuriat el E'nab (Joshua 15:9-10-11 ("Mount Baal"), 60); supposed by many to be Emmaus. in 2 Samuel 6:2 called BaalE of Judah; Joshua 19:3 Balah; 1 Chronicles 4:29 BILHAH
Baal - It is found in several places in the plural BaalIM (Judges 2:11 ; 10:10 ; 1 Kings 18:18 ; Jeremiah 2:23 ; Hosea 2:17 ). Baal is identified with Molech (Jeremiah 19:5 ). It was known to the Israelites as Baal-peor (Numbers 25:3 ; Deuteronomy 4:3 ), was worshipped till the time of Samuel (1 Samuel 7:4 ), and was afterwards the religion of the ten tribes in the time of Ahab (1 Kings 16:31-33 ; 18:19,22 ). The priests of Baal were in great numbers (1 Kings 18:19 ), and of various classes (2 Kings 10:19 ). The sun-god, under the general title of Baal, or "lord," was the chief object of worship of the Canaanites. Each locality had its special Baal, and the various local Baals were summed up under the name of Baalim, or "lords. " Each Baal had a wife, who was a colourless reflection of himself. ...
...
The name of a place inhabited by the Simeonites, the same probably as Baal-ath-beer (1 Chronicles 4:33 ; Joshua 19:8 )
Bel - See Baal
Perazim - (peh' ruh zihm) See Baal-Perazim
Kirjath-Baal - The city of Baal, Joshua 15:60
Perazim - = Baal-perazim
Ethbaal - ("with Baal"), namely, for his patron god. Ithobalus ("Baal with him") in Menander (Josephus, Apion 1:18), king of Sidon, Jezebel's father (1 Kings 16:31)
Jerubbaal - Let Baal plead, Judges 6:31,32
ba'Lah - (Joshua 19:3 ) Bamah, Plural Bamoth - Bamoth-baal was a station of the Hebrews, in the border of Moab, Numbers 21:20 22:41 ; afterwards assigned to the tribe of Reuben, Joshua 13:17 . Baal was worshipped there, and it was perhaps the "high places" referred to in Isaiah 15:2
Dagon - Dagon was a Canaanite Baal god, and biblical references to it are all connected with the Philistines. (For details see Baal; PHILISTIA
Baal, Baalah, Baalath - Baal, BaalAH, BaalATH . Baalath-beer ( Joshua 19:8 , 1 Chronicles 4:33 [1]), a site in the Negeb. Mount Baalab, between Ekron and Jabneel ( Joshua 15:11 ), possibly, as M. Clermont-Gannean has suggested, the river (not mountain) of Baal (now Nahr Rubin )
Beon - = Baal-Meon (wh
Jerubbaal - Name, signifying 'Let Baal plead,' given to GIDEON,q
Peor - See Baal-Peor...
Baal - Baal (Romans 11:4 in a quotation from 1 Kings 19:18) was a generic name for a god among Semitic peoples, the literal meaning being ‘owner’ or ‘lord. Neither of these contentions can be proved; indeed it is evident that the Baal of one place differed from that of another. Thus the reference in the text is to Melkart, the Baal of Tyre. The feminine article (τῇ Βαάλ) in the Greek of Romans 11:4 is due to the frequent substitution of bôsheth (in Greek αἰσχύνη), ‘shame,’ for Baal by the Hebrews. Peake, article ‘Baal’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) ; G
Bel - ) The Babylonian name of the god known among the Hebrews as Baal. See Baal
Beon - Contracted from Baal Meon (Numbers 32:3; Numbers 32:38)
Bamothbaal - City, linked with the worship of Baal
Beth-me'on - (Jeremiah 48:23 ) A contracted form of Beth-baal-meon
Jezebel - Induced the Israelites to worship Baal, supported the prophets of Baal, and killed hundreds of true prophets
Baal-Gad - Baal-GAD (? ‘Baal of fortune’)
Merib'ba-a - (contender against Baal )
Baal - The term Baal, which is itself an appellative, served at first to denote the true God, among those who adhered to the true religion. Accordingly, the Phoenicians, being originally Canaanites, having once had, as well as the rest of their kindred, the knowledge of the true God, probably called him Baal, or lord. But they, as well as other nations, gradually degenerating into idolatry, applied this appellation, to their respective idols; and thus were introduced a variety of divinities, called Baalim, or Baal, with some epithet annexed to it, as Baal Berith, Baal Gad, Baal Moloch, Baal Peor, Baal Zebub, &c. Some have supposed that the descendants of Ham first worshipped the sun under the title of Baal, 2 Kings 23:5 ; 2 Kings 23:11 ; and that they afterward ascribed it to the patriarch who was the head of their line; making the sun only an emblem of his influence or power. It is certain, however, that when the custom prevailed of deifying and worshipping those who were in any respect distinguished among mankind, the appellation of Baal was not restricted to the sun, but extended to those eminent persons who were deified, and who became objects of worship in different nations. It is probable that Baal, Belus, or Bel, the great god of the Carthaginians, and also of the Sidonians, Babylonians, and Assyrians, who, from the testimony of Scripture, appears to have been delighted with human sacrifices, was the Moloch of the Ammonites; the Chronus of the Greeks, who was the chief object of adoration in Italy, Crete, Cyprus, and Rhodes, and all other countries where divine honours were paid him; and the Saturn of the Latins. In process of time, many other deities, beside the principal ones just mentioned, were distinguished by the title of Baal among the Phoenicians, particularly those of Tyre, and of course among the Carthaginians, and other nations. ...
The temples and altars of Baal were generally placed on eminences: they were places inclosed by walls, within which was maintained a perpetual fire; and some of them had statues or images, called in Scripture, "Chamanim. Baal had his prophets and his priests in great numbers; accordingly, we read of four hundred and fifty of them that were fed at the table of Jezebel only; and they conducted the worship of this deity, by offering sacrifices, by dancing round his altar with violent gesticulations and exclamations, by cutting their bodies with knives and lancets, and by raving and pretending to prophesy, as if they were possessed by some invisible power. ...
It is remarkable that we do not find the name Baal so much in popular use east of Babylonia; but it was general west of Babylonia, and to the very extremity of western Europe, including the British isles. A town in Perthshire, on the borders of the Highlands, is called Tilliebeltane or Tulliebeltane; that is, the eminence, or rising ground, of the fire of Baal. ...
The Hebrews often imitated the idolatry of the Canaanites in adoring Baal. Baal had priests and prophets consecrated to his service. All sorts of infamous and immodest actions were committed in the festivals of Baal and Astarte. This false deity is frequently mentioned in Scripture in the plural number, Baalim, which may intimate that the name Baal was given to several different deities. ...
There were many cities in Palestine, whose names were compounded of Baal and some other word: whether it was that the god Baal was adored in them, or that these places were looked upon as the capital cities,— lords of their respective provinces,—is uncertain
Baal-Tamar - Baal-TAMAR
Baalath-Beer - (bay' uh lath-bee' uhr) Place name meaning, “the Baal of the well” or the “lady of the well. It may be identical with Baal (1 Chronicles 4:33 ) and/or with Bealoth (Joshua 15:24 )
Chemosh - Also related to Baal-peor, Baal-zebub, Mars, and Saturn
Baal-Zephon - Baal-ZEPHON . Exodus 14:2 , Numbers 33:7 ; the name of a place near the spot where the Israelites crossed the Red Sea, apparently a shrine of ‘Baal of the north. ’ The corresponding goddess ‘Baalit of the north’ is named along with the god of Kesem (Goshen), in an Egyp
Baalite - ) A worshiper of Baal; a devotee of any false religion; an idolater
Baal-Hamon - Baal-HAMON
Baal-Shalishah - Baal-SHALISHAH ( 2 Kings 4:42 )
Pithon - A grandson of Merib-baal ( 1 Chronicles 8:35 ; 1 Chronicles 9:41 )
Baal Meon - ) Reuben in occupying it along with Nebo (Numbers 32:38) changed the names, probably for the idol name Baal substituting Beth Meon. The famous Moabite stone of Dibon mentions that as Omri made Medeba a military center for opposing Moab, so Mesha occupied Baal Meon as his center for assailing Israel; "I Mesha, son of Kamos (Chemosh), fortified Baal Meon, and I besieged and took Kiriathaim and Nebo," etc
Ish-Bosheth - ” Originally his name was Ish-baal (1 Chronicles 8:33 ), which means “man of Baal. ” The repugnance with which Baal worship was regarded by the faithful in Israel frequently led to the substitution of the word for shame in the place of the name of the Canaanite deity
Baal-Hermon - (bay' uhl-huhr mahn) Place name meaning, “Baal of Hermon” or “lord of Hermon. Some would equate it with Baal-gad
Baal-Zephon - Baal of the north, an Egyptian town on the shores of the Gulf of Suez (Exodus 14:2 ; Numbers 33:7 ), over against which the children of Israel encamped before they crossed the Red Sea. Baal-zapuna of the Egyptians was a place of worship
Bamoth-Baal - (ba' muhth- bay' uhl) Place name meaning, “high places of Baal. Numbers 22:41 speaks of Bamoth or high places of Baal near the Arnon River
Baal-Shalishah - (bay' uhl-sshal' ih' sshah) Place name meaning, “Baal of Shalishah” or “lord of Shalishah. Baal-shalishah may be modern Kefr Thilth, twenty miles southwest of Shechem
pe'or - ( Numbers 23:14,28 ) In four passages -- (Numbers 25:18 ) twice; Numb 31:16; Joshua 22:17 --Peor occurs as a contraction for Baal-peor. [ Baal
Baal (1) - Baalim, the plural form, expresses the various aspects of Baal, as different localities viewed him. Baal is also associated with Aaherah, inaccurately translated "THE GROVE" or "groves" (Judges 3:7; 2 Chronicles 33:3; 2 Chronicles 34:4; 2 Kings 23:5-6). ) Baal means lord, in the sense of owner, possessor; but Αdown means lord, master. The Hebrew article distinguishes the proper name Baal from the common noun; Bel, the Babylonian idol (Isaiah 46:1), is related. Midian and Moab, as early as Moses' time, tempted Israel, by Balaam's devilish counsel (1 Kings 18:19-22; Joshua 13:22; Numbers 25:18), to worship the phase of the deity called Baal-peor (Numbers 25), from peor , "aperire hymenem virgineum " corresponding to the Latin, Ρriapus . "Your eyes have seen what Jehovah did because of Baal-peor, for all the men that followed Baal-peor the Lord thy God hath destroyed them from among you. ...
Baal worship prevailed much in Israel, except during Gideon's judgeship (hence called Jerubbaal, "let Baal plead"), up to Samuel's time (Judges 2:10-13; Judges 6:26-32; Judges 8:33; Judges 10:6-10). Ahab, king of Israel, under Jezebel's influence (daughter of Ethbaal, priest of Baal and king of Zidon), established the worship of Baal and Asherah ("the groves"): 1 Kings 16:31-33; Revelation 2:14. ...
Baal worship also in Judah found entrance under Ahaz (2 Chronicles 28:2-3), but was suppressed by Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:4). Manasseh sought to bring Judah to the same state of Baal worship as Israel had been under Ahab (2 Kings 21:3; compare Micah 6:16). "Sun images" (hammanim ; Isaiah 17:8; Isaiah 27:9; 2 Chronicles 34:4) "were on high above the altars" of Baal (Jeremiah 43:13); "the images of Bethshemesh," literally "the pillars (obelisks) of the house of the sun. An inscription at Palmyra names him Baal Shemesh, owner of the sun. High places were chosen for Baal worship, and human victims were sometimes offered as burnt offerings (Jeremiah 19:5). The name appears in Asdrubal ("help of Baal"), Hannibal ("grace of Baal"), Adherbaal, Ethbaal
Bealoth - Feminine plural of Baal
Beon - Another form of Baal-MEON
Ashtoreth - ) The principal female divinity of the Phoenicians, as Baal was the principal male divinity
Baal-Perazim - Baal-PERAZIM
Bamoth-Baal - ("high places of Baal. ) Baal Meon or Beth Baal Meon was near, sacred to the same idol. Israel's halt at Bamoth is identical with that in Numbers 33:45, connected with Dibon Gad, for Dibon and Bamoth Baal were near (Joshua 13:17)
Bethmeon - Apparently also called Baal-MEON, BETH-BAAL-MEON, and BEON, Joshua 13 : 17; Numbers 32:3 ; Numbers 32:38 (which says 'their names being changed'); 1 Chronicles 5:8
Ashtoreth, Ashtaroth - Although a Baal was a male god and an Ashtoreth a female god, the two are often linked to represent the religion commonly known as Baalism (Judges 2:13; 1 Samuel 12:10; 1 Kings 11:6). For details see Baal
Jerubbaal - (jehr uhb bay' uhl) Personal name meaning, “Baal judges
Melech - A grandson of Merib-baal ( 1 Chronicles 8:35 ; 1 Chronicles 9:41 )
me'Lech, - the second son of Micah, the son of Merib-baal or Mephibosheth
Ishbosheth - His name is given in 1 Chronicles 8:33 ; 1 Chronicles 9:39 as Esh-baal . The same variation meets us in the name of Jonathan’s son Mephibosheth or Meribbaal and in the case of Jerubbaal or Jerubbesheth ; similarly, we have Beeliada and Eliada . In 1 Samuel 14:49 Ishbaal has become Ishvi , which in its turn is a corruption for Ishiah , or ‘man of Jahweh. ’ The change of Ish-baal , ‘man of Baal,’ into Ishbosheth , ‘man of the shameful thing,’ is ordinarily accounted for on the supposition ‘that the later religion wished to avoid the now odious term Baal. ’ The theory, however, is met by the difficulty that it is in the Chronicler that the form compounded with Baal occurs. Ishbosheth or Ishbaal is probably the true reading for Jashobeam in 1 Chronicles 11:11 etc
Eth-Baal - With Baal, a king of Sidon (B. He is said to have been also a priest of Astarte, whose worship was closely allied to that of Baal, and this may account for his daughter's zeal in promoting idolatry in Israel
Baal Zephon - Migdol and Baal Zephon were opposite one another, Baal Zephon being behind Pihahiroh in relation to the Israelites
Baal, Master - Ba‛al (בַּעַל, Strong's #1167), “master; Baal. Baal was a common name given to the god of fertility in Canaan. In the Canaanite city of Ugarit, Baal was especially recognized as the god of fertility. The Old Testament records that Baal was “the god” of the Canaanites. The Israelites worshiped Baal during the time of the judges ( Baal priests at Mount Carmel (1 Kings 18:21ff. Many cities made Baal a local god and honored him with special acts of worship: Baal-peor ( Baal-berith at Shechem ( Baal-zebub (2 Kings 1:2-16) at Ekron, Baal-zephon ( Baalhermon ( Baal most frequently. Hosea pictured Israel as turning to the Baals and only returning to the Lord after a time of despair ( Merib-Baal - Contender with Baal, (1 Chronicles 8:34 ; 9:40 ), elsewhere called Mephibosheth (2 Samuel 4:4 ), the son of Jonathan
Perazim, Mount - A place probably connected with Baal-PERAZIM,where David smote the Philistines
Toldot yaakov yosef - the earliest record of the teachings of the Baal Shem Tov, written by his disciple R
Beth-Peor - See Baal-Peor
Besht - Acronym for "Baal Shem Tov" (lit
Shalisha, Land of - Probably the district of Baal-shalisha (2 Kings 4:42 ), lying about 12 miles north of Lydda (1 Samuel 9:4 )
Moshiach's meal - festive meal instituted by the Baal Shem Tov and held on the last day of Passover in anticipation of the Redemption ...
Baal korei - form of Baal keriah, lit
Baalath-Beer - Baalah of the well, (Joshua 19:8 , probably the same as Baal, mentioned in 1 Chronicles 4:33 , a city of Simeon
Baladan - (2 Kings 20:12) The name seems to be a compound of Baal and Adorn, both meaning lord
Baal - Baal
Beth-Peor - ” A temple for the god Peor or Baal Peor probably stood there. See Baal Peor. Numbers does not use the place name, but evidently at least part of the shameful worship of Baal Peor (Numbers 25:1-5 ) occurred at Beth-peor
Elul 18 - (�the 18th of the month of Elul�); chassidic festival marking the birthday of the Baal Shem Tov (1698) and the Alter Rebbe (1745) ...
Mount Baal-Hermon - (bay' uhl huhr' muhn) A variant name for Mount Hermon (Judges 3:3 ), perhaps indicating its use as a worship place for Baal
Baal-Hanan - Baal-HANAN
Baal, Baalim - The Israelites in coming into the land doubtless found temples, groves, altars and high places set apart to Baal: incense was offered and offerings burnt, and children were sacrificed to him, whilst a great retinue of prophets and priests was maintained in his service, as is manifest by its revival afterwards. ...
The children of Israel were soon led away to the worship of Baal, Judges 2:11,13 ; Judges 3:7 ; Judges 6:31,32 ; Judges 8:33 ; Judges 10:6,10 ; and though under Samuel they relinquished it, 1 Samuel 7:4 ; 1 Samuel 12:10 , yet after the division of the kingdom it was by Ahab fully established in Israel. Elijah however stood for Jehovah, and raised the question with Israel whether Jehovah was God, or whether Baal, and established the rights of Jehovah by fire from heaven. This led to the destruction of all the prophets of Baal, 1 Kings 18:17-40 ; but his idolatrous worship continued until the days of Jehu, who slew his worshippers and destroyed his house and images. It however revived again in Israel, and under Ahaziah and Athaliah extended also to Judah, and during the reigns of Ahaz and Manasseh worshippers of Baal are found there. ...
The word Baal is used in several compounds, at times referring to the god and in other cases to persons or places
Kirjath Huzoth - Between the Arnon and Bamoth Baal
Mattan - Priest of Baal ( 2 Kings 11:18 , 2 Chronicles 23:17 )
Baal-Hamon - I am inclined to think that this was not an idol, but a place; for the church, celebrating the glories of her Solomon, saith, that he had a vineyard at Baal-hamon (Song of Song of Solomon 8:11) Hamon, is people, multitudes, or riches. So that Baal-hamon may be rendered, lord or master of a troop, or people
Baal-Peor - The Psalmist mournfully speaks of it, (Psalms 106:18) "they joined themselves unto Baal-peor, and ate the offerings of the dead. " (Numbers 25:1-3; Hosea 9:10) From what this prophet saith of their shame; and from the impure name of this strumpet idol; there is reason to believe that the greatest indecency was joined with idolatry, in the, worship of this Baal-peor
Azriel - ) Like the Carthaginian, Hasdrubal means "Baal" )"his help"
Mattan - Priest of Baal, slain in the time of Jehoiada
Shalisha - Baal-shalisha is placed by Eusebius fifteen miles from Lydda, towards the north
Eshbaal - Man of Baal, the fourth son of king Saul (1 Chronicles 8:33 ; 9:39 )
Beelzebub - See Baal
Baal - ) The whole class of divinities to whom the name Baal was applied
Kiriath-Baal - (kihr' ih ath-bay' uhl) Place name meaning, “city of Baal
Baal Gad - A Canaanite sanctuary of Baal, as "the lord of fortune. Baalbek ("the city of the sun") is situated too far N. at the lowest declivity of Antilibanus to be identified with Baal
Beelzebub - This name is derived from Baal-zebub, an idol deity among the Ekronites, signifying lord of flies, fly-baal, fly-god, whose office was to protect his worshippers from the torment of the gnats and flies with which that region was infested, 2 Kings 1:2,3,16
Baal Gad - A Canaanite sanctuary of Baal, as "the lord of fortune. Baalbek ("the city of the sun") is situated too far N. at the lowest declivity of Antilibanus to be identified with Baal
Baara - (bay' uh ruh) Personal name meaning, “burning” or a name intentionally changed from one honoring Baal
Ethbaal - ETHBAAL (‘with Baal,’ i
Perazim, Mount - It is the same as Baal-PERAZIM (q
Beeliada - BEELIADA (‘Baal knows’)
Asherah - Some scholars conclude that it was a sacred pole set up near an altar to Baal. " '...
Ăshêrâh signifies the name of the goddess herself: "Now therefore send, and gather to me all Israel unto mount Carmel, and the prophets of Baal four hundred and fifty, and the prophets of the groves [2] four hundred, which eat at Jezebel's table" (1 Kings 18:19). The Canaanites believed that 'ăshêrâh ruled the sea, was the mother of all the gods including Baal, and sometimes was his deadly enemy. Apparently, the mythology of Canaan maintained that 'ăshêrâh was the consort of Baal, who had displaced El as their highest god. Thus her sacred objects (poles) were immediately beside altars to Baal, and she was worshiped along with him
R. aryeh leib - "Grandfather of Shpoli": Rabbi Aryeh Leib of Shpoli, disciple of Rabbi Israel Baal Shem Tov and of Rabbi DovBer of Mezeritch; 1725-1811 (see entry on Rabbi Leib Sarah's) ...
Ashbel - ASHBEL (‘man of Baal’)
Beulah - (Isaiah 62:4) It should seem to be derived from Balak, or Baal-meon, lord of the house, or married
Mephibosheth - It is thought by some, that the proper name of Jonathan's son was Merib-baal, (see 1 Chronicles 8:34) and that his name was changed to Mephibosheth, because the Israelites were cautious of using the name of Baal
Beelphegor - Name given to the god Baal of Mount Phegor in Moab, worshiped with immoral rites at Settim
Draught-House - Jehu ordered the temple of Baal to be destroyed, and the place to be converted to the vile use of receiving offal or ordure
Bamoth - Some would equate it with Bamoth-baal
Eshbaal - The one name signifies 'man of Baal,' and the other 'man of shame
Lancet, - ' The priests of Baal, in their desperation, wounded themselves with this weapon
Baal-Peor - Baal-PEOR
Baal (2) - BAAL as applied to places. It sometimes refers to Baal's worship there; sometimes it means that the place possesses some attribute denoted by the other part of the compound. ...
So strong was Israelite orthodox feeling against the name, that they altered names in which it occurred: Jerubbaal into Jerubbesheth, Merib-baal into Mephibosheth: compare Hosea 2:16. "At that day, saith Jehovah, thou shalt call Me Ishi, and shalt call Me no more Baali. " Though both express "my husband," yet Baali by being used for the images of Baal whose name ought not to be taken up into the lips (Psalms 16:4), was to be renounced for the unambiguous Ishi
Bealiah - ” Literally, “Yahweh is Baal
R. dovber - the Maggid of Mezeritch: ?-1772; second leader of the Chassidic movement, successor to the Baal Shem Tov and spiritual mentor of Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi, known for his scholarship, piety, and asceticism ...
Pihahiroth - At this place the Egyptians had a migdol or tower, and one of their dunghill gods, called Baal-Zephon, had a temple here, as if to watch that no runaway servant or slave might escape from Egypt; at least, it was intended to act as a bugbear to deliver the fugitive. See Baal-Zephon...
ki'Shon - (winding ) , The river, a torrent or winter stream of central Palestine, the scene of two of the grandest achievements of Israelitish history --the defeat of Sisera, Judges 4 , and the destruction of the prophets of Baal by Elijah. The part of the Kishon at which the prophets of Baal were slaughtered by Elijah was doubtless close below the spot on Carmel where the sacrifice had taken place
Mattan - Queen Athaliah's priest of Baal in Jerusalem killed in Jehoiada's purge (2 Kings 11:18 )
Latrine - Jehu demonstrated his utter contempt for Baal by ordering that his temple be destroyed and converted into a latrine
Belshazzar - His history, which is very awful, we have, (Daniel 5:1-31) His name is compounded of Baal, lord; and Otzer, treasure; intimating, no doubt, his great riches and power
Baal-Hazor - Baal-HAZOR
Esh-Baal - ("Baal's man". ) Saul's youngest son (1 Chronicles 8:33; 1 Chronicles 9:39); Bosheth ("shame") being substituted for Baal through the believing Israelites' contempt of idols, Ishbosheth is its equivalent (Isaiah 44:9, etc
Mat'Tan -
The priest of Baal slain before his altars in the idol temple at Jerusalem
Baal (1) - Baal (BAALI, BaalIM) . Baal-gad, Baalath-beer , and other compounds of this word). Baal-berith ), and as their votaries extended their powers over a greater area, became the Baal par excellence, i. Thus Saul, a zealous worshipper of Jahweh, names (1 Chronicles 8:33 ) one of his sons Eshbaal , and one of David’s heroes is called ( 1 Chronicles 12:5 ) Bealiah (‘J″ [2] is Baal’); cf. also Meribbaal ( 1 Chronicles 9:40 ), Beeliada ( 1 Chronicles 14:7 ), Jerubbaal ( Judges 8:35 ). A confusion, however, of Jahweh and the Canaanitish deities seems to have taken place, to avoid which, Hosea ( Hosea 2:16-17 ) demands that Jahweh be no longer called Ba‘ali (‘my Baal’), but ’Ishi (‘my husband’). Under the influence of such prophecies the Israelites abandoned the use of Baal for Jahweh , and in later times developed so great an antipathy to this word that later revisers substituted bôsheth (‘shameful thing’), not only wherever Ba’al occurred for the Canaanitish deities ( Hosea 9:10 , Jeremiah 3:24 ; Jeremiah 11:13 ), but also, forgetful of its former application to Jahweh, in some of the above names (see Ishbosheth), supposing them to allude to local gods
Baal Tamar - The battle at Baal Tamar was prior to her time, 1406 B
Bamoth-Baal - Heights of Baal, a place on the river Arnon, or in the plains through which it flows, east of Jordan (Joshua 13:17 ; Compare Numbers 21:28 )
Baalathbeer - Joshua 19:8 ; also called 'RAMATH of the South;' and in 1 Samuel 30:27 South RAMOTH; and apparently the same as Baal in 1 Chronicles 4:33
Eshbaal - The word Baal , the name of an idol, was not pronounced by scrupulous Jews; they substituted BOSHETH, confusion. For Meribbaal, they said Mephibosheth, etc
Beth-Baal-me'on - (house of Baalmeon ), a place in the possessions of Reuben, on the downs (Authorized Version "plain") east of the Jordan. ( Joshua 13:17 ) At the Israelites' first approach is name was Baal-MEON, (Numbers 32:38 ) or, in its contracted form, BEON (Numbers 32:3 ) to which the Beth was possibly a Hebrew addition. Later it would seem to have come into possession of Moab, and to be known either as Beth-meon, (Jeremiah 48:23 ) or Baal-meon
Baal (3) - A town of Simeon (1 Chronicles 4:33), identical with BaalATH BEER (Joshua 19:8), i. "Baal of the well", "holy well"
Jashobeam - Eshbaal (‘man of Baal’)
Baal-Gad - Gad means fortune; so that Baal-gad means a lord of fortune
Ahaziah - Ahaziah of Israel was the son of Ahab and Jezebel, and during his brief two-year reign (853-852 BC) he continued to promote his parents’ Baal worship (1 Kings 22:51-53). After an accident, Ahaziah sought help from Baal gods, but Elijah stopped him. Through the Judean Jehoram and his wife Athaliah, the Baalism of Ahab and Jezebel spread to Judah. Being very much under the influence of his mother, Ahaziah promoted Baal worship in Judah (2 Chronicles 22:3-4). He had gone to visit his uncle, Jehoram of Israel, who had been wounded in battle, and got caught in Jehu’s anti-Baal revolution (1618648017_34; cf
Schneur zalman of liadi - 1745-1812, founder and first Rebbe of the Chabad branch of chassidism, known also as the "Alter Rebbe," �the Rav,� and as Baal HaTanya; lived in Li'ozna and Liadi, White Russia; author of Tanya, a classic text of the chassidic tra...
Baal-Meon - In Reuben beyond the Jordan, Numbers 32:38 ; called also Bethmeon, Jeremiah 48:23 , and Beth-baal-meon, Joshua 13:17
Elijah - Israel had always been tempted to mix the worship of their God with the religious practices of local Baalism (see Baal), but matters suddenly worsened after Jezebel became queen. She brought with her a new and more dangerous form of Baalism, which she then tried to make the national religion of Israel. This was the Baalism of the god Melqart, whose influence had already spread south along the Mediterranean coast as far as Mt Carmel (1 Kings 16:30-33). ...
Early resistance to Baalism...
Baal was supposed to control nature and fertility. Therefore, to show the powerlessness of Baal, Elijah announced a three-year drought throughout Israel and Phoenicia. God’s miraculous provisions of food, both in Israel and in Phoenicia, showed that he, not Baal, was the God of nature (1 Kings 17:1-4; 1 Kings 17:9; 1 Kings 17:16; cf. ...
After three years of drought, Elijah challenged Ahab to gather Baal’s prophets to Mt Carmel for a public contest to show who was the true God, Yahweh or Baal (1 Kings 18:19-21). The Baal priests considered Mt Carmel to be one of their sacred sites, yet even there they were shamefully defeated (1 Kings 18:40). As a final proof that Israel’s God, not Baal, controlled nature, Elijah announced that God would end the drought by sending a storm. ...
Elijah felt that he was fighting alone in his battle with Jezebel’s Baalism (1 Kings 18:22; Romans 11:1-5). This feeling was strengthened when, in spite of his spectacular victory over Baal at Mt Carmel, nothing in Israel seemed to have changed. The people did not cease from their Baal worship, and Jezebel did not cease from her efforts to kill him. ...
For Israel’s idolatrous majority, however, there would be further violent and spectacular events, but these would be in judgment against them rather than against Baal. ...
Ministry fulfilled...
In addition to opposing Ahab and Jezebel because of their Baalism, Elijah opposed them because of their greed and injustice. Ahab’s son Ahaziah, who came to the throne after Ahab’s death, continued the worship of Baal and likewise met opposition from Elijah. God preserved Elijah from Ahaziah’s attempts to capture him, and then used Elijah to pronounce certain death upon the Baalist king (2 Kings 1:2-4; 2 Kings 1:13-17). ...
The time had now come for Elijah to pass on to Elisha the responsibility for preserving the faithful and preparing judgment for the Baalists
Canaan, History And Religion of - ”...
Baal was the chief god in the popular worship of the people. Baal means “master” or “lord” and could refer to any one of the numerous Baalim (Baals) who had authority in various locations. The Ugaritic Baal, however, referred to the ultimate Baal!...
Whereas El was located at some distance from the people, Baal was easily accessible. Baal statues have been recovered. These depict Baal wearing a conical hat with horns that conveys the strength and fertility associated with bull imagery. In his right hand Baal holds a club that represents his military strength as well as thunder. ...
Baal was joined in his task by Anat, represented in the Bible as Anath. She was portrayed as both sister and consort of Baal. In her role she was both goddess of love, the perpetual virgin, and the goddess of warfare, whose exploits in Baal's behalf were sometimes remarkably cruel. ...
As Baal gradually supplanted El, many of the prerogatives earlier associated with El were naturally transferred to Baal. Thus in the Bible Baal is often depicted with Asherah (i. Mot was clearly understood as a power capable of rendering impotent Baal's regenerative powers. Cultically, the fear of chaos overcoming cosmos was represented in Baal's struggle with Yam. of the vessels made for Baal and Asherah as well as the houses of the male cult prostitutes — 2 Kings 23:1 ) for Israel in daily practice of popular religion to resist Canaanite practices. ...
The mythology apparently centered around three primary exploits of Baal. Eventually, following some negotiations having to do with his role if successful against Yam, Baal stepped forward and proceeded to engage Yam. Baal was successful, bringing Yam under control by dividing him and thus making helpful an otherwise destructive, chaotic force. By this act Baal demonstrated himself worthy of exaltation. ...
The second mythological sequence emphasized that Baal was now worthy of his own palace or temple. Given the cyclic view of reality and the recurring danger posed by Yam, it is understandable that Baal did not want any windows in his palace. Eventually Baal was convinced otherwise. Baal opened the completed palace to all the pantheon for a type of sacred meal. During the meal, Baal opened one of the windows and bellowed out the window, surely understood as an indication of thunder's origin, given Baal's association as god of the storm. ...
All should be well, but Baal had one more enemy to confront, Mot. Baal was defeated, being consigned thereby to the nether world. When Baal was separated from Anat, sterility reigned on earth. The wadis dried up, and Anat anxiously searched for Baal. While she could not find Baal, one day she chanced upon Mot. Regardless, this action by Anat enabled Baal to escape from his confinement. For the Israelites the most natural thing would have been to embrace Baalism, although perhaps not to the exclusion of Yahwism. ...
Strong argument can be made that a type of Yahwism — Baalism synthesis gradually established itself, particularly in the Northern Kingdom. During the period of Joshua and the Judges, a cultural struggle was waged which had to do more with the conflict between wilderness (Israelite) and agrarian (Canaanite) cultural motifs than between Yahweh and Baal. Another judge could be called Jerabaal (Judges 6:32 ), having a father with an altar to Baal (Judges 6:25 ). Without leadership Israel worshipped Baal-berith (“Baal of the covenant”) mixing Baalism with the covenant of Yahweh (Judges 8:33 ). Saul assuredly did not struggle to eliminate Baalism, and he even named a son Eshbaal (“man of Baal,” 1 Chronicles 8:33 ). Jonathan had a son, Merib-baal (1 Chronicles 8:34 ). In like manner David named a son Beeliada (“Baal knows,” 1 Chronicles 14:7 ). In addition, Judah was geographically isolated from the northern Canaanite area where Baalism was more regularly practiced. These shrines, in the shape of bulls, are viewed by most scholars as being associated in some fashion with Baalism (recall that both El and Baal could be represented in the form of a bull). Jezebel brought the clearest infusion of Baalism into Israel. Amidst the building of a Baal temple in the capital city of Samaria and the persecution of Yahweh's prophets, the prophet Elijah emerged on the scene. It clarified that a person must worship either Yahweh or Baal. ...
The struggle Elijah initiated with this either-Yahweh-or-Baal imperative, King Jehu (842-815) carried forward politically. Religiously, in the Northern Kingdom, Hosea gave voice to the anti-Baalistic message. ...
In the South, two kings led the anti-Baalistic struggle. ...
Judah also had its vocal prophetic spokesmen against Baalism. onwards issued the strongest denunciation of Baalism. ...
The Baalistic Canaanites influenced Israel in many ways: Temple construction, sacrificial rituals, the high places, a rejection of any sexual motif as a worship instrument (Deuteronomy 23:17-18 ), and a lessening of the purely mythical with a concomitant emphasis upon the historical happening as with Yahweh's splitting of the sea (Yam Suph) rather than a struggle with a mythological Yam(Exodus 14-15 ). Rather, a long historical process led to the eventual elimination of Baalism and other elements of Canaanite religion. See Amorites ; Anath ; Asherah ; Baal ; El ; Elijah ; Israel ; Phoenicia ; Ugarit
Jerubbesheth - ” A deliberate scribal corruption of the name Jerubbaal (2 Samuel 11:21 ), replacing the name of the Canaanite deity Baal with a form of the Hebrew word for “shame
Baal-Tamar - It was one of the sanctuaries or groves of Baal
Bamah - Bamoth Baal, a city beyond Jordan
Baalah - (bay' uh lah) Place name meaning, “wife, lady,” or “residence of Baal. It is called Baale of Judah (2 Samuel 6:2 ) and may be the same as Kirjath-baal (Joshua 15:60 )
Caesara Philippi - According to some its original name was Baal-Gad ( Joshua 11:17 ), or Baal-Hermon (Judges 3:3 ; 1 Chronicles 5:23 ), when it was a Canaanite sanctuary of Baal
Shame - ...
This word means a “shameful thing” as a substitute for the name Baal: “For shame hath devoured the labor of our fathers from our youth …” ( Baal
Ahab - His wife was Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal king of Tyre; an ambitious and passionate idolatress, through whose influence the worship of Baal and Ashtoreth was introduced in Israel. Ahab erected in Samaria a house of Baal, and set up images of Baal and Ashtoreth; idolatry and wickedness became fearfully prevalent, and the king "did more to provoke the Lord to anger than all the kings that were before him. " In the midst of this great apostasy, God visited the land with three years of drought and famine; and then, at Mount Carmel, reproved idolatry by fire from heaven, and by the destruction of four hundred and fifty prophets of Baal
Baalhanan - ("Baal is gracious"
Baal-Hanan - (bay' uhl-hay' nan) Personal name meaning, “Baal was gracious
Achbor - An Edomite, the father of Baal-hanan
Baal-Zephon - They encamped "over against" and "before" Baal-zephon before crossing the Red Sea
Sun - For the idolatrous worship of the sun, see Baal
Baal-Perazim - Baal having rents, bursts, or destructions, the scene of a victory gained by David over the Philistines (2 Samuel 5:20 ; 1 Chronicles 14:11 )
Baal-Hermon - Probably identical with Baal-gad (Joshua 11:17 )
Shal'Isha, the Land of, - In it perhaps was situated the place called Baal-shalisha, (2 Kings 4:42 ) 15 Miles north of Lydda
Beth-Peor - A place where the worship of Baal-peor had prevailed, in the district allotted to Reuben
Beth-Peor - It was infamous for the worship of Baal-peor
Kir'Jath-hu'Zoth - It appears to have lain between the Arnon (Wady Mojeb ) and Bamoth-baal
Hermon - In two passages of Scripture this mountain is called Baal-hermon, Judges 3:3; 1 Chronicles 5:23, possibly because Baal was there worshipped
Mattan -
A priest of Baal, slain before his altar during the reformation under Jehoiada (2 Kings 11:18 )
Baal-Meon - Lord of dwelling, a town of Reuben (Numbers 32:38 ), called also Beth-meon (Jeremiah 48:23 ) and Beth-baal-meon (Joshua 13:17 )
Baal-Hamon - It has been supposed to be identical with Baal-gad, and also with Hammon in the tribe of Asher (Joshua 19:28 )
Baal-Gad' - It was perhaps the same as Baal-Hermon. Some have supposed it was Baalbek; but this lay further north
Peor - See Baal
Ele'Asah - ) ...
Son of Rapha or Rephaiah; a descendant of Saul through Jonathan and Merib-baal or Mephibosheth
Ashtoreth, Plural Ash'Taroth - She is commonly named in connection with Baal, Judges 2:13 10:6 1 Samuel 7:4 12:10 . ...
As Baal or Bel denotes, in the astrological mythology of the East, the male star of fortune, the planet Jupiter; so Ashtoreth signifies the female star of fortune, the planet Venus. As to the opinion that Baal designates the sun, and Ashtoreth the moon, see under Jeremiah 7:18 11:13 44:17,18 Ezekiel 16:1-63
Baal-Hazor - (bay' uhl-hay' zawr) Place name meaning “Baal of Hazor
Draught - ’ Jehu, according to the last-cited passage, turned the temple of Baal in Samaria into public latrines
Beth-Peor - , "temple of Baal-peor", a place in Moab, on the east of Jordan, opposite Jericho
Arba - ('Αr Βaal "hero of Baal"
Eliada - Called Beelida 1 Chronicles 14:7; Baal being substituted for El (God), why we can only conjecture; possibly he apostatized
Baal-Tamar - (bay' uhl-tay' mahr) Place name meaning, “Baal of the palm tree” or “lord of the palm tree
Nachon - ” Threshing floor between Baal-judah (Kiriath-jearim) and Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6:6 )
Per'Azim - (a breach ), Mount, a name which occurs in ( Isaiah 28:21 ) only --unless the place which it designates is identical with the Baal-perazim mentioned as the scene of one of David's victories over the Philistines, which was in the valley of Rephaim, south of Jerusalem, on the road to Bethlehem
Asaliah - After Ahaziah's death, she killed his potential heirs and ruled for six years, using her influence to suppress the true prophets and to support Baal worship
Athaliah - After Ahaziah's death, she killed his potential heirs and ruled for six years, using her influence to suppress the true prophets and to support Baal worship
First lubavitcher rebbe - Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi, 1745-1812, founder and first Rebbe of the Chabad branch of chassidism, known also as �the Rav,� and as Baal HaTanya; lived in Li'ozna and Liadi, White Russia; author of Tanya, a classic text of the chassidic tradition, and Shulchan Aruch HaRav, a code of Jewish law
R. schneur zalman of liadi - (Alter Rebbe): 1745-1812, founder and first Rebbe of the Chabad branch of chassidism, known also as the "Alter Rebbe," �the Rav,� and as Baal HaTanya; lived in Li'ozna and Liadi, White Russia; author of Tanya, a classic text of the chassidic tradition, and Shulchan Aruch HaRav, a code of Jewish law ...
Abi-Albon - Original name in 2Samuel may have been Abi-baal, whose letters were then transposed to a new name to avoid the idolatrous name
Alter rebbe - The: Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi, 1745-1812, founder and first Rebbe of the Chabad branch of chassidism, known also as �the Rav,� and as Baal HaTanya; lived in Li'ozna and Liadi, White Russia; author of Tanya, a classic text of the chassidic tradition, and Shulchan Aruch HaRav, a code of Jewish law
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - The people forsook the Lord God to serve Asherah and her husband Baal (Ashteroth is an alternative name for Asherah, 2 Kings 1:2-166 ; 3:7 ). In a number of these instances, Baal is mentioned along with Asherah. ...
That Baal and Asherah are mentioned together in several Old Testament passages suggests that the Canaanites and other peoples considered Asherah to be an important "high deity" along with Baal. In the mythology, Asherah is portrayed as the consort of both El and Baal. During the kingdom period of Israel's history she was the goddess at the side of Baal. On some occasions, however, she comes across as a fierce opponent of Baal—particularly when she thought she would lose her authority or influence among other members of the pantheon or when Baal preferred Anath instead of Asherah as his sexual intimate. The conflict and enmity between Baal and Asherah provided an explanation for the alternating two-climate season each year in the Mediterranean region. ...
The most shocking endorsement of Israel's buying into Canaanite religion was the construction of a temple for the worship of Baal at Samaria. ) and Jezebel, his wife, who was the daughter of the Tyrian king Ethbaal (1 Kings 16:29-34 ). Asherah and Baal worship caused the downfall of the northern and southern kingdoms of Israel. The proclamation was to be made in the temples of their idols and among the people (1 Samuel 31:6-10 ): the Baals and Ashtoreths were mightier than the Lord!...
Ashtoreth's influence was finally discredited by Josiah, who "cleaned house" by destroying the shrines erected by Solomon. He made clear that Yahweh was the onlyand trueGod for the people of Israel...
Baal . Baalthe most significant male deity of the Canaanitesand his consort Asherah were the most alluring deities confronting Israel in the promised land following the conquest. The numerous references to Baal in the Old Testament indicate his attractiveness and influence on the Israelites. The Book of Judges chronicles the numerous times the people fell to the temptation to worship Baal. During the time of Ahab and Jezebel Baal was declared the official national deity. A temple and hundreds of officiants were established for Baal's worship in Samaria (1 Kings 16:29-34 ). A final chapter concerning Baal worship was written during the reigns of Jehu and Josiah, when the southern kingdom and its capital were purged of the worship of Baal (2 Kings 10 ; 23:1-30 ). ...
Baal's name derives from the Semitic word ba'lu, meaning "lord. During the time that Baal was under the control of Death, the vegetation wilted or ceased and procreation stopped. ...
The Book of Kings recounts that Jezebel used the plan of the Baal temple in Sidon for the construction of a similar temple in Samaria. Ahab agreed with her to make Baal worship the royal religion of the northern kingdom (1 Kings 16:29-31 ). Baal, like Asherah, was also worshiped at high places. ...
The cult of Baal involved the offering of many animal sacrifices. Some of the northern kingdom rulers even "made their sons pass through fire"offering their own sons as sacrifices to Baal. ...
Baal-zebub, Beel-zebul . Original meaning of the name is unknown but the Old Testament form, Baal-zebub, means "Lord of the flies"; in Jesus' day this god is derisively called Beel-zebul (NIV Beelzebub), "lord of dung, " and identified with Satan, the ruler of demons (Matthew 12:24 ). The Ugaritic myth recounts how Lotan and Baal were locked in mortal combat, until Baal killed the sea-monster
Kiriath-Huzoth - Some suggest a location near the Arnon River (see Numbers 22:36 ) not far from Bamoth-Baal (see Numbers 22:41 NIV)
Bel - See also Baal, Assyria and Babylonia
Che'Mosh - (1 Kings 11:7 ; 2 Kings 23:13 ) Also identified with Baal-peor, Baalzebub, Mars and Saturn
Migdol - Moses writes, that when the Israelites came out of Egypt, the Lord commanded them to encamp over against Pihahiroth, between Migdol and the sea, over against Baal-Zephon, Exodus 14:2
Jezebel - (jehz' eh behl) Personal name meaning, “Where is the prince?” perhaps derived from Phoenician name meaning, “Baal is the prince. ), who brought the worship of Baal from Sidon, where her father Ethbaal was king (1 Kings 16:31 ). Jezebel tried to destroy all God's prophets in Israel (1 Kings 18:4 ), while installing prophets of Baal and Asherah (1 Kings 18:19 , modern translations) as part of the royal household
Chemosh - Jerom and most interpreters consider Chemosh and Peor as the same deity; but some think that Baal-Peor was Tammuz, or Adonis. As to the form of the idol Chemosh, the Scripture is silent; but if, according to Jerom, it were like Baal-Peor, it must have been of the beeve kind; as were, probably, all the Baals, though accompanied with various insignia. There can be little doubt that part of the religious services performed to Chemosh, as to Baal- Peor, consisted in revelling and drunkenness, obscenities and impurities of the grossest kinds
Queen of Heaven - Wife of Baal or Moloch, "king of heaven. Beltis, the female of Bel or Baal, was the Babylonian "queen of heaven
Carmel - )...
According to the beliefs of Baalism that Jezebel introduced into Israel from Phoenicia, Mt Carmel was a sacred Baal site. This gives added significance to the contest on Mt Carmel where Elijah defeated the prophets of Baal (1 Kings 18:17-46; see ELIJAH)
Baal-Peor - So called from Mount Peor, where this worship was celebrated, the Baal of Peor
el-Berith - ” See Baal-berith ; Shechem
Baalath - (bay' uh lath) Place name meaning, “feminine Baal. Some would identify Solomon's town with Simeon's Balah, with Kirjath-jearim, or with Baalath-beer
Baal-Gad - (bay' uhl-gad) Place name meaning, “Baal of Gad” or “lord of Gad. It has been variously located at modern Hasbeya and at Baalbek, over 50 miles east of Beirut where imposing ruins of Greek and Roman worship remain
Baal-Perazim - (bay' uhl-pehr' uh zim) Place name meaning, “Lord of the breakthroughs” or “Baal of the breaches
Baal-Zephon - (bay' uhl-zee' fawn) Place name meaning, “lord of the north” or “Baal of the north
Beelzebub - (Hebrew: Baal, lord; zebub, a fly) ...
A divinity worshiped by the Philistines at Accaron, as the god of flies, identified with the "demon" in the Gospels
R. leib sarah's - Rabbi Leib Sarah's (1725-1811 ?) was held in high esteem by the Baal Shem Tov
Baal - (Hebrew: lord, owner; plural: Baale or Baalim) The chief divinity, the sun god, of the Chanaanites and the Arameans; also the name of the principal deity worshiped by certain nations or communities. The Israelites worshiped Baal in the days of King Achab or Ahab (4Kings, 3,10). In some places he had a female consort named Baaloth (Greek: Beltis)
Baale - (Hebrew: lord, owner; plural: Baale or Baalim) The chief divinity, the sun god, of the Chanaanites and the Arameans; also the name of the principal deity worshiped by certain nations or communities. The Israelites worshiped Baal in the days of King Achab or Ahab (4Kings, 3,10). In some places he had a female consort named Baaloth (Greek: Beltis)
Baalim - (Hebrew: lord, owner; plural: Baale or Baalim) The chief divinity, the sun god, of the Chanaanites and the Arameans; also the name of the principal deity worshiped by certain nations or communities. The Israelites worshiped Baal in the days of King Achab or Ahab (4Kings, 3,10). In some places he had a female consort named Baaloth (Greek: Beltis)
Baaloth - (Hebrew: lord, owner; plural: Baale or Baalim) The chief divinity, the sun god, of the Chanaanites and the Arameans; also the name of the principal deity worshiped by certain nations or communities. The Israelites worshiped Baal in the days of King Achab or Ahab (4Kings, 3,10). In some places he had a female consort named Baaloth (Greek: Beltis)
Baal-Berith - Baal-BERITH (‘lord of the covenant’)
Baal-Zebub - Beel-zebub is clearly a variation of Baal-zebub. See Baal ; Philistines; Satan
Ride - 19:1) is an interesting parallel to the Ugaritic text’s reference to the god Baal as “a rider on the clouds. ” This is not to equate Baal with God, but simply to note the similar imagery which is used, and the apparent influence of one literature on another
Ashtaroth - " Her name is usually mentioned in connection with Baal. Baal and Ashtoreth are taken by many scholars as standing for the sun and the moon respectively
Molech, Moloch, or Milcom - According to some of these passages, Moloch would seem to be another name for Baal; and we find that the Phoenicians, whose chief god was Baal, and the Carthaginians their colonists, worshipped his image with similar horrid sacrifices, as the Romans did their god Saturn
Beelzebul - It was a variation of the name Baal-zebub, a Baal god whose home (according to an ancient Canaanite belief) was in the Philistine town of Ekron (2 Kings 1:2)
Jerubebbeth - Gedeon was sent by God to deliver Israel, which had forsaken Yahweh, and after destroying the altar of Baal, routed the Israelite enemies, the Madianites, with 300 men
Moloch - (Hebrew: molech, king) ...
A divinity worshiped by the idolatrous Israelites, his cult being supposed to have been introduced into Israel by Solomon (3Kings 11); a form of Baal, representing the sun-god in his destructive aspect
Mattan - Baal's priest slain by Jehoiada "before the altars "judicially, at the reformation after Athaliah's idolatrous reign (2 Kings 11:18; 2 Chronicles 23:17). She probably had brought him from Samaria to introduce the Baal worship of her father Ahab into the court of Jehoram her husband, Jehoshaphat's son (2 Chronicles 21:6; 2 Chronicles 21:13)
Carmel, Mount - (car' mehl) In 1 Kings 18:19 , the scene of the confrontation between the prophet Elijah and the prophets of Baal
Peor - A contraction of Baal-PEOR:it refers to the fornication and idolatry of the Israelites in connection with the Midianites
Baal - The ancient Jews were often tempted to follow Baal because so much of their lives depended upon the rain that fed the crops
Gedeon - Gedeon was sent by God to deliver Israel, which had forsaken Yahweh, and after destroying the altar of Baal, routed the Israelite enemies, the Madianites, with 300 men
Gideon - Gedeon was sent by God to deliver Israel, which had forsaken Yahweh, and after destroying the altar of Baal, routed the Israelite enemies, the Madianites, with 300 men
Rechab - (Hebrew: square or chariot) ...
Rechab was the father of Jonadab who, with Jehu, exterminated the followers of Baal (4Kings 10)
Rechabites - (Hebrew: square or chariot) ...
Rechab was the father of Jonadab who, with Jehu, exterminated the followers of Baal (4Kings 10)
pi-Hahiroth - It was ‘between Migdol and the sea, before Baal-zephon’ ( Exodus 14:9 )
Ethba'al - (with Baal ), king of Sidon and father of Jezebel. The date of Ethbaal's reign may be given as about B
Ahab - ...
Besides accepting the Baal worship that Jezebel brought with her from Phoenicia, Ahab gave it official status in Israel by building a Baal temple in his capital city (1 Kings 16:29-33). Israel’s long-established practice of mixing the worship of God (Yahweh) with the worship of Baal was bad enough, but Jezebel’s intention was far worse. She wanted to remove the worship of God from Israel entirely and replace it with the worship of Baal. The Baalism promoted by Ahab and Jezebel was a threat to Israel’s existence as God’s people, and for this reason God sent the prophets Elijah and Elisha to oppose it. (For details of this aspect of Ahab’s reign see Baal; ELIJAH. Three years later he used Elijah to announce the end of the drought, but that end came in such a way as should have convinced Ahab that he could not serve both God and Baal (1 Kings 18:1-2; 1 Kings 18:17-18; 1 Kings 18:21; 1 Kings 18:41-46). He allowed the queen to try to kill the prophet who opposed her Baalism (1 Kings 19:1-2), but at the same time he looked to another of God’s prophets for directions that would bring him military victory against Syria (1 Kings 20:13-14; 1 Kings 20:22). ...
The victories should have convinced Ahab that God’s power was not, like Baal’s, limited to only certain places (1 Kings 20:28)
Abelshittim - Here the Israelites were enticed by the women of Moab and Midian into uncleanness and the idolatry of Baal-peor, and 24,000 died of the plague, Numbers 25:1 - 18
Dan-Jaan - Baal-jaan, a Phoenician god's name, is found upon coins
Abel-Shittim - It was the scene of the offence of Baal-peor ( Numbers 25:1 )
Hivites - Bryant supposes the Hivites to be the same as the Ophites, or ancient worshippers of the sun under the figure of a serpent; which was, in all probability, the deity worshipped at Baal-Hermon
Ahijah the shilonite - According to chassidic tradition, Ahijah was the Baal Shem Tov�s primary teacher
Abel-Shittim - Near mount Peor, at Shittim, in the shade of the acacia groves, Israel was seduced to Baal Peor's licentious rites; and here also Israel's judges, by Moses' direction under God, slew all the men seduced by Midian and Moab under Balaam's Satanic counsel (24,000) into whoredom and the worship of Baal Peor (Numbers 25:1; Numbers 31:16)
Athaliah - She may be said to have introduced the worship of Baal into Judah, and she brought up her son to follow in her evil ways. The temple and idol of Baal were at once destroyed, and the priest slain
Baalzebub (Beelzebub) - BaalZEBUB (BEELZEBUB) . The OT form, ‘Baal (controller, inhabiter) of flies,’ indicates either that the god was thought to appear as a fly, or that, besides oracular powers, he possessed the ability to increase or destroy these insects. On the other hand, if the NT spelling, ‘Baal of the mansion (temple),’ is to be preferred, it would seem to indicate that the OT form is a deliberate perversion originating with some pious scribe, who was perhaps offended at such a title being given to any other than Jahweh
Great - Others have argued that Simon claimed to be a lesser god who represented the power of the high god, such as Baal Zebul or Athena
Merodach - (mihr oh' dak) Hebrew form of Marduk, the chief god of Babylon, also called Bel, corresponding to the Semitic Baal or “Lord” (Jeremiah 50:2 )
Pihahiroth - ” Pihahiroth lay in the eastern Nile delta to the east of Baal-zephon
Shalishah - Baal-shalishah ( 2 Kings 4:42 ) was doubtless a place in the same district
Baalah - City in Judah on the border of Benjamin, Joshua 15:9-11 , (called Baale of Judah in 2 Samuel 6:2 ), the same as KIRJATH-JEARIM (q. ) and KIRJATH-BAAL
Geder - In 1 Chronicles 27:28 Baal-hanan, who had charge of David’s olives and sycomores, is called the Gederite , which may be a gentilic name derived from Geder, although some prefer to derive it from Gederah (wh
Ekron - The Philistines considered Ekron to be the home of the god Baal-zebub (2 Kings 1:2-3; see BEELZEBUL)
Ekron - Ahaziah, the son of King Ahab of Israel, called on the god of Ekron, Baal-zebub, when he was sick (2 Kings 1:2-16 ). The name of the deity may have been Baal-zebul (“Baal is exalted”)
Jezebel - Daughter of Ethbaal, king of Tyre and previously high priest of the Tyrian Baal; wife of Ahab, king of Israel, of the dynasty of Omri. Jezebel’s evil influence in the land of Israel, especially in combating the religion of Jahweh in the Interests of Baal-worship, was exercised not only during the twenty-two years of Ahab’s reign, but also during the thirteen years of the rule of her two sons, Ahaziah and Joram; moreover, this influence extended, though in a less degree, to the Southern Kingdom of Judah, where Athaliah, the daughter of Jezebel, seems to have followed in the footsteps of her mother ( 2 Kings 8:18 ). These are: the account of the trial of strength between the prophets of Baal and Elijah (1 Kings 18:19 to 1 Kings 19:3 ), the narrative about Naboth and his vineyard ( 1 Kings 21:1-16 ), and, as illustrating her obstinate, unbending character to the very end note especially her words to Jehu in 2 Kings 9:31 the story of her death ( 2 Kings 9:30-37 )
Jehoram - He married Athaliah, daughter of the Israelite king Ahab and his Baalist wife Jezebel, and introduced the Baalism of Jezebel into Judah (2 Kings 8:16-18; 2 Chronicles 21:4-6). Though not as devoted to Baal as his parents, he remained in conflict with Elisha, the prophet who led God’s opposition to Baal (2 Kings 3:1-3; 2 Kings 3:13; 2 Kings 6:30-31). There he was assassinated by his army commander Jehu, who then seized the throne and began a violent anti-Baal purge (2 Kings 8:28-29; 2 Kings 9:14-26)
Obadiah - When all around him were worshipping Baal, this man remained faithful to God
Gideon - (Γεδεών)...
Gideon was a man of valour who, according to Judges 6-8, received a visit from Jahweh’s messenger, overturned the altar of Baal, saved Israel from the hand of Midian, chastised the men of Succoth, and finally refused a crown
Abel-Shittim - Here the Israelites fell into idolatry, and worshipped Baal-peor, for which God punished them by the destruction of twenty-four thousand persons in one day
Peor - Abbreviated form of Baal-Peor (lord of Peor), a god whom the Israelites were led to worship (Numbers 25:18 ; Numbers 31:16 ; Joshua 22:17 )
Chassidism - (a) The movement within Judaism founded by Rabbi Israel Baal Shem Tov (1698-1760), stressing service of G-d through the mystical in addition to the legalistic dimension of Judaism, the power of joy, love of G-d and one's fellow, emotional involvement in prayer, finding G-dliness in every aspect of one's existence, and the elevation of the material universe; (b) the teachings and philosophy of this movement; see also Chabad ...
Baal - And when more than a single idol is spoken of, the word is made plural, Baalim. "And it shall be in that day, saith the Lord, that thou shalt call me Ishi, and shalt call me no more Baali. For I will take away the names of Baalim out of her mouth. The reader will have a full apprehension of the grace and loving kindness of the Lord in this ordination, when he is told, that as the word Baal, Lord; or Baali, my lord, was a general name to imply lordship, or sovereignty: the Lord JEHOVAH had been considered as Israel's Baal, to distinguish him from the nations' Baal around. But as there was not distinction enough in those general names, to preserve Israel in a proper sense of reverence between JEHOVAH, and those dunghill gods, being all alike called Baal, or Lord; the Lord graciously saith, in this sweet Scripture, that he will be no more called Baal, but will lose as it were, the name of Lord, in that of husband
Monotheism - Principal among the gods of the Canaanite pantheon were the great father figure, El; the younger hero, Baal; the adversary against order in the created land, Yam; the consort for Baal, Anat; and the ruler of Sheol, the place of the dead, Mot. In the Canaanite story about the various events involving these gods, Baal and his consort were primarily responsible for the success or failure of the agriculture in the social structure of Canaan. The fertility of the land depended on the fertility of Baal and his consort. The sexual activities of these rituals would stimulate Baal and his consort to similar activities and thus secure the fertility of the land. ...
One particular phase of that cult developed its drama from a belief that in the fall of the year, the time when vegetation on the earth dies, Baal died and descended into Sheol. On hearing the news of this tragedy, Anat began a long search for Baal. Competition between the people of Israel and the people of Phoenicia was highlighted by a competition for loyalty of the people between the Lord and Baal. That competition came to its sharpest focus in the story about the contest between Elijah, the prophet for the Lord, and the prophets of Baal on Mount Carmel (1 Kings 18:1 ). “If the Lord be God, follow him: but if Baal, then follow him” (1 Kings 18:21 )
Ugarit - There were found temples dedicated to Baal and to El; between these buildings was located the house of the high priest and scriptorium. Foremost is the Baal-Anath cycle which has survived in a number of large tablets and smaller fragments. The central figure was Baal, the god of storm cloud and rain or the giver of life and fertility, who struggled against his foes in order to gain a dominant position in the pantheon. Asherah and Anath were the consorts of El and Baal, respectively. Baal's antagonists were Prince Sea (Yam) and Mot (god of the dry season and underworld). Having received permission to build a house (temple), Prince Sea struck fear into the hearts of the gods by demanding that Baal be surrendered to him. But Baal defeated Prince Sea in an episode reminiscent of Marduk's defeat of the sea monster, Tiamat, in the enuma elish . Then Baal was permitted to build a palace (temple) as symbol of his new status among the gods. However, Baal's mightiest foe, Mot, defeated Baal, crushing him like a kid in his gullet, and taking him down to the netherworld. El wept piteously at the news, gashing his back, chest, and arms, while Anath, having found Baal's corpse, put on sackcloth and bewailed the death of the lord of life. Then came the joyous cry that Baal was alive; the rains came, and the world returned to life. While Baal ruled half the year, giving rain and crops, Mot held dominion over the other half: the dry season. Fertility religion consisted in part of various magical and ritual practices designed to bring Baal back to life. Hints of these practices are given in the Baal-Anath cycle. El, upon hearing that Baal was dead, gashed his body: “He harrows the roll of his arm, he plows his chest like a garden, harrows his back like a plain. ” Like the prophets of Baal on Mount Carmel (1 Kings 18:1 ), he was practicing imitative magic as though preparing the fields to receive the rain. For her part, Anath wept for Baal, the falling tears intended to encourage the rain to fall. Many of these names are known in the Old Testament: El, Baal, Asherah, Anath, Yarih (moon), Shahar, Shalim, Mot, Dagon, for example. The existence of the divine assembly (Psalm 82:1 ; Job 1-2 ) is attested at Ugarit, especially in the Baal-Anath cycle
Fertility Cult - pictured Baal-Hadad, the storm god, as the dying and rising god. As Baal replaced El as the major deity, he became associated with Asherah (Judges 6:25-30 ; 1 Kings 18:19 ). ...
Elijah's struggle with the priests of Baal and Asherah at Mount Carmel is the best known conflict between worship of Yahweh and a fertility cult (1 Kings 18:17-40 ). Under Ahab, Baalism had become the state religion (1 Kings 16:31 ). The account of the priests of Baal lacerating themselves (1 Kings 18:28 ) is illuminated by the Ugaritic myths where El gashes his arms, chest, and back at the news of Baal's death. The priests of Baal customarily reenacted this scene from the myth at plowing time. Baal's resurrection came with the return of the rains. The biblical narrative is clear that —Yahweh, not Baal, is the Lord who withholds and gives rain (1 Kings 17:1 ; 1 Kings 18:20-45 ). See Asherah ; Ashtoroth; Baal ; Canaan, History and Religion of ; Dagon ; Diana ; Gods, Pagan ; High Place ; Prostitution ; Tammuz ; Ugarit
Kir'Jath-je'Arim - (Joshua 18:14,15 ) and in the last two passages we find that it bore another, perhaps earlier, name --that of the great Canaanite deity Baal, namely BaalAH and KIRJATH-BAAL
Ashtoreth - The chief goddess of the Phoenicians, as Baal was the male. By the plural (ASHTAROTH, Baalim: Judges 10:6; 1 Samuel 7:4) different phases of the same deity, according to the different places of worship, are indicated. The active and passive powers of nature, generative and receptive, suggested the male and female deities, Baal and Ashtoreh. This naturally was grafted on idol worship, Baal sometimes being the sun god, sometimes distinct (2 Kings 23:5). The stone pillar was the symbol of Baal, as the sacred tree was the symbol of Ashtoreh; stone marking his strength as the male, the tree her fruitfulness (Deuteronomy 16:21)
Idol - ...
...
Bosheth, "shame;" "shameful thing" (Jeremiah 11:13 ; Hosea 9:10 ); as characterizing the obscenity of the worship of Baal. It is the name given to the statues of Baal (2 Kings 3:2 ; 10:27 ). " Hamman is a synonym of Baal, the sun-god of the Phoenicians (2 Chronicles 34:4,7 ; 14:3,5 ; Isaiah 17:8 ). ) denote "a stone or cippus with the image of an idol, as Baal, Astarte, etc
Baalpeor - Thus Israel joined himself unto Baal-peor — had full fellowship with its demon worship and its attendant uncleanness
Shalisha - Keil makes Shalisha the country round Baal-Shalishah (2 Kings 4:42), 2 Kings 4:15 Roman miles N
Jerubbaal - One of the names of Gideon: he was so called for destroying the grove of that idol Baal-Jerub, meaning, that he destroys
e'Phra-in - ( 2 Chronicles 13:19 ) It has been conjectured that this Ephrain or Ephron is identical with the Ephraim by which Absalom's sheep-farm of Baal-hazor was situated; with the city called Ephraim near the wilderness in which our Lord lived for some time; and with Ophrah, a city of Benjamin, apparently not far from Bethel
Eliada - In 1 Chronicles 14:7 he is listed as Beeliada (“Baal has known” or “the lord has known”)
Beelzebub - The term is based on Hebrew Baal-zebub, “lord of the flies
Meir, rabbi - (2century CE) Mishnaic sage, also known as Meir Baal Hanes (�Meir, the Master of the Miracle�), husband of Beruriah and son-in-law of Hananiah ben Teradion
az'Maveth - ...
A descendant of Mephibosheth, or Merib-baal
az'Maveth - ...
A descendant of Mephibosheth, or Merib-baal
Hinnom, Valley of - The worshipers of the pagan deities, Baal and Molech, practiced child sacrifice in the valley of Hinnom (2 Kings 23:10 ). See Baal ; Gehenna ; Hell ; Jerusalem ; Molech
Sanctuary - The Baal sanctuaries, which Israelites often took over and used in their own form of false worship, were known as high places (Amos 7:9; see Baal)
Jezebel - The daughter of Ethbaal, king of Tyre, and wife of Ahab, king of Israel, infamous for her idolatry, wickedness and cruel persecution of the prophets of Jehovah. She established the worship of Baal and other idols in the kingdom of Israel. When Elijah caused 450 prophets of Baal to be put to death this wicked woman threatened to slay Elijah, but he escaped
Athaliah - The destruction of the temple of Baal, which is spoken of in the same connexion, indicates that Athaliah was addicted to the worship of the Phœnician Baal, introduced by her mother into Israel ( 2 Kings 11:1-21 )
Rechab - Father or ancestor of J[1]onadab, a supporter of Jehu's purge of the family of Ahab and other worshipers of Baal (2Kings 10:15,2 Kings 10:23 )
Merodach-Baladan - Merodach-baladan (me-rô'dak-băl'a-dăn), worshipper of Baal
Ashtaroth, Ashtoreth - Ashtaroth was the chief female goddess and Baal the chief male god, and they are often named together
Zidonians, Sidonians - The Zidonians were idolators: Baal and Ashtoreth were their gods
Jehu - He used trickery to gather and destroy worshipers of Baal, so that Jehu destroyed Baal out of Israel (2 Kings 10:28 )
Gods, Pagan - After the political rise of Babylon, Marduk was considered the chief god and was given the epithet Bel (equivalent to the Canaanite term Baal), meaning “lord” ( Isaiah 46:1 ; Jeremiah 50:2 ; Jeremiah 51:44 ). By far the most prominent role must be assigned to Baal around whom the Ugaritic myths revolve. These myths represent Baal as the storm god with power over rain, wind, and clouds, and thus over the fertility of the land. The cycle of the seasons is represented in the myths by Baal's struggle with Mot (literally, “death”), who represented drought and brought forth dry barren fields. During the dry season (summer) Baal was forced temporarily into the underworld by Mot, but his recurring return brought forth the rainy season (winter) and restored fertility to the land. In another myth, Baal defeated Yam (literally “sea”), the god of chaos, in much the way that the Babylonian Marduk defeated Tiamat. Baal was often pictured standing on the back of a bull or wearing a helmet adorned with horns to emphasize his role as the chief fertility god. ...
Some confusion surrounds the various usages of Baal in the Old Testament. Fifty-eight times Baal is used as a divine name in the singular, but eighteen times it appears in the plural form (RSV “Baalim,” NIV “Baals”). Thus, Baal was also used to designate various local gods, such as Baal-peor (“Baal of Peor,” Numbers 25:3 ). Perhaps these should be viewed as local manifestations of a single Baal, the Semitic storm god. In the Ugaritic myths, Baal is frequently identified with the storm god Hadad (Adad of Mesopotamia), perhaps as a title. In fact, the Hebrew word Baal means “lord” or “possessor. ” Other divine names in the Old Testament combine Baal and a noun, such as Baal-berith (“Lord of the covenant,” Judges 9:4 ) and Baal-zebub (“Lord of flies,” 2 Kings 1:2 ). While the Hebrew word Baal was not in itself considered pagan, perhaps its use as a divine title in Canaanite religion is behind God's rejection of the appellation Baali, “my master” (Hosea 2:16-17 ). In the Ugaritic myths, Baal's sister/consort Anat, goddess of war and love, assisted in his victories. As the female counterpart of Baal, Astarte/Ashtoreth seems to have been worshiped through sacred prostitution designed to promote fertility. Asherah was often worshiped in connection with Baal (Judges 3:7 ; 2 Kings 17:16 ), her object appearing alongside the latter's altar (Judges 6:25 , Judges 6:30 ). A great deal of syncretism must have occurred, mixing elements of Baalism with worship of God. Indeed, Jeroboam's golden calves at Dan and Bethel may have been an attempt to identify Yahweh of Israel with the Baal of the Canaanite elements of the kingdom and to combine their traditions. ” Baalism reached its peak in the northern nation of Israel under King Ahab and his wife Jezebel who aggressively sponsored worship of Baal in Samaria (1 Kings 16:31-33 ). The drought at this time and Elijah's contest with the prophets of Baal were intended to show that the God of Israel, not Baal, was truly Lord of the rain (1 Kings 17:1 ; 1 Kings 18:20-45 ). The god Dagon of the Philistines (Judges 16:23 ) was apparently a Semitic god of grain mentioned in the Ugaritic texts as Dagan, the father of Baal. Thus, Molech may have served as a title (“the king”; compare Amos 1:15 ) for the Ammonite god much as Baal served as a title for the storm god
Kishon - Later, the river was the place where Elijah brought the prophets of Baal to be executed following God's display and victory on Mount Carmel (1 Kings 18:40 )
Kishon, River of, Kison - It was also at this brook that Elijah slew the prophets of Baal
Dagon - Thus Dagon was a grain god or a storm god, much like Baal. , Dagon was the father of Baal
Baal-Zebub - So called from Baal, lord, and Zebub, a fly. It is worthy remark, that the name of this idol changed only from Baal-zebub in Hebrew, to Beel-zebub in Greek, was given to the devil, in the days of our Lord's ministry upon earth
Kirjath Jearim - Its other names BaalAH, BaalE of Judah, KIRJATH Baal, betray its original connection with Baal worship (Joshua 15:9; Joshua 15:60; Joshua 18:14; 1 Chronicles 13:3; 1 Chronicles 13:6)
Her'Mon - In two passages of Scripture this mountain is called Baal-hermon , ( Judges 3:3 ; 1 Chronicles 5:23 ) possibly because Baal was there worshipped
Baal Zebub - Some commentators think that he was called Baal Samin, or the lord of heaven; but that the Jews, from contempt, gave him the name of Baal-zebub. Pliny is of opinion, that the name of Achor, the god invoked at Cyrene against flies, is derived from Accaron, or Ekron, where Baal-zebub was worshipped, and where he had a famous temple and oracle
Sab'Aoth, the Lord of, - " In the mouth and the mind of an ancient Hebrew, Jehovah-tsebaoth was the leader and commander of the armies of the nation, who "went forth with them" (Psalm 44:9 ) and led them to certain victory over the worshippers of Baal Chemosh
Zaphon - It was probably a center of worship of the god Baal-zaphon in the days of Canaanite supremacy before the Gadites took over
Gods, False - Some of the false gods listed in the Bible are Adrammelech and Anammelech (2 Kings 17:31), Asherah (1 Kings 15:13; 1Ki 18:19), Ashtoreth (1 Kings 11:5; 1Ki 11:33), Baal (1 Kings 14:23; 2 Kings 23:7), Baalzebub (2 Kings 1:1-16); Luke 11:19-23), Dagon (Judges 16:23-30), Molech/Moloch (Leviticus 18:21; Lev 20:1-5), Rimmon (2 Kings 5:18, and Tammuz (Ezekiel 8:14)
hi'Vites - (Joshua 9:7 ; 11:19 ) The main body of the Hivites were at this time living in the northern confines of western Palestine-- "under Hermon, in the land of Mizpeh," (Joshua 11:3 ) --"in Mount Lebanon, from Mount Baal Hermon to the entering in of Hamath
Ashtaroth - She is almost always joined with Baal, and is called a god, the Scriptures having no particular word to express a goddess. Her temples generally accompanied those of the sun; and while bloody sacrifices of human victims were offered to Baal, bread, liquors, and perfumes were presented to Astarte
Elias - He announced to Achad, King of Israel, who under the influence of his Tyrian wife Jezabel had erected a temple to Baal, that Jehovah had determined to avenge the apostasy of Israel by bringing a long drought on the land. At length he once more confronted the king and challenged the prophets of Baal to a contest on Mount Carmel, when Elias's oblation was consumed by fire from heaven, and the false prophets were slain by the people at his command
Elijah - He announced to Achad, King of Israel, who under the influence of his Tyrian wife Jezabel had erected a temple to Baal, that Jehovah had determined to avenge the apostasy of Israel by bringing a long drought on the land. At length he once more confronted the king and challenged the prophets of Baal to a contest on Mount Carmel, when Elias's oblation was consumed by fire from heaven, and the false prophets were slain by the people at his command
Jezebel - daughter of Ethbaal, King of the Zidonians, and wife of Ahab, king of Israel, 1 Kings 16:31 . This princess introduced into the kingdom of Samaria the public worship of Baal, Astarte, and other Phenician deities, which the Lord had expressly forbidden; and with this impious worship, a general prevalence of those abominations which had formerly incensed God against the Canaanites, to their utter extirpation. ...
Jezebel was so zealous, that she fed at her own table four hundred prophets belonging to the goddess Astarte; and her husband Ahab, in like manner, kept four hundred of Baal's prophets, as ministers of his false gods
Chanaanites - They worshiped Baal, Moloch, and Ashtoreth
Ekron - There was here a noted sanctuary of Baal-zebub (2 Kings 1 :: 23616,3,6,16 )
Aven - Probably the great plain of Lebanon, Coele-Syria (included in the Scripture designation, "Syria of Damascus"), in which the idol temple of Baalbek or Heliopolis, the city of the sun god Baal, stood
Baalbec - , "the city of the sun", because of its famous Temple of the Sun, has by some been supposed to be Solomon's "house of the forest of Lebanon" (1 Kings 7:2 ; 10:17 ; 2 Chronicles 9:16 ); by others it is identified with Baal-gad (q
Kiriath-Jearim - Kiriath-jearim was on the border between Benjamin and Judah, and was known also as Kiriath-baal, Baalah, Baale-judah and Kiriath-arim (Joshua 15:9; Joshua 15:60; Joshua 18:14; Joshua 18:21-28; 2 Samuel 6:2; Ezra 2:25)
Marduk - (mahr' dyook) Chief god of Babylon, sometimes called Merodach or Bel, the Babylonian equivalent of Baal meaning lord
Baalzebub - Name of Baal as the god of Ekron, signifying 'lord of the fly
Hadad - King of Edom who succeeded Baal-hanan
Gideon - The first thing he was bid to do was to throw down the altar of Baal, and erect an altar to Jehovah, and offer an offering thereon. The men of the city desired his death, but his father protected him, saying, Let Baal plead for himself, and symbolically named Gideon JERUBBAAL, 'Let Baal plead. ' In 2 Samuel 11:21 it is JERUBBESHETH, 'Let the shameful thing plead,' meaning the same, without mentioning the name of Baal: cf. Alas, the man of faith, who had thrown down the altar of Baal, was now led astray with a golden ephod! A memorial of God's intervention is not present faith in the God who has intervened
Beelzebub or Beelzebul - The first part of the name is clear enough; it is the Aramaic form of the Hebrew ‘Baal’; nor is there anything strange in the dropping of λ before ζ the MSS Zalmon - The hill near Shechem where Abimelech and his followers cut wood for the burning down of the stronghold of Baal-berith ( Judges 9:48 )
Peor - ...
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A Moabite divinity, called also "Baal-peor" (Numbers 25:3,5,18 ; Compare Deuteronomy 3:29 )
Ishi - Transliteration of Hosea's wordplay between “my man” or “my husband” (Hebrew, ishi ) and “my master” or “my lord” (Hebrew, Baali ) (Hosea 2:16 KJV, NAS). Hosea looked to the day when Israel would quit worshiping or even pronouncing the name of Baal and would be totally faithful to Yahweh as “her man” and “her master
Mephibosheth - The son of Jonathan and grandson of Saul, 2 Samuel 4:4; also called "Meribbaal"= contender against Baal
Oph'Rah - ...
More fully, OPHRAH OF THE ABIEZRITES, the native place of Gideon (Judges 6:11 ) and the scene of his exploits against Baal, ver
Midian, Midianites - The Midianites are associated with the Moabites in seducing Israel into immorality and pagan worship at Baal-peor (Numbers 25:1-18 ). See Amalekites; Baal-peor ; Gideon ; Ishmaelites; Jethro ; Kenites
Jehu - He then, at a great festival, exterminated all the idolatrous priests and prophets of Baal, as traitors to King Jehovah, and turned the temple of Baal into a draughthouse
Bel - But whether under this appellation they worshipped Nimrod, their first Baal, or lord, or Pul, king of Assyria, or some other monarch, or the sun, or all in one, is uncertain. It is, however, probable, that Bel is the same as the Phenician Baal, and that the worship of the same deity passed over to the Carthaginians, who were a colony of Phenicians. Hence the names Hannibal, Asdrubal, &c, compounded with Bel or Baal, according to the custom of the east, where great men added the names of the gods to their own
Molech, Moloch - We find that the object of this worship is also called Baal (‘master’) ( Jeremiah 19:5 ; Jeremiah 32:35 ). This is likewise a title of numerous Semitic divinities, and is sometimes used of Jahweh (see Baal). When the name ‘Baal’ is used in the OT with specific reference to a particular god, it means Melkarth of Tyre ( 1Ki 16:32 , 2 Kings 3:2 ; 2Ki 8:18 ; 2 Kings 8:27 ; 2 Kings 10:18-27 ; 2 Kings 11:18 ). The origin of such a cult, together with a possible more or less complete identification with Melkarth, would explain the constant use of the titles ‘Melech’ and ‘Baal’ rather than the name ‘Jahweh
Hermon - It had numerous Baal sanctuaries, which gave it a name very anciently. (See Baal HERMON. Jerome refers to this, and no doubt it is one of those Baal high places set up by the former inhabitants, and so often condemned in the Old Testament. A circle of temples surrounded Hermon, facing its summit, so that Hermon seems to have been the great sanctuary of Baal
Ahab - ...
His wife, Jezebel, was the daughter of Ethbaal, priest-king of Tyre (1 Kings 16:31 ). She was a devotee to the Tyrian god Melqart and gave open endorsement to the worship of Baal in Israel by supporting 450 Baal prophets and 400 prophets of the goddess Asherah (1 Kings 18:19 ). His surrender to the influences of idolatry is illustrated by the construction of a temple for Baal (1 Kings 16:32 ), the massacre of the Lord's prophets (1Kings 18:4,1 Kings 18:19 ), and seizure of an Israelite's property (1 Kings 21:1 ). He frequently consulted with Yahweh's prophets (1Kings 20:13-14,1Kings 20:22,1 Kings 20:28 ; 1Kings 22:8,1 Kings 22:16 ), used the divine name in naming his children (Ahaziah, Jehoram, and Athaliah) and did not interfere with the execution of the priests of Baal after the contest on Mt
Mount Carmel - (4Kings 1), and there his sacrifice was consumed by fire from above, after the sacrifice of the prophets of the false god Baal had remained unconsumed, whereupon they were all put to death (3Kings 18)
Carmel, Mount - (4Kings 1), and there his sacrifice was consumed by fire from above, after the sacrifice of the prophets of the false god Baal had remained unconsumed, whereupon they were all put to death (3Kings 18)
Betharbel - Jerome curiously refers "Shalman" to "Zalmunna," and Betharbel ("the house of him who judged Baal"), i. Jerubbaal (Judges 8)
Bajith - In the Moabite stone of Dibon there is inscribed: "I Mesha, son of Chemosh god, built Beth Bamoth, for it was destroyed, and Beth Diblathaim, and Beth Baal Meon
Peor - In Numbers 25:18 ; Numbers 31:16 , Joshua 22:17 , Peor is the god Baal-Peor
Ekron - It was to Ekron that king Ahaziah sent to inquire of the god Baal-zebub if he should recover from his accident
Jehu - After Jezebel of Phoenicia had married King Ahab of Israel, she set about establishing her Phoenician Baalism as Israel’s official religion. God foretold through the prophet Elijah that Jehu would be his instrument to wipe out their dynasty and their Baalism (1 Kings 19:15-18; see Baal). The climax of his anti-Baal activity was the cold-blooded massacre of any others he suspected of being Baal worshippers (2 Kings 10:15-27). In spite of this he received God’s reward for ridding Israel of Jezebel’s Baalism
Jehoshaphat - ...
Jehoshaphat began his reforms by destroying the Baal shrines and removing the cult prostitutes (1 Kings 22:46; 2 Chronicles 17:6). A prophet rebuked Jehoshaphat for cooperating with the Israelite king, who was morally corrupt, a worshipper of Baal and an enemy of God (2 Chronicles 19:1-3). By wrecking the ships, God showed Jehoshaphat once more that he was not to cooperate with the Baal-worshipping kings of Israel (2 Chronicles 20:35-37)
Carmel - The towering mountain (1 Kings 18:19 ) where Elijah confronted the prophets of Baal
Hivites - The main body of the Hivites were then living on the northern confines of western Palestine—"under Hermon in the land of Mizpeh," Joshua 11:3; "in Mount Lebanon, from Mount Baal-hermon unto the entering in of Hamath
Kirjathjearim - City lying on the borders of Judah and Benjamin, the former name of which was KIRJATH-BAAL. The city is also called KIRJATH in Joshua 18:28 ; KIRJATH-ARIM in Ezra 2:25 ; BaalAH in Joshua 15:9-11 , and BaalE OF JUDAH in 2 Samuel 6:2
Kirjath-Jearim - One of the four cities of the Gibeonites, Joshua 9:17, situated on the border of Judah and Benjamin, Joshua 15:9; Joshua 18:14-15, but belonging to Judah, 1 Samuel 7:1-2,98; Judges 18:12; was also called Baalah, Joshua 15:9-10, or Baale of Judah, 2 Samuel 6:2, or Kirjath-baal
Mero'Dach-Bal'Adan - (worshipper of Baal ) is mentioned as king of Babylon in the days of Hezekiah both in the second hook of Kings, ch
Zido'Nians, - They were idolaters, and worshipped Ashtoreth as their tutelary goddess, (1 Kings 11:5,33 ; 2 Kings 23:13 ) as well as the sun-god Baal from whom their king was named
Ahab - He married Jezebel, the daughter of Ethbaal, king of Zidon, who introduced the whole abominations and idols of her country, Baal and Ashtaroth
Jehu - He fulfilled the divine purpose in extirpating the family of the impious Ahab, and zealously destroyed the priests of Baal and many other friends of Ahab
Samaria - Ahab here built a Baal temple ( 1 Kings 16:32 ) and a palace of ivory ( 1 Kings 22:39 ). Jehoram attempted a feeble and half-hearted reform, destroying Ahab’s Baal-pillar, though retaining the calf-worship ( 2 Kings 3:2 ) and the ashçrah ( 2 Kings 13:5 )
Phoenicia - ...
Culture Phoenician religion was akin to that of the Canaanites, featuring fertility rites of Baal. Later, Baal's Greek counterpart Adonis (“my lord”) was worshiped in similar fashion to Tammuz. The Phoenician princess Jezebel imported devotion to Baal to Israel
Fly - The word zebub is considered to be a part of the word Baal-ZEBUB,the idol-god of Ekron, 'the lord of the fly,' who it was thought could protect persons from its bite
Pihahiroth - of Baal Zephon, all three W
Deborah - , had a tent pitched beneath, a noted tree; a palm tree it is called, and may have been at Baal-tamar, Judges 20:33, or not far distant from the tree under which the first Deborah was buried
Caesare'a Philip'pi - Caesarea Philippi has no Old Testament history, though it has been not unreasonably identified with Baal-gad
Asherah - (uh sshee' rah) A fertility goddess, the mother of Baal, whose worship was concentrated in Syria and Canaan and the wooden object that represented her. According to ancient mythology, Asherah, the mother goddess, was the wife of El and mother of seventy gods, of whom Baal was the most famous. ” See Baal ; Idolatry
Elijah - All but the last were concerned with the clash of Baal and Yahweh. ...
Elijah appeared on the scene without warning, introduction, or genealogy (1 Kings 17:1 ) to deliver an oracle to Ahab announcing a drought, presumably a punishment for defection to the Baal cult. ...
Three years later there was a break in the drought and Elijah was successful in ending Baal worship at Carmel. The Baal priests were not completely destroyed; they actually continued on past the end of the Ahab dynasty, until the time of Athaliah of Judah (who was related to Ahab's royal house). Elijah helped Israel understand that Yahweh guided the fortunes of the nations; even the Baal cult was under his control. Yahweh, not Baal, had the power of life and death, and was the giver of rain and good things. Israel was not truly synchretistic; Baal or Yahweh would be king, but not both (1 Kings 18:21 ). Ahab was not wholly Baalist; his family bore Yahwistic names, and he consulted with Yahweh after the encounter with Elijah (1 Kings 20:13-15,22,28 ). The Tyrian cult of Baal Melqart may have been a pseudo-monotheistic movement that precipitated this struggle. Ahab's dynasty ended because of the Naboth incident, not because of the Baal struggle. Later, Elijah protested Ahaziah's appeal to Baal-Zebub, the local god of Ekron (2 Kings 1:9-15 ; Josephus called this god "the lord of the flies, " as did the Ras Shamra texts )
Micah - ...
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The son of Merib-baal (Mephibosheth), 1 Chronicles 8:34,35
Ashtoreth - The moon goddess of the Phoenicians, representing the passive principle in nature, their principal female deity; frequently associated with the name of Baal, the sun-god, their chief male deity (Judges 10:6 ; 1 Samuel 7:4 ; 12:10 ). These names often occur in the plural (Ashtaroth, Baalim), probably as indicating either different statues or different modifications of the deities
Gilead, Balm of - The word "balm" is a contracted form of "balsam," a word derived from the Greek Balsamon , Which was adopted as the representative of the Hebrew words Baal shemen , meaning "lord" or "chief of oils
Jareb - As in Judges 6:32, Jerub in Jerubbaal means "let Baal plead
Fly - zebûb , Ecclesiastes 10:1 , Isaiah 7:18 : also Baal-zebub Athali'ah - (afflicted of the Lord ) daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, married Jehoram the son of Jehoshaphat king of Judah and introduced into that kingdom the worship of Baal
Hazael - God told the prophet Elijah that Hazael of Syria would be God’s instrument to punish Israel for its Baal worship during the reign of Ahab (1 Kings 19:15-17)
Ishbosheth - ("man of shame"); substituted for his original name Esh-baal (1 Chronicles 8:33; 1 Chronicles 9:39) in contempt of Baal, from some connection of the family with whom he had been named; so Jerub-baal, Jerub-besheth (Judges 8:35; Hosea 9:10). ) Youngest of Saul's four sons, and his successor according to eastern usage, though Mephibosheth (whose name was similarly changed from Meribbaal), son of his oldest brother Jonathan, was alive
Jezebel - Daughter of Ethbaal, or Ithobal, king of Sidon and priest of Astarte, who had murdered Phelles his predecessor (Josephus contra Apion, 1:18) and restored order in Tyre after a period of anarchy. ) She established the Phoenician idolatry on a grand scale at her husband's court, maintaining at her table 450 prophets of Baal and 400 of Astarte (so "the groves" ought to be translated): 1 Kings 16:31-32; 1 Kings 18:19; 1 Kings 18:13. A priestess and devotee of Baal and Astarte herself, she seduced Israel beyond the calf worship (the worship of the true God under the cherub ox form, a violation of the second commandment) to Baal worship, of which whoredoms and witchcrafts were a leading part (a violation of the first)
Elijah - Ahab had brought on a religious crisis in Israel by marrying Jezebel, a daughter of the Tyrian king Ethbaal, who, prior to his assuming royal purple, had been a priest of Melkart, the Tyrian Baal, and in order to ascend the throne had stained his hand with his master’s blood. True to her early training and environment, Jezebel not only persuaded her husband to build a temple to Baal in Samaria ( 1 Kings 16:32 ), but became a zealous propagandist, and developed into a cruel persecutor of the prophets and followers of Jehovah. 2), in the reign of Ithobal, the Biblical Ethbaal, Phœnicia suffered from a terrible drought, which lasted one year. The time is ripe for action, and Elijah throws down the gauntlet to Baal and his followers. ’ At Elijah’s suggestion the prophets of Baal are summoned to Carmel to a trial by fire. From morn till noon, and from noon till dewy eve, they cry to Baal for fire, but all in vain. Elijah is further encouraged with information that there are still 7000 in Israel who have not bowed the knee to Baal ( 1 Kings 19:15 ; 1 Kings 19:18 ). Meeting with a serious accident, after his fall he sends a messenger to Ekron to inquire of Baal-zebub, the fly-god, concerning his recovery. Elijah intercepts the emissaries of the king, hidding them return to their master with this word from Jehovah: ‘Is it because there is no God in Israel, that ye go to inquire of Baal-zebub the god of Ekron? Thou shalt not come down from the bed whither thou art gone up, but shalt surely die. In his battle against Baal, he struggled for the moral rights and freedom of man, and introduced ‘the categorical imperative into prophecy. ’ He started a movement which finally drove the Phœnician Baal from Israel’s confines
Ahab - Having occasional good impulses (1 Kings 21:27), but weak and misled by his bad wife Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal, king of Zidon, i. ) Ahab, under Jezebel's influence, introduced the impure worship of the sun-god Baal, adding other gods besides Jehovah, a violation of the first commandment, an awful addition to Jeroboam's sin of the golden calves, which at Dan and Bethel (like Aaron's calves) were designed (for state policy) as images of the one true God, in violation of the second commandment; compare 2 Kings 17:9; "the children of Israel did secretly things Hebrew covered words that were not right Hebrew so against the Lord," i. ...
The close relation of the northern kingdom with Tyre in David's and Solomon's time, and the temporal advantage of commercial intercourse with that great mart of the nations, led to an intimacy which, as too often happens in amalgamation between the church and the world, ended in Phoenicia seducing Israel to Baal and Astarte, instead of Israel drawing Phoenicia to Jehovah; compare 2 Corinthians 6:14-18. Ahab built an altar and temple to Baal in Samaria, and "made a grove," i. a sacred symbolic tree (asheerah ), the symbol of Ashtoreth (the idol to whom his wife's father was priest), the moon-goddess, female of Baal; else Venus, the Assyrian Ishtar (our "star". ) Jehovah worship was scarcely tolerated; but the public mind seems to have been in a halting state of indecision between the two, Jehovah and Baal, excepting 7000 alone who resolutely rejected the idol; or they thought to form a compromise by uniting the worship of Baal with that of Jehovah. ...
So prevalent was idolatry that Baal had 450 prophets, and Asherah ("the groves") had 400, whom Jezebel entertained at her own table. When softened by the visitation, the people were ripe for the issue to which Elijah put the conflicting claims to Jehovah and Baal at Carmel, and on the fire from heaven consuming the prophet's sacrifice, fell on their faces and exclaimed with one voice, "Jehovah, He is the God; Jehovah, He is the God. " Baal's prophets were slain at the brook Kishon, and the national judgment, through Elijah's prayers, was withdrawn, upon the nation's repentance
Hanan - ” Personal name probably originally connected to divine name such as El, Yahweh, or Baal
Joram - He married the daughter of Ahab of Israel and brought Baal worship to Judah
Meonenim, the Oak of - Here was the temple of Baal Berith (Lord of the covenant, Judges 9:46)
Hermon - Psalms 89:12 ; and the name ‘mount Baal-hermon ,’ Judges 3:3 )
Hivites - Their abode was about Hermon and Lebanon (Joshua 11:3, "under Hermon in the land of Mizpeh"; Judges 3:3, "from mount Baalhermon unto the entering in of Hamath"); toward Tyre (2 Samuel 24:7), and Sichem or Shechem (Genesis 34:11), and Gibeon (Joshua 9:1; Joshua 9:7). The Shechemite idol Baalberith, "Baal of the covenant," was a god of peace not war
Ituraea - The tribe of Manasseh wrested it from the Hagrites (Ishmaelites), Jetur, Nephish, and Nodab, and "increased from Bashan unto Baal Hermon and Senir, and unto mount Hermon"; i
Calves, Golden - The bull was used to represent many gods in the Ancient Near East, particularly Amon-Re in Egypt and El and Baal in Canaan
Beelzebub, - The meaning of this word is much disputed, some associate it with Baal-ZEBUB 'lord of the fly,' in the O
Ahaziah - The prophet Elijah announced Ahaziah would die because he sent for help from Baal-zebub, the god of Ekron, instead of from Yahweh
c Sarea-Philippi - It was the northern limit of our Lord's journeys, Matthew 16:13; Mark 8:27, and was probably Baal-gad of Old Testament history
Mephibosheth - A son of Jonathan, also called Merib-baal, 1 Chronicles 8:34
Jezebel - Daughter of Ethbaal king of Tyre and Zidon, and wife of Ahab king of Israel, 1 Kings 16:31 . When the prophets of Baal perished at Carmel, at the word of Elijah, she sought to avenge herself on him
Baal - Canaanite and Phoenician gods were known as Baals, or Baalim (the plural form of Baal in Hebrew; Judges 2:11; Judges 10:10; 1 Kings 16:31). ...
The word Baal was a common Hebrew word meaning ‘master’, ‘husband’ or ‘owner’. When the Israelites entered Canaan and found that the local people believed every piece of land had a god as its ‘owner’, Baal developed a particular use as a proper noun. In some cases the local Baal took its name from the locality (Numbers 25:3; Deuteronomy 4:3), and in other cases a locality was named after the Baal (Joshua 11:17; Judges 3:3; 2 Samuel 5:20; 2 Samuel 13:23)
Mephibosheth - In 1 Chronicles 8:34 ; 1 Chronicles 9:40 he is called MERIB-BAAL, 'Baal contendeth
Ahab - He married Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal king of the Zidonians, and under her influence became an idolater, and led Israel into the worship of Baal. The trial of fire from heaven is an especial instance of this, which was followed by the death of 450 of the prophets of Baal, 1 Kings 18:19-40 , but there was no repentance in the king
Elijah - ...
In the third year the time had at length arrived for the rights of Jehovah to be vindicated before all Israel, to the confusion of the followers of Baal. Charged with troubling Israel, the prophet in the power of God rejoined that the guilt of this lay on Ahab and on his house, in forsaking Jehovah for Baal. He directed him to call all the prophets of Baal together to mount Carmel, and there before the assembled throng of Israel he stood alone for God. Nothing can exceed the interest of this moment when the question raised was whether Jehovah or Baal was the God. The issue is presented: the prophets of Baal offered their sacrifice, and from morning till noon in vain implored the intervention of their god. "Jehovah, He is the God" was the twice repeated cry of Israel in view of these things; and, controlled by the power of God in the prophet, they, at his bidding, seized the prophets of Baal, who were to a man slain by him. He had yet 7000 whose knees had not bowed to Baal. Once more the prophet is seen, confronting Ahab's successor and son Ahaziah, who, following closely in his parents' steps, had sent messengers to Baalzebub the god of Ekron to inquire whether he should recover from his sickness
Elijah - ...
In the third year the time had at length arrived for the rights of Jehovah to be vindicated before all Israel, to the confusion of the followers of Baal. Charged with troubling Israel, the prophet in the power of God rejoined that the guilt of this lay on Ahab and on his house, in forsaking Jehovah for Baal. He directed him to call all the prophets of Baal together to mount Carmel, and there before the assembled throng of Israel he stood alone for God. Nothing can exceed the interest of this moment when the question raised was whether Jehovah or Baal was the God. The issue is presented: the prophets of Baal offered their sacrifice, and from morning till noon in vain implored the intervention of their god. "Jehovah, He is the God" was the twice repeated cry of Israel in view of these things; and, controlled by the power of God in the prophet, they, at his bidding, seized the prophets of Baal, who were to a man slain by him. He had yet 7000 whose knees had not bowed to Baal. Once more the prophet is seen, confronting Ahab's successor and son Ahaziah, who, following closely in his parents' steps, had sent messengers to Baalzebub the god of Ekron to inquire whether he should recover from his sickness
Ashtaroth - ...
In Canaanite mythology, she appears to be the sister of the goddess Anath and the spouse of the god Baal. Anath also was the spouse of Baal, as well as the goddess of love and war. ...
The biblical writers often coupled Baal with Ashtaroth as a designation of pagan worship (Judges 2:13 ; Judges 10:6 ; 1 Samuel 7:3-4 ; 1 Samuel 12:10 )
False Worship - ” The most consistent problem with false worship seen in the Old Testament is with the nature or fertility deities—Baals and Ashtaroth, Anath, Astarte—the male and female representations of reproduction and growth. Baal was commonly believed to have control over growth of all crops and reproduction of all flocks. Yet the appeal and practice of these rituals continued, probably because of Baal's reputed power in those areas so intwined with life and livelihood of the ancient Hebrews. Native national gods and fertility deities similar to Baal and Ashtaroth of the Old Testament period still abounded. This mixing of the gold calf—a symbol of Baal—with the worship of the God who delivered the Hebrews from their Egyptian bondage was false worship. In his confrontation with the Baal prophets on Mt. “How long halt ye between two opinions? if the Lord be God, follow him: but if Baal, then follow him” (1 Kings 18:21 )
Jashobeam - 2 Samuel 23:8 spells the name Josheb-basshebeth (see modern translations), the last part of which represents the Hebrew word for shame, at times used by scribes instead of an original name containing the Canaanite god's name Baal, leading some interpreters to see the original name here as Yishbaal. Some Greek manuscripts actually read Ishbaal. In 2 Samuel 23:8 , REB reads Ishbaal
Kirjath-Jearim - It was also called Baalah (Joshua 15:9 ) and Kirjath-baal (60)
Knife - Others believe that the lances of the priests of Baal were pointed knives with which they cut themselves to gain Baal's attention ( 1 Kings 18:28 )
Aphek - slopes of Lebanon; mentioned in company with Baal-Gad, the other northern sanctuary
Esarhaddon - " He says, "I counted among the vassals of my realm twelve kings of Syria, beyond the mountains: Balon, or Baal, king of Tyre; Manasseh, king of Judah ," etc
Chemarim - This word occurs only once in our version of the Bible: "I will cut off the remnant of Baal, and the name of the Chemarims (Chemarim) with the priests," Zephaniah 1:4 ; but it frequently occurs in the Hebrew, and is generally translated "priests of the idols," or "priests clothed in black," because chamar signifies blackness
Athaliah - Athaliah, probably engaged in her idolatrous worship in the house of Baal, heard the shouts of the people, rushed into the temple, and saw the young king standing by, or perhaps on a pillar or platform; but her cry of "treason" only caused her own arrest and deserved execution
Keilah - " All "the inhabitants of Keilah" probably did not join in the treachery against David, only the Baalites, Hebrew: Baali for "men" of Keilah (Joshua 15:11-12), i. the Canaanite portion, votaries of Baal, to whom David's devotion to Jehovah and the presence of the sacred ephod with the priest Abiathar were an offense. Psalms 31:6; Psalms 31:8; Psalms 31:21 alludes, with the undesignedness which characterizes genuineness, to this: "I have hated them that regard lying vanities (idols as Baal), but I trust in Jehovah
Riblah - " Probably, without the vowel points and the final -ah of motion towards, the true name is Ηarbel "the Mount of Bel" or "Baal". ...
The ruins of a Baal sanctuary still remain on it. of Baalbek; consisting of 40 or 50 houses and the remains of a quadrangular building
Ahaziah - He was a worshipper of Baal; and having injured himself by falling through a lattice he sent to inquire of Baal-zebub, the god of Ekron
Ahab - " He not only maintained the worship of the calves set up by Jeroboam, but, having married Jezebel, daughter of Eth-baal, king of the Zidonians, he yielded himself to her evil influence, and introduced the worship of Baal into Samaria
Elijah - His life is best understood when considered from four historical perspectives which at times are interrelated: his miracles, his struggle against Baalism, his prophetic role, and his eschatological relationship to Messiah. ”...
On Mount Carmel his greatest public miracle involved his encounter with the 450 prophets of Baal and the 400 prophets of Asherah (1 Kings 18:19-40 ). ...
Baalism Interwoven in the life of Elijah is his struggle with Baalism. Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal, king of Sidon and Tyre (1 Kings 16:31 ), was Ahab's wife and Israel's queen. She brought the worship of her god Baal into Ahab's kingdom. Even “Ahab served Baal a little” (2 Kings 10:18 ). Yahweh's power and Baal's impotence was further revealed through the drought. ...
When Ahaziah fell and injured himself, he sent messengers to ask Baal-zebub (lord of flies) about his fate
Asherah - Thus in 1 Kings 18:19 we read of the prophets of Baal and of Asherah, in 1 Kings 15:13 (= 2 Chronicles 15:16 ) of ‘an abominable image,’ and in 2 Kings 21:7 of ‘a graven image’ of Asherah, also of the sacrificial vessels used in her worship ( 2 Kings 23:4 ), while Judges 3:7 speaks of the Baalim and the Asheroth. There is therefore good warrant for seeing in the asherah which Ahab set up in the temple of Baal at Samaria (cf. 2500 2000), this deity probably shared with Baal (cf. In this early aniconic age, the wooden post was her symbol, as the stone pillar was of Baal
Hosea - Israel’s religion had been corrupted through Baal worship, with the result that the nation was heading for judgment and would be taken captive to a foreign land. ...
Because the covenant between Israel and Yahweh was likened to a marriage covenant, Israel’s association with other gods was really spiritual adultery (Hosea 4:17; Hosea 5:4; Hosea 6:10; Hosea 7:16; Hosea 8:5-6; see Baal). The nation has rebelled against God by making alliances with foreign nations (7:8-16) and by giving itself to Baal worship (8:1-14)
Lord - This is to be distinguished from Baal (also “lord”) in that adon represents a personal relationship of the subjection of one person to another, while Baal designates the owner of things, including slaves and women. See Baal . ” Marduk, the national god of Babylon, was called Bel, another form of Baal (Isaiah 46:1 ; Jeremiah 50:2 ; Jeremiah 51:44 ). ”...
The designation of Yahweh as adonai led to varied forms of conflict with Baal and his worshipers during the history of Israel: for example, prior to the conquest ( Numbers 25:1 ); during the time of the Judges (Judges 6:25-32 ); during the monarchy (1 Kings 18:1 ; 1 Kings 22:54 ; 2 Kings 3:2 ; 2 Kings 10:18-28 ). Even in Judah, worship of Baal proved a danger (2 Kings 11:18 ; 2 Kings 21:1-5 ). King Josiah's reform finally ended the conflict with Baal by destroying the worship places outside Jerusalem (2 Kings 23:1 ). The prophets Hosea, Jeremiah, Zephaniah, and Ezekiel spoke out against the hidden “Baalizing” of the religion of Yahweh. They claimed Israel went to worship Yahweh but did it in such a way they were actually worshiping Baal without naming his name. Yahweh was the supreme Lord over the world; but Baal's worshipers saw Baal as lord of at least a part of the world
Gideon - warrior, or the hewer down of Baal (Isaiah 10:33). ...
His second revelation was in a dream, commanding him to overthrow his father's altar to Baal and to erect an altar to Jehovah and offer a burnt sacrifice with the wood of the Asherah ("grove") or idol goddess of nature, probably a wooden pillar (Deuteronomy 16:21). As God alone, Jehovah will not be worshipped along with Baal (1 Kings 18:21; Ezekiel 20:39). Gideon with ten servants overthrew Baal's altar and Asherah in the night, for he durst not do it in the day through fear of his family and townsmen. Joash, when required to bring out his son to die for the sacrilege, replied, "Will ye plead for Baal? . he that will plead for him shall be put, to death himself, let us wait until the morning (not 'shall be put to death while it is yet morning') and see whether Baal, if he be a god, will plead for himself. " So Gideon got the surname "Jerubbaal," "Let Baal fight," i. vindicate his own cause on the destroyer of his altar; and as the Jews in contempt changed Baal in compounds to besheth, "Jerubbesheth," "Let the shameful idol light. His sin which became a "snare" (means of ruin) to him and his house was his usurping the Aaronic priesthood, and drawing off the people from the one lawful sanctuary, the center of theocratic unity, and so preparing the way for the relapse to Baal warship at his death. ...
But his unambitious spirit is praiseworthy; he, the great Baal fighter, "Jerubbaal," instead of ambitiously accepting the crown, "went and dwelt in his own house" quietly, and died "in a good old age," having secured for his country "quietness" for 40 years, leaving, besides 70 sons by wives, a son by a concubine, Abimelech, doomed to be by ambition as great a curse to his country as his father was in the main a blessing
Ahaziah - Ahaziah imitated Ahab's impiety, and worshipped Baal and Astarte, whose rites had been introduced into Israel by Jezebel his mother
Fly - This fly was so grievous a pest that the Phoenicians invoked against it the aid of their god Baal-zebub (q
Mephibosheth - Mephibosheth may be an intentional change by copyists to avoid writing the pagan god's name “baal. ” The original name would be Meribaal (1 Chronicles 8:34 ). See Meribaal
Ahaziah - He is said to have been a worshipper of Baal, that is, to have continued the religious policy of his father
Balaam - Numbers 25:1,2 : see Baal-PEOR
Jeho-i'Ada - [1] The destruction of Baal-worship and the restoration of the temple were among the great works effected by Jehoiada
Gaal - ...
At the vintage ingathering feast they made praise offerings" (hillulim ), KJV made merry, margin songs; compare Isaiah 15:9-10) of their fruits, which newly planted vineyards bore in the fourth year, eating and drinking in the house of their god Baal-berith ("Baal in covenant"), answering to Jehovah's feast (Leviticus 19:2;Leviticus 19:3-35). At the feast Gaal said, "Who is Abimelech and who is Shechem that we should serve him? is not he son of Jerubbaal?" i. , he is son of the man who pulled down Baal's altar at Shechem and restored Jehovah's worship, for which the Shechemites themselves had tried to slay him (Judges 6:27-32). The rebellion sought to combine the aboriginal Shechemites with the idolatrous Israelites against the anti-Baalite family of Gideon
Gideon - ...
Israel was in bondage to the worship of Baal. In Gideon’s home town of Ophrah, Gideon’s father was caretaker of the local Baal shrine, but when Gideon began his reformation, his father became the first convert
Idol - ...
(5) bosheth , "shame": not merely shameful, but the essence of shame, bringing shame on its votaries and especially expressing the obscenity of Baal's and Baal Peor's worship (Jeremiah 11:13; Hosea 9:10). The "images" or standing columns of wood (subordinate gods worshipped at the same altar with Baal) are distinct from the standing column of stone or "image" of Baal himself, i. Chamman, is a synonym of Baal the sun god in the Phoenician and Palmyrene inscriptions, and so is applied to his statues or lofty, obelisk like, columns (Isaiah 17:8; Isaiah 27:9 margin). These "statues" are associated with the Asherim ("groves" KJV), just as Baal is associated with Asherah or Astarte (1 Kings 14:23, margin 2 Kings 23:14). Cicero ridicules this groveling anthropomorphic worship, yet was himself a priest and worshipper!...
These sun columns towering high above Baal's altars (2 Chronicles 34:4; 2 Chronicles 34:7) were sometimes of wood, which could be "cut down" (Leviticus 26:30). The two combined are represented as at once male and female, from whence in the Septuagint Baal occurs with masculine and feminine articles, and men worshipped in women's clothes, and women in men's clothes, which explains the prohibition Deuteronomy 22:5. Baal or sun worship appears indicated in the names Bethshemesh, Baal Hermon, Mount Heres ("sun"), Belshazzar, Hadadezer, Hadad Rimmon (the Syrian god). Gesenius, "a stone with an idol's image, Baal or Astarte. The Baal and Asheerah ("groves") worship violated the first command. Jeroboam's calves paved the way for Baal worship. The calves of Jeroboam and Baal's groves were the sin. Hosea 2:16-17; "thou shalt call Me Ishi (my Husband, the term of affection), no more Baali" (my Lord, the term of rule, defiled by its application to Baal, whose name ought never to be on their lips: Exodus 23:13; Zechariah 13:2), etc. ...
Fornication formed part of the abominable worship of the idols, especially Baal Peor and Ashtoreth or Astarte, who represented nature's generative powers and (Numbers 25:1-2) to whom qideeshim and qedeeshot public male and female prostitutes, were "consecrated" (as the Hebrew means: Deuteronomy 23:17, etc. Man making lust a sacred duty! This is the force of the phrase, "Israel joined himself unto Baal Peor," as appears in 1 Corinthians 6:16-17, "He which
Astronomy - The planets Jupiter and Venus were worshipped under various names, as Baal and Ahtoreth, Gad and Meni, Isaiah 65:11
Baal-Zephon - One thing however is certain concerning it, that it was over against Baal-zephon, the Lord directed Israel to encamp, when the Egyptians were pursuing them after their departure from Egypt
Persecution - The first great persecution for religious opinion of which we have any record was that which broke out against the worshippers of God among the Jews in the days of Ahab, when that king, at the instigation of his wife Jezebel, "a woman in whom, with the reckless and licentious habits of an Oriental queen, were united the fiercest and sternest qualities inherent in the old Semitic race", sought in the most relentless manner to extirpate the worship of Jehovah and substitute in its place the worship of Ashtoreth and Baal
Kishon - This was the scene of the defeat of Sisera (Judges 4:7,13 ), and of the destruction of the prophets of Baal by Elijah (1 Kings 18:40 )
Rain - The Canaanites worshiped Baal as the god of rain and thunder, and sexual orgies were enacted to provoke his presence in the land
Athaliah - She brought the northern court's devotion to Baal to the court of Judah
Dagon - Indeed, the name Baal-dagon inscribed in Phœnician characters upon a cylinder now in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, and the modern place-name Beit Dajan (S
Topheth - Afterward it was defiled by idols and polluted by the sacrifices of Baal and the fires of Molech
Ekron - Its local numen was Baal-zebub, whose oracle Ahaziah consulted after his accident ( 2 Kings 1:2 )
Canaanites - The chief object of their worship was the sun-god, who was addressed by the general name of Baal, "lord. " Each locality had its special Baal, and the various local Baals were summed up under the name of Baalim, "lords
Joram, Jehoram - He put to death his six brothers, and established Baal worship at Jerusalem. He wrought evil in the sight of the Lord, but put away the image of Baal that his father had made
Dan - This may have represented a combination of Baal worship with worship of Yahweh. The extent to which the Baal cult influenced Northern Israel is seen in the reign of Jehu, who did not destroy the altars at Dan and Bethel, despite eradicating the Baal priests from the land (2 Kings 10:32 ). ” An upper gate to the city was built during this period, and the inscription found at this level, “belonging to Ba'alpelet,” demonstrates that Baal worship continued to influence this area after the Assyrian destruction
Hinnom - It had been the place where the idolatrous Jews burned their children alive to Moloch and Baal
Gomer - Others have maintained that she was a cultic prostitute in the service of Baal
Jez'Ebel - ) She was a Phoenician princess, daughter of Ethbaal king of the Zidonians. At her table were supported no less than 450 prophets of Baal and 400 of Eastward
Josiah - This purge included tearing down the high places, the Asherah, and the altars to Baal. The Asherah were cult objects associated with the worship of Baal, the fertility god of Canaan
Zephaniah - ; and in Zephaniah 1:4-6 threatens "cutting off" to "the remnant of Baal" and "the name of the (See CHEMARIMS with the priests "; see Hosea 10:5 margin, "and them that worship the host of heaven upon the housetops, and them that worship and that swear by the Lord, and that swear by Malcham. "The remnant of Baal" (Zephaniah 1:4) implies that Josiah's reformation was already begun but not completed
Zephaniah, Prophecy of - " God could see the followers of Baal still there, and the Chemarim (idolatrous priests, mentioned in 2 Kings 23:5 and Hosea 10:5 , margin ), and those who worshipped the host of heaven; and those that sware by Jehovah and by Malcham, or 'their king,' that is, Baal: cf
Name, Names - ‘Dawn’]'>[1] is brother’), Baal ( 1 Chronicles 5:5 ; 1 Chronicles 8:30 ), Bildad ( Job 2:11 ), Balaam, Obed-edom (‘servant of [2] Edom’), Reu and Reuel ( Genesis 11:18 , Exodus 2:18 ). Adoneshmun , ‘Eshmun is lord’), Malchiah (‘Jah is king’), Baaliah (‘Jah is Baal[3]). Almost all the compounds with Baal belong to this class: Baal-beer , Bamoth-baal , B. One, Baal-judah (the correct reading of 2 Samuel 6:2 ; cf. origin, Baal here being a name for Jahweh
Hermon - It is also called Baal-hermon (Judges 3:3 ; 1 Chronicles 5:23 ) and Sion (Deuteronomy 4:48 )
to'Pheth, - Afterward it was defiled by idols and polluted by the sacrifices of Baal and the fires of Molech
Remphan - ) Ken is related to Khem, the Egyptian god of productiveness, Remphan and Chiun answer to the Phoenician Baal and Astarte or Ashtoreth (Mylitta of Babylon)
Incense - The burning of incense to Baal and other false gods is also often spoken of
Ahaziah - Ahaziah imitated the impiety of his father and mother in the worship of Baal and Ashteroth
Balaam - This was by causing the young women of Moab to inveigle the Hebrews into the impure and idolatrous worship of Baal-Peor
Calf Worship - "...
Jehu's worship of the calves is markedly distinguished from the Baal worship of Ahab which he overthrew (2 Kings 10:18-29). Baal worship breaks the first commandment by having other gods besides Jehovah
False Prophet - A familiar example is the story of Elijah and the prophets of Baal (1 Kings 18:20-39 ). In a test against Elijah and the true God, the prophets of Baal suffered humiliating defeat
Prostitution - ...
The term cult prostitution is frequently used to refer to certain practices in Canaanite fertility cults, including the cult of Baal. The covenant was imaged as a marriage between the Lord and the people; their continual interest in other gods, especially Baal, was seen as a form of harlotry
Sun - " The Phoenician Baal; the Ammonite Moloch and Milcom; the Syrian Hadad; latterly the Persian Mithras (Zoroaster previously had reformed the worship). ...
The "sun images" were called in Hebrew chammanim (Leviticus 26:30; margin 2 Chronicles 14:5; 2 Chronicles 34:4), stone statues to "solar Baal" or Βaal Ηaman in Carthaginian inscriptions. The temple at Baalbek was dedicated to the worship of the sun
Tent - kubbah (Numbers 25:8 ), a dome-like tent devoted to the impure worship of Baal-peor
Gad - Syrian god known from inscriptions from Phoenicia and Palmyra and used in biblical names such as Baal-gad (Joshua 11:17 ) and Migdal-gad (Joshua 15:37 )
Sidon And Tyre - , Ahab married Jezebel, the daughter of the Phoenician king, bringing Baal worship to Israel's court
Zimri - When Israel were being plagued for the impure worship of Baal Peor, and were weeping and craving mercy before the tabernacle, Zimri shamelessly brought a Midianitess, Cozbi daughter of Zur, into the dome-shaped tent (qubbah , the al-cove, or arched inner recess appropriated to the women, or else a tent appropriated to Peor's vile worship) in sight of Moses and the congregation
Polytheism - Baal was the god of rain and exercised a powerful influence over the religion of many pagan cultures and even into the Jewish community
ne'bo - Tristram identifies it with a peak (Jebel Nebbah) of the Abarim or Moab mountains, about three miles southwest of Heshban (Heshbon) and about a mile and a half due west of Baal-meon
Minister - Lightfoot says, Baal Aruch expounds the chazan, or minister of the congregation, by sheliach hatzibbor, or angel of the congregation; and from this common platform and constitution of the synagogue, we may observe the Apostle's expression of some elders ruling and labouring in word and doctrine, others in the general affairs of the synagogue
ne'bo - Tristram identifies it with a peak (Jebel Nebbah) of the Abarim or Moab mountains, about three miles southwest of Heshban (Heshbon) and about a mile and a half due west of Baal-meon
Ahab - To the calf-worship introduced by Jeroboam he added the worship of Baal
Queen of Heaven - And as the greater light, the sun which JEHOVAH made to rule the day, was called Baal Shemim, lord of heaven, so the lesser light, the moon, which governed the night, was naturally called Malkah Shemem, queen of heaven; and from the influence of both they naturally became idle
Punishment - It appears that those who sinned at Baal-peor were first slain, and then hanged or impaled: Numbers 25:4,5 ; the word is yaqa, and for hanging is used only here and in 2 Samuel 21:6,9,13 , when the seven descendants of Saul were 'hung up to the Lord,' which may also signify being impaled
Joram or Jehoram - He discontinued the worship of Baal, but followed the "sin of Jeroboam
Jezebel - Daughter of Ethbaal king of the Zidonians, wife of Ahab king of Israel, and mother of Ahaziah, Joram, and Athaliah. She 'cut off' the prophets of Jehovah, and had four hundred prophets of Baal that ate at her table
Hermon, Mount - ” Site of sanctuary of Baal and northern boundary of Israel. The term Mount Baalhermon (Judges 3:3 )indicates that a local Baal was worshiped there
Caesarea - Identified with the Baal Gad of Old Testament Herod erected here a temple of white marble to Augustus. (See Baal GAD
Ahab - His alliance with the Phœnicians was cemented by his marriage with Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal, king of Tyre ( 1 Kings 16:31 ), who was also, if we may trust Josephus, priest of Astarte. ...
The religious innovation for which Ahab is held responsible by the Hebrew writers, was the introduction of the Phœnician Baal as one of the gods of Israel. This prophet, by his bold challenge to the priests of Baal, roused the anger of Jezebel, and was obliged to flee the country (1 Kings 17:1-24 ; 1 Kings 18:1-46 ; 1 Kings 19:1-21 )
Jehu - " He then in craft gathered together all the priests and worshippers of Baal, for a great sacrifice, completely filling the house of Baal
Joash - Father of Gideon: he defended his son when he had thrown down the altar of Baal, saying, If Baal "be a god, let him plead for himself
Phoenice - Dido, as David, "beloved"; Hasdrubal "his help is Baal"; Hannibal "grace of Baal "; Hamilcar the god "Milcar's gift. ) Palestine's being the granary of Phoenice explains why the latter alone of the surrounding nations maintained lasting peace with Israel; and this notwithstanding Elijah's slaughter of the Phoenician Baal's prophets and priests, and Jehu's slaughter of Baal's worshippers. , and the people's halting between Jehovah and Baal under Ahab. ...
The burning of sons to Baal (Jeremiah 19:5; Jeremiah 32:35) originated in the idea of human life forfeited by sin needing expiation by human life; substitution was the primitive way revealed; fire, the symbol of the sun god, purified in consuming, so was the mode of vicarious sacrifice
Hiram - ...
Hiram was the son of Abibaal (“my father is Baal”) and was nineteen years old when he succeeded his father as king of Tyre on the Phoenician coast, just north of Israel
Zidon - " In this inscription Baal is mentioned as the chief god of the Sidonians
Hazael - According to 1 Kings 19:15 , Elijah is sent to anoint Hazael king of Syria; he is regarded as Jahweb’s instrument who is to punish the Baal-worshippers in Israel ( 1 Kings 19:18 )
Topheth - ...
Topheth was next defiled by idols, Baal and Moloch, with their inhuman sacrifices
Leviathan - depicts the mythical Baal defeating the sea creature called Lotan (another linguistic form for Leviathan)
Fire - He showed His acceptance of the sacrifices by fire from heaven; He vindicatedHis servant Elijah, when he stood alone against the prophets of Baal, by consuming the sacrifice, the wood and the stone, by fire from heaven (1 Kings 18:38 ); and He vindicated His own honour by fire, by destroying those who were disobedient in approaching to Him
Carmel - It was the scene of Elijah's contest with the priests of Baal, that led to their destruction
Micah - Son of Merib-baal, or Mephibosheth, the grandson of Saul
Destroy - 10:8) of Baal and his images (2 Kings 10:28)
Balaam - This bad counsel was pursued; the young women of Moab inveigled the Hebrews to the impure and idolatrous worship of Baal-Peor, for which 24,000 Israelites were slain, Numbers 25:1-9 31:16 2 Peter 2:15 Jude 1:11 Revelation 2:14
Phinehas - The succession of the priesthood in his line was assured to him when he showed his zeal at Shittim in Moab, when Israel ‘joined themselves unto Baal-peor
Beersheba - Abraham planted here a" grove" ('eshel ) (distinct from the idol grove, Asheerah, or Astarte Baal), or tree, the tamarisk, long living, of hard wood, with long, clustering, evergreen leaves, as a type of the ever enduring grace of the faithful, covenant keeping God (Genesis 21:33), "and called on the name (the self manifested character and person) of Jehovah, the everlasting God. " (See Baal
Caesarea Philippi - The Canaanite god Baal-gad, the god of good fortune, was worshiped here in Old Testament times. See Agrippa II; Augustus ; Baal ; Herod the Great; Herod Philip; Nero
Philistines - The ancient Philistines appear in sacred history as a warlike people, not strangers to the arts of life, Judges 15:5 1 Samuel 13:20 ; worshippers of Baal and Ashtoreth, under the names of Baal-zebub and Dagon; having many priests and diviners, 1 Samuel 6:2 2 Kings 1:2 Isaiah 2:6
Elisha - At the time of the ministry of Elijah and Elisha, Israel’s ancient religion was threatened by the Baalism that Jezebel had brought with her from Phoenicia. Through her husband, King Ahab of Israel, Jezebel had tried to establish Phoenician Baalism as the official religion of Israel (1 Kings 16:30-33). The man who began the long and difficult job of removing this Baalism from Israel was the prophet Elijah (see ELIJAH). Many more miracles would follow, showing what a serious threat Jezebel’s Baalism was to Israel’s national life. ...
A combined Israelite-Judean attack on Moab gave Elisha the opportunity to demonstrate to the two kings his opposition to Baal. He refused to help the Baal-worshipping Israelite king, though he passed on advice to the godly Judean king (2 Kings 3:9-15). Jehu’s job was to remove Jezebel’s Baalism from Israel’s leadership by destroying Ahab, Jezebel and all their Baal-worshipping family (2 Kings 9:1-10; cf
Names of God - ...
El-Berith “God of the Covenant” ( Judges 9:46 ) transforms the Canaanite Baal Berith (Judges 8:33 ) to show God alone makes and keeps covenant. ...
Other Names Baal This was the chief god of the Canaanite pantheon. In some ancient religions, Baal and El could be used interchangeably. There were tendencies within Israel to identify Baal with Yahweh, but Baal worship was incompatible with Hebrew monotheism
Jonathan - He left one son five years old, Merib-baal, or Mephibosheth (2 Samuel 4:4 ; Compare 1 Chronicles 8:34 )
Inquire of God - Other methods of discerning God's will rejected by the biblical writiers include: consulting mediums, wizards, and necromancers (Deuteronomy 18:10-11 ; 1Samuel 28:3,1 Samuel 28:7 ; Isaiah 8:19 ); consulting teraphim (Judges 17:5 ; Judges 18:13-20 ; Hosea 3:4 ; Zechariah 10:2 ); and consulting pagan dieties (Baal-zebub, 2Kings 1:2-3,2 Kings 1:16 ; Malcham or Milcom, Zephaniah 1:5 )
Beard - Baal worshippers rounded the beard and hair to make their faces round, like the sun
Migdol - One of the sites on or near the route of the Exodus, Migdol was located near the sites of Pi-hahiroth and Baal-Zephron, all of which were near the sea (Exodus 14:20
Images - Sometimes such terms would replace those used without offence in earlier days; thus, in a proper name compounded with Baal (lord), the objectionable word would be replaced by bosheth (‘shame’), in obedience to Exodus 23:13 etc
Weather - Before long the Israelites fell to the temptation to combine the worship of these gods with the worship of their own God, Yahweh (Judges 2:11-13; Hosea 2:5-13; see Baal)
Kiriath-Jearim - Its older name appears to have been Kiriath-baal ( Joshua 15:60 ) or Baalah . It is also mentioned as Baale Judah ( 2 Samuel 6:2 ), and through a textual error as Kiriath-arim ( Ezra 2:25 ; cf
Omri - ) For the same end his son Ahab married the Sidonian king Ethbaal's daughter Jezebel, which issued in the introduction of Baal worship into Israel
Mephib'Osheth - ...
The son of Jonathan, grandson of Saul and nephew of the preceding; called also Merib-baal
Joash or Jehoash - For a long time he was a worshipper of Baal; but when his son boldly attacked idolatry, he also came out on the Lord's side, Judges 6:11,25-32
re'Chab - The worship of Baal was offensive to them
Beth'el - (2 Kings 2:2,3 ) But after the destruction of Baal worship by Jehu Bethel comes once more into view
Destroy, Destruction - ...
The Baal and Aqht myths described the rampages of the goddess Anat. She offers to make blood run down her father's grey hair if Baal does not get a palace. The Baal-worshiping Athaliah almost ended David's line by slaughtering her husband's sons (2 Kings 11:1-3 ). Before Baal's trip to Mot's domain he had intercourse eighty-eight times with a cow, who was really his sister. When the Israelites joined in these rites they yoked themselves to Baal (Numbers 25:1-5 ). When Gideon destroyed the altar of Baal, his father pointed out to its defenders Baal's inability to stop the desecration of a structure sacred to him (Judges 6:28-32 ). ...
In the Baal myth Mot, the god of death, swallows his victims
Elijah - It was then proposed that sacrifices should be publicly offered, for the purpose of determining whether Baal or Jehovah were the true God. The prophets of Baal were then put to death by the order of Elijah. ...
Jezebel, enraged at the fate that had befallen her priests of Baal, threatened to put Elijah to death (1 Kings 19:1-13 )
Jehu - Then convening the people of Samaria, he said, "Ahab paid some honours to Baal, but I will pay him greater. Send now and gather together all the ministers, priests, and prophets of Baal. " When they were all assembled in Baal's temple, Jehu commanded to give each of them a particular habit, to distinguish them; at the same time directing that no stranger should mingle with them; and then ordered his people to put them all to the sword, not sparing one of them; the image of Baal was also pulled down, broken to pieces, and burned, the temple itself destroyed, and the place where it stood reduced to a dunghill, 2 Kings 10:12-28
Gad - There was a Baal-Gad in the valley of Lebanon
Gideon - Called also Jerubbaal (Judges 6:29,32 ), was the first of the judges whose history is circumstantially narrated (Judges 6-8 ). First, with ten of his servants, he overthrew the altars of Baal and cut down the asherah which was upon it, and then blew the trumpet of alarm, and the people flocked to his standard on the crest of Mount Gilboa to the number of twenty-two thousand men. They again forgot Jehovah, and turned to the worship of Baalim, "neither shewed they kindness to the house of Jerubbaal" (Judges 8:35 )
Prostitution - In many of the idolatrous religions, prostitutes were available for sexual rites that people believed gave increase in family, crops, flocks and herds (1 Kings 14:23-24; Jeremiah 3:6-10; Jeremiah 13:22-27; Hosea 4:7-14; Amos 2:7-8; see Baal)
Mephibosheth - A son of Jonathan ( 2 Samuel 4:4 ), called also in 1 Chronicles 8:34 ; 1 Chronicles 9:40 Merib ( b ) aal , really the original form of the name ‘Baal contends’ or ‘Baal’s warrior
Bull - ” The bull was closely associated with Baal and may have influenced Jeroboam to set up the golden bulls at Bethel and Dan (1 Kings 12:28 )
Philistines - The Philistines were idolaters and worshipped Dagon, Ashtaroth and Baal-zebub
Statue - ...
This word means “statue”: “And all the people of the land went into the house of Baal, and brake it down; his altars and his images brake they in pieces thoroughly …” (2 Kings 11:18; cf
a'Hab - He married Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal king of Tyre; and in obedience to her wishes, caused temple to be built to Baal in Samaria itself; and an oracular grove to be consecrated to Astarte
Fire - The Israelites burned the images (2 Kings 10:26 ; RSV, "pillars") of the house of Baal
Uzzah - Perez Uzzah (the breach on Uzzah) was eventually the name (contrast Jehovah's "breaking forth upon David's enemies as the breach of waters," Baal Perazim, 2 Samuel 5:20) Uzzah tried with his hand to prevent the ark's shaking, but, God smote him for the offense (fault: shal )
Carmel - The site was probably chosen for the sacrifice whereby the claims of Baal and Jehovah were tested, because it was already holy ground
Mountain - ...
Other Old Testament mountain episodes include Aaron's death on Mount Hor (Numbers 33:38 ), the death of Moses on Mount Nebo (Deuteronomy 34:1-8 ), and Elijah's defeat of the prophets of Baal on Mount Carmel (1 Kings 18:15-40 )
Calf, Golden - Idolatry did not stop here with Israel, for they went on to worship 'all the host of heaven, and served Baal
Punishments - ...
The command (Numbers 25:4-5) was that the Baal-peor sinners should be slain first, then impaled or nailed to crosses; the Hebrew there (hoqa ) means dislocated, and is different from that in Deuteronomy 21:22 (thalitha toli ), Deuteronomy 21:23
Rechabites - Of this family was Jehonadab, the son of Rechab, a man of eminent zeal for the pure worship of God against idolatry, who assisted King Jehu in destroying the house of Ahab, and the worshippers of Baal, 2 Kings 10:15-16 ; 2 Kings 10:23 , &c
Ahaziah - Ahaziah imitated his father's impieties, 1 Kings 22:52 , &c, and paid his adorations to Baal and Ashtaroth, the worship of whom had been introduced into Israel by Jezebel his mother. Ahaziah had not leisure or power to reduce them, 2 Kings 1:1-2 , &c, for, about the same time, having fallen through a lattice from the top of his house, he was considerably injured, and sent messengers to Ekron to consult Baalzebub, the god of that place, whether he should recover, 2 Kings 1:1-17
Sun - Exodus 23:24 , Lev 26:30 , 2 Chronicles 14:3 , Isaiah 17:8 , Ezekiel 6:4 ; and in Phœnicia, a solar Baal, Baal-Hammon, was worshipped
Mephibosheth - Originally Merib-baal, an ancestor being named Baal (1 Chronicles 8:30; 1 Chronicles 8:33; 2 Samuel 16:1-48; 1 Chronicles 9:36). (See ISHBOSHETH; JERUBBAAL
Elijah - He was raised up by God, to be set like a wall of brass, in opposition to idolatry, and particularly to the worship of Baal, which Jezebel and Ahab supported in Israel. Elijah retorted the charge upon the king, and his iniquities, and challenged Ahab to gather the people together, and the prophets of Baal, that it might be determined by a sign from heaven, the falling of fire upon the sacrifice, who was the true God. In this the prophet obeyed the impulse of the Spirit of God; and Ahab, either under an influence of which he was not conscious, or blindly confident in the cause of idolatry, followed Elijah's direction, and convened the people of Israel, and four hundred prophets of Baal. The prophets of Baal prepared their altar, sacrificed their bullock, placed it on the altar, and called upon their gods. " Elijah then, having excited the people to slay the false prophets of Baal, said to Ahab, "Go home, eat and drink, for I hear the sound of abundance of rain;" which long-expected blessing descended from heaven according to his prediction, and gave additional proof to the truth of his mission from the only living and true God. Ahaziah, king of Israel, being hurt by a fall from the platform of his house, sent to consult Baalzebub, the god of Ekron, whether he should recover. Elijah met the messengers, and said to them, "Is it because there is no God in Israel, that ye go to inquire of Baalzebub, the god of Ekron? Now, therefore, saith the Lord, Thou shalt surely die
Bela - He too "in Aroer, even unto Nebo and Baal Meon, eastward unto the entering in of the wilderness from the river Euphrates" (1 Chronicles 5:8-9)
Carmel - , the place of burning), that Elijah brought back the people to their allegiance to God, and slew the prophets of Baal ( 1 Kings 18 )
Adonis - The Syrians, Phoenicians, and Cyprians, called him Adonis; and Calmet is of opinion that the Ammonites and Moabites designated him by the name of Baal- peor
Altar - The contest between Elijah and the prophets of Baal involving an altar demonstrated interaction between Yahweh and Baal
Amos - The golden calves, the forbidden representation of Jehovah, not Baal, were the object of worship in Jeroboam's reign, as being the great grandson of Jehu, who had purged out Baal worship, but retained the calves
Balaam - The Psalmist, speaking of this sad history, (Psalms 106:28-29) saith, "they joined themselves unto Baal-peor, and did eat the sacrifices of the dead. " This Baal-peor was an obscene idol, before which image, the votaries offered the most horrid prostitution of their bodies, and wrought such abomination as would be shocking to the feelings of chastity to relate. (See Baal-peor. )...
We should not have known that it was from the advice of Balaam, the Moabites enticed Israel to sin, in the matter of Baal-peor, had not the Holy Ghost graciously informed us of it, in his holy word
Idol - More of a threat to Hebrew worship were the Canaanite Baal and Asherah fertility images, some of which are commonly found in excavations
Midianite - Balaam, who had been sent for to curse Israel, having utterly failed to do so, was dismissed by the king of Moab; nevertheless he still tarried among the Midianites, and induced them to enter into correspondence with the Israelites, so as to bring them into association with them in the licentious orgies connected with the worship of Baal-Peor
Esdraelon - He later slaughtered all the men of Ahab and Azariah and all the prophets of Baal there (2 Kings 10:1 )
Remnant - ’ The comparison here is with the ‘seven thousand men’ who during the religious persecution of Ahab’s reign had not ‘bowed the knee to Baal’ (1 Kings 19:18)
Balaam - Balaam could not curse Israel, but he taught the Moabites to bring the men of Israel into Baal worship with its immorality
Goshen - ) The names of sonic places in Goshen are Semitic, as Migdol and Baal-zephon
Idolatry - Thus the sun and moon, the Baal and Astarte of Phœnician worship, were regarded as embodying these active and passive principles respectively
Maiden, Virgin - These nations are hardly being commended for their purity! In Ugaritic literature the word is used frequently of the goddess Anat, the sister of Baal and hardly a virgin
Chief - Baal is the lord or master (Leviticus 21:4 )
Carmel - The scene of Elijah's conflict with, and execution of, Baal's prophets was at the N. An altar of Jehovah had existed on Carmel before that Baal worship was introduced; Jezebel had east it down (1 Kings 28:30); this Elijah repaired and used as the altar for his sacrifice. They and the 850 prophets of Baal stood close beneath the high place of the altar, near the spring, in full view of Jezreel and Ahab's palace and Jezebel's temple in the distance
Ephraim - A place near Baal-hazor ( 2 Samuel 13:23 ) It may be identical with the Ephraim which the Onomasticon places 20 Roman miles N. If Baal-hazor be represented, as seems probable, by Tell ‘Asûr , the city by relation to which such a prominent feature of the landscape was indicated must have been of some importance
Elijah - In contrast to the detailed genealogy of Samuel, Elisha, and other prophets, Elijah abruptly appears, like Melchizedek in the patriarchal dispensation, without father or mother named, his exact locality unknown; in order that attention should be wholly fixed on his errand from heaven to overthrow Baal and Asherah (the licentious Venus) worship in Israel. This idolatry had been introduced by Ahab and his idolatrous wife, Ethbaal's daughter Jezebel (in violation of the first, commandment), as if the past sin of Israel were not enough, and as if it were "a light thing to walk in the sins of Jeroboam," namely, the worship of Jehovah under the symbol of a calf, in violation of the second commandment. )...
Ahab and his party represented Baal and Jehovah as essentially the same God, in order to reconcile the people to this further and extreme step in idolatry; compare 1 Kings 18:21; Hosea 2:16. " The shutting up of heaven at the prophet's word was, Jehovah's vindication of His sole Godhead; for Baal (though professedly the god of the sky)and his prophets could not open heaven and give showers (Jeremiah 14:22). He hurls back on the king himself the charge of being, like another Achan, the troubler of Israel; "I have not, troubled Israel, but thou and thy father's house, in that ye have spoken the commandments of Jehovah, and thou hast followed Baalim. " On Carmel the issue was tried between Jehovah and Baal, there being on one side Baal's 450 prophets with the 400 of Asherah, "the groves"), who ate at Jezebel's table under the queen's special patronage; on the other side Jehovah's sole representative, in his startling costume, but with dignified mien. )...
Amidst Elijah's ironical jeers they cried, and gashed themselves, in vain repetitions praying from morning until noon for fire from their god Baal, the sun god and god of fire (!), and leaped upon (or up and down at) the altar. ...
After the excitement of the victory over the Baal priests, and the nervous tension which under God's mighty hand sustained him in running to Jezreel, there ensued a reaction physically and an overwhelming depression of mind; for the hope which had seemed so bright at Carmel, of a national repentance and return to God, the one ruling desire of his soul, was apparently blighted; his labors seemed lost; the throne of iniquity unshaken; and hope deferred made his heart sick. He wished to be brought down from the soft luxuriant secondary formations of human religion (the halting between two opinions, between the luxurious Baal worship and the uncompromising holy worship of Jehovah) to the primary stratification of God's religion . ...
Yet (adds the Lord to cure his depression by showing him his witness for God was not lost, but had strengthened in faith many a secret worshipper) I have left Me 7,000 in Israel who have not bowed unto Baal," etc. Sending to consult concerning his recovery the Philistine oracle of Baalzebub at Ekron, he learned from his messengers that a man met them saying, "Is it not because there is not a God in Israel that thou sendest to inquire of Baalzebub the god of Ekron? therefore thou shalt not come down, . This was his last interview with the house of Ahab, and his last witness against Baal worship
Jehoram - Jehoram fell into Jeroboam's sin of worshipping Jehovah under the calf symbol, which every Israelite king regarded as a political necessity, but not into his father's and mother's Baal idolatry; nay, he removed Baal's statue (2 Kings 3:2-3). Baal worship outlived such half hearted religious efforts. However, Jehoram's removal of Baal's statue seems to have drawn Elisha to him, so that the prophet was able to offer the Shunammite woman to speak to the king in her behalf (2 Kings 4:13). As Elisha spoke so sternly to him in 2 Kings 3:14, the removal of the Baal statue may have been subsequent to, and the consequence of, Jehoram's witnessing the deliverance of himself and his two allies, wrought through Jehovah's prophet in chapter 3. Jehoram thought that by his sackcloth he had done his part; when God's help did not yet come, Jehoram vented his impatience on the prophet, as if Elisha's zeal for Jehovah against Baal was the cause of the calamity
Blasphemy - From Exodus 23:13, "make no mention of the name of other gods," they thought themselves bound to turn the idols' names into nicknames, as Baal into Bosheth, Beth-aven for Beth-el, Beel-zebul for Beel-zebub
Moon - The moon was worshipped as Isis in Egypt; as Karnaim, "two horns," of Ashtoreth, wife of Baal the king of heaven (the male and female symbolizing the generative powers of nature), in Syria; as Sin, "lord of the month," in Babylon
Kishon - The other OT incident connected with this river is the slaughter there of the prophets of Baal after Elijah’s vindication of Jehovah on the heights of Carmel ( 1 Kings 18:40 )
Grove - ) The worship of Asherah like that of Astarte or Ashtoreth, was associated with Baal worship. The stone "pillar" (as the Hebrew for "image" ought to be translated, Exodus 34:13) was Baal's symbol; as the wooden pillar or tree was Astarte's (2 Kings 18:4)
Samaria - The worship of Baal was set up in Samaria by Ahab, who built there an altar and a temple to the idol-god, 1 Kings 16:32, which were destroyed by Jehu
Elijah - Returning to King Ahab, he procured the great assembling at mount Carmel, where God "answered by fire," and the prophets of Baal were destroyed
jo'Ash - For at least twenty-three years, while Jehoiada lived, his reign was very prosperous; but after the death of Jehoiada, Joash fell into the hands of bad advisers, at whose suggestion he revived the worship of Baal and Ashtaroth
Kiss - (Psalms 2:12) On the other hand, the prophet represents the worshippers of Baal as commanding this service, in token of absolute submission to this idolatrous worship as expressed in this single act of kissing. " (Job 31:26-28) A similar passage we meet with in 1 Kings 19:18 where the Lord, in telling his servant the prophet Elijah, that the idolaters in Israel, many as they were, did not yet come up to the fears of his mind, saith, "Yet I have left me seven thousand in Israel, all the knees which have not bowed unto Baal, and every mouth which hath not kissed him
Mouth - ” The phrase “from mouth to mouth” or “mouth to mouth” can mean “from end to end”: “And they came into the house of Baal; and the house of Baal was full from one end to another” (2 Kings 10:21)
Idol, Idolatry - ...
Under the government of the judges, "the children of Israel did evil in the sight of the Lord, and served Baalim. They forsook the Lord God of their fathers, and served Baal and Ashtaroth," Judges 2:11,12 . The people, no longer restrained by royal authority, worshipped not only these golden calves, but many other idols, particularly Baal and Ashtoreth
Red Sea - Instead of proceeding from Etham, round the head of the Red Sea, and coasting along its eastern shore, the Lord made them turn southward along its western shore, and, after a stage of about twenty or thirty miles, to encamp in the valley of Bedea, where there was an opening in the great chain of mountains that line the western coast, called Pi-hahiroth, the mouth of the ridge between Migdol westward, and the sea eastward, "over against Baal-zephon," on the eastern coast; to tempt Pharaoh, whose heart he finally hardened, to pursue them when they were "entangled in the land," and shut in by the wilderness on their rear and flanks, and by the sea in their front. So Pharaoh pursued the Israelites by the direct way of Migdol, with six hundred chariots, his horsemen, and his army, and overtook them encamping by the sea, beside Pi-hahiroth, over against Baal-zephon. The day before the passage, by the divine command, the Israelites encamped beside Pi-hahiroth "between Migdol and the sea, over against Baal-zephon,"...
Exodus 14:2 ; Numbers 33:7 . Pi-hahiroth signifies "the mouth of the ridge," or chain of mountains, which line the western coast of the Red Sea, called Attaka, "deliverance," in which was a gap, which formed the extremity of the valley of Bedea, ending at the sea eastward, and running westward to some distance, toward Cairo; Migdol, signifying "a tower," probably lay in that direction; and Baal-zephon, signifying "the northern Baal," was probably a temple on the opposite promontory, built on the eastern coast of the Red Sea. And it was this unexpected change in the direction of their march, and the apparently disadvantageous situation in which they were then placed, entangled in the land, and shut in by the wilderness, with a deep sea in front, the mountains of Attaka on the sides, and the enemy in their rear, that tempted the Egyptians to pursue them through the valley of Bedea, by the direct route from Cairo, who overtook them encamping by the sea, beside Pi-hahiroth, opposite to Baal-zephon, Exodus 14:2-9
Sun - The Hebrews must have been well acquainted with the idolatrous worship of the sun during the captivity in Egypt, both from the contiguity of On, the chief seat of the worship of the sun, as implied in the name itself (On being the equivalent of the Hebrew Bethshemesh, "house of the sun") (Jeremiah 43:13 ) and also from the connection between Joseph and Potipherah("he who belongs to Ela") the priest of On, (Genesis 41:45 ) After their removal to Canaan, the Hebrews came in contact with various forms of idolatry which originated in the worship of the sun; such as the Baal of the Phoenicians, the Molech or Milcom of the Ammonites, and the Hadad of the Syrians
Midian - ...
They were joined with Moab in desiring Balsam to curse Israel (Numbers 22:4; Numbers 22:7; Numbers 25:6; Numbers 25:15; Numbers 25:17-18), and then in tempting Israel at Shittim to whoredom and idolatry with Baal Peor
Jonathan - Eldest son of King Saul; mother: Ahinroam; brothers: Abinadab, Malchishua and Ish-baal; sisters Merab and Michal; son Mephibosheth (Meribbaal)
Athaliah - Baal worship through her was introduced into Judah, as it had been through her mother into Israel. Mattan, Baal's priest, was the only other person slain
Shechem - The city, however, remained Canaanite after the conquest, serving the local god Baal-herith ( Judges 9:4 ): Gideon’s concubine, mother of Abimelech, was a Canaanitess from Shechem, and her relatives set up her son as a king, to his and their own destruction ( Judges 9:1-57 )
Sama'Ria - Ahab built a temple to Baal there
Absalom - This revenge was executed at the time of the festivities connected with a great sheep-shearing at Baal-hazor
Jehonadab - ...
Jehonadab by his strict asceticism was held in high repute in Israel, as well as in his own tribe; Jehu desired his countenance, that so he might without any opposition carry out the slaughter of the Baal worshippers. ) Jehonadab is last mentioned in accompanying Jehu into Baal's temple, to remove all Jehovah's secret worshippers (2 Kings 10:23), whom probably his previous knowledge of them in the desert would enable him to discern
Elijah - God had reserved for Himself seven thousand men who had not bowed the knee to Baal
Gedaliah - Johanan warned Gedaliah that Baalis (called from the idol Baal) king of Ammon had sent Ishmael to assassinate him and his retinue
Man - Baal, 'master, lord
Cloud - This description is somewhat parallel to the descriptions of Baal, the lord of the storm and god of nature set forth in Ugaritic mythology
je'hu - For the pretended purpose of inaugurating anew the worship of Baal, he called all the Bailouts together at Samaria
Carmel - It is memorable for frequent visits of the prophets Elijah and Elisha, 2 Kings 2:25 4:25 , and especially for the destruction of the priests of Baal upon it, 1 Kings 18:1-46
Jehu - By a cunning stratagem he cut off all the worshippers of Baal found in Samaria (2 Kings 10:19-25 ), and destroyed the temple of the idol (2 Kings 10:27 )
Idolatry - ( a ) Thus, on Israel’s settling in Canaan, the existing shrines, whether natural (hills, trees, wells each understood to have its own tutelary Baal or lord) or artificial (altars, stone pillars, wooden poles), would be quite innocently used for the worship of J″ Reuben - ‘The children of Reuben built Heshbon, and Elealeh, and Kiriathaim; and Nebo, and Baal-meon (their names being changed), and Sibmah: and gave other names unto the cities which they builded. ’ The names given here must be the original names, as it is improbable that the author would allow the worshippers of Jahweh to couple with the names of their cities the gods Nebo and Baal
Rechab - Jehonadab's name, containing "Jehovah," and his abhorrence of Baal worship, imply that the Rechabites though not of Israel were included in the Abrahamic covenant; the Arab Wahabees , ascetics as to opium and tobacco, present a parallel
Cuttings in the Flesh - ’ The practice of gashing the body till the blood ran, as part of the ritual of Baal worship, is attested by 1 Kings 18:28
Carmel - It was here that Elijah so successfully opposed the false prophets of Baal, 1 Kings 18; and there is a certain part of the mountain facing the west, and about eight miles from the point of the promontory, which the Arabs call Man-sur, and the Europeans the place of sacrifice, in commemoration of that miraculous event
Manasseh - He did evil in the sight of the Lord; worshipped the idols of the land of Canaan; rebuilt the high places that his father Hezekiah had destroyed; set up altars to Baal; and planted groves to false gods
Calf - It is plain from Aaron's proclaiming a fast to Jehovah, ...
Exodus 32:4 , and from the worship of Jeroboam's calves being so expressly distinguished from that of Baal, 2 Kings 10:28-31 , that both Aaron and Jeroboam meant the calves they formed and set up for worship to be emblems of Jehovah
Samaria - Ahab built there a palace of ivory, 1 Kings 22:39 , and also a temple of Baal, 1 Kings 16:32,33 , which Jehu destroyed, 2 Kings 10:18-28
Jeho'Ram - He then, probably at the instance of his wife Athaliah the daughter of Ahab, proceeded to establish the worship of Baal
Bethel - Under Ahab the Baal worship at Samaria and Jezreel drew off attention from the calf worship at Bethel
Moloch - In this respect Moloch answered to Baal the Phoenician sun god, to whom also human burnt offerings were sacrificed; also to Chemosh, to whom Mesha sacrificed his son (2 Kings 3:27; Micah 6:7; Ezekiel 16:20; Ezekiel 23:39)
Directions (Geographical) - For the Canaanites, Zaphon represented the dwelling place of Baal, while in the Old Testament it is an attribute of the throne of Yahweh (Isaiah 14:13 ; Psalm 48:2-3 )
Aaron - Perhaps he had not completely detached himself from the Apis-bull worship of Egypt or from some insidious feature of Baal worship present in Egypt
Repetitions - The reference to Gentile errors in this respect is well illustrated by the cry of the priests of Baal on Carmel (1 Kings 18:26), and the shout of the Ephesian mob, kept up for more than an hour (Acts 19:34)
Exodus, the - ...
The people were led from Rameses to Succoth, thence to Etham, and to Pi-hahiroth, between Migdol and the sea, over against Baal-zephon
Manasseh - The record ( 2 Kings 21:2-9 ) is that he built again the altars which Hezekiah had destroyed, and erected altars for Baal, and made an ashçrah , as Ahab king of Israel had done, and that he worshipped the host of heaven and served them. In restoring the old altars he doubtless thought he was returning to the early religion of the nation, and the Baal whom he worshipped was probably identified in the minds of the people with the national God Jahweh
Gods - ) Nothing was more common than to place men among the number of deities; and from Belus or Baal, to the Roman emperors before Constantine, the instances of this kind are innumerable: frequently they did not wait so long as their deaths for the apotheosis. The pious Israelites had so great an aversion and such an extreme contempt for strange gods, that they scorned even to mention them; they disguised and disfigured their names by substituting in the room of them some term of contempt; for example, instead of Elohim, they called them Elilim, "nothings, gods of no value;" instead of Mephibaal, Meribaal, and Jerubaal, they said "Mephibosheth, Meribosheth, and Jeribosheth. " Baal signifies master, husband; and bosheth, something to be ashamed of, something apt to put one in confusion
Ahaziah - Son of Ahab and Jezebel; king of Israel; a worshipper of Jeroboam's calves, and of his mother's idols, Baal and Ashtoreth. Ahaziah sent to Baalzebub (lord of flies), god of Ekron, to inquire, should he recover? Elijah, by direction of the angel of the Lord, met the messengers, and reproving their having repaired to the idol of Ekron as if there were no God in Israel, announced that Ahaziah should die
Elisha - See Miracles; Prophet-Prophecy; History of Israel; Baal Worship
Persecution in the Bible - Jezebel persecuted the prophets of the Lord, and the prophet Elijah persecuted and killed the prophets of Baal (1 Kings 18:1 )
High Place - The surrounding nations had high places dedicated to Chemosh (1 Kings 11:7)Baal ( Name - " (Exodus 23:13) And hence we find, in after-ages of the church, the Lord again interposing with his grace on this occasion, and saying: "And it shall be at that day, saith the Lord, that thou shalt call me Ishi, and shalt call me no more Baali; for I will take away the names of Baalim out of her mouth. " (Hosea 2:16-17) The Israelites were not only in danger from using the same name of Baali, which signifies Lord, as their idolatrous neighbours did, when speaking of their gods, but they had been upon numberless occasions infected also with their idolatry. Hence the Lord graciously promised, in this sweet and condescending Scripture, to remove the temptation to this sin, by taking the names of Baal and Baalim out of their mouths
Goat - It is well known that Baal-peor and Ashtaroth were worshipped with unclean rites, and that public prostitution formed a grand part of the worship of many deities among the Egyptians, Moabites, Canaanites, &c
Tyre - At length Eth-baal, by the murder of his brother, seized the throne, and married his daughter Jezebel to Ahab (1 Kings 16:31 ). Some time after the death of Eth-baal a domestic rebellion led to the emigration of the Tyrian princess Elissa, who is said to have fled from Tyre with her murdered husband’s riches and to have founded Carthage, thereby winning fame for herself as the Dido of Virgil’s Æneid . At the next attack, under Sennacherib, Elulæus, the king, fled in despair to Cyprus, the Assyrians appointing a tributary king, Tubaal, in his stead (b
Typology - He rehearsed the experiences of the people of Israel in the Exodus and in their forty years in the desert: the destruction of Pharaoh's army in the sea (Exodus 14-15 ); the eating of manna (Exodus 16:1 ); their conduct when thirsty—Rephidim—striking the rock (Exodus 17:1 ); Kadesh—speaking to the rock (Numbers 20:1 ); sin of the gold calf (Exodus 32:1 ); fornication with the daughters of Moab at Baal of Peor (Numbers 25:1 ); murmuring when going from Mount Hor around the land of Edom (Numbers 21:1 ). Christians are not to desire evil things, as in the golden calf incident, and as at Baal-Peor (1 Corinthians 10:7-8 )
Micaiah - The 400 prophets whom Ahab gathered together to "inquire the word of Jehovah" (1 Kings 22:5) were prophets of Jeroboam's symbolic calf worship of Jehovah not of Baal
Palmtree - (See JERICHO; HAZEZON TAMAR; ENGEDI; Baal TAMAR
Judges, Theology of - And his obedience, when it does come, is not exactly courageous: he does tear down the Baal altar and the Asherah pole in his community as God commanded—but still a bit the coward and skeptic, he does it at night (6:25-27). Although Gideon earns the sobriquet "Jerub-baal" ("Let Baal contend [1]" — 6:32), he himself eventually succumbs to false worship that leads Israel astray (8:22-27)
Nimrod - ) Nimrod was the Bel, Belus, or Baal, i
Jachin And Boaz - [10], 447 551 point to a possible original nomenclature as Baal and Jachun the latter a Phœnician verbal form of the same signification (‘he will be’) as the Heb
Angel - of mal'âk]'>[1] and said unto them, Go, inquire of Baal-zebub the god of Ekron whether I shall recover of this disease” (2 Kings 1:2)
Israel, Kingdom of - The adoption of Baal-worship led to a reaction in the nation, to the moral triumph of the prophets in the person of Elijah, and to extinction of the house of Ahab in obedience to the bidding of Elisha
Jehoshaphat - "He walked in the first ways of his father David (before his sin with Bathsheba), and sought not unto Baalim (whether Baal or other false god, or worshipping Jehovah by an image which degrades Him to the level of Baal, Judges 2:11), but to the Lord God of his fathers, and not after the doings of Israel (worshipping Jehovah through the golden calves)
Zephaniah, Book of - In 621King Josiah instituted a sweeping reformation of worship in Judah (see 2 Kings 22:3-23:25 ), which officially abolished the worship of Baal and the stars mentioned in Zephaniah 1:4-6
Deborah - "Lived under the palm tree"; a landmark, as palms were rare in Palestine (Judges 4:5); possibly meaning Baal Tamar, "the sanctuary of the palm" (Judges 20:33)
Divination And Magic - The goddess Anath through magical means restored the dead Baal to the earth
Ashtoreth - See Molech, Baal
Anthropomorphism - Living in the midst of worshipers of Baal, Ashera, Astarte, and many other deities, Israel struggled against idolatry throughout its history
Priest; Priesthood - 5:5), “priests” of Baal (2 Kings 10:19), “priests” of Chemosh ( Baalim and Asherim ( Remnant - In the days of Elijah, when God’s chosen people in the northern kingdom had fallen into apostasy, the Lord announced: “Yet I have left me seven thousand in Israel, all the knees which have not bowed unto Baal …” (1 Kings 19:18)
Nimrod - He was also called Baal, Beel, Bel, or Belus, signifying "lord," or "master," by the Phenicians, Assyrians, and Greeks; and Bala Rama, by the Hindus
Jezebel - She was daughter of the king-priest of the Phoenician cities Tyre and Sidon, and set out to make Phoenician Baalism the official religion of Israel. Ahab cooperated in the plan and built a royal Baal temple in Israel’s capital, Samaria (1 Kings 16:29-33)
Idol, Idolatry - ...
In Canaan Israel was influenced to worship Baal and other deities. Priests offered sacrifices to Baal and Yahweh and idols were erected in the temple itself (2 Chronicles 15:16 ; Jeremiah 32:34 ; Ezekiel 8:5-11 )
High Place - Although most high places were part of the worship of Baal, the Ammonite god Molech and the Moabite god Chemosh were also worshiped at similar high places (1 Kings 11:5-8 ; 2 Kings 23:10 )
Samaria, Samaritans - Jezebel influenced Ahab, her husband, to make the city the center for Baal worship (1 Kings 16:29-33 ). ...
Here Elijah destroyed the messengers of King Ahaziah, who were seeking the consultation of Baalzebub
Balaam - This artifice succeeded; for as the Israelites lay encamped at Shittim, many of them were deluded by these strange women, not only to commit whoredom with them, but to assist at their sacrifices, and worship their god Baal-Peor, Numbers 25:1-3 ; Numbers 31:16 ; ...
Micah 6:5 ; 2 Peter 2:15 ; Judges 1:11 ; Revelation 2:14 ; Deuteronomy 23:4-5 ; Joshua 24:9-10 ; Nehemiah 13:2
Miracle - The faithful remnant of Israel is locked in a mortal, spiritual battle with idolatry, especially Baal worship. The predominant purpose behind the miracles of these two prophets is to demonstrate Yahweh's superiority over Baal and to call God's people back to worship him. The classic expression of this combat comes at Carmel, as fire from heaven consumes Elijah's sacrifice and the prophets of Baal are destroyed (1 Kings 18:16-40 )
Balaam - Thence Balaam was taken to "the high places (bamot ) of Baal," called Beth Bamoth in the Moabite stone. ...
In Micah 6:5 ("O My people, remember now what Balak king of Moab consulted, and what Balaam the son of Beer answered him from Shittim)," the sense is, Remember the fatal effects at Shittim of Israel's joining Baal Peer and committing whoredom with the daughters of Moab, and how but for God's sparing mercy Israel would have been given to utter destruction
Damascus - ...
1 Kings 20:1 also features Ben-hadad of Damascus, giving reason to believe that Ben-hadad (literally, “son of Hadad”) was a royal title in Syria, identifying the king of Damascus as a worshiper of the god Hadad, another name for Baal
Philistines, the - David finally checked the Philistine advance at Baal-perazim (2 Samuel 5:17-25 ). ...
While our information on Philistine religion is limited, three Philistine gods are mentioned in the Old Testament—Dagon, Ashtoreth, and Baalzebub. Baalzebub, the Philistine god whose name means “lord of the flies,” was the god of Ekron ( 2 Kings 1:1-16 ). Most likely the Philistines worshiped Baalzebub as a god who averted pestilence or plagues
Hell - of Jerusalem, where, after Ahaz introduced the worship of the fire gods, the sun, Baal, Moloch, the Jews under Manasseh made their children to pass through the fire (2 Chronicles 33:6), and offered them as burntofferings (Jeremiah 7:31; Jeremiah 19:2-6)
Gad - A god whose name appears in Genesis 30:11 (‘by the help of Gad’; so in Genesis 30:13 ‘by the help of Asherah’); in the place-names Baal-gad, and Migdal-gad ( Joshua 11:17 ; Joshua 12:7 ; Joshua 13:5 ; Joshua 15:37 ); and in the personal name Azgad ( Ezra 2:12 , Nehemiah 7:17 ; Nehemiah 10:15 )
Absalom - As Simeon and Levi avenged on Hamor their sister Dinah's violation, so Absalom after two years' dark, silent hatred, took vengeance on Amnon at a sheepshearing feast at Baal Hazor to which he invited all the king's sons (2 Samuel 13)
Gideon - Gideon has also the names of Jerubbaal ( Judges 6:32 ) and Jerubbesheth ( 2 Samuel 11:21 ). ]'>[2] command he destroys the altar of Baal in Ophrah and builds one to Jahweh, to whom he also offers sacrifice. The narrative of Gideon’s leadership is brought to a close by a reference to his offspring, and special mention of his son Abimelech; after his death, we are told, the Israelites ‘went a whoring after the Baalim
Seek - Thus, Ahaziah instructed messengers: “Go, inquire of Baal-zebub the god of Ekron whether I shall recover of this disease” (2 Kings 1:2)
Separate - 9:10, the various versions differ in their rendering of nâzar: “I found Israel like grapes in the wilderness; I saw your fathers as the firstripe in the fig tree at her first time: but they went to Baal-peor, and separated [2] themselves unto that shame; and their abominations were according as they loved
Name - The following instances may be mentioned among others, and may stand as specimens of the whole, namely, שמואל , Samuel, "hear God;" אדניה , Adonijah, "God is lord;" יהוצדק , Josedech, "God is just;" אתבעל , Ethbaal, a Canaanitish name, the latter part of the compound being the name of the idol deity, Baal; בלשאצר , Belshazzar, "Bel," a Babylonish deity, "is ruler and king
Balaam - ]'>[2] ascribing the sin of Baal-peor to Balaam is out of touch with both the other narratives
Israel, History of - Perhaps the central issue during this period resulted from the emergence of overt Baalism with the clarification that Yahwism could not coexist with Baalism, the worship surrounding the indigenous Canaanite god of fertility, Baal. The worshiper of Yahweh could not worship both Yahweh and Baal. ...
Jehu (842-815) took up the struggle against Baalism. He successfully overthrew King Jehoram (ending the Omride dynasty) and instigated a violent anti-Baalistic purge in Israel. Not only did Jehoram of Israel die; so, too, did Queen Jezebel, many of the Baal worshipers, and King Ahaziah of Judah, who just happened to visit his kin in Israel during the year of his coronation!...
This struggle against Baalism was a key factor in the emergence of Israel and Judah's prophetic movement during the second half of the eighth century. More importantly, during this period a systematic attempt was made to establish Baalism also in Judah. The Southern Kingdom, in part because it housed the Jerusalem Temple and was thus the focus of Yahwism, did not embrace Baalism in the fashion of the north. Thus, when Yahwistic priests placed the young King Jehoash (837-800) on the throne, progress made by Baalism in displacing Yahwism was rapidly reversed. Yahwistic prophets were persecuted; Baalism was encouraged; activities associated with the Assyrian astrological rites were incorporated; and the practice of human sacrifice was revived. This political aspiration was coupled with a religious fervor for combating Baalism. Even the mandate that all sacrificial worship take place in the Jerusalem Temple was partially motivated by his desire to prevent the use of Baalistic “high places” and to keep all sacrificial activity where it could be carefully monitored to prevent Baalistic assimilation
Persecution - It was easy to persuade the people that the alliance with Tyre was not complete unless the Tyrian Baal shared with Jahweh the homage of Israel. To Elijah ‘Baal and Yahweh represented, so to speak, a contrast of principles, of profound and ultimate practical convictions; both could not be right, nor could they exist side by side. Ahab might worship Baal and steal his subject’s private property. When the prophet condemned the king’s effort to legitimize the worship of the Tyrian Baal, or his unsocial conduct, he spoke in the name of God, and in the interest of religion
Kings, First And Second, Theology of - Great prominence is also given to the defection to the Baal cult. However, even Jehu, who had cleansed the nation of Baal, failed to eradicate the high places (2 Kings 10:31 )
Prophesy - ...
The word is also used of “heathen prophets”: “Now therefore send, and gather to me all Israel unto mount Carmel, and the prophets of Baal four hundred and fifty, and the prophets of the groves four hundred, which eat at Jezebel’s table” (1 Kings 18:19)
Hornet - The vindictive power that presided over this dreadful scourge was worshipped at Ekron, in Palestine, through fear, the reigning motive of Pagan superstition, under the title of Baal-zebub, "master or lord of the hornet," whence Beelzebub, in the New Testament, "the prince of demons," Matthew 12:24
Judges, Book of - But once they were enjoying peace and prosperity again, the people slipped back into idolatry (Judges 2:16-20; Judges 8:33; see Baal)
Idol, Idolatry - The form of idolatry that Israel most frequently fell into was Baalism (2 Kings 17:15-16; see Baal)
Kings, Books of - ...
When Omri’s son and successor Ahab married Jezebel of Phoenicia, the Baalism of Phoenicia threatened to become Israel’s national religion. The prophet Elijah was God’s servant to help preserve Israel and punish the Baalists (16:29-17:24). Elijah won a great victory over the prophets of Baal on Mt Carmel (18:1-46), but when the people of Israel still did not give up their Baalism, God strengthened and reassured the discouraged Elijah (19:1-21). Jezebel’s Baalism, however, continued to flourish, and even spread to Judah (8:16-9:10). ...
An army commander named Jehu led a revolt against the ruling house of Ahab and Jezebel, which resulted in the removal of Jezebel’s Baalism from Israel (9:11-10:36). Then a priest named Jehoiada led a revolt that wiped out Jezebel’s Baalism from Judah (11:1-21)
Servant of the Lord - Thus the ‘servants of Jahweh’ and ‘the servants of the (Tyrian) Baal’ are contrasted in 2 Kings 10:23 , though the fact that the same word is used in both phrases is obscured by the RV Judges, Book of - God proved more powerful than Baal (Judges 6:25-32 )
Elisha - This change of attitude on the part of the prophet may be due to the fact that Jehoram attempted to do away with Baal worship ( 2 Kings 3:2 ); but Elisha has not forgotten the doom pronounced upon the house of Ahab by Elijah
False Prophet - ...
False prophets prophesied lies (Jeremiah 6:13 ; 27:14 ; Zechariah 13:3 ), deceived the people with their dreams (Jeremiah 29:8 ), prophesied by the alleged authority of Baal (Jeremiah 2:8 ; 23:13 ), threatened the lives of the true prophets (Jeremiah 26:7 ), and dared to speak when they had not stood in the council of Yahweh and received a word directly from the Lord (Jeremiah 23:18 )
Jehoiada - Mattan the Baal priest alone was slain by the people when breaking Baal's images and altars
Cross - The worshippers of Baal-peor, and the king of Ai were hung up alive; as were also the descendants of Saul, who were put into the hands of the Gibeonites, 2 Samuel 21:9
Persecution - Examples in the Old Testament include Abel, who offered a better sacrifice than Cain (Genesis 4:4-10 ; Hebrews 11:4 ); Lot, also a "righteous man who was distressed by the filthy lives of lawless men" (2 Peter 2:7 ) who rejected him and who "kept bringing pressure on [3] and moved forward to break down the door" of his house in Sodom (Genesis 19:9 ); Elijah, who spoke against the prophets of Baal (1 Kings 18:25-40 ) and against the idolatry of Israel (1 Kings 18:16-21 ), and was persecuted by Jezebel for his godly stand (1 Kings 19:1-3 ); David, who conducted himself in a godly manner despite the machinations and pursuit of Saul (1 Samuel 9-27:1 ); Jeremiah, who spoke God's message of condemnation against Judah for her sins and the coming judgment against her to be brought by the Babylonians (Jeremiah 9:11,13-16 ; 21:3-7 ; 25:1-14 ), had his message rejected (Jeremiah 36-37 ), was beaten (Jeremiah 37:15 ), and finally dropped into a muddy cistern (Jeremiah 38:6-13 )
Samaria - ...
Called from its Baal worship, introduced by Ahab, "the city of the house of Ahab" (1 Kings 16:32-33; 2 Kings 10:25)
Zedekiah - Zedekiah therefore was one of the "400 prophets of the GROVES" , (Asheerah Ashtaroth) who apparently were not slain when Elijah slew the 450 prophets of Baal (1 Kings 18:19; 1 Kings 18:22; 1 Kings 18:24), or rather a prophet of the calves symbolizing "Jehovah," for they spoke in Jehovah's name (1 Kings 22:8)
Nebuchadnezzar the Great - Ithobaal, who was then king, was put to death, and Baal succeeded him
Josiah - " At the age of 20, in the 12th year of his reign, he began to purge Judah and Jerusalem of the high places or Asherah, and images of the sun and Baal, and strewed their dust on the graves of their former worshippers
Priest - 2:60), and of Baal Poor's worship. Under apostate kings the priests themselves fell into the worship of Baal and the heavenly hosts (Jeremiah 2:8; Jeremiah 8:1-2)
Elisha - Elisha went to Carmel, where the priests of Baal had been destroyed, and thence to Samaria, the seat of the apostasy, and where his testimony was most needed
Solomon - Solomon also built the walls of Jerusalem, and the place called Millo in this city; he repaired and fortified Hazor, Megiddo, Gezer, the two Bethhorons, Upper and Lower, Baal-ath, and Palmyra, in the desert of Syria
Kings, the Books of - But in Israel their agency was more continuous and prominent, because of the absence of Jehovah's ordinary ministers the priests and Levites, and because of the state idolatry of the calves, to which Ahab added Baal worship. Elijah "the prophet as fire, whose words burned as a torch" (Sirach 48:1), as champion of Jehovah, defeated Baal's and Asherah's prophets at Carmel; and averted utter apostasy front northern Israel by banding God's prophets in schools where Jehovah's worship was maintained, and a substitute supplied for the legal temple worship enjoyed by the godly in Judah. ...
Also Paul refers to Elias' intercession against Israel, and God's answer about the 7,000 who bowed not to Baal (1 Kings 5:9)
Balaam - The first point of view to which Balak took Balaam was to one of the high places of Baal. ...
Let me die the death of the righteous! That was Balaam's noble peroration on the high place of Baal
Redeem - 25:13, Phinehas is said to have “made an atonement for the children of Israel” by spearing a couple during orgiastic worship of Baal
Habits - The priests of Baal were habited in black; a colour which appears to have been peculiar to themselves, and which few others in those countries, except mourners, would choose to wear
Magic, Divination, And Sorcery - In this manner classes of professional diviners and magicians arose, as in Egypt ( Genesis 41:8 , Exodus 7:11 ), in Babylon ( Daniel 2:2 ), in connexion with Baal ( 1 Kings 18:19 ), and even among the Israelites in the lower rank of professed prophets ( Micah 3:5-11 ; see G. Throughout pre-exilic times there was a struggle in Israel between the pure worship of Jehovah alone as inculcated by the great prophets, and the worship of ‘other gods,’ such as the local Canaanitish Baalim and idols in the homes of the people. the worship of the Phœnician Baal, fostered by Ahab), and by its favouring the introduction of methods of magic and divination in use among their neighbours (cf
High Priest - Hilkiah removed all traces of Baal worship from the Jerusalem Temple (2 Kings 23:4 )
Name - ]'>[29] A great number of personal names in the OT are compounded of Jahweh, El, or Baal
Disciple, Discipleship - Elijah calls to the people of Israel and says, "How long will you waver between two opinions? If the Lord is God, follow him; but if Baal is God, follow him" (1 Kings 18:21 )
Jacob - Their name is often connected with one of their gods, becoming Jacob-el or Jacob-baal
Prophecy, Prophet - Nevertheless, when Israel’s religion was under threat from the Baal worship introduced by Jezebel, the prophets Elijah and Elisha found many faithful followers of God in these schools
House - Retributively in kind, as they burnt incense to Baal the god of fire, the Chaldeans should burn the houses, the scene of his worship, with fire (Zephaniah 1:5)
Cabbala - Thus it is, rabbi Jacob Ben Ascher, surnamed Baal-Hatturim, is said to have compiled most of the cabbalas invented on the books of Moses before his time
Phoenicia, phNicians - In the following century king Ahab of Israel married Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal, king of Tyre. Baal and Ashtart were the principal divinities, and much prominence was given to sexual rites (cf
Elisha - At Bethel, on his way from Jericho to Carmel (2 Kings 2:23), where he had been with Elijah (2 Kings 2:2), he was met by "young men" (narim , not "little children"), idolaters or infidels, who, probably at the prompting of Baal's prophets in that stronghold of his worship sneered at the report of Elijah's ascension: "Go up" like thy master, said they, "thou bald head" (qereach , i. ...
Next, a man of Baal Shalisha brings firstfruits (paid to the prophets in the absence of the lawful priests: Numbers 18:8; Numbers 18:12; Deuteronomy 18:3-4), namely, 20 small loaves of new barley, and full green ears of grain roasted, esteemed a delicacy (Luke 9:18-17; Leviticus 23:14), in his garment (margin) or bag. ...
Joram, in language identical with his mother Jezebel's threat against Elijah (1 Kings 19:2; 2 Kings 6:31), makes Elisha the scape-goat of the national calamity, as though his late act in leading the blinded Syrians to Samaria and glorifying Jehovah above Baal were the cause, or suspecting it was by Elisha's word of prayer, as it was by Elijah's formerly (1 Kings 17), that the famine came (See JEHORAM); "God do so and more also to me, if the head of Elisha shall stand on him this day
History - Observation of natural seasons and life cycles advances such a theory, as seen in the Baal religion that tempted Israel
Ishmael - During the siege of Jerusalem Ishmael had fled to Baalis, king of Ammon, E. Baalis (called from the idol Baal) his host, urged him to slay Gedaliah who under the Babylonian king governed Judaea and the population which had not been carried away
Babylon, History And Religion of - In subsequent periods, Marduk (Merodach in Jeremiah 50:2 ) was considered the leading god and was given the epithet Bel (equivalent to the Canaanite term Baal), meaning “lord” (Isaiah 46:1 ; Jeremiah 50:2 ; Jeremiah 51:44 )
History - Observation of natural seasons and life cycles advances such a theory, as seen in the Baal religion that tempted Israel
High Place, Sanctuary - In taking over from the Canaanites the high places at which they worshipped Baal and Astarte, the Hebrews made little or no change in their appearance and appointments. As the Hebrews gradually became masters of Canaan, the high places at which the local Baals and Astartes had been worshipped became, as we have seen, the legitimate sanctuaries of J″ Numbers, Book of - Immorality and idolatry owing to seduction by the Moabite women; the worship of the Baal of Peor
Sanctify - This sense can be applied to pagan holy days: “Proclaim a solemn assembly for Baal
Archaeology And Biblical Study - In addition, the presence of names of several persons containing Baal as a component (e. Abibaal, Meribaal) reveal the continued influence of Baalism in the land. ...
Tell el-Balatah (ancient Shechem) had foundations of a temple from the late Bronze Age conjectured to be those of Baal-Berith (Judges 9:1 )
Wilderness of the Wanderings - If the backslider return to Kadesh, weeping there for his provocations (Deuteronomy 1:45), Jesus, the antitypical Joshua, will still bring him to the heavenly Canaan, though by a more trying way and with sore temptations, even at the hour of death, as Israel suffered from Baal-peor at the verge of Jordan (Numbers 25:1)
Moab - The principal deities of the Moabites were Chemosh and Baal-peor
Jeroboam - ...
Rome compared the Protestant reformation to Jeroboam's secession; but it is she who breaks the unity of the faith by representing the one God underimages, in violation of the second commandment; paving the way to violating the first, as Jeroboam's sin prepared the way for Baal worship
Solomon - ]'>[2] over the Baal worship of Canaan, and of His exaltation as supreme God of the nation
Music, Instruments, Dancing - As an idolatrous act, dancing is mentioned in the golden-calf story (Exodus 32:19 ) and in the worship of Baal at Carmel (1 Kings 18:26 )
Insects - 2 Kings 1:1 names the god of Ekron Baal-zebub
God, Names of - Any competing ideology is idolatry, whether that be the ancient worship of Baal or the modern preoccupation with technique, nationalism, or militarism
Saul - The Spirit of God came upon Jesus at the Jordan, but He came also upon Samson at the camp of Dan, and upon Balaam beside the altar of Baal
Saul - The names Kish and Ner, Nadab and Abi-nadab, Baal and Mephibosheth, recur in the genealogy in two generations
Zechariah, Theology of - They erroneously thought that Baal rode upon the storm cloud bringing rain to the crops
Rivers And Waterways in the Bible - In biblical history it is best known for its role in the Barak-Deborah victory over the Canaanite forces of Sisera (Judges 4-5 ) and Elijah's contest with the prophets of Baal on Mount Carmel (1 Kings 18:40 )
Jerusalem - The most active of the gods of Ugarit was called Baal-Zaphon
Demon, Demoniacal Possession, Demoniacs - ‘Baal-zebul’ is also regarded, in the Talmud, as a prince among demons, and is looked upon as the most evil of all evil spirits
Preaching - Jezebel, an idolatress, had four hundred prophets of Baal; and Ahab, a pretended worshipper of Jehovah, had as many pretended prophets of his own profession, 2 Chronicles 18:5
David - The Philistines, who had for some time observed a kind of truce, now made war against David; but were defeated in battle at a place afterwards called, in remembrance of the victory, Baal-perazim
Judea - Auranitis, or Ituraea, a mountainous and barren tract north of Batantaea, and bounded on the west by a branch of Mount Hermon, contained Bostra, or Bozra, about fifty miles east from the sea of Tiberias, bordering on Arabia Petraea, afterward enlarged by Trajan, and named Trajana Bostra; and Trachonitis, in 33 15' north latitude, between Hermon and Antilibanus, eastward from the sources of Jordan, and containing Baal-gad, Mispah, Paneas, or Caesarea Philippi, and AEnos, nearly twenty-five miles east of Panaeas, and as far south south-west of Damascus
Plagues of Egypt - This insect was worshipped in Palestine and elsewhere under the title of Baal-zebub, "lord of the gad fly," 2 Kings 1:1-2
Marriage - ...
(2) The normal type is where the wife becomes the property of her husband, who is her ‘Baal’ or possessor (Hosea 2:16 ), she herself being ‘Beulah’ ( Isaiah 62:4 )
Jerusalem - Next Joash (and Jehoiada in his 23rd year of reign (1 Kings 11:36; 2 Chronicles 24:4-14) repaired the temple after its being injured by the Baal worshippers of Athaliah's rein
Job, Theology of - This metaphorical description of God counteracts the pagan myths, which depicted the Canaanite storm-god Baal-Hadad and the Mesopotamian counterpart Adad holding a flash of lightning as a weapon
Romans, Theology of - God has not totally rejected Israel; Paul himself is evidence to the contrary, as were the seven thousand who did not bow the knee to Baal in the Old Testament, which attests the graciousness of God; and even now "there is a remnant chosen by grace" (11:5)
Preaching - Jezebel, an idolatress, had four hundred prophets of Baal; and Ahab, a pretended worshipper of Jehovah, had as many pretended prophets of his own profession, 2 Chronicles 18:5
God - The religion of the Canaanites was a nature-worship; their deities were personified forces of nature, though called ‘Lord’ or ‘Lady’ ( Baal, Baalah ) of the place where they were venerated (Guthe, EBi Judges (1) - The following is an outline of the contents of these chapters: ...
There is, first of all, an introduction (Judges 6:25-3278 to Judges 3:6 ) which contains a brief but comprehensive résumé of the period about to be dealt with; as long as Joshua was alive, it says, the children of Israel remained faithful to Jahweh; but after his death, and after the generation that knew him had passed away, the people for sook Jahweh, the God of their fathers, and served Baal and Ashtaroth; the consequence was that they were oppressed by the surrounding nations. 9, the story of Abimelech, is one of the oldest portions of the book, and contains for the most part genuine history; it gives an instructive glimpse of the relations between Canaanites and Israelites now brought side by side; ‘the Canaanite town Shechem, subject to Jerubbaal of Ophrah; his balf-Canaanite son Abimelech, who naturally belongs to his mother’s people; the successful appeal to blood, which is “thicker than water,” by which he becomes king of Shechem, ruling over the neighbouring Israelites also; the interloper Gaal, and his kinsmen, who settle in Shechem and Instigate insurrection against Abimelech by skilfully appealing to the pride of the Shechemite aristocracy all help us better than anything else in the book to realize the situation in this period’ (Moore)
Hellenism - Not only were the Oriental gods called by Greek names (Ammon and Baal became Zeus; Melkart, Herakles; Astarte, Aphrodite; Thoth, Hermes, etc
Egypt - Sutech answers to the Phoenician Baal, and is represented in inscriptions as the Hittites' chief god, and had human sacrifices at Heliopolis under the Hyksos, which Aahmes I suppressed
Israel - Thus the Gadites had Dibon, Ataroth, and Aroer to the south, Jazer north of Heshbon, and Bethnimrah and Beth-baran in the Jordan valley; while the Reubenites had Baal-meon, Nebo, Heshbon, and Elealeh, which lay between these
Theodoretus, Bishop of Cyrrhus - The indictment was formulated by a presbyter of Antioch named Pelagius, who, in language of the most atrocious violence, proceeded to demand of the council to take the sword of God and, as Samuel dealt with Agag, and Elijah with the priests of Baal, pitilessly destroy those who had introduced strange doctrines into the church