What does Ark mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
אֲר֣וֹן chest 47
אֲר֥וֹן chest 21
אֲר֨וֹן chest 11
אֲר֤וֹן chest 10
אֲרוֹן֙ chest 8
הַתֵּבָ֔ה ark. 7
אֲר֧וֹן chest 6
הָאָרֹ֖ן chest 6
הַתֵּבָ֑ה ark. 5
אֲרוֹן־ chest 5
הַתֵּבָ֖ה ark. 5
וַאֲר֥וֹן chest 4
הָאָרֽוֹן chest 4
אֲר֖וֹן chest 4
הַתֵּבָֽה ark. 4
הָאָרֹ֑ן chest 4
הָאָר֑וֹן chest 3
הָ֣אָר֔וֹן chest 3
הָאָר֔וֹן chest 3
אֲרֹ֣ן chest 3
הָאָר֥וֹן chest 3
הַתֵּבָה֙ ark. 2
הָאָרוֹן֙ chest 2
אֲרֹ֥ן chest 2
הָ֣אָרֹ֔ן chest 2
κιβωτόν a wooden chest or box. / in the NT the ark of the covenant 2
וַֽאֲרוֹן֙ chest 2
הָֽאָרוֹן֙ chest 2
הָאָר֛וֹן chest 2
לַאֲר֣וֹן chest 2
הָֽאָר֑וֹן chest 2
בָּֽאָר֔וֹן chest 2
לָאָרֽוֹן chest 2
κιβωτὸν a wooden chest or box. / in the NT the ark of the covenant 2
לַתֵּבָ֗ה ark. 1
לַֽאֲר֣וֹן chest 1
תֵּבַ֣ת ark. 1
הָאָר֗וֹן chest 1
κιβωτοῦ a wooden chest or box. / in the NT the ark of the covenant 1
תֵּ֣בַת ark. 1
הָאָרֹ֤ן chest 1
וַאֲר֤וֹן chest 1
בַּתֵּבָֽה ark. 1
וַאֲר֨וֹן chest 1
הָאָרֹן֙ chest 1
לָאָר֡וֹן chest 1
הָֽאָר֔וֹן chest 1
הָאָר֨וֹן chest 1
בַּאֲר֣וֹן chest 1
אֲרֽוֹן־ chest 1
הָאָרֹן֮ chest 1
הָאָרֹֽן chest 1
הָאָרֹ֥ן chest 1
הָֽאָרֹן֙ chest 1
הָאָרֹ֔ן chest 1
לָֽאָר֔וֹן chest 1
לַֽאֲרוֹן֙ chest 1
בָּאָר֖וֹן chest 1
בָּאָרֽוֹן chest 1
κιβωτὸς a wooden chest or box. / in the NT the ark of the covenant 1
הָ֠אָרוֹן chest 1
וַאֲר֣וֹן chest 1
בַּתֵּבָ֑ה ark. 1

Definitions Related to Ark

H727


   1 chest, Ark.
      1a money chest.
      1b Ark of the Covenant.
   2 (TWOT) coffin.
   

H8392


   1 Ark.
      1a vessel which Noah built.
      1b basket vessel in which Moses was placed.
      

G2787


   1 a wooden chest or box.
   2 in the NT the Ark of the covenant, in the temple at Jerusalem.
   3 of Noah’s vessel built in the form of an Ark.
   

Frequency of Ark (original languages)

Frequency of Ark (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ark And Dove
Names of the vessels in which the first colonists arrived in Maryland, March 25, 1634, under the leadership of Leonard Calvert, as governor, and the spiritual direction of the Jesuit chaplains Andrew White and John Altham.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ark of the Covenant
The sacred chest or coffer in which the tables of the law were deposited, written by the finger of God, and witnessing to his covenant with his people, Exodus 25:22 34:29 . It was of shittim-wood, covered within and without with plates of gold, nearly four feet in length, and two feet three inches in width and height. On the top of it, all around, ran a kind of gold crown. It had four rings of gold, two on each side, through which staves were put, by which it was carried. These also were overlaid with the finest gold, and were not to be removed from the rings, Exodus 25:10-22 . The lid of the ark, all of gold, was called the mercy-seat; and upon its opposite ends were two golden cherubim, fronting each other and the mercy-seat, which they covered with their outspread wings, Exodus 37:1-9 . Here God especially dwelt, 2 Kings 19:15 1 Chronicles 13:6 , and shone forth, perhaps by some sensible manifestations, Leviticus 16:2 Psalm 80:1 . Here he received the homage of his people, and dispensed his living oracles, Numbers 7:89 . The great yearly sacrifice of expiation was here offered by the high priest, Hebrews 9:7 , in the Holy of Holies. Hence there was no object held more sacred by the Jews than "the ark of God." During their journeys in the wilderness, it was borne by the priests under a purple canopy and with great reverence before the host of Israel, Numbers 4:5,6 . Before it the Jordan was divided, and behind it the waters flowed on again, Joshua 3:1-4:24 . The walls of Jericho fell down before it, Joshua 6:4-12 .
After this, the ark continued some time at Gilgal, whence it was removed to Shiloh, Joshua 4:19 10:43 18:1 . Hence the Israelites took it to their camp; but when they gave battle to the Philistines, it was taken by the enemy, 1 Samuel 4:1-22 . Th Philistines, oppressed by the hand of God, returned the ark, and it was lodged at Kirjath-jearim, 1 Samuel 7:1 . It was afterwards, in the reign of Saul, at Nob. David conveyed it from Kirjath-jearim to the house of Obed-Edom, and from thence to his palace on Zion, 2 Samuel 6:1-23 ; and lastly, Solomon brought it into the temple at Jerusalem,
2 Chronicles 5:2 . It remained in the temple, with all suitable respect, till the times of the later idolatrous kings of Judah, who profaned the Most Holy place by their idols, when the priests appear to have removed the ark from the temple. At least, Josiah commanded them to bring it back to the sanctuary, and forbade them to carry it about, as they had hitherto done, 2 Chronicles 35:3 . The ark appears to have been destroyed at the captivity, or perhaps concealed by pious Jews in some hiding-place afterwards undiscoverable, as we hear nothing more of it; and the want of it made the second temple less glorious than the first.
Besides the tables of the covenant, placed by Moses in this sacred coffer, God appointed the blossoming rod of Aaron to be lodged there, Numbers 17:10 Hebrews 9:4 ; a golden vase of manna gathered in the wilderness, Exodus 16:33,34 , and a copy of the book of the law, Deuteronomy 31:26 .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ark of Noah
The vessel in which the family of Noah was preserved during the deluge, when all the rest of our race perished for their sins. The ark is called in Hebrew, in the Septuagint, and by Josephus, a chest; and the same word is used in the history of the infant Moses, Exodus 2:3 . So far as this name affords any evidence, it goes to show that the ark of Noah was not a regular sailing-vessel, but merely intended to float at large guard it as a large, oblong, floating house, with a roof either flat or only slightly inclined. It was constructed with three stories, and had a door in the side. There is no mention of windows in the side, but "above," probably in the roof, where Noah was commanded to make them of a cubit in height, Genesis 5:16 8:13 .
The dimensions of the ark, taking the cubit as eighteen inches, were 450 feet in length, 75 in breadth and 45 in height. It was built of gopher-wood, and made water-proof with bitumen, and was no doubt large enough to accommodate the eight persons of Noah's family and the animals to be saved in it-namely, of all birds and clean beasts seven each, and of unclean beasts two each, male and female. Many questions have been raised, and discussed at great length by skeptics and others, respecting the form and dimensions of the ark; the number of animals saved in it-whether including all species then existing in the world, except such as live in water or lie dormant, or only the species living in the parts of world then peopled by man; and as to the possibility of their being all lodged in the ark, and their food during the year, etc. Some of these questions the Bible clearly settles. Others it is vain to discuss, since we have no means of deciding them. Certain it is, that while the Bible eulogizes the faith and obedience of Noah, it shows that his salvation was a miracle of Providence. It was by miracle that he was forewarned, and directed to prepare for the flood; and the same miraculous power accomplished all that Noah was unable to so in designing, building, and filling the ark, and preserving and guiding it through the deluge. It has been commonly supposed that the warning came to Noah 120 years before the flood. Compare Genesis 5:32 with Genesis 7:6 , and Genesis 6:3 with 1 Peter 3:20 . Traditions of the ark are found in most nations all over the globe. See DELUGE .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ark
Noah's ark, a building of gopher-wood, and covered with pitch, 300 cubits long, 50 cubits broad, and 30 cubits high (Genesis 6:14-16 ); an oblong floating house of three stories, with a door in the side and a window in the roof. It was 100 years in building (Genesis 5:32 ; 7:6 ). It was intended to preserve certain persons and animals from the deluge which God was about to bring over the earth. It contained eight persons (Genesis 7:13 ; 2 Peter 2:5 ), and of all "clean" animals seven pairs, and of "unclean" one pair, and of birds seven pairs of each sort (Genesis 7:2,3 ). It was in the form of an oblong square, with flat bottom and sloping roof. Traditions of the Deluge, by which the race of man was swept from the earth, and of the ark of Noah have been found existing among all nations. The ark of bulrushes in which the infant Moses was laid (Exodus 2:3 ) is called in the Hebrew Teebah , A word derived from the Egyptian Teb , meaning "a chest." It was daubed with slime and with pitch. The bulrushes of which it was made were the papyrus reed.
The sacred ark is designated by a different Hebrew word, 'Aron' , Which is the common name for a chest or coffer used for any purpose ( Genesis 50:26 ; 2 Kings 12:9,10 ). It is distinguished from all others by such titles as the "ark of God" (1 Samuel 3:3 ), "ark of the covenant" (Joshua 3:6 ; Hebrews 9:4 ), "ark of the testimony" (Exodus 25:22 ). It was made of acacia or shittim wood, a cubit and a half broad and high and two cubits long, and covered all over with the purest gold. Its upper surface or lid, the mercy-seat, was surrounded with a rim of gold; and on each of the two sides were two gold rings, in which were placed two gold-covered poles by which the ark could be carried (Numbers 7:9 ; 10:21 ; 4:5,19,20 ; 1 Kings 8:3,6 ). Over the ark, at the two extremities, were two cherubim, with their faces turned toward each other (Leviticus 16:2 ; Numbers 7:89 ). Their outspread wings over the top of the ark formed the throne of God, while the ark itself was his footstool (Exodus 25:10-22 ; 37:1-9 ). The ark was deposited in the "holy of holies," and was so placed that one end of the poles by which it was carried touched the veil which separated the two apartments of the tabernacle (1 Kings 8:8 ). The two tables of stone which constituted the "testimony" or evidence of God's covenant with the people (Deuteronomy 31:26 ), the "pot of manna" (Exodus 16:33 ), and "Aaron's rod that budded" (Numbers 17:10 ), were laid up in the ark (Hebrews 9:4 ). (See TABERNACLE) The ark and the sanctuary were "the beauty of Israel" (Lamentations 2:1 ). During the journeys of the Israelites the ark was carried by the priests in advance of the host (Numbers 4:5,6 ; 10:33-36 ; Psalm 68:1 ; 132:8 ). It was borne by the priests into the bed of the Jordan, which separated, opening a pathway for the whole of the host to pass over (Joshua 3:15,16 ; 4:7,10,11,17,18 ). It was borne in the procession round Jericho (Joshua 6:4,6,8,11,12 ). When carried it was always wrapped in the veil, the badgers' skins, and blue cloth, and carefully concealed even from the eyes of the Levites who carried it. After the settlement of Israel in Palestine the ark remained in the tabernacle at Gilgal for a season, and was then removed to Shiloh till the time of Eli, between 300,400 years (Jeremiah 7:12 ), when it was carried into the field of battle so as to secure, as they supposed, victory to the Hebrews, and was taken by the Philistines (1 Samuel 4:3-11 ), who sent it back after retaining it seven months (1 Samuel 5:7,8 ). It remained then at Kirjath-jearim (7:1,2) till the time of David (twenty years), who wished to remove it to Jerusalem; but the proper mode of removing it having been neglected, Uzzah was smitten with death for putting "forth his hand to the ark of God," and in consequence of this it was left in the house of Obed-edom in Gath-rimmon for three months (2 Samuel 6:1-11 ), at the end of which time David removed it in a grand procession to Jerusalem, where it was kept till a place was prepared for it (12-19). It was afterwards deposited by Solomon in the temple (1 Kings 8:6-9 ). When the Babylonians destroyed Jerusalem and plundered the temple, the ark was probably taken away by Nebuchadnezzar and destroyed, as no trace of it is afterwards to be found. The absence of the ark from the second temple was one of the points in which it was inferior to the first temple.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Ark of the Covenant
(aron , not teebah ). An oblong chester shittim wood (acacia), two and a half cubits long, one and a half broad and deep. F. W. Kolland measured acacias nine feet in girth, in the region of Israel's wandering; he attributes their being usually stunted there to the Arabs cutting off the young shoots for the she goats. Thus Colenso's cavil that "not a single acacia" is to be seen where the ark is said to have been constructed is answered. It is a propriety characteristic of the truth of the Scripture narrative that it represents the ark as not made of oak or cedar, the best woods of the Holy Land, but of acacia, the wood of the wilderness. Cedar actually was the wood used for the Jerusalem temple. In the thorn of man's curse appeared the angel of the covenant to Moses, to bless man; and out of its wood was formed the ark of the covenant, the typical source of his blessing. Overlaid with gold within and without.
The mercy-seat supporting the cherubim, one at each end, was on the lid, with a crown or raised border, and was Jehovah's mystical throne. It had rings at the four grainers for the two staves to pass through, wherewith the Kohathite Levites or priests carried it. The staves were permanently in the rings. Within e veil was its proper place, the ends of the staves, however, being visible, in Solomon's temple, in the outer holy place. When carried about, the ark was wrapped in the veil, the badger's skin, and blue cloth. Its title, "the ark of the testimony," implies its purpose, namely, to keep intact God's "covenant" written by God on the two stone tables (Exodus 34:28), as the sacred deposit of the Israelite church (Exodus 25:22; Numbers 10:33).
The outward keeping taught symbolically the moral and spiritual keeping of God's commandments. In the wilderness "the ark of the covenant of the Lord went before them in the three days' journey to search out a resting place for them; and when the ark set forward, Moses said, Rise up, Lord, and let Thine enemies be scattered, and let them that hate Thee flee before Thee. And when it rested, he said, Return, O Lord, unto the many thousands of Israel" (Numbers 10:33-36; Psalms 68:1; Psalms 132:8). At the passage of the Jordan it was when the ark was borne by the priests and their feet had touched the water, that an open way was made for Israel. Only when the material ark, apart from obedience, was expected to give that favor of God which only obedience to the law contained within the ark could ensure, did God "deliver His strength" (the pledge of God's strengthening His people) "into captivity and His glory into the enemy's hands" (Psalms 78:61; 1 Samuel 4:11).
When the ark was taken the "glory" was departed (1 Samuel 4:21-22). The ark and the sanctuary were "the beauty of Israel" (Lamentations 2:1). The antitype, Messiah, goes before His redeemed, exploring their way through the wilderness, making clear passage through death's waters into the heavenly Canaan. Like the ark with the Philistines Messiah was the captive of the grave for a brief space, but with triumph He rose again; and as when the ark went up to the tabernacle reared for it by David on Zion, so on Christ's ascending the heavenly mount the glorious anthem arose: "Lift up your heads, O ye gates, and be ye lift up, ye everlasting doors, and the King of glory shall come in" (Psalm 24). Every Dagon must fall before Him now; for even in His temporary captivity in death the powers of darkness were crushed before Him (Colossians 2:14-15; Matthew 27:50-54). As the ark blessed the house of Obed Edom, so Christ is the true bestower of blessings (Acts 3:20).
The restriction of the ark's contents to the decalogue implies that this is the central core of all the various precepts, the moral end for which the positive precepts were given. They were in the innermost shrine, to mark their perpetually obligatory nature and the holiness of God; in the ark, the type of Christ, to mark that in Him alone, "the Lord our righteousness," they find their perfect realization. 1 Kings 8:9 states there was nothing in the ark of Solomon's temple save the two stone tables of the law; but Hebrews 9:4 states there were also the golden pot of manna (the memorial of God's providential care of Israel), and Aaron's rod that budded (the memorial of the lawful priesthood, Numbers 17:3-10). Probably by the time of Solomon the other two relics had been lost, perhaps when the ark was in the hands of the Philistines. "Before the Lord" and "before the testimony" was where they were directed to be laid up (Exodus 16:32-36).
The mercy-seat was not merely regarded as the lid of the ark, but as the most important feature in the holiest place (Exodus 25:17; Exodus 26:34; Leviticus 16:2), the only meeting place between God and man. It was the (caporeth ) or covering, not merely of the ark. but (when sprinkled with the sacrificial blood once a year on the great day of atonement) of Israel's sins against the law contained within the ark. Hence it is called in the Septuagint "the propitiatory" (hilasterion ); and Christ, the true mercy-seat (Psalms 85:10) and place of meeting between the holy God and guilty man, is called the very same (Romans 3:25), "propitiation," lit. propitiatory. In 1 Chronicles 28:11 the holiest is called" the place of the mercy-seat," so prominent was the latter in symbolical significance.
The ark was never seen save by the high priest; symbol of God whom no man can see, and whose likeness is only to be seen in Christ (John 1:18; Hebrews 1:3), the true Ark, and our High Priest with the Father. Thus every tendency to idolatry was excluded, an ark occupying the central place of holiness, and that seen only once a year by the one religious representative of the people. Even it is to be superseded in the coming temple at. Jerusalem, when "they shall say no more, The ark of the covenant of the Lord, neither shall it come to mind, neither shall they re. member it"; for Jehovah Jesus, the Antitype, will be there, "at that time they shall call Jerusalem the throne of the Lord, and all the nations shall be gathered unto it" (Jeremiah 3:16). The absence of the ark after its capture by the Philistines possibly impaired the reverential awe felt toward it (1 Chronicles 13:3; 1 Chronicles 13:9). But the stroke on Uzza, and the rearing of the tabernacle for it in Zion by David, after its long abode of 20 years in Kirjath Jearim, in Abinadab's house, recovered for it all its sanctity.
The altar of burnt offering where the sacrifices were offered continued separate from it at Gibeon, the "great high place" (1 Kings 3:4) (in the tabernacle of the ark on Zion the service was song and praise alone) until the two were reunited in the temple of Solomon, a type of the gospel separation of the spiritual service of prayer and praise going on here below, from the priestly intercession being carried on above by our Lord Jesus. The spiritual and the literal priestly services will perhaps be reunited in Ezekiel's millennial temple at Jerusalem, one antitype to Solomon's temple. Compare Acts 15:16-17. Manasseh set up an idol, a carved image, instead of the ark which contained the testimony against him. Josiah restored it to its place in the house of God (2 Chronicles 33:7; 2 Chronicles 35:3).
The ark was wanting in the second temple, having been probably burnt with the temple (2 Chronicles 36:19); compare (apocryphal) 2 Esdras 10:22, "the ark of our covenant is spoiled." Its absence was one of the points wherein the second was inferior to the first temple. (See ALTAR.) There must have been some substitute for it, on which to sprinkle the blood, in the holiest, on the great day of atonement; the Jews mention an altar stone, slightly raised from the floor. Pagan nations too had their mystic arks (whence arcanum is the term for a mystery), but so distinct in use from the Mosaic that the differences are more prominent than the resemblances.
The Egyptian arks (on their monuments) were, like the Hebrew ark, carried by poles on men's shoulders. Some had too on the cover two winged figures like cherubim; but between these was the material symbol of a deity, and the arks were carried about in procession to make a show before the people. The ark of the covenant on the contrary was marked by the absence of any symbol of God. It was never carried in procession. When moved it was carefully covered up from the eyes even of the Levites who bore it (Numbers 4:5-6; Numbers 4:19-20): "they shall not go in to see when the holy things are covered, lest they die." Compare 1 Samuel 6:19. In the tabernacle the ark was withdrawn from view in the mysterious holy of holies.
It was not moved from its "rest" (Psalms 132:8; Psalms 132:14) when once Jerusalem became the fixed capital, and the hill of Zion God's chosen seat, until its forcible removal under Nebuchadnezzar; God giving up the apostate Jews to the pagan world power. Previously it had a few times accompanied the army (1 Samuel 4:3; 1 Samuel 14:18; 2 Samuel 11:11). But from the first rest was appointed as its final condition, and under David it obtained that "rest" (Deuteronomy 12:10-11; 1 Chronicles 6:31; 1 Chronicles 16:1). Its simple and grand purpose was to be the casket containing the precious tables of stone written with the moral law by God Himself. The originality of the tabernacle furniture and arrangements is more striking than the superficial resemblances which have been traced to pagan usages.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Ark, Noah's
(See ARK.)
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Ark of Moses
(See ARK.)
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Ark
(See NOAH.) The term (teebah ) is applied to the infant Moses' ark. (See BULRUSH.) Teebah is evidently the Egyptian teb , "a chest," Hebraised. It has no Semitic equivalent. It is a type of the manger which disclosed to the shepherds Messiah, who, beginning with the manger, at last ascended to His Father's throne; also of the paper ark to which God has committed His revelation.
Webster's Dictionary - Ark Shell
A marine bivalve shell belonging to the genus Arca and its allies.
Webster's Dictionary - Ark
(1):
(n.) The oblong chest of acacia wood, overlaid with gold, which supported the mercy seat with its golden cherubs, and occupied the most sacred place in the sanctuary. In it Moses placed the two tables of stone containing the ten commandments. Called also the Ark of the Covenant.
(2):
(n.) The large, chestlike vessel in which Noah and his family were preserved during the Deluge. Gen. vi. Hence: Any place of refuge.
(3):
(n.) A large flatboat used on Western American rivers to transport produce to market.
(4):
(n.) A chest, or coffer.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Ark
Gold-covered acacia wood box measuring 2.5 x 1.5 x 1.5 cubits that for the Israelite people symbolized the presence of God. It is first mentioned in Exodus 25:10-22 among the furnishings of the tabernacle. The ark's top cover supported two winged creatures called cherubim. They faced each other across the top of the ark and their outstretched wings touched at the tips. The mobility of the ark was insured by two permanently attached carrying poles, reflecting the fact that the people of Israel and their God had no fixed dwellingplace. Even when the ark was permanently located in the Holy of Holies, the poles remained ( 1 Kings 8 ), a visible reminder that God was "tenting" among his people, but that his presence could be withdrawn.
The practical function of the ark was to protect and preserve various sacred objects. In the early accounts of the ark only the Mount Sinai covenant tablets are so protected, giving rise to the common epithet, the "ark of the covenant" (Exodus 25:16 ; 1 Kings 8:9 ), or a variant, "ark of the Lord's covenant" (Numbers 14:44 ). Later traditions also mentioned a portion of preserved manna and Aaron's rod as being in the ark (Hebrews 9:4 ). The ark also had a military role, leading the march of the people of Israel in the wilderness (Numbers 10:33 ), circling the walls of Jericho (Joshua 4:6 ), and going forth to battle against the Philistines (1 Samuel 4:5 ).
Scripture associates God's physical presence with the ark. Moses addressed the ark as "the Lord" in the wilderness (Numbers 10:35 ). The ark was sacred, indeed, dangerous to friends and foes alike. The Philistines recognized its holiness, and to neutralize its power they placed it in the temple of Dagon, to Dagon's distress (1 Samuel 5:8 ). The awesome holiness of the ark was demonstrated when Uzzah was killed for touching the ark when he tried to prevent it from falling (1 Chronicles 13:10 ).
In the temple, the ark occupied the Holy of Holies. With a permanent location, the theological understanding of the ark changed. The cover of the ark was seen as the throne of God with the cherubim supporting him and setting aside the space between their wings as his seat. Interestingly, Solomon placed huge cherubim to flank the ark in the temple, thus setting apart the entire ark and its surrounding space as God's seat. Solomon aimed to make a place where God could "dwell forever" (1 Kings 8:13 ). Hezekiah, seeking divine aid against the Assyrians, called on the "God of Israel, enthroned between the cherubim" (2 Kings 19:15 ).
The ark disappears from post-Solomonic biblical history except for a passing reference in 2 Chronicles 35:3 , where the Levites are charged by Josiah no longer to carry the ark about. This may be as much a reflection of a postexilic understanding of Josiah (the new David who would correct the behavior of the Levites) as that of the actual ark itself.
In the return, according to the prophet Jeremiah, the ark would not be remembered or replaced, because Jerusalem would be "The Throne of the Lord" (3:16; the only prophetic mention of the ark). In the new temple envisioned by Ezekiel, no ark is mentioned. There will be no ark because in the new kingdom God will no longer be just a God of Israel, dwelling in a limited space, but will reveal himself as the God of all nations ruling with a new covenant. In Revelation 11:19 (the only New Testament mention) the ark has returned to the direct care of God, sacred, but no longer functional. In the New Testament, Christ himself is the bearer of the new covenant and the focus of God's presence.
Thomas W. Davis
Bibliography . R. G. Boling and G. E. Wright, Joshua ; R. de Vaux, Ancient Israel ; M. Haran, Temple and Temple Service in Ancient Israel .
King James Dictionary - Ark
'ARK, n. L. arca.
1. A small close vessel, chest or coffer, such as that which was the repository of the tables of the covenant among the Jews. This was about three feet nine inches in length. The lid was the propitiatory, or mercy seat, over which were the cherubs. The vessel in which Moses was set afloat upon the Nile was an ark of bulrushes. 2. The large floating vessel, in which Noah and his family were preserved, during the deluge. 3. A depository. Arise, O Lord, into thy rest, thou and the ark of thy strength. Psalms 132 .
4. A large boat used on American rivers, to transport produce to market.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ark
(Latin: arca, chest)
The vessel of timber daubed with pitch, 300 cubits long, 50 broad, and 30 high, which Noe constructed at the command of God for the preservation of him and his family and two of all living creatures during the Deluge; also the chest in Which were kept the tables of the Law, called the Ark of the Covenant.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ark of the Covenant Person
A title given to the Blessed Virgin Mary to signify her Divine motherhood, that as the ark of old, made of incorruptible wood and adorned with pure gold, contained the precious treasures of the Divine law and the manna from heaven, so she, the true ark, bore within her not merely the law but the Lawgiver, not merely the Divine presence as manifested over the ark of the covenant, but the Divine One Himself, and the Living Bread from heaven.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Ark
Boat or water vessel and in particular one built by Noah under God's direction to save Noah, his family, and representatives of all animal life from the flood. Old Testament—Genesis 6:14-9:18 ; Exodus 2:3-5 ; New Testament—Matthew 24:38 ; Luke 17:27 ; Hebrews 11:7 ; 1 Peter 3:20 .
Old Testament God warned Noah of His intentions to destroy the earth because of the wickedness of humanity. Noah was commanded to build an ark to God's specifications to save his family and representatives of all animals from the flood (Genesis 6:18-19 ). As such, the ark became both a symbol of a faith on the part of Noah and a symbol of grace on the part of God (Genesis 6:8 ,Genesis 6:8,6:22 ).
The shape of the ark was unusual. Although the Bible does not give enough detail to enable a full model to be made, the ark was apparently not shaped like a boat, either ancient or modern. The shape more closely approximates a giant block. The length was 300 cubits (about 450 feet), the width was 50 cubits (about 75 feet), and the height was 30 cubits (about 45 feet), overall dimensions that resemble the dimensions of a giant house (Genesis 6:15 ). The ark had three floors filled with rooms (Genesis 6:14 ,Genesis 6:14,6:16 ) and one window and one door (Genesis 6:16 ).
The ark was built of gopher wood (Genesis 6:14 ) which may have been a variety of cypress. It has also been suggested that gopher wood referred to a particular shape or type of plank or beam, rather than a type of wood. Our limited knowledge makes it impossible to make a final conclusion.
The ark was a testimony of Noah's faith because no large body of water stood nearby on which Noah could have floated such a large boat. Hence people could see no obvious or visible need for such a vessel. To have built such a vessel at that place and at that time was clearly an act of tremendous faith in the message of God that the vessel would be needed (Genesis 6:17-19 ). Noah dared to believe that he had properly understood God and that God could be depended upon (Genesis 6:22 ).
The ark was also a symbol of God's grace. Obviously, the ark was intended by God as an instrument of deliverance to preserve both human and animal life upon the earth (Genesis 6:17-18 ). As such, it came to be understood as a symbol of His grace and mercy (Hebrews 11:7 ). The ark showed that God still cared for the people whom He had created in spite of their stubborn sinful rebellion. The ark as symbol of both faith and grace teaches the importance of obedience. God offered the ark to save Noah. Noah's obedience allowed him to experience that grace.
New Testament The gospel references to the ark are in connection with Jesus' teachings regarding the second coming. The expectancy of some at the second coming is likened to those who were destroyed by the flood. In the Book of Hebrews, the preacher lists Noah as a man of faith who prepared an ark even though the danger was at that point unseen. The last New Testament reference to the ark points to the evil of humanity and God's patient salvation (1 Peter 3:20 ).
Extra-biblical Sources The Babylonian flood story, called the Gilgamesh epic, also tells of a large boat by which its hero survived the flood. There, however, the ark was not a symbol of the grace of the gods but of their folly and faulty planning. In the Sumerian and Babylonian traditions, we are given more details concerning the size and shape of the ark. These details may be of interest, but are of far less significance than the message of the biblical ark itself as testimony to God's unmerited grace.
Searches for the ark have proven fruitless. Numerous newspaper articles and paperback books record attempts to discover the ruins of Noah's ark. While the ark has not yet been recovered, the discovery of such remains are unnecessary to demonstrate the authenticity of the story. Faith which requires proof is not faith at all. See Flood ; Noah .
Robert Cate
Holman Bible Dictionary - Ark of Bulrushes
KJV translation of a Hebrew word in Exodus 2:3-5 usually translated basket.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Ark of the Covenant
names the original container for the Ten Commandments and the central symbol of God's presence with the people of Israel.
Old Testament The ark of ancient Israel is mysterious in its origins, its meanings, and its ultimate fate. Its many names convey the holy sense of God's presence. The Hebrew word for ark means simply “box, chest, coffin,” as is indicated by its use for the coffin of Joseph (Genesis 50:26 ) and for the Temple collection box of King Joash (2 Kings 12:9-10 ).
The names used for the ark define its meaning by the words which modify it. The word “covenant” in the name defines the ark from its original purpose as a container for the stone tablets upon which the Ten Commandments (sometimes called the “testimony”) were inscribed. Sometimes it is identified rather with the name of deity, “the ark of God,” or “the ark of the Lord” (Yahweh), or most ornately “the ark of the covenant of the Lord of hosts (Yahweh Sabaoth) who is enthroned on the cherubim” (1 Samuel 4:4 ).
The origin of the ark goes back to Moses at Sinai. The mysterious origin of the ark is seen by contrasting the two accounts of how it was made in the Pentateuch. The more elaborate account of the manufacture and ornamentation of the ark by the craftsman Bezalel appears in Exodus 25:10-22 ; Exodus 31:2 ,Exodus 31:2,31:7 ; Exodus 35:30-35 ; Exodus 37:1-9 . It was planned during Moses' first sojourn on Sinai and built after all the tabernacle specifications had been communicated and completed. The other account is found in Deuteronomy 10:1-5 . After the sin of the golden calf and the breaking of the original decalogue tablets, Moses made a plain box of acacia wood as a container to receive the new tables of the law.
A very ancient poem, the “Song of the Ark” in Numbers 10:35-36 , sheds some light on the function of the ark in the wanderings in the wilderness. The ark was the symbol of God's presence to guide the pilgrims and lead them in battle (Numbers 10:33 ,Numbers 10:33,10:35-36 ). If they acted in faithlessness, failing to follow this guidance, the consequences could be drastic (Numbers 14:39-45 ). Some passages suggest the ark was also regarded as the throne of the invisible deity, or his footstool (Jeremiah 3:16-17 ; Psalm 132:7-8 ). These various meanings of the ark should be interpreted as complementary rather than contradictory.
The ark was designed for mobility. Its size (about four feet long, two and a half feet wide, and two and a half feet deep) and rectangular shape were appropriate to this feature. Permanent poles were used to carry the ark, since no one was allowed to touch it, and only priestly (Levitical) personnel were allowed to carry it. The ark was the most important object within the tabernacle of the desert period, though its relationship to the tabernacle was discontinued sometime after the conquest of Canaan.
The ark played a prominent role in the “holy war” narratives of the crossing of the Jordan and the conquest, of Jericho (Joshua 3-6 ). After the conquest, it was variously located at Gilgal, Shechem (Joshua 8:30-35 ; see Deuteronomy 11:26-32 ; Deuteronomy 27:1-26 ) or Bethel (Judges 20:26 ), wherever the tribal confederacy was gathered for worship. Finally, it was permanently located at Shiloh, where a temple was built to house it (1 Samuel 1:9 ; 1 Samuel 3:3 ).
Because of the faithless superstition of the wicked sons of Eli, the Hebrew tribes were defeated in the battle of Ebenezer, and the ark was captured by the Philistines (1 Samuel 4:1 ). The adventures of the ark in the cities of Ashdod, Gath, and Ekron are told to magnify the strength and glory of the Lord of the ark. The Lord vanquished Dagon and spread bubonic plagues among the enemy until they propitiated the God of Israel by symbolic guilt offerings and a ritually correct sending away of the dread object (1 Samuel 5:1-6:12 ). The men of Bethshemesh welcomed the return of the ark, until they unwisely violated its holiness by looking into it (1Samuel 6:13-15,1 Samuel 6:19-20 ). Then it was carried to Kiriath-Jearim, where it remained in comparative neglect until David recovered the symbolism it had for the ancient tribal confederacy and moved it to his new capital and sanctuary in Jerusalem (1 Samuel 6:21-7:2 ; 2 Samuel 6:1 ). Abinadab and his sons (2 Samuel 6:3 ) seemed to have served the Lord of the ark faithfully until one son, Uzzah, was smitten for his rash touching of the holy object during David's first attempt to transport the ark from its “hill” at Kiriath-Jearim to his own city. In fear, David left the ark with Obed-edom the Gittite, whose household was blessed by its presence. More cautiously and with great religious fervor, David succeeded the second time in taking the ark into his capital city (2 Samuel 6:12-19 ).
Recent scholarship has suggested that on coronation occasions or annually at a festival of enthronement this ark ceremony was reenacted. Such an occasion would re-emphasize the promise to the Davidic dynasty, as well as the glory of the Lord of Hosts (Psalm 24:7-10 ;Psalms 24:7-10;132:1 ). Finally, Solomon built the Temple, planned by David, to house the ark, which he then transported into the holy of holies with elaborate festival ceremonies (1 Kings 8:1 ; 2 Chronicles 5:1 ).
The precise time of the theft or destruction of the ark is unknown. Some have suggested Shishak of Egypt plundered the Temple of this most holy object (1 Kings 14:25-28 ), but it seems more likely, from Jeremiah 3:16-17 , that the Babylonians captured or destroyed the ark in 587 B.C. with the fall of Jerusalem and the burning of the Temple. As Jeremiah predicted, the ark was never rebuilt for the second Temple, the holy of holies remaining empty.
Other mysteries of the ark are its relation to the cherubim, its ornate lid called the “mercy seat,” and its precise ritual usage during the time of the monarchy. Because the ark of the covenant was the central symbol of God's presence with His people Israel, its mysteries remain appropriately veiled within the inner sanctuary of the living God. See Holy of Holies ; Mercy Seat ; Tabernacle ; Temple.
New Testament Hebrews 9:1-10 shows the ark was a part of the old order with external regulations waiting for the new day of Christ to come with a perfect Sacrifice able to cleanse the human conscience. Revelation 11:19 shows the ark of the covenant will be part of the heavenly temple when it is revealed.
M. Pierce Matheney, Jr.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ark of the Covenant Item
Sacred chest measuring about 45 x27 x27 inches (Exodus 37) and containing the Tables of the Law and perhaps also a golden vessel of manna and the rod of Aaron (Exodus 16; Numbers 17; 3Kings 8; Hebrews 9). It was constructed of setim-wood overlaid with gold within and without, and furnished with rings through which passed setim-wood bars for carrying it. Upon its cover, termed the "propitiatory," were two cherubim of beaten gold. The ark was the only piece of furniture placed in the inner room (holy of holies) of the Temple. The one time it was carried to battle by the Hebrews, it fell into the hands of the Philistines who, however, were soon compelled to restore it to Israel (1 Kings 4). From Cariathiarim David brought it solemnly to Jerusalem, and Solomon had it later on placed in the Temple. According to a tradition, the value of which is much discussed, the Ark, with the Tabernacle and the altar of incense, was hidden by Jeremias before the siege of Jerusalem by Nabuchodonosor (2Machabees 2); however, the view that it was carried to Babylon as a trophy (4Esdas 10) seems to enjoy greater probability.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Ark
Genesis 6:14-18 (c) This boat may be taken as a type of the Lord JESUS in His Calvary experience. As the ark was under the deluge of the downpouring rain, so the Lord JESUS suffered under the rolling billows of GOD's terrible wrath. This experience of CHRIST He calls a baptism in Luke 12:50. As those who were in the ark were saved from drowning, so those who are in CHRIST JESUS are saved from the wrath of GOD. It is the baptism of the Lord JESUS under GOD's anger and wrath, as described in1Pe 3:20-21, by which we are saved. We are saved by baptism, but it is JESUS' baptism, and not ours.
Exodus 25:10 (c) This ark is a type of the Lord JESUS as GOD's perfect Son (represented by the gold), and yet a perfect man (represented by the acacia wood). The wood represented the humanity of CHRIST, and the golden covering both inside and outside the ark represented the deity of CHRIST. His perfect Godhead, and His perfect manhood are shown by the fact that the gold covered both the inside and the outside, and revealed also the purity of HIS outward actions and His innermost thoughts. In Him there dwelt the law of GOD perfectly, the priesthood of GOD fully, and the bread of GOD abundantly. He is GOD's mercy seat; GOD meets the sinner in CHRIST.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ark of Bulrushes
The little boat or cradle in which Moses was placed by his mother. It was made of bulrushes, or rather paper-reeds or papyrus which grew in the river Nile. It was daubed with slime and with pitch, that is, most probably first covered with wet earth or clay, and then with bitumen. Exodus 2:3,5 . Some of the heathen writers speak of the papyrus-woven craft of the Nile. God answered the faith of the parents, and Moses was drawn out of the water to be the saviour of His people.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ark of Noah
The vessel constructed by the command of God, by which Noah and his household and some of every living creature of the earth were saved when the world was destroyed by the flood. Precise instructions were given by God as to the construction of the ark. It was to be made of 'gopher' wood, a kind known at the time, but which cannot now be identified with certainty; and it was to be pitched within and without with pitch, or bitumen, to make it water-tight.
Its proportions were to be 300 cubits long, 50 cubits broad, and 30 cubits high. If the cubit be taken at 18 inches, its length would have been 450 feet, its breadth 75 feet and its height 45 feet. If the cubit used had been 21 inches, the dimensions would be one-sixth larger.
A window was to be made to the ark. Genesis 6:16 . The word tsohar signifies 'a place of light' and was probably placed in the roof, and may have served in some way for ventilation as well as for giving light. Another word for window is used in Genesis 8:6 (challon) which could be opened from the inside. This word is used for the windows or casements of houses, and would give ventilation. In Genesis 6:16 , after speaking of the window, it says, "and in a cubit shalt thou finish it above;" it is a question whether this refers to the size of the window or whether the word 'it' refers to the ark. It has been said that the feminine suffix, which is rendered 'it' cannot refer to the word window, which is masculine: so that it is possible the cubit refers to the roof; that the middle of the roof should be raised, giving a cubit for the pitch of the roof. A door was to be made in the side of the ark; and the ark was to be divided into three stories. 'Rooms,' or 'nests' (margin) are also mentioned. Genesis 6:14 .
Such is the description given us of the form of the ark. It was by faith Noah prepared the ark, by which he condemned the world, and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith. Hebrews 11:7 . It is thus referred to in 1 Peter 3:20,21 , "into which few, that is, eight souls, were saved through water: which figure also now saves you, [1] baptism, not a putting away of [2] filth of flesh, but [2] demand as before God of a good conscience, by [2] resurrection of Jesus Christ."
It may just be added that the form of the ark was not intended for navigation amid storms and billows, but it was exactly suited for the purpose for which it was constructed. A ship for freight was once made in like proportions, to be used in quiet waters, and was declared to be a great success.
Various questions have been raised as to the veracity of the Bible account of the Deluge, for which see FLOOD.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ark of God
This is also called 'ARK OF THE COVENANT,' 'ARK OF THE TESTIMONY,' 'ARK OF JEHOVAH.'The sacred chest belonging to the Tabernacle and the Temple. It was made of shittim wood, overlaid within and without with pure gold. It was 2-1/2 cubits long, 1-1/2 cubits in breadth, and the same in height, with a crownor cornice of gold. On each side were rings of gold in which were inserted the staves by which it was carried. Its lid, on which were the twocherubim made wholly of gold, was called the MERCY-SEAT, q.v. The ark was typical of Christ, in that it figured the manifestation of divine righteousness (gold) in man; the mercy-seat was Jehovah's throne, the place of His dwelling on earth. In the ark were placed the two tables of stone (the righteousness demanded by God from man), and afterwards the golden pot that had manna, and Aaron's rod that budded. For the place of the ark and the manner of its being moved see the TABERNACLE.
In thefirst journey of the children of Israel from Mount Sinai the ark of the covenant went before them to "search out a resting place for them," type of God's tender care for them. When the ark set forward Moses said, "Rise up, Lord, and let thine enemies be scattered;" and when it rested he said, "Return, O Lord, unto the many thousands of Israel." Numbers 10:33-36 . When they arrived at Jordan, the ark was carried by the priests 2000 cubits in front of the host that they might know the way they must go, Joshua 3:3,4 , and the ark remained on the shoulders of the priests in the bed of the river, until all had passed over. Joshua 3:17 . This typifies association with Christ's death and resurrection.
The ark accompanied them in their first victory: it was carried by the priests around Jericho. It is only in the power of Christ in resurrection that the saint can be victorious. The tabernacle was set up at Shiloh, and doubtless the ark was placed therein, Joshua 18:1 , though it may have been carried elsewhere. In Eli's days when Israel was defeated they fetched the ark from Shiloh that it might save them, but they were again defeated, and the ark, in which they had placed their confidence instead of in Jehovah, was seized by the Philistines. 1 Samuel 5:1 . When put into the house of their god Dagon the idol fell down before it on two occasions, and on the second was broken to pieces. Subsequently it was taken from Ashdod to Gath, and from Gath to Ekron, and the people were smitten by the hand of God in each city.
After seven months a new cart was made, to which two milch kine were yoked, and the ark sent back to the Israelites with a trespass offering to the God of Israel. The kine, contrary to nature, went away from their calves, and went direct to Beth-shemesh, for it was God who restored the ark. There God smote the men of the place for looking into the ark. It was then taken to Kirjath-jearim and placed in the house of Abinadab. 1 Samuel 6 ; 1 Samuel 7:1,2 . See ABINADAB.
In after years David fetched the ark from thence on a new cart, but the ark being shaken, Uzzah put forth his hand to steady it, and was smitten of God. This frightened David and the ark was carried aside to the house of Obed-edom. The law had directed how the ark was to be carried, and the new cart was following the example of the Philistines: Uzzah disregarded God's plain direction and heeded not the sacredness of that which represented the presence of God. David however, hearing that God had blessed the house of Obed-edom, again went for the ark, and now it was carried by the Levites according to divine order, and with sacrifices and rejoicing it was placed in the tabernacle or tent that David had pitched for it. 2 Samuel 6 .
When Solomon had built the temple, the ark was removed thither, and the staves by which it had been carried were taken out: the ark had now found its resting place in the kingdom of Solomon, whose reign is typical of the millennium. It is significant too that now there were only the two tables of stone in the ark, 1 Kings 8:1-11 : the manna had ceased when they ate of the old corn of the land, which is typical of a heavenly Christ; and the witness of Aaron's rod was no longer needed now they were in the kingdom. The wilderness circumstances, in which the manna and the priesthood of Christ were so necessary, were now passed. These are both mentioned in Hebrews 9:4 , for there the tabernacle, and not the temple is in contemplation.
No further mention is made of the ark: it is supposed to have been carried away with the sacred vessels to Babylon, and to have never been returned: if so there was no ark in the second temple nor in the temple built by Herod, nor do we read of the ark in connection with the temple described by Ezekiel. In Revelation 11:19 the ark of God's covenant is seen in the temple of God in heaven: symbol here of the resumption of God's dealings with His earthly people Israel.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Ark
Ârôn (אָרֹן, Strong's #727), "ark; coffin; chest; box." This word has cognates in Phoenician, Aramaic, Akkadian, and Arabic. It appears about203times in biblical Hebrew and in all periods.In Genesis 50:26, this word represents a coffin or sarcophagus (as the same word does in Phoenician): "So Joseph died, being a hundred and ten years old: and they embalmed him, and he was put in a coffin in Egypt." This coffin was probably quite elaborate and similar to those found in ancient Egyptian tombs.
During the reign of Joash (or Jehoash), when the temple was repaired, money for the work was deposited in a "chest" with a hole in its lid. The high priest Jehoida prepared this chest and put it at the threshold to the temple (2 Kings 12:9).
In most occurrences, 'ârôn refers to the "ark of the covenant." This piece of furniture functioned primarily as a container. As such the word is often modified by divine names or attributes. The divine name first modifies 'ârôn in1Sam 3:3: "And ere the lamp of God went out in the temple of the Lord, where the ark of God was, and Samuel was laid down to sleep.…" 'Ârôn is first modified by God's covenant name, Yahweh, (in Joshua 4:5. Judges 20:27 is the first appearance of the "ark" as the ark of the covenant of Elohim. First Samuel 5:11 uses the phrase "the ark of the God [1] of Israel," and 1Chron 15:12 employs "the ark of the Lord [2] God [3] of Israel."
Sometimes divine attributes replace the divine name: "Arise, O Lord, into thy rest; thou, and the ark of thy strength" (Psalm 132:8). Another group of modifiers focuses on divine redemption (cf. Hebrews 8:5). Thus 'ârôn is often described as the "ark of the covenant" (Joshua 3:6) or "the ark of the covenant of the Lord" (Numbers 10:33). As such, the ark contained the memorials of God's great redemptive acts—the tablets upon which were inscribed the Ten Commandments, an omer or two quarts of manna, and Aaron's rod. By Solomon's day, only the stone tablets remained in the ark (1 Kings 8:9). This chest was also called "the ark of the testimony" (Exodus 25:22), which indicates that the two tablets were evidence of divine redemption.
Exodus 25:10-22 tells us that this ark was made of acacia wood and measured 3 ¾ feet by2 ¼ feet by 2 ¼ feet. It was gold-plated inside and outside, with a molding of gold. Each of its four feet had a golden ring at its top, through which passed unremovable golden carrying poles. The golden cover or mercy seat (place of propitiatory atonement) had the same dimensions as the top of the ark. Two golden cherubim sat on this cover facing each other, representing the heavenly majesty (Ezekiel 1:10) that surrounds the living God.
In addition to containing memorials of divine redemption, the ark represented the presence of God. To be before it was to be in God's presence (Numbers 10:35), although His presence was not limited to the ark (cf. 1 Sam. 4:3-11; 7:2,6). The ark ceased to have this sacramental function when Israel began to regard it as a magical box with sacred power (a palladium).
God promised to meet Moses at the ark (Exodus 25:22). Thus, the ark functioned as a place where divine revelation was received (Leviticus 1:1; 16:2; Numbers 7:89). The ark served as an instrument through which God guided and defended Israel during the wilderness wandering (Numbers 10:11). Finally, it was upon this ark that the highest of Israel's sacraments, the blood of atonement, was presented and received (Leviticus 16:2 ff.).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ark
ARK . This word, from Lat. arca , ‘a chest,’ is the rendering of two Hebrew words, of which one ( tçbhâh , probably a loan-word) is applied both to the basket of bulrushes in which the infant Moses was exposed, and to the ark built by Noah (see Deluge). The other ( ’ǎrôn , the native word for box or chest, 2 Kings 12:10 f.), is used for a mummy-case or coffin ( Genesis 50:26 ), and in particular for the sacred ark of the Hebrews.
Ark of the Covenant
1 . Names of the ark . Apart from the simple designation ‘the ark’ found in all periods of Heb. literature, the names of the ark, more than twenty in number, fall into three groups, which are characteristic ( a ) of the oldest literary sources, viz. Samuel and the prophetical narratives of the Hexateuch; ( b ) of Deuteronomy and the writers influenced by Dt.; and ( c ) of the Priests’ Code and subsequent writings. In ( a ) we find chiefly ‘the ark of J″ [1] ,’ doubtless the oldest name of all, and ‘the ark of God’; in ( b ) the characteristic title is ‘the ark of the covenant’ alone or with the additions ‘of J″ [1] ,’ ‘of God,’ etc. a contraction for ‘the ark or chest containing the tables of the covenant’ ( Deuteronomy 9:9 ff.), and therefore practically ‘the ark of the Decalogue’; in ( c ) the same conception of the ark prevails (see below), but as the Decalogue is by P [3] termed ‘the testimony,’ the ark becomes ‘the ark of the testimony.’ All other designations are expansions of one or other of the above.
2 . History of the ark . The oldest Pentateuch sources (J [4] , E [5] ) are now silent as to the origin of the ark, but since the author of Deuteronomy 10:1-6 had one or both of these before him, it may be assumed that its construction was there also assigned to Moses in obedience to a Divine command. It certainly played an important part in the wanderings ( Numbers 10:33 ff; Numbers 14:44 ), and in the conquest of Canaan ( Joshua 3:3 ff; Joshua 6:6 f.), and finally found a resting-place in the temple of Shiloh under the care of a priestly family claiming descent from Moses ( 1 Samuel 3:3 ). After its capture by the Philistines and subsequent restoration, it remained at Kiriathjearim ( 1 Samuel 4:1 to 1 Samuel 7:1 ), until removed by David, first to the house of Obed-edom, and thereafter to a specially erected tent in his new capital ( 2 Samuel 6:10 ff.). Its final home was the inner sanctuary of the Temple of Solomon ( 1 Kings 8:1 ff.). Strangely enough, there is no further mention of the ark in the historical books. Whether it was among ‘the treasures of the house of the Lord’ carried off by Shishak ( c [6] . b.c. 930), or whether it was still in its place in the days of Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 3:16 f.) and was ultimately destroyed by the soldiers of Nebuchadrezzar (587 b.c.), it is impossible to say. There was no ark in the Temples of Zerubbabel and Herod.
3 . The significance of the ark . In attempting a solution of this difficult problem, we must, as in the foregoing section, leave out of account the late theoretical conception of the ark to be found in the Priests’ Code (see Tabernacle), and confine our attention to the oldest sources. In these the ark a simple chest of acacia wood, according to Deuteronomy 10:3 is associated chiefly with the operations of war, in which it is the representative of J″ [1] , the God of the armies of Israel. Its presence on the field of battle is the warrant of victory ( 1 Samuel 4:3 ff., cf. 2 Samuel 11:11 ), as its absence is the explanation of defeat ( Numbers 14:44 ). Its issue to and return from battle are those of J″ [1] Himself ( Numbers 10:35 f.). So closely, indeed, is the ark identified with the personal presence of J″ [1] in the oldest narratives (see, besides the above, 1Sa 6:20 , 2 Samuel 6:7 f., 2 Samuel 6:14 ), that one is tempted to identify it with that mysterious ‘presence’ of J″ [1] which, as a fuller manifestation of the Deity than even the ‘angel of J″ [1] ,’ was Israel’s supreme guide in the wilderness wanderings ( Exodus 32:34 ; Exodus 33:2 compared with Exodus 33:14 f., Deuteronomy 4:37 , and Isaiah 63:9 , where read ‘neither a messenger nor an angel, but his presence delivered them’). The ark was thus a substitute for that still more complete Presence (EV [12] ‘face’) which no man can see and live.
Under the prophetic teaching Israel gradually outgrew this naive and primitive, not to say fetish-like, conception, and in the 7th cent. we first find the ark spoken of as the receptacle for the tables of the Decalogue (Deuteronomy 10:2 ff.). Apart from other difficulties attending this tradition, it is quite inadequate to explain the extreme reverence and, to us, superstitious dread with which the ark is regarded in the narratives of Samuel. Hence many modern scholars are of opinion that the stone tables of the Deuteronomic tradition have taken the place of actual fetish stones, a view which it is impossible to reconcile with the lofty teaching of the founder of Israel’s religion.
A. R. S. Kennedy.
CARM Theological Dictionary - Ark of the Covenant
Also called the "Ark of the Testimony" (Exodus 30:6), "Ark of God" (1 Samuel 3:3), and the "Ark of the covenant of the Lord" (Deuteronomy 10:8). The Ark of the Covenant was very sacred to the Ancient Jews. It was a rectangular box made of Acacia wood about 4 10:1.5 10:1.5 feet. It was covered with gold and was carried by poles that were inserted into rings located on the four corners. On top was a lid called "The Mercy Seat" which had two Cherubs with outstretched wings pointing towards each other. Inside of the Ark were the tablets of the Ten Commandments, a jar of manna, and Aaron's Rod that budded (Hebrews 9:4). It served as the symbol of the very presence of God. The Ark of the Covenant was place in the Holy of Holies in the Tabernacle and later in the Temple. Once a year, the High Priest would enter the Holy of Holies and sprinkle blood on the Mercy Seat. This was symbolic of the forgiveness of the sins of the Jewish nation.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Ark of the Covenant
A small chest of coffer, three feet nine inches in length, two feet three inches in breadth, and two feet three inches in height, in which were contained the golden pot that had manna, Aaron's rod, and the tables of the covenant. The ark was reposited in the holiest place of the tabernacle. It was taken by the Philistines, and detained twenty (some say forty) years at Kirjath-jearim; but, the people being afflicted with emerods on account of it, returned it with divers presents. It was afterwards placed in the temple. The lid or covering of the ark was called the propitiatory or mercy-seat; over which two figures were placed, called cherubims, with expanded wings of a peculiar form. Here the Shechinah rested both in the tabernacle and temple in a visible cloud; hence were issued the Divine oracles by an audible voice; and the high priest appeared before the mercy-seat once every year on the great day of expiation; and the Jews, wherever they worshipped, turned their faces towards the place where the ark stood. In the second temple there was also an ark, made of the same shape and dimensions with the first, and put in the same place, but without any of its contents and peculiar honours. It was used as a representative of the former on the day of expiation, and a repository of the original copy of the holy Scriptures, collected by Ezra and the men of the great synagogue after the captivity; and, in imitation of this, the Jews, to this day, have a kind of ark in their synagogues, wherein their sacred books are kept.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Ark
Or NOAH'S ARK, a floating vessel built by Noah for the preservation of his family, and the several species of animals, during the deluge. The form of the Ark was an oblong, with a flat bottom, and a sloped roof, raised to a cubit in the middle; it had neither sails nor rudder; nor was it sharp at the ends for cutting the water. This form was admirably calculated to make it lie steady on the water, without rolling, which might have endangered the lives of the animals within. The length of this ark was 300 cubits, which according to Dr. Arbuthnot's calculation, amount to a little more than 547 feet; its breadth, 50 cubits, or 54-72 feet; and its solid contents 2, 730-782 solid feet, sufficient for a carriage for 81, 062 ton. It consisted of three stories, each of which, abating the thickness of the floors, might be about 18 feet high, and no doubt was partitioned into a great many rooms or apartments. This vessel was doubtless so contrived, as to admit the air and the light on all, though the particular construction of the windows be not mentioned.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Ark
The Septuagint and the NT use κιβωτός = a wooden chest or box, as a terminus technicus both for Noah’s ark (חֵּבָה), and for the ark (אֲרוֹן) of the covenant.
1. An interesting account of the successive phases of modern opinion regarding the former ark will be found in Encyclopaedia Britannica 11 (s.v.). The writer of Hebrews (Hebrews 11:7), taking the story as he finds it, refers to Noah’s forethought as a supreme instance of that faith which is the conviction of things not seen-a faith by which he not only virtually condemned the world, bringing its careless infidelity into strong relief, but became heir of that righteousness which is faith’s crown and reward (τῆς κατὰ πίστιν δικαιοσύνης). St. Peter (1 Peter 3:18 ff.), supplementing a tradition which is found in the Book of Enoch (6-16; cf. Jubilees, 5), imagines Christ, as a bodiless spirit, preaching, in the days between His Passion and His Resurrection, to the spirits in prison. These are the disobedient and, to St. Peter (himself like a spirit in prison during those three days), unhappy children of the unlawful union between angels and the daughters of men, condemned rebels who in vain sought the intervention of Enoch on their behalf in that time of Divine long-suffering when Noah was preparing the ark in which he saved himself and his family (see R. H. Charles, Bk. of Jub., Lond. 1902, p. 43ff.).
2. The writer of Hebrews mentions the ark of the covenant (τὴν κιβωτὸν τῆς διαθήκης) as the innermost and most sacred piece of furniture contained in the Tabernacle. His description of it as ‘completely overlaid with gold’ (περικεκαλυμμένην πάντοθεν χρυσίῳ) corresponds with the directions given in Exodus 25:11 (ἔσωθεν καὶ ἔξωθεν χρυσώσεις αὐτήν). The designation ‘the ark of the covenant,’ which was probably coined by the writer of Deut., was historic ally later than ‘the ark of Jahweh,’ and ‘the ark of God’ (Jewish Encyclopedia ), and earlier than ‘the ark of the testimony’ (P). It was a contraction for ‘the ark containing the tables of the covenant,’ the Decalogue being a summary of the terms which Israel accepted on entering into covenant with God. In Kautzsch’s Heilige Schrift it is rendered die Lade mit dem Gesetz, ‘the ark with the law.’ When the Decalogue came to be known as ‘the testimony,’ the new name ἡ κιβωτὸς τοῦ μαρτυρίου was introduced, but it did not displace the older phrases. The golden pot of manna (the adj. is an embellishment upon Exodus 16:33) and Aaron’s rod that budded, which in the original narratives were laid up before the Lord (ἐναντίον τοῦ θεοῦ, Exodus 16:33; ἐνώπιον τῶν μαρτυρίων, Numbers 17:10) are supposed by the writer of Hebrews to have been within the ark.
The ultimate fate of the κιβωτός is involved in obscurity. The popular imagination could not entertain the idea that the inviolable ark was irrecoverably lost, and there arose a tradition that before the destruction of Jerusalem in 586 b.c., the Tabernacle with all its sacred furniture was hidden by Jeremiah (or, according to the Talmud, by Josiah) in a cava of Mt. Nebo (2 Esdras 10:22; 2 Maccabees 2:5), whence it was to be miraculously restored to its place at the coming of the Messiah. In the second and third Temple the Holy of Holies contained no ark. ‘In this was nothing at all,’ is Josephus’ emphatic testimony (Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) v. 5). Pompey, on entering, found ‘vacuam sedem et inania arcana’ (Tac. Hist. v. 9). The thought of that emptiness oppressed the minds both of devout Jews and of Jewish Christians, and in Revelation 11:19, when the seventh angel has sounded, and the temple of God in heaven is opened, the ark of the covenant is there. ‘All we have willed or hoped or dreamed of good shall exist; not the semblance but itself.’
Literature.-Besides the articles in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) (J. Macpherson and A. R. S. Kennedy), Hastings’ Single-vol. Dictionary of the Bible (A. R. S. Kennedy), and especially Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics (R. H. Kennett), see R. Kraetzschmar, Die Bundesvorstellung, Marburg, 1896; H. Couard, ‘Die religiöse nationale Bedeutung der Lade,’ in ZATW [1] xii. [2]; Volck, article ‘Bundeslade,’ in Realencyklopädie für protestantische Theologie und Kirche 3.
James Strahan.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Ark
We read in Scripture of the ark which the Lord directed Noah to make. (Genesis 6:14) And Moses in the wilderness was commanded to make an ark. (Exodus 25:10) And we read of an ark seen by John in the temple in heaven; but then, this latter was visional. For the same apostle elsewhere saith, that he "saw no temple in heaven? (Revelation 11:19 with Revelation 21:22) The ark of Noah, as well as that of Moses, were types of the Lord Jesus Christ. Hence, Noah it is said by the Holy Ghost,"by (Hebrews 11:7) faith being warned of God, "prepared an ark for the saving of his house." Faith in what? Surely, faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. And the ark in the wilderness is called the ark of the covenant, intimating Christ given of JEHOVAH to the people. (See Numbers 10:33; Joshua 3:11; Jos 7:6 with Isaiah 42:6; 2 Chronicles 8:11) We no where read of arks. Never is it said in the word of God of more than one ark; no more than one Lord Jesus Christ. They who talk of arks, like them who talk of archangels, do err, "not knowing the Scriptures, neither the power of God." And it were to be wished, that such men would call to mind the Lord's jealousy in the case of the men of Bethshemesh, (1 Samuel 6:19) and also the circumstance of Uzzah, (1 Chronicles 13:10) What was the sin of all those but overlooking Christ? And wherein do those differ, who talk of arks instead of one ark, and that expressly, and on no other account valuable, than as it represented the Lord Jesus? (1 Samuel 4:3; 2 Samuel 15:24)
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Ark of the Covenant
a small chest or coffer, three feet nine inches in length, two feet three inches in breadth, and two feet three inches in height; in which were contained the golden pot that had manna, Aaron's rod, and the tables of the covenant, Numbers 17:10 ; Hebrews 9:4 . This coffer was made of shittim wood, and was covered with a lid, called the mercy seat, Exodus 25:17-22 , &c, which was of solid gold, at the two ends whereof were two figures, called cherubim, looking toward each other with expanded wings, which, embracing the whole circumference of the mercy seat, met in the middle. The whole, according to the rabbins, was made out of the same mass, without any of the parts being joined by solder. Over this it was that the Shechinah, or visible display of the divine presence in a luminous cloud rested, both in the tabernacle, and in the temple,
Leviticus 16:2 ; and from hence the divine oracles were given forth by an audible voice, as often as God was consulted in behalf of his people. Hence it is that God is said in Scripture to dwell between the cherubim, on the mercy seat, because there was the seat or throne of the visible appearance of his glory among them, 2 Kings 19:15 ; 1 Chronicles 13:6 ; Psalms 80:1 , &c; and for this reason the high priest appeared before the mercy seat once every year, on the great day of expiation, at which time he was to make his nearest approach to the divine presence, to mediate and make atonement for the whole people of Israel.
On the two sides of the ark there were four rings of gold, two on each side, through which staves, overlaid with gold, were put, by means whereof they carried it as they marched through the wilderness, &c, on the shoulders of the Levites, Exodus 25:13-14 ; Exodus 27:5 . After the passage of the Jordan, the ark continued for some time at Gilgal, from whence it was removed to Shiloh. From this place the Israelites carried it to their camp, where, in an engagement with the Philistines, it fell into their hands. The Philistines, having gotten possession of the ark, carried it in triumph to one of their principal cities, named Ashdod, and placed it in the temple of Dagon, whose image fell to the ground and was broken. The Philistines also were so afflicted with emerods, that they afterward returned the ark with various presents; and it was lodged at Kirjath-Jearim, and afterward at Nob. David conveyed it to the house of Obededom, and from thence to his palace at Zion; and lastly, Solomon brought in into the temple which he had built at Jerusalem. It remained in the temple till the times of the last kings of Judah, who gave themselves up to idolatry, and even dared to place their idols in the holy temple itself. The priests, being unable to bear this profanation, took the ark and carried it from place to place, to preserve it from the hands of those impious princes. Josiah commanded them to bring it back to the sanctuary, and it was accordingly replaced, 2 Chronicles 35:3 . What became of the ark at the destruction of the temple by Nebuchadnezzar, is a dispute among the rabbins. Had it been carried to Babylon with the other vessels of the temple, it would, in all probability, have been brought back with them at the close of the captivity. But that this was not the case, is agreed on all hands; whence it is probable that it was destroyed with the temple.
The ark of the covenant was, as it were, the centre of worship to all those of the Hebrew nation who served God according to the Levitical law; and not only in the temple, when they came thither to worship, but every where else in their dispersions through the whole world; whenever they prayed, they turned their faces toward the place where the ark stood, and directed all their devotions that way, Daniel 6:10 . Whence the author of the book of Cosri, justly says, that the ark, with the mercy seat and cherubim, were the foundation, root, heart, and marrow of the whole temple, and all the Levitical worship performed therein; and, therefore, had there been nothing else wanting in the second temple but the ark only, this alone would have been a sufficient reason for the old men to have wept when they remembered the first temple in which it stood; and for the saying of Haggai 2:3 , that the second temple was as nothing compared with the first; so great a share had the ark of the covenant in the glory of Solomon's temple. However, the defect was supplied as to the outward form, for in the second temple there was also an ark of the same dimensions with the first, and put in the same place; but it wanted the tables of the law, Aaron's rod, and the pot of manna; nor was there any appearance of the divine glory over it; nor any oracles delivered from it. The only use that was made of it was to be a representation of the former on the great day of expiation, and to be a repository of the Holy Scriptures, that is, of the original copy of that collection of them made by Ezra after the captivity; in imitation of which the Jews, in all their synagogues, have a like ark or coffer in which they keep their Scriptures.
For the temple of Solomon a new ark was not made; but he constructed cherubim in the most holy place, which were designed to give additional state to this most sacred symbol of God's grace and mercy. These cherubim were fifteen feet high, and were placed at equal distance from the centre of the ark and from each side of the wall, so that their wings being expanded, the two wings which were extended behind touched the wall, and the other two met over the ark and so overshadowed it. When these magnificent cherubim were finished, the ark was brought in and placed under their wings, 2 Chronicles 5:7-10 .
The ark was called the ark of the covenant, because it was a symbol of the covenant between God and his people. It was also named the ark of the testimony, because the two tables which were deposited in it were witnesses against every transgression.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Ark
arca, denotes a kind of floating vessel built by Noah, for the preservation of himself and family, with several species of animals during the deluge. The Hebrew word by which the ark is expressed, is תבת or תיבת , the constructive form of תבה , which is evidently the Greek θιβη ; and so the LXX render the word in Exodus 2:3 , where only it again occurs. They also render it κιβωτον ; Josephus, λαρνακα ; and the Vulgate arcam; signifying an ark, coffer, or chest. Although the ark of Noah answered, in some respects, the purpose of a ship, it is not so certain that it was of the same form and shape. It has been inconclusively argued by Michaelis and some others, that if its form had not been like that of a ship, it could not have resisted the force of the waves; because it was not intended to be conducted, like a ship, from one place to another, but merely "to float on the surface of the waters," Genesis 7:17 . It appears to have had neither helm, nor mast, nor oars; but was merely a bulky capacious vessel, light enough to be raised aloft with all its contents, by the gradual rise of the deluge. Its shape, therefore, was of little importance; more especially as it seems to have been the purpose of Providence, in this whole transaction, to signify to those who were saved, as well as to their latest posterity, that their preservation was not in any degree effected by human contrivance. The ark in which Moses was exposed bears the same name; and some have thought that both were of the same materials. With respect to the etymology of the Hebrew word, the most rational seems to be that of Clodius, who derives it from the Arabic word תאב , "he collected," from which is formed תבה , or תיבה , denoting a place in which things are collected. Foster deduces it from two Egyptian words, thoi, "a ship," and bai, "a palm tree branch;" and such ships are still to be seen not only in Egypt, but in India and other countries; particularly in some isles of the Pacific Ocean.
To the insufficiency of the ark to contain all the creatures said to have been brought into it, objections have, at different times, been made. Bishop Wilkins and others have learnedly discussed this subject, and afforded the most satisfactory answers. Dr. Hales proves the ark to have been of the burden of forty-two thousand four hundred and thirteen tons; and asks, "Can we doubt of its being sufficient to contain eight persons, and about two hundred or two hundred and fifty pair of four-footed animals, (a number to which, according to M. Buffon, all the various distinct species may be reduced,) together with all the subsistence necessary for a twelvemonth, with the fowls of the air, and such reptiles and insects as cannot live under water?" All these various animals were controlled by the power of God, whose special agency is supposed in the whole transaction, and "the lion was made to lie down with the kid."
Whether Noah was commanded to bring with him, into the ark, a pair of all living creatures, zoologically and numerically considered, has been doubted. During the long period between the creation and the flood, animals must have spread themselves over a great part of the antediluvian earth, and certain animals would, as now, probably become indigenous to certain climates. The pairs saved must therefore, if all the kinds were included, have travelled from immense distances. But of such marches no intimation is given in the history; and this seems to render it probable that the animals which Noah was "to bring with him" into the ark, were the animals clean and unclean of the country in which he dwelt, and which, from the capacity of the ark, must have been in great variety and number. The terms used, it is true, are universal; and it is satisfactory to know, that if taken in the largest sense there was ample accommodation in the ark. Nevertheless, universal terms in Scripture are not always to be taken mathematically, and in the vision of Peter, the phrase παντα τα τετραποδα της γης ,— all the four-footed beasts of the earth, must be understood of varii generis quadrupedes, as Schleusner paraphrases it. Thus we may easily account for the exuviae of animals, whose species no longer exist, which have been discovered in various places. The number of such extinct species probably has been greatly overrated by Cuvier; but of the fact, to a considerable extent, there can be no doubt. It is also to be observed that the presumptive evidence of the truth of the fact of the preparation of such a vessel, and of the supernatural circumstances which attended it, is exceedingly strong. It is, in truth, the only solution of a difficulty which has no other explanation; for as a universal deluge is confirmed by the general history of the world, and by a variety of existing facts and monuments, such a structure as the ark, for the preservation and sustenance of various animals, seems to have been absolutely necessary; for as we can trace up the first imperfect rudiments of the art of ship building among the Greeks, there could be no ships before the flood; and, consequently, no animals could have been saved. Nay, it is highly improbable that even men and domestic annuals could be saved, not to mention wild beasts, serpents, &c, though we should admit that the antediluvians had shipping, unless we should suppose, also, that they had a divine intimation respecting the flood, such as Moses relates; but this would be to give up the cause of infidelity. Mr. Bryant has collected a variety of ancient historical relations, which show that some records concerning the ark had been preserved among most nations of the world, and in the general system of Gentile mythology. Abydenus, with whom all the eastern writers concur, informs us that the place of descent from the ark was Armenia; and that its remains had been preserved for a long time. Plutarch mentions the Noachic dove, and its being sent out of the ark. Lucian speaks of Deucalion's going forth from the ark, and raising an altar to God. The priests of Ammonia had a custom, at particular seasons, of carrying in procession a boat, in which was an oracular shrine, held in great veneration: and this custom of carrying the deity in an ark or boat was in use also among the Egyptians. Bishop Pococke has preserved three specimens of ancient sculpture, in which this ceremony is displayed. They were very ancient, and found by him in Upper Egypt. The ship of Isis referred to the ark, and its name, "Baris," was that of the mountain corresponding to Ararat in Armenia. Bryant finds reference to the ark in the temples of the serpent worship, called Dracontia; and also in that of Sesostris, fashioned after the model of the ark, in commemoration of which it was built, and consecrated to Osiris at Theba; and he conjectures that the city, said to be one of the most ancient in Egypt, as well as the province, was denominated from it, Theba being the appellation of the ark. In other countries, as well as in Egypt, an ark, or ship, was introduced in their mysteries, and often carried about in the seasons of their festivals. He finds, also, in the story of the Argonauts several particulars, that are thought to refer to the ark of Noah. As many cities, not in Egypt only and Boeotia, but in Cilicia, Ionia, Attica, Phthiotis, Cataonia, Syria, and Italy, were called Theba; so likewise the city Apamea was denominated Cibotus, from κιβωτος , in memory of the ark, and of the history connected with it. The ark, according to the traditions of the Gentile world, was prophetic; and was regarded as a kind of temple or residence of the deity. It comprehended all mankind, within the circle of eight persons, who were thought to be so highly favoured of Heaven that they at last were reputed to be deities. Hence in the ancient mythology of Egypt, there were precisely eight gods; and the ark was esteemed an emblem of the system of the heavens. The principal terms by which the ancients distinguished the ark were Theba, Baris, Arguz, Aren, Arene, Arni, Laris, Boutas, Boeotus, and Cibotus; and out of these they formed different personages. See DELUGE .
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Ark
1: κιβωτός (Strong's #2787 — Noun Feminine — kibotos — kib-o-tos' ) "a wooden box, a chest," is used of (a) Noah's vessel, Matthew 24:38 ; Luke 17:27 ; Hebrews 11:7 ; 1 pet. 3:20; (b) the "ark" of the Covenant in the Tabernacle, Hebrews 9:4 ; (c) the "ark" seen in vision in the Heavenly Temple, Revelation 11:19 .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Ark
Ark. The vessel constructed by Noah at God's command, for the preservation of himself and family, and a stock of the various animals, when the waters of the flood overflowed the inhabited earth. If the cubit be reckoned at 21 inches, the dimensions of the ark were 525 feet in length, 87 feet 6 inches in breadth, 52 feet 6 Inches in height. The proportions are those of the human body; and they are admirably adapted for a vessel required, like the ark, to float steadily with abundant stowage. This is proved by modern experiments. The ark was made of "gopher-wood," probably cypress; and it was to be divided into "rooms" or "nests," that is, furnished with a vast number of separate compartments, placed one above another in three tiers. Light was to be admitted by a window, not improbably a sky-light, a cubit broad, extending the whole length of the ark. If so, however, there must have been some protection from the rain. A "covering" is spoken of. Genesis 8:13; but several writers have believed that some transparent or translucent substance was employed, excluding the weather and admitting the light. It is observable that the "window" which Noah is said to have opened, Genesis 8:6, is not in the original the same word with that occurring in 6:16. Perhaps one or more divisions of the long sky-light were made to open. There was a door also, through which the persons and the animals would enter and pass out. Many questions have been raised, and discussed at great length by skeptics and others, respecting the form and dimensions of the ark; the number of animals saved in it—whether including all species then existing in the world, except such as live in water or lie dormant, or only the species living in the parts of the world then peopled by man; and as to the possibility of their being all lodged in the ark, and their food during the year. Some of these questions the Bible clearly settles. Others it is vain to discuss, since we have no means of deciding them. It was by miracle that he was forewarned and directed to prepare for the flood; and the same miraculous power accomplished all that Noah was unable to do in designing, building, and filling the ark, and preserving and guiding it through the deluge. 2. Moses's ark was made of the bulrush or papyrus, which grows in marshy places in Egypt. It was daubed with slime, which was probably the mud of which their bricks were made, and with pitch or bitumen. Exodus 2:3. 3. Ark of the covenant. The most important piece of the tabernacle's furniture. It appears to have been an oblong chest of shittim (acacia) wood, two and a half cubits long, by one and a half broad and deep. Within and without gold was overlaid on the wood; and on the upper side or lid, which was edged round about with gold, the mercy seat was placed. The ark was fitted with rings, one at each of the four corners, and through these were passed staves of the same wood similarly overlaid, by which it was carried by the Kohathites. Numbers 7:9; Numbers 10:21. The ends of the staves were visible without the veil in the holy place of the temple of Solomon. 1 Kings 8:8. The ark, when transported, was covered with the "veil" of the dismantled tabernacle, in the curtain of badgers' skins, and in a blue cloth over all, and was therefore not seen. Numbers 4:5; Numbers 4:20. The chief facts in the earlier history of the ark, see Joshua 3:1-17; Joshua 6:1-27, need not be recited. Before David's time its abode was frequently changed. It sojourned among several, probably Levitical, famines, 1 Samuel 7:1; 2 Samuel 6:3; 2 Samuel 6:11; 1 Chronicles 13:13; 1 Chronicles 15:24-25, in the border villages of eastern Judah, and did not take its place in the tabernacle, but dwelt in curtains, i.e., in a separate tent pitched for it in Jerusalem by David. When idolatry became more shameless in the kingdom of Judah, Manasseh placed a "carved image" in the "house of God," and probably removed the ark to make way for it. This may account for the subsequent statement that it was reinstated by Josiah. 2 Chronicles 33:7; 2 Chronicles 35:3. It was probably taken captive or destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Ark, Noah's
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Smith's Bible Dictionary - Ark of Moses
A small boat or basket made of the papyrus, a reed which grows in the marshes of Egypt. It was covered with bitumen to make it water tight.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Ark of the Covenant
The first piece of the tabernacle's furniture, for which precise directions were delivered. Exodus 25 . I. Description. -- It appears to have been an oblong chest of shittim (acacia) wood, 2 1/2 cubits long by 1 1/2 broad and deep. Within and without gold was overlaid on the wood, and on the upper side or lid, which was edged round about with gold, the mercy-seat was placed. The ark was fitted with rings, one at each of the four corners, and through these were passed staves of the same wood similarly overlaid, by which it was carried by the Kohathites. ( Numbers 7:9 ; 10:21 ) The ends of the staves were visible without the veil in the holy place of the temple of Solomon. (1 Kings 8:8 ) The ark, when transported, was enveloped in the "veil" of the dismantled tabernacle, in the curtain of badgers' skins and in a blue cloth over all, and was therefore not seen. (Numbers 4:5,20 ) II. Its purpose was to contain inviolate the divine autograph of the two tables, that "covenant" from which it derived its title. It was also probably a reliquary for the pot of manna and the rod of Aaron. III. History .--Before David's time its abode was frequently shifted. It sojourned among several, probably Levitical, families, ( 1 Samuel 7:1 ; 2 Samuel 6:3,11 ; 1 Chronicles 13:13 ; 15:24,25 ) in the border villages of eastern Judah; and did not take its place in the tabernacle, but dwelt in curtains, i.e. in a separate tent pitched for it in Jerusalem by David. Subsequently the temple, when completed, received, in the installation of the ark in its shrine, the signal of its inauguration by the effulgence of divine glory instantly manifested. It was probably taken captive or destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar, 2Esdr. 10:22, so that there was no ark in the second temple.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Ark
An ark was a box-like container. In older English versions of the Bible, the word is used of Noah’s floating animal-house (Genesis 7:8-9), of the floating basket made for the baby Moses by his parents (Exodus 2:3-5), and of the sacred box in the inner shrine of Israel’s tabernacle (Exodus 26:33).
Noah’s ark
God’s purpose in commanding Noah to build an ark was to provide a way of preserving people and animals through the judgment of the great flood (Genesis 6:5-13; see FLOOD). The ark was not designed to sail the seas like a huge boat, but to float on the floodwaters like a huge box. It was about 133 metres long, 22 metres wide and 13 metres high, with a door in the side and a 44 centimetre light and ventilation opening running around the top of the wall, just below the roof overhang. It was divided horizontally into three decks, and vertically into a number of rooms. This helped to separate the animals and to brace the whole structure (Genesis 6:14-20).
More important than the preservation of the animals was the preservation of the family of Noah. Noah’s building of the ark demonstrated his faith and made possible the survival of a nucleus of believers through whom God could build a new people (Hebrews 11:7; 1 Peter 3:20; see NOAH).
Ark of the covenant
The gold covered wooden box known as the ark of the covenant, or covenant box, was Israel’s most sacred religious article. It was approximately 110 centimetres long, 66 centimetres wide and 66 centimetres deep. Its ornamented lid, over which were mounted two golden cherubim, was the symbolic throne of God known as the mercy seat (Exodus 25:10-22; see CHERUBIM). (For fuller details of the ark and for its significance in the tabernacle rituals see TABERNACLE.)
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Uzzah - ” Levite assisting with David's aborted transfer of the Ark to Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6:1-5 ). Rather than carrying the Ark with poles (see Exodus 25:10-25 ), the Ark was transported by oxcart (see 1 Samuel 6:7-12 where the Philistines sent the Ark home by oxcart). When the oxen shook the Ark, Uzzah grabbed the Ark to steady it
Uzzah - ” Levite assisting with David's aborted transfer of the Ark to Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6:1-5 ). Rather than carrying the Ark with poles (see Exodus 25:10-25 ), the Ark was transported by oxcart (see 1 Samuel 6:7-12 where the Philistines sent the Ark home by oxcart). When the oxen shook the Ark, Uzzah grabbed the Ark to steady it
Uzzah - ” Levite assisting with David's aborted transfer of the Ark to Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6:1-5 ). Rather than carrying the Ark with poles (see Exodus 25:10-25 ), the Ark was transported by oxcart (see 1 Samuel 6:7-12 where the Philistines sent the Ark home by oxcart). When the oxen shook the Ark, Uzzah grabbed the Ark to steady it
Arkite - 'ARKITE, n. A term used by Bryant to denote one of the persons who were preserved in the Ark; or who, according to pagan fables, belonged to the Ark. ...
'ARKITE, a. Belonging to the Ark
Ark - The Ark's top cover supported two winged creatures called cherubim. They faced each other across the top of the Ark and their outstretched wings touched at the tips. The mobility of the Ark was insured by two permanently attached carrying poles, reflecting the fact that the people of Israel and their God had no fixed dwellingplace. Even when the Ark was permanently located in the Holy of Holies, the poles remained ( 1 Kings 8 ), a visible reminder that God was "tenting" among his people, but that his presence could be withdrawn. ...
The practical function of the Ark was to protect and preserve various sacred objects. In the early accounts of the Ark only the Mount Sinai covenant tablets are so protected, giving rise to the common epithet, the "ark of the covenant" (Exodus 25:16 ; 1 Kings 8:9 ), or a variant, "ark of the Lord's covenant" (Numbers 14:44 ). Later traditions also mentioned a portion of preserved manna and Aaron's rod as being in the Ark (Hebrews 9:4 ). The Ark also had a military role, leading the march of the people of Israel in the wilderness (Numbers 10:33 ), circling the walls of Jericho (Joshua 4:6 ), and going forth to battle against the Philistines (1 Samuel 4:5 ). ...
Scripture associates God's physical presence with the Ark. Moses addressed the Ark as "the Lord" in the wilderness (Numbers 10:35 ). The Ark was sacred, indeed, dangerous to friends and foes alike. The awesome holiness of the Ark was demonstrated when Uzzah was killed for touching the Ark when he tried to prevent it from falling (1 Chronicles 13:10 ). ...
In the temple, the Ark occupied the Holy of Holies. With a permanent location, the theological understanding of the Ark changed. The cover of the Ark was seen as the throne of God with the cherubim supporting him and setting aside the space between their wings as his seat. Interestingly, Solomon placed huge cherubim to flank the Ark in the temple, thus setting apart the entire Ark and its surrounding space as God's seat. ...
The Ark disappears from post-Solomonic biblical history except for a passing reference in 2 Chronicles 35:3 , where the Levites are charged by Josiah no longer to carry the Ark about. This may be as much a reflection of a postexilic understanding of Josiah (the new David who would correct the behavior of the Levites) as that of the actual Ark itself. ...
In the return, according to the prophet Jeremiah, the Ark would not be remembered or replaced, because Jerusalem would be "The Throne of the Lord" (3:16; the only prophetic mention of the Ark). In the new temple envisioned by Ezekiel, no Ark is mentioned. There will be no Ark because in the new kingdom God will no longer be just a God of Israel, dwelling in a limited space, but will reveal himself as the God of all nations ruling with a new covenant. In Revelation 11:19 (the only New Testament mention) the Ark has returned to the direct care of God, sacred, but no longer functional
Covenant Box - TEV name for the Ark of the covenant. See Ark of the Covenant
Ark - Ârôn (אָרֹן, Strong's #727), "ark; coffin; chest; box. ...
In most occurrences, 'ârôn refers to the "ark of the covenant. The divine name first modifies 'ârôn in1Sam 3:3: "And ere the lamp of God went out in the temple of the Lord, where the Ark of God was, and Samuel was laid down to sleep. Judges 20:27 is the first appearance of the "ark" as the Ark of the covenant of Elohim. First Samuel 5:11 uses the phrase "the Ark of the God [1] of Israel," and 1Chron 15:12 employs "the Ark of the Lord [2] God [3] of Israel. "...
Sometimes divine attributes replace the divine name: "Arise, O Lord, into thy rest; thou, and the Ark of thy strength" (Psalm 132:8). Thus 'ârôn is often described as the "ark of the covenant" (Joshua 3:6) or "the Ark of the covenant of the Lord" (Numbers 10:33). As such, the Ark contained the memorials of God's great redemptive acts—the tablets upon which were inscribed the Ten Commandments, an omer or two quarts of manna, and Aaron's rod. By Solomon's day, only the stone tablets remained in the Ark (1 Kings 8:9). This chest was also called "the Ark of the testimony" (Exodus 25:22), which indicates that the two tablets were evidence of divine redemption. ...
Exodus 25:10-22 tells us that this Ark was made of acacia wood and measured 3 ¾ feet by2 ¼ feet by 2 ¼ feet. The golden cover or mercy seat (place of propitiatory atonement) had the same dimensions as the top of the Ark. ...
In addition to containing memorials of divine redemption, the Ark represented the presence of God. To be before it was to be in God's presence (Numbers 10:35), although His presence was not limited to the Ark (cf. The Ark ceased to have this sacramental function when Israel began to regard it as a magical box with sacred power (a palladium). ...
God promised to meet Moses at the Ark (Exodus 25:22). Thus, the Ark functioned as a place where divine revelation was received (Leviticus 1:1; 16:2; Numbers 7:89). The Ark served as an instrument through which God guided and defended Israel during the wilderness wandering (Numbers 10:11). Finally, it was upon this Ark that the highest of Israel's sacraments, the blood of atonement, was presented and received (Leviticus 16:2 ff
Mercy Seat - The propitiatory, the golden cover of the Ark. Having a distinct significance and designation of its own; not a mere part of the Ark. Placed "above upon the Ark" (Exodus 25:17-22; Exodus 26:34; Exodus 30:6; Exodus 31:7; Exodus 35:12; Exodus 37:6). Never called "the cover" (kaporeth ) merely of the Ark, but made a distinct thing. ...
The holy of belies is called "the place of the mercy-seat" (1 Chronicles 28:11; Leviticus 16:2), marking that it was not a mere subordinate part of the Ark. " (See Ark. Appropriately, therefore the mercy-seat covered that covenant written on the two tables of stone inside the Ark. God, thus reconciled through the blood sprinkled on the mercy-seat, could speak to His people "from off the mercy-seat that was upon the Ark of the testimony" (Numbers 7:89; Psalms 80:1)
Ark of the Covenant - ...
Old Testament The Ark of ancient Israel is mysterious in its origins, its meanings, and its ultimate fate. The Hebrew word for Ark means simply “box, chest, coffin,” as is indicated by its use for the coffin of Joseph (Genesis 50:26 ) and for the Temple collection box of King Joash (2 Kings 12:9-10 ). ...
The names used for the Ark define its meaning by the words which modify it. The word “covenant” in the name defines the Ark from its original purpose as a container for the stone tablets upon which the Ten Commandments (sometimes called the “testimony”) were inscribed. Sometimes it is identified rather with the name of deity, “the Ark of God,” or “the Ark of the Lord” (Yahweh), or most ornately “the Ark of the covenant of the Lord of hosts (Yahweh Sabaoth) who is enthroned on the cherubim” (1 Samuel 4:4 ). ...
The origin of the Ark goes back to Moses at Sinai. The mysterious origin of the Ark is seen by contrasting the two accounts of how it was made in the Pentateuch. The more elaborate account of the manufacture and ornamentation of the Ark by the craftsman Bezalel appears in Exodus 25:10-22 ; Exodus 31:2 ,Exodus 31:2,31:7 ; Exodus 35:30-35 ; Exodus 37:1-9 . ...
A very ancient poem, the “Song of the Ark” in Numbers 10:35-36 , sheds some light on the function of the Ark in the wanderings in the wilderness. The Ark was the symbol of God's presence to guide the pilgrims and lead them in battle (Numbers 10:33 ,Numbers 10:33,10:35-36 ). Some passages suggest the Ark was also regarded as the throne of the invisible deity, or his footstool (Jeremiah 3:16-17 ; Psalm 132:7-8 ). These various meanings of the Ark should be interpreted as complementary rather than contradictory. ...
The Ark was designed for mobility. Permanent poles were used to carry the Ark, since no one was allowed to touch it, and only priestly (Levitical) personnel were allowed to carry it. The Ark was the most important object within the tabernacle of the desert period, though its relationship to the tabernacle was discontinued sometime after the conquest of Canaan. ...
The Ark played a prominent role in the “holy war” narratives of the crossing of the Jordan and the conquest, of Jericho (Joshua 3-6 ). ...
Because of the faithless superstition of the wicked sons of Eli, the Hebrew tribes were defeated in the battle of Ebenezer, and the Ark was captured by the Philistines (1 Samuel 4:1 ). The adventures of the Ark in the cities of Ashdod, Gath, and Ekron are told to magnify the strength and glory of the Lord of the Ark. The men of Bethshemesh welcomed the return of the Ark, until they unwisely violated its holiness by looking into it (1Samuel 6:13-15,1 Samuel 6:19-20 ). Abinadab and his sons (2 Samuel 6:3 ) seemed to have served the Lord of the Ark faithfully until one son, Uzzah, was smitten for his rash touching of the holy object during David's first attempt to transport the Ark from its “hill” at Kiriath-Jearim to his own city. In fear, David left the Ark with Obed-edom the Gittite, whose household was blessed by its presence. More cautiously and with great religious fervor, David succeeded the second time in taking the Ark into his capital city (2 Samuel 6:12-19 ). ...
Recent scholarship has suggested that on coronation occasions or annually at a festival of enthronement this Ark ceremony was reenacted. Finally, Solomon built the Temple, planned by David, to house the Ark, which he then transported into the holy of holies with elaborate festival ceremonies (1 Kings 8:1 ; 2 Chronicles 5:1 ). ...
The precise time of the theft or destruction of the Ark is unknown. Some have suggested Shishak of Egypt plundered the Temple of this most holy object (1 Kings 14:25-28 ), but it seems more likely, from Jeremiah 3:16-17 , that the Babylonians captured or destroyed the Ark in 587 B. As Jeremiah predicted, the Ark was never rebuilt for the second Temple, the holy of holies remaining empty. ...
Other mysteries of the Ark are its relation to the cherubim, its ornate lid called the “mercy seat,” and its precise ritual usage during the time of the monarchy. Because the Ark of the covenant was the central symbol of God's presence with His people Israel, its mysteries remain appropriately veiled within the inner sanctuary of the living God. ...
New Testament Hebrews 9:1-10 shows the Ark was a part of the old order with external regulations waiting for the new day of Christ to come with a perfect Sacrifice able to cleanse the human conscience. Revelation 11:19 shows the Ark of the covenant will be part of the heavenly temple when it is revealed
Ark of God - This is also called 'ARK OF THE COVENANT,' 'ARK OF THE TESTIMONY,' 'ARK OF JEHOVAH. The Ark was typical of Christ, in that it figured the manifestation of divine righteousness (gold) in man; the mercy-seat was Jehovah's throne, the place of His dwelling on earth. In the Ark were placed the two tables of stone (the righteousness demanded by God from man), and afterwards the golden pot that had manna, and Aaron's rod that budded. For the place of the Ark and the manner of its being moved see the TABERNACLE. ...
In thefirst journey of the children of Israel from Mount Sinai the Ark of the covenant went before them to "search out a resting place for them," type of God's tender care for them. When the Ark set forward Moses said, "Rise up, Lord, and let thine enemies be scattered;" and when it rested he said, "Return, O Lord, unto the many thousands of Israel. When they arrived at Jordan, the Ark was carried by the priests 2000 cubits in front of the host that they might know the way they must go, Joshua 3:3,4 , and the Ark remained on the shoulders of the priests in the bed of the river, until all had passed over. ...
The Ark accompanied them in their first victory: it was carried by the priests around Jericho. The tabernacle was set up at Shiloh, and doubtless the Ark was placed therein, Joshua 18:1 , though it may have been carried elsewhere. In Eli's days when Israel was defeated they fetched the Ark from Shiloh that it might save them, but they were again defeated, and the Ark, in which they had placed their confidence instead of in Jehovah, was seized by the Philistines. ...
After seven months a new cart was made, to which two milch kine were yoked, and the Ark sent back to the Israelites with a trespass offering to the God of Israel. The kine, contrary to nature, went away from their calves, and went direct to Beth-shemesh, for it was God who restored the Ark. There God smote the men of the place for looking into the Ark. ...
In after years David fetched the Ark from thence on a new cart, but the Ark being shaken, Uzzah put forth his hand to steady it, and was smitten of God. This frightened David and the Ark was carried aside to the house of Obed-edom. The law had directed how the Ark was to be carried, and the new cart was following the example of the Philistines: Uzzah disregarded God's plain direction and heeded not the sacredness of that which represented the presence of God. David however, hearing that God had blessed the house of Obed-edom, again went for the Ark, and now it was carried by the Levites according to divine order, and with sacrifices and rejoicing it was placed in the tabernacle or tent that David had pitched for it. ...
When Solomon had built the temple, the Ark was removed thither, and the staves by which it had been carried were taken out: the Ark had now found its resting place in the kingdom of Solomon, whose reign is typical of the millennium. It is significant too that now there were only the two tables of stone in the Ark, 1 Kings 8:1-11 : the manna had ceased when they ate of the old corn of the land, which is typical of a heavenly Christ; and the witness of Aaron's rod was no longer needed now they were in the kingdom. ...
No further mention is made of the Ark: it is supposed to have been carried away with the sacred vessels to Babylon, and to have never been returned: if so there was no Ark in the second temple nor in the temple built by Herod, nor do we read of the Ark in connection with the temple described by Ezekiel. In Revelation 11:19 the Ark of God's covenant is seen in the temple of God in heaven: symbol here of the resumption of God's dealings with His earthly people Israel
Ark - Noah was commanded to build an Ark to God's specifications to save his family and representatives of all animals from the flood (Genesis 6:18-19 ). As such, the Ark became both a symbol of a faith on the part of Noah and a symbol of grace on the part of God (Genesis 6:8 ,Genesis 6:8,6:22 ). ...
The shape of the Ark was unusual. Although the Bible does not give enough detail to enable a full model to be made, the Ark was apparently not shaped like a boat, either ancient or modern. The Ark had three floors filled with rooms (Genesis 6:14 ,Genesis 6:14,6:16 ) and one window and one door (Genesis 6:16 ). ...
The Ark was built of gopher wood (Genesis 6:14 ) which may have been a variety of cypress. ...
The Ark was a testimony of Noah's faith because no large body of water stood nearby on which Noah could have floated such a large boat. ...
The Ark was also a symbol of God's grace. Obviously, the Ark was intended by God as an instrument of deliverance to preserve both human and animal life upon the earth (Genesis 6:17-18 ). The Ark showed that God still cared for the people whom He had created in spite of their stubborn sinful rebellion. The Ark as symbol of both faith and grace teaches the importance of obedience. God offered the Ark to save Noah. ...
New Testament The gospel references to the Ark are in connection with Jesus' teachings regarding the second coming. In the Book of Hebrews, the preacher lists Noah as a man of faith who prepared an Ark even though the danger was at that point unseen. The last New Testament reference to the Ark points to the evil of humanity and God's patient salvation (1 Peter 3:20 ). There, however, the Ark was not a symbol of the grace of the gods but of their folly and faulty planning. In the Sumerian and Babylonian traditions, we are given more details concerning the size and shape of the Ark. These details may be of interest, but are of far less significance than the message of the biblical Ark itself as testimony to God's unmerited grace. ...
Searches for the Ark have proven fruitless. Numerous newspaper articles and paperback books record attempts to discover the ruins of Noah's Ark. While the Ark has not yet been recovered, the discovery of such remains are unnecessary to demonstrate the authenticity of the story
Ark of the Covenant - Also called the "Ark of the Testimony" (Exodus 30:6), "Ark of God" (1 Samuel 3:3), and the "Ark of the covenant of the Lord" (Deuteronomy 10:8). The Ark of the Covenant was very sacred to the Ancient Jews. Inside of the Ark were the tablets of the Ten Commandments, a jar of manna, and Aaron's Rod that budded (Hebrews 9:4). The Ark of the Covenant was place in the Holy of Holies in the Tabernacle and later in the Temple
Ark - We read in Scripture of the Ark which the Lord directed Noah to make. (Genesis 6:14) And Moses in the wilderness was commanded to make an Ark. (Exodus 25:10) And we read of an Ark seen by John in the temple in heaven; but then, this latter was visional. For the same apostle elsewhere saith, that he "saw no temple in heaven? (Revelation 11:19 with Revelation 21:22) The Ark of Noah, as well as that of Moses, were types of the Lord Jesus Christ. Hence, Noah it is said by the Holy Ghost,"by (Hebrews 11:7) faith being warned of God, "prepared an Ark for the saving of his house. And the Ark in the wilderness is called the Ark of the covenant, intimating Christ given of JEHOVAH to the people. (See Numbers 10:33; Joshua 3:11; Jos 7:6 with Isaiah 42:6; 2 Chronicles 8:11) We no where read of Arks. Never is it said in the word of God of more than one Ark; no more than one Lord Jesus Christ. They who talk of Arks, like them who talk of archangels, do err, "not knowing the Scriptures, neither the power of God. " And it were to be wished, that such men would call to mind the Lord's jealousy in the case of the men of Bethshemesh, (1 Samuel 6:19) and also the circumstance of Uzzah, (1 Chronicles 13:10) What was the sin of all those but overlooking Christ? And wherein do those differ, who talk of Arks instead of one Ark, and that expressly, and on no other account valuable, than as it represented the Lord Jesus? (1 Samuel 4:3; 2 Samuel 15:24)...
Testimony - The two stone tables of the law were a visible "testimony" or witness of God's covenant with his people; and hence the Ark of the covenant was called sometimes the testimony, or the Ark of the testimony, Exodus 25:22 34:29 . See Ark
Ark - Ark . arca , ‘a chest,’ is the rendering of two Hebrew words, of which one ( tçbhâh , probably a loan-word) is applied both to the basket of bulrushes in which the infant Moses was exposed, and to the Ark built by Noah (see Deluge). ), is used for a mummy-case or coffin ( Genesis 50:26 ), and in particular for the sacred Ark of the Hebrews. ...
Ark of the Covenant...
1 . Names of the Ark . Apart from the simple designation ‘the Ark’ found in all periods of Heb. literature, the names of the Ark, more than twenty in number, fall into three groups, which are characteristic ( a ) of the oldest literary sources, viz. In ( a ) we find chiefly ‘the Ark of J″ [1] ,’ doubtless the oldest name of all, and ‘the Ark of God’; in ( b ) the characteristic title is ‘the Ark of the covenant’ alone or with the additions ‘of J″ [3] termed ‘the testimony,’ the Ark becomes ‘the Ark of the testimony. History of the Ark . ]'>[5] ) are now silent as to the origin of the Ark, but since the author of Deuteronomy 10:1-6 had one or both of these before him, it may be assumed that its construction was there also assigned to Moses in obedience to a Divine command. Strangely enough, there is no further mention of the Ark in the historical books. There was no Ark in the Temples of Zerubbabel and Herod. The significance of the Ark . In attempting a solution of this difficult problem, we must, as in the foregoing section, leave out of account the late theoretical conception of the Ark to be found in the Priests’ Code (see Tabernacle), and confine our attention to the oldest sources. In these the Ark a simple chest of acacia wood, according to Deuteronomy 10:3 is associated chiefly with the operations of war, in which it is the representative of J″ Ark, Noah's - (See Ark
Ark of Moses - (See Ark
Ark of the Covenant Person - A title given to the Blessed Virgin Mary to signify her Divine motherhood, that as the Ark of old, made of incorruptible wood and adorned with pure gold, contained the precious treasures of the Divine law and the manna from heaven, so she, the true Ark, bore within her not merely the law but the Lawgiver, not merely the Divine presence as manifested over the Ark of the covenant, but the Divine One Himself, and the Living Bread from heaven
Uzzah - Strength, a son of Abinadab, in whose house the men of Kirjath-jearim placed the Ark when it was brought back from the land of the Philistines (1 Samuel 7:1 ). He with his brother Ahio drove the cart on which the Ark was placed when David sought to bring it up to Jerusalem. When the oxen stumbled, Uzzah, in direct violation of the divine law (Numbers 4:15 ), put forth his hand to steady the Ark, and was immediately smitten unto death. David on this feared to proceed further, and placed the Ark in the house of Obed-edom the Gittite (2 Samuel 6:2-11 ; 1 Chronicles 13:6-13 )
Aran - An Ark; their curse
Araunah - Ark; song; joyful cry
Arkite - ) Belonging to the Ark
Testimony, Tabernacle of - The Ark in which these tables were deposited was called the "ark of the testimony" (40:3), and also simply the "testimony" (27:21; 30:6)
Gopher Wood - In Genesis 6:14 , the material out of which Noah was instructed to construct the Ark. See Ark
Emerods - One of the diseases of the Egyptians, and with which the Philistines were smitten when they had possession of the Ark. They returned 'images' of the same with the Ark
Ark - Noah's Ark, a building of gopher-wood, and covered with pitch, 300 cubits long, 50 cubits broad, and 30 cubits high (Genesis 6:14-16 ); an oblong floating house of three stories, with a door in the side and a window in the roof. Traditions of the Deluge, by which the race of man was swept from the earth, and of the Ark of Noah have been found existing among all nations. The Ark of bulrushes in which the infant Moses was laid (Exodus 2:3 ) is called in the Hebrew Teebah , A word derived from the Egyptian Teb , meaning "a chest. ...
The sacred Ark is designated by a different Hebrew word, 'Aron' , Which is the common name for a chest or coffer used for any purpose ( Genesis 50:26 ; 2 Kings 12:9,10 ). It is distinguished from all others by such titles as the "ark of God" (1 Samuel 3:3 ), "ark of the covenant" (Joshua 3:6 ; Hebrews 9:4 ), "ark of the testimony" (Exodus 25:22 ). Its upper surface or lid, the mercy-seat, was surrounded with a rim of gold; and on each of the two sides were two gold rings, in which were placed two gold-covered poles by which the Ark could be carried (Numbers 7:9 ; 10:21 ; 4:5,19,20 ; 1 Kings 8:3,6 ). Over the Ark, at the two extremities, were two cherubim, with their faces turned toward each other (Leviticus 16:2 ; Numbers 7:89 ). Their outspread wings over the top of the Ark formed the throne of God, while the Ark itself was his footstool (Exodus 25:10-22 ; 37:1-9 ). The Ark was deposited in the "holy of holies," and was so placed that one end of the poles by which it was carried touched the veil which separated the two apartments of the tabernacle (1 Kings 8:8 ). The two tables of stone which constituted the "testimony" or evidence of God's covenant with the people (Deuteronomy 31:26 ), the "pot of manna" (Exodus 16:33 ), and "Aaron's rod that budded" (Numbers 17:10 ), were laid up in the Ark (Hebrews 9:4 ). (See TABERNACLE) The Ark and the sanctuary were "the beauty of Israel" (Lamentations 2:1 ). During the journeys of the Israelites the Ark was carried by the priests in advance of the host (Numbers 4:5,6 ; 10:33-36 ; Psalm 68:1 ; 132:8 ). After the settlement of Israel in Palestine the Ark remained in the tabernacle at Gilgal for a season, and was then removed to Shiloh till the time of Eli, between 300,400 years (Jeremiah 7:12 ), when it was carried into the field of battle so as to secure, as they supposed, victory to the Hebrews, and was taken by the Philistines (1 Samuel 4:3-11 ), who sent it back after retaining it seven months (1 Samuel 5:7,8 ). It remained then at Kirjath-jearim (7:1,2) till the time of David (twenty years), who wished to remove it to Jerusalem; but the proper mode of removing it having been neglected, Uzzah was smitten with death for putting "forth his hand to the Ark of God," and in consequence of this it was left in the house of Obed-edom in Gath-rimmon for three months (2 Samuel 6:1-11 ), at the end of which time David removed it in a grand procession to Jerusalem, where it was kept till a place was prepared for it (12-19). When the Babylonians destroyed Jerusalem and plundered the temple, the Ark was probably taken away by Nebuchadnezzar and destroyed, as no trace of it is afterwards to be found. The absence of the Ark from the second temple was one of the points in which it was inferior to the first temple
Chest - 'Αron , always, except twice (Joseph's coffin and Jehoiada's alms chest, Genesis 50:26; 2 Kings 12:9-10), used for the Ark of the covenant; the "ark" (teebah ) of Noah, and that of bulrushes in which Moses was put, is quite distinct
Ark - 3:20; (b) the "ark" of the Covenant in the Tabernacle, Hebrews 9:4 ; (c) the "ark" seen in vision in the Heavenly Temple, Revelation 11:19
Opher Wood - A species of wood used in the construction of Noah's Ark
Mikneiah - A gate-keeper of the Ark ( 1 Chronicles 15:18 )
Obed Edom - After Uzzah's stroke David in fear took the Ark aside to the house of Obed Edom. Instead of the Levites bearing the Ark (as was commanded, Numbers 7:9), David had put it in a cart, in the Philistine fashion (1 Samuel 6:8). His turning aside from the direct way to go to Obed Edom's house is accounted for by his sudden fear owing to the punishment of Uzzah's presumption; he goes to a Kohathite Levite, one of the family especially appointed to bear the Ark on their shoulders, and deposits the Ark with him, conscious that he himself might have been punished for irregularity. ...
Accordingly, in 1 Chronicles 15 we find the Ark was no longer taken in a cart, but borne on the Levites' shoulders, with Obed Edom "a doorkeeper for the Ark," and it is emphatically said it was "as Moses commanded, according to the word of Jehovah" (1 Chronicles 15:15; 1 Chronicles 15:18; 1 Chronicles 15:24). While the Ark brought a plague every one was glad to be rid of it; but when it brought a blessing to Obed Edom, they wished for it. Many will own a blessing Ark; he is an Obed Edom indeed that will own a persecuted, tossed, banished Ark (Trapp). Obed Edom was doorkeeper for the Ark (1 Chronicles 15:24). Those whom the Lord hath blessed, and who have received God's Ark into their home and heart, are best fitted to serve in the sanctuary and to open the kingdom of heaven ministerially. Obed Edom and his colleagues could not possibly at the same time as porters precede, and as singers come after, the priests and the Ark
Jehiah - Door-keeper when the Ark was brought to Jerusalem
Aron hakodesh - �the holy Ark�); the repository for the Torah scrolls in a synagogue...
Japheth - Son of Noah, survived the Flood together with his family by entering the Ark
Ark - 'ARK, n. The vessel in which Moses was set afloat upon the Nile was an Ark of bulrushes. Arise, O Lord, into thy rest, thou and the Ark of thy strength. A large boat used on American rivers, to transport produce to market
Pitch - Noah covered the Ark with pitch inside and outside. The Ark in which the infant Moses was put, was likewise thus rendered waterproof. Noah was to pitch ( kaphar , 'to cover,' often translated 'atonement') the Ark with pitch (kopher, translated 'ransom') as if to teach that Noah and those with him could be saved only by being covered with a ransom, and which would introduce them to a new earth
Ark - ) The term (teebah ) is applied to the infant Moses' Ark. It is a type of the manger which disclosed to the shepherds Messiah, who, beginning with the manger, at last ascended to His Father's throne; also of the paper Ark to which God has committed His revelation
Gopher-Wood - The Ark was made of this material. It abounded in Syria, was used very commonly for shipbuilding, and was almost the only wood which could furnish suitable timber for so large a vessel as the Ark
Staves - Exodus 25:13 (c) These were the two rods covered with gold by which the Ark was carried. In this passage the rods indicate the wandering and movable character of the Ark of the covenant. It was to be on the move constantly, therefore the staves were to remain in the rings on the Ark. The Ark was to wander no more
Testimony - See Ark, 1 ; Tabernacle, 7 ( a ); Witness; and, for 2 Kings 11:12 , Ornaments, 4
Ark - The Septuagint and the NT use κιβωτός = a wooden chest or box, as a terminus technicus both for Noah’s Ark (חֵּבָה), and for the Ark (אֲרוֹן) of the covenant. An interesting account of the successive phases of modern opinion regarding the former Ark will be found in Encyclopaedia Britannica 11 (s. Peter (himself like a spirit in prison during those three days), unhappy children of the unlawful union between angels and the daughters of men, condemned rebels who in vain sought the intervention of Enoch on their behalf in that time of Divine long-suffering when Noah was preparing the Ark in which he saved himself and his family (see R. The writer of Hebrews mentions the Ark of the covenant (τὴν κιβωτὸν τῆς διαθήκης) as the innermost and most sacred piece of furniture contained in the Tabernacle. The designation ‘the Ark of the covenant,’ which was probably coined by the writer of Deut. , was historic ally later than ‘the Ark of Jahweh,’ and ‘the Ark of God’ (Jewish Encyclopedia ), and earlier than ‘the Ark of the testimony’ (P). It was a contraction for ‘the Ark containing the tables of the covenant,’ the Decalogue being a summary of the terms which Israel accepted on entering into covenant with God. In Kautzsch’s Heilige Schrift it is rendered die Lade mit dem Gesetz, ‘the Ark with the law. is an embellishment upon Exodus 16:33) and Aaron’s rod that budded, which in the original narratives were laid up before the Lord (ἐναντίον τοῦ θεοῦ, Exodus 16:33; ἐνώπιον τῶν μαρτυρίων, Numbers 17:10) are supposed by the writer of Hebrews to have been within the Ark. The popular imagination could not entertain the idea that the inviolable Ark was irrecoverably lost, and there arose a tradition that before the destruction of Jerusalem in 586 b. In the second and third Temple the Holy of Holies contained no Ark. The thought of that emptiness oppressed the minds both of devout Jews and of Jewish Christians, and in Revelation 11:19, when the seventh angel has sounded, and the temple of God in heaven is opened, the Ark of the covenant is there
Obed-Edom - But as Obed-jah, the prophet, was called the slave or labourer of the Lord, so Obed-edom, the slave of the Adam or Edom, the earth or earthy, was eminently the Lord's chosen for that peculiar service of receiving the Ark, when David himself trembled on the occasion. ...
But I hope the reader, in beholding the blessing of the Lord upon Obed-edom and his house, for the Ark of God's sake, will not overlook the cause. That Ark was a type of the ever-blessed Jesus. In receiving the Ark into his house, into his family, and among his people, he did, to all intents and purposes, receive Christ into his heart, and like the faithful descendant of the faithful Abraham, "saw the day of Christ afar off, rejoiced, and was glad. "...
Obed-edom was no stranger to the dreadful consequences which had fallen on the Philistines for their daring impiety, in taking the Ark of God, and detaining it. Nay, he could not but know that the reason wherefore David wished Obed-edom to take the Ark into his house was, because he was afraid to take it into his own. What was it then, that prompted the mind of this pious faithful Gittite to receive the Ark of God under such alarming circumstances? What was it, but thy grace almighty Lord, that taught him to rejoice in thee and thy favour, while others were trembling under thy judgments? Oh! the blessedness of' distinguishing grace, which makes that to thy people "a savour of life unto life," whilst to others it becomes"a savour of death unto death. " Three whole months was Obed-edom favoured with the abode of the Ark. No doubt, the tokens of the divine presence were so visibly bestowed upon this man and his household, that the whole neighborhood, yea, the whole kingdom, could not but take notice of it; for it is said, "that it was told king David, saying, the Lord hath blessed the house of Obed-edom, and all that pertained to him, because of the Ark of God," 2 Samuel 6:12. Behold the blessedness in Obed-edom, and all that pertained to him, for receiving the Ark of God into his house. When none ventured to serve the interest of God, and to receive his Ark, he was faithful. ...
And what is it now? If that Ark was a type of Christ, who are they that may be said to be faithful in the midst of the present perverse and crooked generation, but they who receive Christ Jesus the Lord into their hearts, and houses, and families, whilst others despise him! Who are the Obed-edoms of the present day, but such as receive Christ Jesus the Lord, and walk in him, and live to him, and rejoice in him, as the Lord our Righteousness! And if there ever was a day of peculiar blessedness, for the manifesting this distinguishing love to Jesus and his cause, surely the present is the one. Oh! for grace, therefore, that while the Ark of God, the Christ of God, is shut out of such numberless houses in this adulterous and sinful generation, many an Obed-edom may yet be found in our British Israel to welcome the Lord Jesus to their hearts, and he, and he alone, be formed there the hope of glory. ) and the Ark of the Testament is beheld by the whole church, still will it be held in everlasting remembrance how the Lord blessed the house of Obed-edom upon earth, for the Ark of God's sake
Ark - The Hebrew word by which the Ark is expressed, is תבת or תיבת , the constructive form of תבה , which is evidently the Greek θιβη ; and so the LXX render the word in Exodus 2:3 , where only it again occurs. They also render it κιβωτον ; Josephus, λαρνακα ; and the Vulgate arcam; signifying an Ark, coffer, or chest. Although the Ark of Noah answered, in some respects, the purpose of a ship, it is not so certain that it was of the same form and shape. The Ark in which Moses was exposed bears the same name; and some have thought that both were of the same materials. ...
To the insufficiency of the Ark to contain all the creatures said to have been brought into it, objections have, at different times, been made. Hales proves the Ark to have been of the burden of forty-two thousand four hundred and thirteen tons; and asks, "Can we doubt of its being sufficient to contain eight persons, and about two hundred or two hundred and fifty pair of four-footed animals, (a number to which, according to M. "...
Whether Noah was commanded to bring with him, into the Ark, a pair of all living creatures, zoologically and numerically considered, has been doubted. But of such marches no intimation is given in the history; and this seems to render it probable that the animals which Noah was "to bring with him" into the Ark, were the animals clean and unclean of the country in which he dwelt, and which, from the capacity of the Ark, must have been in great variety and number. The terms used, it is true, are universal; and it is satisfactory to know, that if taken in the largest sense there was ample accommodation in the Ark. It is, in truth, the only solution of a difficulty which has no other explanation; for as a universal deluge is confirmed by the general history of the world, and by a variety of existing facts and monuments, such a structure as the Ark, for the preservation and sustenance of various animals, seems to have been absolutely necessary; for as we can trace up the first imperfect rudiments of the art of ship building among the Greeks, there could be no ships before the flood; and, consequently, no animals could have been saved. Bryant has collected a variety of ancient historical relations, which show that some records concerning the Ark had been preserved among most nations of the world, and in the general system of Gentile mythology. Abydenus, with whom all the eastern writers concur, informs us that the place of descent from the Ark was Armenia; and that its remains had been preserved for a long time. Plutarch mentions the Noachic dove, and its being sent out of the Ark. Lucian speaks of Deucalion's going forth from the Ark, and raising an altar to God. The priests of Ammonia had a custom, at particular seasons, of carrying in procession a boat, in which was an oracular shrine, held in great veneration: and this custom of carrying the deity in an Ark or boat was in use also among the Egyptians. The ship of Isis referred to the Ark, and its name, "Baris," was that of the mountain corresponding to Ararat in Armenia. Bryant finds reference to the Ark in the temples of the serpent worship, called Dracontia; and also in that of Sesostris, fashioned after the model of the Ark, in commemoration of which it was built, and consecrated to Osiris at Theba; and he conjectures that the city, said to be one of the most ancient in Egypt, as well as the province, was denominated from it, Theba being the appellation of the Ark. In other countries, as well as in Egypt, an Ark, or ship, was introduced in their mysteries, and often carried about in the seasons of their festivals. He finds, also, in the story of the Argonauts several particulars, that are thought to refer to the Ark of Noah. As many cities, not in Egypt only and Boeotia, but in Cilicia, Ionia, Attica, Phthiotis, Cataonia, Syria, and Italy, were called Theba; so likewise the city Apamea was denominated Cibotus, from κιβωτος , in memory of the Ark, and of the history connected with it. The Ark, according to the traditions of the Gentile world, was prophetic; and was regarded as a kind of temple or residence of the deity. Hence in the ancient mythology of Egypt, there were precisely eight gods; and the Ark was esteemed an emblem of the system of the heavens. The principal terms by which the ancients distinguished the Ark were Theba, Baris, Arguz, Aren, Arene, Arni, Laris, Boutas, Boeotus, and Cibotus; and out of these they formed different personages
Ben - (son ), a Levite, one of the porters appointed by David for the Ark
Ark of the Covenant - Thus Colenso's cavil that "not a single acacia" is to be seen where the Ark is said to have been constructed is answered. It is a propriety characteristic of the truth of the Scripture narrative that it represents the Ark as not made of oak or cedar, the best woods of the Holy Land, but of acacia, the wood of the wilderness. In the thorn of man's curse appeared the angel of the covenant to Moses, to bless man; and out of its wood was formed the Ark of the covenant, the typical source of his blessing. When carried about, the Ark was wrapped in the veil, the badger's skin, and blue cloth. Its title, "the Ark of the testimony," implies its purpose, namely, to keep intact God's "covenant" written by God on the two stone tables (Exodus 34:28), as the sacred deposit of the Israelite church (Exodus 25:22; Numbers 10:33). In the wilderness "the Ark of the covenant of the Lord went before them in the three days' journey to search out a resting place for them; and when the Ark set forward, Moses said, Rise up, Lord, and let Thine enemies be scattered, and let them that hate Thee flee before Thee. At the passage of the Jordan it was when the Ark was borne by the priests and their feet had touched the water, that an open way was made for Israel. Only when the material Ark, apart from obedience, was expected to give that favor of God which only obedience to the law contained within the Ark could ensure, did God "deliver His strength" (the pledge of God's strengthening His people) "into captivity and His glory into the enemy's hands" (Acts 15:16-17; 1 Samuel 4:11). ...
When the Ark was taken the "glory" was departed (1 Samuel 4:21-22). The Ark and the sanctuary were "the beauty of Israel" (Lamentations 2:1). Like the Ark with the Philistines Messiah was the captive of the grave for a brief space, but with triumph He rose again; and as when the Ark went up to the tabernacle reared for it by David on Zion, so on Christ's ascending the heavenly mount the glorious anthem arose: "Lift up your heads, O ye gates, and be ye lift up, ye everlasting doors, and the King of glory shall come in" (Psalm 24). Every Dagon must fall before Him now; for even in His temporary captivity in death the powers of darkness were crushed before Him (Colossians 2:14-15; Matthew 27:50-54). As the Ark blessed the house of Obed Edom, so Christ is the true bestower of blessings (Acts 3:20). ...
The restriction of the Ark's contents to the decalogue implies that this is the central core of all the various precepts, the moral end for which the positive precepts were given. They were in the innermost shrine, to mark their perpetually obligatory nature and the holiness of God; in the Ark, the type of Christ, to mark that in Him alone, "the Lord our righteousness," they find their perfect realization. 1 Kings 8:9 states there was nothing in the Ark of Solomon's temple save the two stone tables of the law; but Hebrews 9:4 states there were also the golden pot of manna (the memorial of God's providential care of Israel), and Aaron's rod that budded (the memorial of the lawful priesthood, Numbers 17:3-10). Probably by the time of Solomon the other two relics had been lost, perhaps when the Ark was in the hands of the Philistines. ...
The mercy-seat was not merely regarded as the lid of the Ark, but as the most important feature in the holiest place (Exodus 25:17; Exodus 26:34; Leviticus 16:2), the only meeting place between God and man. It was the (caporeth ) or covering, not merely of the Ark. but (when sprinkled with the sacrificial blood once a year on the great day of atonement) of Israel's sins against the law contained within the Ark. ...
The Ark was never seen save by the high priest; symbol of God whom no man can see, and whose likeness is only to be seen in Christ (John 1:18; Hebrews 1:3), the true Ark, and our High Priest with the Father. Thus every tendency to idolatry was excluded, an Ark occupying the central place of holiness, and that seen only once a year by the one religious representative of the people. Jerusalem, when "they shall say no more, The Ark of the covenant of the Lord, neither shall it come to mind, neither shall they re. The absence of the Ark after its capture by the Philistines possibly impaired the reverential awe felt toward it (1 Chronicles 13:3; 1 Chronicles 13:9). ...
The altar of burnt offering where the sacrifices were offered continued separate from it at Gibeon, the "great high place" (1 Kings 3:4) (in the tabernacle of the Ark on Zion the service was song and praise alone) until the two were reunited in the temple of Solomon, a type of the gospel separation of the spiritual service of prayer and praise going on here below, from the priestly intercession being carried on above by our Lord Jesus. Manasseh set up an idol, a carved image, instead of the Ark which contained the testimony against him. ...
The Ark was wanting in the second temple, having been probably burnt with the temple (2 Chronicles 36:19); compare (apocryphal) 2 Esdras 10:22, "the Ark of our covenant is spoiled. Pagan nations too had their mystic Arks (whence arcanum is the term for a mystery), but so distinct in use from the Mosaic that the differences are more prominent than the resemblances. ...
The Egyptian Arks (on their monuments) were, like the Hebrew Ark, carried by poles on men's shoulders. Some had too on the cover two winged figures like cherubim; but between these was the material symbol of a deity, and the Arks were carried about in procession to make a show before the people. The Ark of the covenant on the contrary was marked by the absence of any symbol of God. In the tabernacle the Ark was withdrawn from view in the mysterious holy of holies
Chidon - Elsewhere Nachon's ("firm") threshingfloor (2 Samuel 6), where Uzza touched the shaking Ark
Abel the Great - " The Septuagint and the Chaldee versions so read; but "Abel" is probably right, and refers to the mourning caused by the destruction of so many Bethshemites for looking into the Ark. The field in which Abel the great Stone was, on which the Ark was placed on its return from the Philistines, belonged to Joshua, a Bethshemite
Ark of the Covenant - ...
On the two sides of the Ark there were four rings of gold, two on each side, through which staves, overlaid with gold, were put, by means whereof they carried it as they marched through the wilderness, &c, on the shoulders of the Levites, Exodus 25:13-14 ; Exodus 27:5 . After the passage of the Jordan, the Ark continued for some time at Gilgal, from whence it was removed to Shiloh. The Philistines, having gotten possession of the Ark, carried it in triumph to one of their principal cities, named Ashdod, and placed it in the temple of Dagon, whose image fell to the ground and was broken. The Philistines also were so afflicted with emerods, that they afterward returned the Ark with various presents; and it was lodged at Kirjath-Jearim, and afterward at Nob. The priests, being unable to bear this profanation, took the Ark and carried it from place to place, to preserve it from the hands of those impious princes. What became of the Ark at the destruction of the temple by Nebuchadnezzar, is a dispute among the rabbins. ...
The Ark of the covenant was, as it were, the centre of worship to all those of the Hebrew nation who served God according to the Levitical law; and not only in the temple, when they came thither to worship, but every where else in their dispersions through the whole world; whenever they prayed, they turned their faces toward the place where the Ark stood, and directed all their devotions that way, Daniel 6:10 . Whence the author of the book of Cosri, justly says, that the Ark, with the mercy seat and cherubim, were the foundation, root, heart, and marrow of the whole temple, and all the Levitical worship performed therein; and, therefore, had there been nothing else wanting in the second temple but the Ark only, this alone would have been a sufficient reason for the old men to have wept when they remembered the first temple in which it stood; and for the saying of Haggai 2:3 , that the second temple was as nothing compared with the first; so great a share had the Ark of the covenant in the glory of Solomon's temple. However, the defect was supplied as to the outward form, for in the second temple there was also an Ark of the same dimensions with the first, and put in the same place; but it wanted the tables of the law, Aaron's rod, and the pot of manna; nor was there any appearance of the divine glory over it; nor any oracles delivered from it. The only use that was made of it was to be a representation of the former on the great day of expiation, and to be a repository of the Holy Scriptures, that is, of the original copy of that collection of them made by Ezra after the captivity; in imitation of which the Jews, in all their synagogues, have a like Ark or coffer in which they keep their Scriptures. ...
For the temple of Solomon a new Ark was not made; but he constructed cherubim in the most holy place, which were designed to give additional state to this most sacred symbol of God's grace and mercy. These cherubim were fifteen feet high, and were placed at equal distance from the centre of the Ark and from each side of the wall, so that their wings being expanded, the two wings which were extended behind touched the wall, and the other two met over the Ark and so overshadowed it. When these magnificent cherubim were finished, the Ark was brought in and placed under their wings, 2 Chronicles 5:7-10 . ...
The Ark was called the Ark of the covenant, because it was a symbol of the covenant between God and his people. It was also named the Ark of the testimony, because the two tables which were deposited in it were witnesses against every transgression
Ark - Ark. If the cubit be reckoned at 21 inches, the dimensions of the Ark were 525 feet in length, 87 feet 6 inches in breadth, 52 feet 6 Inches in height. The proportions are those of the human body; and they are admirably adapted for a vessel required, like the Ark, to float steadily with abundant stowage. The Ark was made of "gopher-wood," probably cypress; and it was to be divided into "rooms" or "nests," that is, furnished with a vast number of separate compartments, placed one above another in three tiers. Light was to be admitted by a window, not improbably a sky-light, a cubit broad, extending the whole length of the Ark. Many questions have been raised, and discussed at great length by skeptics and others, respecting the form and dimensions of the Ark; the number of animals saved in it—whether including all species then existing in the world, except such as live in water or lie dormant, or only the species living in the parts of the world then peopled by man; and as to the possibility of their being all lodged in the Ark, and their food during the year. It was by miracle that he was forewarned and directed to prepare for the flood; and the same miraculous power accomplished all that Noah was unable to do in designing, building, and filling the Ark, and preserving and guiding it through the deluge. Moses's Ark was made of the bulrush or papyrus, which grows in marshy places in Egypt. Ark of the covenant. The Ark was fitted with rings, one at each of the four corners, and through these were passed staves of the same wood similarly overlaid, by which it was carried by the Kohathites. The Ark, when transported, was covered with the "veil" of the dismantled tabernacle, in the curtain of badgers' skins, and in a blue cloth over all, and was therefore not seen. The chief facts in the earlier history of the Ark, see Joshua 3:1-17; Joshua 6:1-27, need not be recited. When idolatry became more shameless in the kingdom of Judah, Manasseh placed a "carved image" in the "house of God," and probably removed the Ark to make way for it
Obed-Edom - At Obed-edom's house David left the Ark of the covenant following the death of Uzzah at the hand of God (2 Samuel 6:6-11 ). Obed-edom was unusually blessed of God (probably a reference to prosperity) during the three months the Ark was at his house. His duties related especially to the Ark of the covenant. A guild of Levites may have adopted the name “Obed-edom” as their title as keepers of the Ark
Uzzah - Son of Abinadab at whose house in Kirjath Jearim the Ark stayed 20 years. The latter and Uzzah drove the new cart wherein the Ark was carried from Abinadab's house for removal to Zion (1 Chronicles 13:7). Perez Uzzah (the breach on Uzzah) was eventually the name (contrast Jehovah's "breaking forth upon David's enemies as the breach of waters," Baal Perazim, 2 Samuel 5:20) Uzzah tried with his hand to prevent the Ark's shaking, but, God smote him for the offense (fault: shal ). Uzzah though with good intentions had in his rash act forgotten the reverence due to the Ark, the earthly throne and visible pledge of the presence of the unseen God. We must not in presumptuous haste try to sustain God's cause, as if it must fall unless it have our support; God can guard His own Ark. God's law (Numbers 4; Ezekiel 25:14) had ordained that the Ark was to be carried on the Levites' shoulders, not in a carriage. David's excitement changed into fear of Jehovah; not daring to bring the Ark near him, since a touch proved so fatal, he removed it to the house of Obed Edom the Gathite. Contrast the blessed effect of the touch of faith toward the Ark's Antitype, Jesus (Matthew 9:20-22; Mark 5:25-34). Uzzah was evidently a Levite, for otherwise the Ark would not have been allowed to remain at his father Abinadab's house 20 years. Moreover, if Abinadab had not been a Levite his son Eleazar would not have been consecrated to take charge of the Ark (1 Samuel 7:2)
Ebenezer - During the second of two engagements in the area, the Philistines captured the Ark of the covenant. Later, after the recovery of the Ark and a decisive Israelite victory over the Philistines, Samuel erected a monument to which he gave the name Eben-ezer
Chenani'ah - (established by the Lord ), chief of the Levites when David carried the Ark to Jerusalem
a'Bel, Stone of - (the great abel ), the place where the Ark rested in the field of Joshua at Beth-shemesh
Parochet - (b) curtain covering the synagogue Ark
Keruvim - (Cherubs): angels resembling young children; relief images of two winged cherubim were part of the cover of the holy Ark in the temple ...
ja-a'zi-el - (whom Jehovah comforts ), one of the Levites appointed by David to perform the musical service before the Ark
Jaar - It occurs once as a proper name, namely in Psalms 132:6 , where, speaking of the Ark, the Psalmist says that it was heard of at Ephrathah and found at Jaar. The Ark was brought from the region of Bethlehem (Ephrathah), yea, from the woody heights of Kiriath-jearim
Ahio - He and his brother Uzzah drove an ox and cart carrying the Ark. His brother touched the Ark and was killed (2 Samuel 6:6-7 )
Unni - Levite musician and door-keeper when David brought up the Ark
Ark of the Covenant - The Ark was reposited in the holiest place of the tabernacle. The lid or covering of the Ark was called the propitiatory or mercy-seat; over which two figures were placed, called cherubims, with expanded wings of a peculiar form. Here the Shechinah rested both in the tabernacle and temple in a visible cloud; hence were issued the Divine oracles by an audible voice; and the high priest appeared before the mercy-seat once every year on the great day of expiation; and the Jews, wherever they worshipped, turned their faces towards the place where the Ark stood. In the second temple there was also an Ark, made of the same shape and dimensions with the first, and put in the same place, but without any of its contents and peculiar honours. It was used as a representative of the former on the day of expiation, and a repository of the original copy of the holy Scriptures, collected by Ezra and the men of the great synagogue after the captivity; and, in imitation of this, the Jews, to this day, have a kind of Ark in their synagogues, wherein their sacred books are kept
Jaaziel - A Levite who assisted when David brought up the Ark
Bitumen - With this the Ark was pitched (6:14
Ham - Son of Noah, survived the Flood together with his family by entering the Ark
Holy of holies - the inner chamber of the Temple where the Divine Presence was most revealed; contained the Holy Ark, was only entered by the High Priest on Yom Kippur ...
Nachon - The person at whose threshing-floor Uzzah was smitten for touching the Ark when it shook
Jehiah - ” Guard of the Ark when David brought it up from Philistine territory (1 Chronicles 15:24 )
Cham - Son of Noah, survived the Flood together with his family by entering the Ark
Aaron's Rod - As representing his tribe, it had been deposited by Divine command before the Ark along with 12 other rods representing the 12 secular tribes, in order that the will of J″ Ark of Noah - The Ark is called in Hebrew, in the Septuagint, and by Josephus, a chest; and the same word is used in the history of the infant Moses, Exodus 2:3 . So far as this name affords any evidence, it goes to show that the Ark of Noah was not a regular sailing-vessel, but merely intended to float at large guard it as a large, oblong, floating house, with a roof either flat or only slightly inclined. ...
The dimensions of the Ark, taking the cubit as eighteen inches, were 450 feet in length, 75 in breadth and 45 in height. Many questions have been raised, and discussed at great length by skeptics and others, respecting the form and dimensions of the Ark; the number of animals saved in it-whether including all species then existing in the world, except such as live in water or lie dormant, or only the species living in the parts of world then peopled by man; and as to the possibility of their being all lodged in the Ark, and their food during the year, etc. It was by miracle that he was forewarned, and directed to prepare for the flood; and the same miraculous power accomplished all that Noah was unable to so in designing, building, and filling the Ark, and preserving and guiding it through the deluge. Traditions of the Ark are found in most nations all over the globe
Coffer - The receptacle or small box placed beside the Ark by the Philistines, in which they deposited the golden mice and the emerods as their trespass-offering (1 Samuel 6:8,11,15 )
Coffer - The box or case in which the golden mice and the images of the emerods were placed by the Philistines when the Ark was returned
Uzza, Uzzah - Son of Abinadab: he was smitten by God for touching the Ark when it shook. Though he did it with a good motive, it was against the law, which forbad even the Kohathites to touch the Ark
Gopher Wood - GOPHER WOOD ( Genesis 6:14 ), of which the Ark was constructed, was by tradition cypress wood, and this, or else the cedar, may be inferred as probable
Ark - As the Ark was under the deluge of the downpouring rain, so the Lord JESUS suffered under the rolling billows of GOD's terrible wrath. As those who were in the Ark were saved from drowning, so those who are in CHRIST JESUS are saved from the wrath of GOD. ...
Exodus 25:10 (c) This Ark is a type of the Lord JESUS as GOD's perfect Son (represented by the gold), and yet a perfect man (represented by the acacia wood). The wood represented the humanity of CHRIST, and the golden covering both inside and outside the Ark represented the deity of CHRIST
Slime - Jochebed daubed the "ark of bulrushes" with slime (Exodus 2:3 )
Baale of Judah - Lords of Judah, a city in the tribe of Judah from which David brought the Ark into Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6:2 )
Shem - (2203-1603 BCE) Son of Noah, survived the Flood together with his family by entering the Ark
Aziel - Levite in the choral service at the bringing up of the Ark from the house of Obed-edom, 1 Chronicles 15:20 : a shortened form apparently of JAAZIELin 1 Chronicles 15:18
Mikne'Iah - (possession of Jehovah ), one of the Levites of the second rank, gatekeepers of the Ark, appointed by David to play in the temple band "with harps upon Sheminith
Ark of Noah - Precise instructions were given by God as to the construction of the Ark. ...
A window was to be made to the Ark. In Genesis 6:16 , after speaking of the window, it says, "and in a cubit shalt thou finish it above;" it is a question whether this refers to the size of the window or whether the word 'it' refers to the Ark. A door was to be made in the side of the Ark; and the Ark was to be divided into three stories. ...
Such is the description given us of the form of the Ark. It was by faith Noah prepared the Ark, by which he condemned the world, and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith. "...
It may just be added that the form of the Ark was not intended for navigation amid storms and billows, but it was exactly suited for the purpose for which it was constructed
Draw - This should be contrasted with Exodus 25:15 where Israel was instructed not to draw out the staves from the Ark. In the time of Exodus, the Ark was in transit, Israel was traveling from place to place, and this may represent the vacillating life of most Christians. In2Chronicles, however, the Ark was in its final resting place in the temple of GOD, and it was to be carried about no more
Perez-Uzza - So David named Nachon's or Chidoh's threshing floor, because Jehovah made a breach or breaking forth on Uzzah for his presumptuous rashness in stretching forth his hand to support the shaken Ark. The Ark was taken to his father Abinadab's house, as subsequently to Obed Edom's, just because he was a Levite. Probably the Amminadab of 1 Chronicles 15:10, of Kohath's family (1 Chronicles 6:18); Numbers 4:5; Numbers 4:15, shows the Kohathites were to bear but not to touch the Ark, which was the office of Aaron's family
Ahio - A son of Abinadab, who went before the Ark of God on its way to Jerusalem from his father's house; thus escaping the fate of Uzzah his brother, 2 Samuel 6:3-7
Elipheleh - God will distinguish him, one of the porters appointed to play "on the Sheminith" on the occasion of the bringing up of the Ark to the city of David (1 Chronicles 15:18,21 )
Deluge - See Ark OF NOAH . After the door of the Ark had been closed upon those that were to be saved, the deluge commenced: it rained forty days; "the fountains of the great deep were broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened. " At length the waters began to abate; the highest land appeared, and the Ark touched ground upon Mount Ararat. At length he removed the covering of the Ark, and found the flood had disappeared; he came forth from the Ark, reared an altar, and offered sacrifices to God, who appointed the rainbow as a pledge that he would no more destroy mankind with a fool. ...
Since all nations have descended from the family then preserved in the Ark, it is natural that the memory of such an event should be perpetuated in various national traditions
Shemiramoth - Levite appointed as musician and doorkeeper when David brought up the Ark
Arau'Nah - (ark ), a Jebusite who sold his threshing floor on Mount Moriah to David as a site for an altar to Jehovah, together with his oxen
Ararat - It is identified with Urartu or Urardhu of the Assyrian inscriptions, a district in Armenia, in which is Mount Ararat, on some part of which the Ark of Noah rested. Objection has been taken to its great height, but it may not have been on its highest part that the Ark rested
Obed-Edom - We learn that the Lord blessed this man exceedingly, on account of the Ark resting under his roof, 2 Samuel 6:10-11 . David having removed the Ark to the place he had previously prepared for its reception, Obed-Edom and his sons were appointed to be keepers of the doors of the temple, 1 Chronicles 15:18 ; 1 Chronicles 15:21
Chenaniah - Chief of the Levites at the removal of the Ark from the house of Obed-edom ( 1 Chronicles 15:22 ; 1 Chronicles 15:27 ), named among the officers and judges over Israel ( 1 Chronicles 26:29 )
Perez-Uzzah - The breach of Uzzah, a place where God "burst forth upon Uzzah, so that he died," when he rashly "took hold" of the Ark (2 Samuel 6:6-8 )
Gopher Wood - The wood with which Noah built the Ark
na'Chon's - (prepared ) threshing floor, the place at which the Ark had arrived in its progress from Kirjath-jearim to Jerusalem, when Uzzah lost his life in his too-hasty zeal for its safety
Ark - Or NOAH'S Ark, a floating vessel built by Noah for the preservation of his family, and the several species of animals, during the deluge. The form of the Ark was an oblong, with a flat bottom, and a sloped roof, raised to a cubit in the middle; it had neither sails nor rudder; nor was it sharp at the ends for cutting the water. The length of this Ark was 300 cubits, which according to Dr
Shebaniah -
A Levite appointed to blow the trumpet before the Ark of God (1 Chronicles 15:24 )
Gittite - Obed-edom, in whose house the Ark was placed, is so designated (2 Samuel 6:10 )
Chi'Don - (a javelin ), the name which in ( 1 Chronicles 13:9 ) is given to the threshing-floor at which the accident to the Ark took place
Noah - Because Noah walked with God and stood blameless among the people of that time, God gave him specific instructions for building the Ark by which Noah and his family would survive the coming flood. Then a week before the flood (Genesis 7:4 ), Noah led his family and all of the animals into the Ark just as God directed. As he sought to know whether it was safe to leave the Ark, he sent out first a raven and then a dove. ...
Once out of the Ark, Noah built an altar and sacrificed clean animals as burnt offerings on the altar. ...
The sinful nature of humanity is one thing that remained preserved on the Ark. ...
New Testament Hebrews 11:7 affirms Noah's actions of faith in building the Ark
Pharez - The same word as David afterwards used from the breach made at Uzzah's touching the Ark
Silo - For three centuries after the conquest of the Promised Land it was the dwelling-place of the Tabernacle and the Ark of the Covenant (Josiah 18)
Eliph'Eleh - (whom God makes distinguished ), a Merarite Levite, one of the gate-keepers appointed by David to play on the harp "on the Sheminith" on the occasion of bringing up the Ark to the city of David
Nave - Derived from the Latin word navis meaning a ship, and isintended to symbolize "the Ark of Christ's Church
Uriel - Descendant of Kohath, employed by David when he brought up the Ark
Shittah Tree - ) A tree that furnished the precious wood of which the Ark, tables, altars, boards, etc
Haemorrhoids - This calamity they attributed to the presence of the Ark in their midst, and therefore they removed it to Gath (1 Samuel 5:6-8 ). The Ekronites were afflicted with the same dreadful malady, but more severely; and a panic seizing the people, they demanded that the Ark should be sent back to the land of Israel (9-12; 6:1-9)
Hophni And Phinehas - The Ark, which they had carried to the camp in spire of divine prohibitions, was taken, and they were slain in battle, 1 Samuel 2:1-4:22 . The Ark of God protects only those who love and obey him
Sabaoth - The title was apparently closely tied to Shiloh and the Ark of the covenant (1Samuel 1:3, 1 Samuel 1:11 ; 1 Samuel 4:4 ; 1 Samuel 6:2 ). When David brought the Ark to Jerusalem, he also introduced the title Yahweh of Hosts to Jerusalem worship (2 Samuel 6:2 ). Yahweh Sabaoth seems to have emphasized God's place as divine king enthroned on the cherubim with the Ark as His footstool ruling over the nation, the earth, and the heavens (Psalm 24:10 )
Chidon - to 1 Chronicles 13:9 , of the threshing-floor where Uzzah was struck dead for rashly touching the Ark (see Uzzah)
Unni -
A Levite whom David appointed to take part in bringing the Ark up to Jerusalem from the house of Obed-edom by playing the psaltery on that occasion (1 Chronicles 15:18,20 )
Perezuzzah, or Perezuzza - Place signifying 'Breach of Uzzah,' thus named by David, in his anger, because God there smote Uzzah for putting his hand to the Ark, which by the law should not have been touched except by the priests
Joshaphat - Priest who sounded the trumpet before the Ark of the Covenant as David brought it to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:24 ; KJV, Jehoshaphat)
Raisin Cakes - David gave raisin cakes (“flagon,” KJV) to those who accompanied the Ark to Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6:19 ; 1 Chronicles 16:3 NRSV)
Flag - suph , a weed that grows on the banks of the Nile, among which Moses in the Ark was laid
Sabbath-Day's Journey - The permitted distance seems to have been grounded on the space to he kept between the Ark and the people, (Joshua 3:4 ) in the wilderness, which tradition said was that between the Ark and the tents
Aarons Rod - Aaron’s rod is mentioned only in Hebrews 9:4, which locates the rod in the Ark. 1 Kings 8:9) preserves it ‘before’ the Ark, on the spot on which it had budded (see Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) i
Abinadab - A man at Kirjath-jearim, at whose house the Ark remained for many years after it had been returned by the Philistines. The Ark abode in Abinadab's house long after this, however, and was not removed till the early part of David's reign
Mercy-Seat - (Exodus 25:17 ; 37:6 ; Hebrews 9:5 ) This appears to have been merely the lid of the Ark of the covenant, not another surface affixed thereto. ) It was that whereon the blood of the yearly atonement was sprinkled by the high priest; and in this relation it is doubtful whether the sense of the word in the Hebrew is based on the material fact of its "covering" the Ark, or derived from this notion of its reference to the "covering" (i
Uriel - Chief of the Levites assisting in David's transport of the Ark to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 6:24 ; 1Chronicles 15:5,1 Chronicles 15:11 ); 2
Bulrush - In Exodus 2:3 , the material that was used to make the Ark in which the infant Moses was placed to protect him from the edict of Pharaoh requiring that every male Hebrew child be drowned
Gopher - The name of the wood of which the Ark was built
Basket - The final term was used to describe both the basket (ark) in which Moses was placed as an infant (Exodus 2:3 ,Exodus 2:3,2:5 ) and the Ark which Noah built (Genesis 6:14-16 ). See Ark
Amasai - Priest who helped to bring up the Ark from the house of Obed-edom
Uriel - ...
...
The chief of the Kohathites at the time when the Ark was brought up to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:5,11 )
Ahi'o -
Son of Abinadab, who accompanied the Ark when it was brought out of his father's house
Ichabod - "When she heard that the Ark of God was taken, and that her father in law and her husband were dead, she bowed herself and travailed. " As in the case of her pious and patriotic father-in-law, Eli, the overwhelming sorrow that caused her death was "because the Ark of God was taken," hence this is thrice repeated
Bethshemesh - The Philistines having sent back the Ark of the Lord, it was brought to Bethshemesh, 1 Samuel 6:12 , where some of the people out of curiosity having looked into it, the Lord destroyed seventy of the principal men belonging to the city, and fifty thousand of the common people, 1 Samuel 6:19 . It is here to be observed that it was solemnly enjoined, Numbers 4:20 , that not only the common people but that even the Levites themselves should not dare to look into the Ark, upon pain of death
Ashdod - When the Philistines captured Israel’s Ark of the covenant and placed it in the temple, the god Dagon fell down in front of the Ark and broke in pieces (1 Samuel 5:1-5)
Ark of the Covenant - The Ark was fitted with rings, one at each of the four corners, and through these were passed staves of the same wood similarly overlaid, by which it was carried by the Kohathites. (1 Kings 8:8 ) The Ark, when transported, was enveloped in the "veil" of the dismantled tabernacle, in the curtain of badgers' skins and in a blue cloth over all, and was therefore not seen. Subsequently the temple, when completed, received, in the installation of the Ark in its shrine, the signal of its inauguration by the effulgence of divine glory instantly manifested. 10:22, so that there was no Ark in the second temple
Holy of Holies - In the early years of the existence of the Temple the holy of holies contained the Ark of the covenant
Chest - 'Aron , Generally rendered "ark"), the coffer into which the contributions for the repair of the temple were put ( 2 Kings 12:9,10 ; 2 Chronicles 24:8,10,11 )
Hosah - One of David's first doorkeepers ("porters") to the Ark on its reaching Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 16:38)
Azaziah - A Levite appointed to the musical service on the bringing up of the Ark from the house of Obed-edom
Obed-Edom - A Levite, whose special prosperity while keeper of the Ark after the dreadful death of Uzziah encouraged David to carry it up to Jerusalem
Noah - God bade Noah make the Ark, and He would establish His covenant with him, and would preserve alive in the Ark Noah, his wife, his three sons, and their wives. reveals the fact thatNoah had faith, and that in godly fear he prepared the Ark, in obedience to God's warning, for the saving of his house, thereby condemningthe world and becoming heir of the righteousness which is by faith. We know from other scriptures that God gave the people time for repentance "the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the Ark was a preparing. ...
Noah is called a "preacher of righteousness," 2 Peter 2:5 , but another scripture shows that his preparing the Ark and his preaching had no effect: "they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noe entered into the Ark, and knew not until the flood came, and took them all away. In due time He abated the flood, and eventually bade Noah go out of the Ark, for though Noah saw that the earth was dry, yet he waited like a dependent one for God's word. See Ark and FLOOD
Noah - God bade Noah make the Ark, and He would establish His covenant with him, and would preserve alive in the Ark Noah, his wife, his three sons, and their wives. reveals the fact thatNoah had faith, and that in godly fear he prepared the Ark, in obedience to God's warning, for the saving of his house, thereby condemningthe world and becoming heir of the righteousness which is by faith. We know from other scriptures that God gave the people time for repentance "the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the Ark was a preparing. ...
Noah is called a "preacher of righteousness," 2 Peter 2:5 , but another scripture shows that his preparing the Ark and his preaching had no effect: "they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noe entered into the Ark, and knew not until the flood came, and took them all away. In due time He abated the flood, and eventually bade Noah go out of the Ark, for though Noah saw that the earth was dry, yet he waited like a dependent one for God's word. See Ark and FLOOD
Expiation - The cover or lid of the Ark is termed in the LXX
Ichabod - The name which the wife of Phinehas gave to her son, because the Ark of God had been taken by the Philistines, and her father-in-law and her husband were dead
Ebenezer - The same place had before witnessed the defeat of Israel and the capture of the Ark, 1 Samuel 4:1 ; 5:1 ; 7:5-12
Uzza - The driver of the cart on which the Ark was removed from Kiriath-jearim ( 2 Samuel 6:3 ; 2 Samuel 6:6-8 [2] = 1 Chronicles 13:7 ; 1 Chronicles 13:9-11 ). Uzza’s sudden death at a place called, in commemoration of this untoward incident, Perez-uzzah (‘breach of Uzzah’), led to the temporary abandonment of David’s project of transporting the Ark to Jerusalem
Ephratah - while David was still a youth at Bethlehem) heard of it," namely, the Ark, as a mere matter of hearsay, so neglected was the Ark then while in the forest town of Kirjath Jearim
o'Bed-e'Dom - ) After the death of Uzzah, the Ark, which was being conducted from the house of Abinadab in Gibeah to the city of David, was carried aside into the house of Obed edom, where it continued three months. He was a Levite of the second degree and a gate-keeper for the Ark, (1 Chronicles 15:18,24 ) appointed to sound "with harps on the Sheminith to excel
Holy of Holies - It was left in total darkness. It contained the Ark of the covenant only (Exodus 25:10-16 )
Hophni And Phinehas - In vain Israel relied on the Ark of God when Hophni and Phinehas were its escort. If Eli had "restrained them" firmly when "they made themselves vile," and had Israel thoroughly amended their ways, the Ark, so far from falling into the foe's hands, would have been the pledge of victory over the foe (Jeremiah 7:4; Isaiah 48:2)
Noah - Rest, comfort, the name of celebrated patriarch who was preserved by Jehovah with his family, by means of the Ark, through the deluge, and thus became the second founder of the human race. ...
His first care on coming out from the Ark was to worship the Lord, with sacrifices of all the fitting animals. We may also mention the medals struck at Apamea in Phrygia, in the time of Septimus Severus, and bearing the name NO, an Ark, a man and woman, a raven, and a dove with an olive branch in its mouth. See Ark
Ichabod - His birth seems to have been precipitated by the news of the death of his father and the capture of the Ark of the covenant in battle against the Philistines
Jaar - The Psalm celebrates David's returning the Ark to Jerusalem from its Philistine captivity (compare 1 Samuel 7:2 ; 2 Samuel 6:1 ; 1 Chronicles 13:5 )
Mouse - They made great havoc in the fields of the Philistines after that people had taken the Ark of the Lord
Ahio - While Uzzah walked at the side of the Ark, Ahio went before it, guiding the oxen which drew the cart, after having brought it from his father's house at Gibeah (the Benjamite quarter of Kirjath-jearim) (2 Samuel 6:3-4; 1 Chronicles 13:7)
Ark - (Latin: arca, chest) ...
The vessel of timber daubed with pitch, 300 cubits long, 50 broad, and 30 high, which Noe constructed at the command of God for the preservation of him and his family and two of all living creatures during the Deluge; also the chest in Which were kept the tables of the Law, called the Ark of the Covenant
Ahio - Son of Abinadab, and who with his brother Uzzah drove the cart on which was the Ark of God when Uzzah was struck dead
Ebenezer - the name of that field wherein the Israelites were defeated by the Philistines, when the Ark of the Lord was taken, 1 Samuel 4:1 ; also a memorial stone set up by Samuel to commemorate a victory over the Philistines
Chenaniah - Chief of the Levites under David who instructed people in singing and played a leading role in bringing the Ark back to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:22 , 1 Chronicles 15:27 )
Sadoc - During Absalom's revolt, he brought the Ark back to Jerusalem, and stood by David during the crisis (id
Ships, Blessing of - It consists of prayers to be offered by the priest, supplicating God to bless the vessel and protect those who sail in it, as He protected the Ark of Noe, and also Peter, when the latter was sinking in the sea; the ship is then sprinkled with holy water
Amasa'i, - ) ...
One of the priests who blew trumpets before the Ark
Jahaziel - ...
...
A priest who accompanied the removal of the Ark to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 16:6 )
Ark of the Covenant - The lid of the Ark, all of gold, was called the mercy-seat; and upon its opposite ends were two golden cherubim, fronting each other and the mercy-seat, which they covered with their outspread wings, Exodus 37:1-9 . Hence there was no object held more sacred by the Jews than "the Ark of God. ...
After this, the Ark continued some time at Gilgal, whence it was removed to Shiloh, Joshua 4:19 10:43 18:1 . Th Philistines, oppressed by the hand of God, returned the Ark, and it was lodged at Kirjath-jearim, 1 Samuel 7:1 . It remained in the temple, with all suitable respect, till the times of the later idolatrous kings of Judah, who profaned the Most Holy place by their idols, when the priests appear to have removed the Ark from the temple. The Ark appears to have been destroyed at the captivity, or perhaps concealed by pious Jews in some hiding-place afterwards undiscoverable, as we hear nothing more of it; and the want of it made the second temple less glorious than the first
Noah - He was accordingly commanded to build an Ark (6:14-16) for the saving of himself and his house. An interval of one hundred and twenty years elapsed while the Ark was being built (6:3), during which Noah bore constant testimony against the unbelief and wickedness of that generation (1 Peter 3:18-20 ; 2 Peter 2:5 ). ...
When the Ark of "gopher-wood" (mentioned only here) was at length completed according to the command of the Lord, the living creatures that were to be preserved entered into it; and then Noah and his wife and sons and daughters-in-law entered it, and the "Lord shut him in" ( Ark floated on the waters for one hundred and fifty days, and then rested on the mountains of Ararat (Genesis 8:3,4 ); but not for a considerable time after this was divine permission given him to leave the Ark, so that he and his family were a whole year shut up within it (Genesis 614-14 ). ...
On leaving the Ark Noah's first act was to erect an altar, the first of which there is any mention, and offer the sacrifices of adoring thanks and praise to God, who entered into a covenant with him, the first covenant between God and man, granting him possession of the earth by a new and special charter, which remains in force to the present time (Genesis 8:21-9:17 )
Gopher - A tree from the wood of which Noah was directed to build the Ark (Genesis 6:14 )
Noah - (Hebrew: rest) ...
Son of Lamech, and ninth patriarch of the Sethite line, who, with his family, was saved in the Ark, from the Deluge, dying 350 years later at the age of 950
Noe - (Hebrew: rest) ...
Son of Lamech, and ninth patriarch of the Sethite line, who, with his family, was saved in the Ark, from the Deluge, dying 350 years later at the age of 950
Ahio - He helped to drive the cart on which the Ark was placed when removed from Ahinadab’s house ( 2 Samuel 6:3-4 , 1 Chronicles 13:7 )
Propitiatory - among the Jews, was the cover or lid of the Ark of the covenant, which was lined both within and without with plates of gold, insomuch that there, was no wood to be seen
Arcturus - Arcturus (ark-tû'rus)
Kirjath-Jearim, or Kirjath-Baal - Here the Ark was lodged for many years, in the house of Abinadab, till David removed it to Jerusalem, 1 Samuel 7:2 2 Samuel 6:2 1 Chronicles 13:1-14
Mercy Seat - This was made of pure gold and covered the Ark. The faces were inwards, towards the covenant that was contained in the Ark. God said to Moses, "I will commune with thee from above the mercy seat, from between the two cherubim which are upon the Ark of the testimony
Obed-Edom -
"The Gittite" (probably so called because he was a native of Gath-rimmon), a Levite of the family of the Korhites (1 Chronicles 26:1,4-8 ), to whom was specially intrusted the custody of the Ark (1 Chronicles 15:18 ). When David was bringing up the Ark "from the house of Abinadab, that was in Gibeah" (probably some hill or eminence near Kirjath-jearim), and had reached Nachon's threshing-floor, he became afraid because of the "breach upon Uzzah," and carried it aside into the house of Obededom (2 Samuel 6:1-12 )
Cart - Carts were used for the removal of the Ark and its sacred utensils (Numbers 7:3,6 ). After retaining the Ark amongst them for seven months, the Philistines sent it back to the Israelites
Oracle - It is also spoken of the covering of he Ark of the covenant; as if God there sat enthroned, and delivered his oracles, 2 Samuel 16:23 . In other places, it means the "Holy of Holies" in the temple, where the Ark was placed, 1 Kings 6:5,16,19 8:6
Flood - God’s means of preserving Noah’s family, along with enough animals to repopulate the animal world, was through an Ark that God told Noah to build (Genesis 6:8-22; see Hebrews 11:7; 1 Peter 3:20; see Ark; NOAH). Almost four months after the rain stopped, the Ark came to rest in the Ararat range (Genesis 8:3-4). Seven months later, grass and plants had grown sufficiently to allow Noah, his family and the animals to leave the Ark and begin life afresh on the earth (Genesis 8:14-19)
Noah - He and his family survived the Flood that wiped out the rest of the human race by taking shelter in the Ark he constructed
Berechiah - A Levite guard of the Ark ( 1 Chronicles 9:16 ; 1 Chronicles 15:23 )
Hophni - They accompanied the Ark to the war with the Philistines and were both slain
Miriam - She was older than Moses, for she watched over him when placed in the Ark on the river, and it is probable that she was older than Aaron
Perez-Uzzah - ” Site of the threshing floor of Nacon (or Chidon) west of Jerusalem on the Kiriath-jearim road where the anger of the Lord “broke out” against Uzzah, who touched the Ark to steady it (2 Samuel 6:8 ; 1 Chronicles 13:11 )
Testimony - Since they were kept in the Ark, it became known as the “ark of the testimony” ( Ark containing these tablets was sometimes called the “tabernacle of testimony” ( Olive Tree - (Romans 11:17-36)...
I must not dismiss this subject without first remarking the allusions made by men in general to the olive branch, as an emblem of peace. It is more than probable that this took its rise from the circumstance of Noah's dove in the Ark, when from being sent forth to discover whether the waters of the flood had subsided at length returned with the olive-branch in her mouth. The raven he dismissed found means of subsistence in going to and fro, probably from the carcases of those drowned; but the dove found no rest for the sole of her foot until returning to the Ark. " And it is remarkable, that when the Psalmist saith, (Psalms 116:7) "Return unto thy rest, O my soul!" the original is, Return unto thy Noah, thy Christ; for he is the rest wherewith the Lord causeth the weary to rest. The Ark is a type of Jesus, through whom and in whom God is at peace, in the blood of his cross
Propitiation - The same Greek word is used by the Septuagint to denote "sin-offering," Ezekiel 44:27; Ezekiel 45:19; "atonement," Numbers 6:8; the "mercy-seat," Hebrews 9:5; and the covering of the Ark of the covenant Leviticus 16:14
Ahio - While Uzzah went by the side of the Ark, he walked before it guiding the oxen which drew the cart on which it was carried, after having brought it from his father's house in Gibeah (1Chronicles 13:7; 2 Samuel 6:3,4 )
Bulrush - It was of this that the Ark was made in which the infant Moses was put, Exodus 2:3 , and the smaller boats on the Nile
Kirjath-Jearim - The Ark was brought to this place (1 Samuel 7:1,2 ) from Beth-shemesh and put in charge of Abinadab, a Levite. ) The words of Psalm 132:6 , "We found it in the fields of the wood," refer to the sojourn of the Ark at Kirjath-jearim
Propitiation - translators in Exodus 25:17 and elsewhere as the equivalent for the Hebrew Kapporeth , Which means "covering," and is used of the lid of the Ark of the covenant ( Exodus 25:21 ; 30:6 ). This Greek word (hilasterion) came to denote not only the mercy-seat or lid of the Ark, but also propitation or reconciliation by blood
Kiriath-Jearim - After the Philistines returned the Ark of the covenant, it was kept at Kiriath-Jearim for a time (1 Samuel 6:21-7:2 ). David attempted to move the Ark to Jerusalem from there, but because he did so improperly, God struck down Uzzah (2 Samuel 6:1-8 )
Ark of the Covenant Item - The Ark was the only piece of furniture placed in the inner room (holy of holies) of the Temple. According to a tradition, the value of which is much discussed, the Ark, with the Tabernacle and the altar of incense, was hidden by Jeremias before the siege of Jerusalem by Nabuchodonosor (2Machabees 2); however, the view that it was carried to Babylon as a trophy (4Esdas 10) seems to enjoy greater probability
Shittah - The Ark, the staves, the shewbread table and staves, and the altars of burnt offering and incense, were made of shittah (Exodus 25; 26; 36-38). The gum arabic is obtained by incisions in the bark. If the Ark had been made in Palestine, oak or cedar would have been its material; its being said to be made of shittah, the wood of the wilderness, is an undesigned propriety and mark of truth (Exodus 25:10)
Will of Man: Adverse to the Gospel - When the dove was weary she recollected the Ark, and flew into Noah's hand at once: there are weary souls who know the Ark, but will not fly to it
Eli - Ascent, the high priest when the Ark was at Shiloh (1 Samuel 1:3,9 ). They now sought safety in having the "ark of the covenant of the Lord" among them. This was the first time since the settlement of Israel in Canaan that the Ark had been removed from the sanctuary. The full extent of the national calamity was speedily made known to him: "Israel is fled before the Philistines, there has also been a great slaughter among the people, thy two sons Hophni and Phinehas are dead, and the Ark of God is taken" (1 Samuel 4:12-18 ). (Mark 15:34 ), as usual, gives the original Aramaic form of the word, Eloi
Bethshemesh - From the latter was the road to Bethshemesh, on which the Philistines sent back the Ark to Israel after its fatal stay among them. In the field of Joshua the Bethshemite was "the great Abel" (the Septuagint reads Aben "stone"; others retaining Abel explain it "the stone of mourning," compare 1 Samuel 6:19) whereon the Ark was set (1 Samuel 6:18). Providence fitly arranged that Bethshemesh being a priests' city (Joshua 21:16; 1 Chronicles 1:59) had Levites and priests ready on the spot duly to receive the Ark and sacrifice before it. ...
Curiosity tempted many to stare at (not necessarily "into") the Ark beneath the cover; compare Numbers 4:20; 2 Samuel 6:6-7
Mattithiah - Mattithiah also ministered before the Ark (1 Chronicles 16:5 )
Abinadab - A Levite of Kirjath-jearim, (but (See LEVITES for doubts as to Abinadab being a Levite,) in whose house the Ark remained twenty years (1 Samuel 7:1-2; 1 Chronicles 13:7); Eleazar his son was sanctified to keep it
Jahaziel - Priest who assisted at the bringing up of the Ark
Obededom - The Gittite at whose house the Ark rested for three months
Abinadab - Owner of the house whither the Ark was brought by the men of Kiriath-jearim ( 1 Samuel 7:1 ), whence it was subsequently removed by David ( 2 Samuel 6:3 f
Amminadab, Aminadab - Son of Uzziel, a Levite, who assisted to bring up the Ark from the house of Oded-edom
Amminadab - or ABINADAB, a Levite, and an inhabitant of Kirjath- jearim, with whom the Ark was deposited after it was brought back from the land of the Philistines, 1 Samuel 7
Deluge - " ...
At the command of God, Noah made an Ark 300 cubits long, 50 broad, and 30 high. The following table exhibits the order of events as they occurred: ...
In the six hundredth year of his life Noah is commanded by God to enter the Ark, taking with him his wife, and his three sons with their wives (Genesis 7:1-10 ). ...
The Ark grounds on one of the mountains of Ararat on the seventeenth day of the seventh month, or one hundred and fifty days after the Deluge began (Genesis 8:1-4 ). ...
Noah leaves the Ark on the twenty-seventh day of the second month (Genesis 8:14-19 ). " The Biblical narrative clearly shows that so far as the human race was concerned the Deluge was universal; that it swept away all men living except Noah and his family, who were preserved in the Ark; and that the present human race is descended from those who were thus preserved. The most remarkable of these traditions is that recorded on tablets prepared by order of Assur-bani-pal, the king of Assyria
Noah - He therefore "found grace in the sight of the Lord," and was directed for his preservation to make an Ark, the shape and dimensions of which were prescribed by the Lord. 1656, and in the six hundreth year of his age, Noah, by divine appointment, entered his Ark with his family, and all the animals collected for the renewal of the world. ) After the Ark had stranded, and the earth was in a measure dried, Noah offered a burnt- sacrifice to the Lord, of the pure animals that were in the Ark; and the Lord was pleased to accept of his offering, and to give him assurance that he would no more destroy the world by water, Genesis 9. Peter calls Noah a preacher of righteousness, because before the deluge he was incessantly preaching and declaring to men, not only by his discourses, but by the building of the Ark, in which he was employed a hundred and twenty years, that the cloud of divine vengeance was about to burst upon them
Obed-Edom - A Gittite who lived in David's time, 1 Chronicles 13:13, and at whose house the Ark was left, after the dreadful death of Uzzah. The blessing which came on the house of Obed-edom for the Ark's sake encouraged David to remove it to Jerusalem
Bethel - It was the scene of the vision of Jacob's Ladder and a sacred place under the Judges where the Israelites "consulted God" (Judges 21), and where the Ark of the Covenant was probably kept for a time
Abinadab - A Levite of Kirjath-jearim, in whose house the Ark of God, when restored by the Philistines, remained seventy years, 1 Samuel 7:1 ; 1 Chronicles 13:7
Berechiah - Levite, a door keeper 'for the Ark
Phinehas - (fihn' ih huhss) Personal name meaning “dark-skinned” or “mouth of brass. He and Hophni died in a battle with the Philistines while attempting to keep the Ark from being captured (1 Samuel 4:11 )
Tabret - Scripture associates the tambourine with occasions of strong emotion: farewells (Genesis 31:27 ); prophetic ecstasy (1 Samuel 10:5 ); a victory procession (1 Samuel 18:6 ); the procession of the Ark to Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6:5 )
Gatekeeper - One who guards access to a place, either a city (2 Samuel 18:26 ; 2 Kings 7:10-11 ), a residence (John 18:17 ), the sacred precincts of the Ark (1 Chronicles 15:23-24 ), or the Temple (1 Chronicles 23:5 )
Shebani'ah - (Nehemiah 10:12 ) ...
One of the priests appointed by David to blow with the trumpets before the Ark of God
Baale - If the latter reading is correct, then Baale Judah is a place name where the Ark of the covenant was before David took it to Jerusalem
Asahiah, Asaiah - Descendant of Merari who assisted in bringing up the Ark from Obed-edom's house, 1 Chronicles 15:6,11 (possibly the same as No
Mouse, - When the Philistines returned the Ark, they sent as a trespass offering images of their emerods, and images of the mice that 'marred the land
Berechi'ah - (1 Chronicles 9:16 ) ...
A doorkeeper for the Ark
Nob - It was one of the places where the Ark of Jehovah was kept for a time during the days of its wanderings
David, City of - ...
David moved the Ark of the covenant into the city of David (2 Samuel 6:12 ) and built houses in the city, including a place for the Ark (1 Chronicles 15:1 ). At that time he moved the Ark of the covenant from the city of David to the new Temple (1 Kings 8:1 ) and moved his wife to the new palace (1 Kings 9:24 )
Pitch - Pitch or bitumen made the papyrus Ark of Moses watertight (Exodus 2:3). As the pitch covered the Ark from the overwhelming waters, so the atonement covers the believer in Jesus from the blood of God's wrath. Κippurim , "atonement" (Exodus 29:36; Leviticus 23:27), and kapporeth , "mercy-seat," the covering of the Ark and the law inside it (Romans 3:25; Romans 10:4), are related
no'ah - " ( 2 Peter 2:5 ) Besides this we are merely told that he had three: sons each of whom had married a wife; that he built the Ark in accordance with divine direction; end that he was 600 years old when the flood came. (Genesis 6:7 ) The Ark . The planks of the Ark, after being put together were to be protected by a coating of pitch, or rather bitumen, both inside and outside, to make it water-tight, and perhaps also as a protection against the attacks of marine animals. The Ark was to consist of a number of "nests" or small compartments, with a view, no doubt, to the convenient distribution of the different animals and their food. " Means were also to be provided for letting light into the Ark. There was to be a door this was to be placed in the side of the Ark. Of the shape of the Ark nothing is said, but its dimensions are given. Taking 21 inches for the cubit, the Ark would be 525 feet in length, 87 feet 6 inches in breadth and 52 feet 6 inches in height. The inmates of the Ark were Noah and his wife and his three sons with their wives. Noah was directed to take also animals of all kinds into the Ark with him, that they might be preserved alive. (The method of speaking of the animals that were taken into the Ark "clean" and "unclean," implies that only those which were useful to man were preserved, and that no wild animals were taken into the Ark; so that there is no difficulty from the great number of different species of animal life existing in the word. --The Ark was finished, and all its living freight was gathered into it as a place of safety. The Ark rested on the seventeenth day of the seventh month on the mountains of Ararat. After this the waters gradually decreased till the first day of the tenth month, when the tops of the mountains were seen but Noah and his family did not disembark till they had been in the Ark a year and a month and twenty days. Upon the top of this chest or Ark is perched a bird, whilst another flies toward it carrying a branch between its feet. ) ( The scene of the deluge --Hugh Miller, in his "Testimony of the Rocks," argues that there is a remarkable portion of the globe, chiefly on the Asiatic continent, though it extends into Europe, and which is nearly equal to all Europe in extent, whose rivers (some of them the Volga, Oural, Sihon, Kour and the Amoo, of great size) do not fall into the ocean, but, on the contrary are all turned inward, losing themselves in the eastern part of the tract, in the lakes of a rainless district in the western parts into such seas as the Caspian and the Aral. --Noah's great act after he left the Ark was to build an altar and to offer sacrifices
no'ah - " ( 2 Peter 2:5 ) Besides this we are merely told that he had three: sons each of whom had married a wife; that he built the Ark in accordance with divine direction; end that he was 600 years old when the flood came. (Genesis 6:7 ) The Ark . The planks of the Ark, after being put together were to be protected by a coating of pitch, or rather bitumen, both inside and outside, to make it water-tight, and perhaps also as a protection against the attacks of marine animals. The Ark was to consist of a number of "nests" or small compartments, with a view, no doubt, to the convenient distribution of the different animals and their food. " Means were also to be provided for letting light into the Ark. There was to be a door this was to be placed in the side of the Ark. Of the shape of the Ark nothing is said, but its dimensions are given. Taking 21 inches for the cubit, the Ark would be 525 feet in length, 87 feet 6 inches in breadth and 52 feet 6 inches in height. The inmates of the Ark were Noah and his wife and his three sons with their wives. Noah was directed to take also animals of all kinds into the Ark with him, that they might be preserved alive. (The method of speaking of the animals that were taken into the Ark "clean" and "unclean," implies that only those which were useful to man were preserved, and that no wild animals were taken into the Ark; so that there is no difficulty from the great number of different species of animal life existing in the word. --The Ark was finished, and all its living freight was gathered into it as a place of safety. The Ark rested on the seventeenth day of the seventh month on the mountains of Ararat. After this the waters gradually decreased till the first day of the tenth month, when the tops of the mountains were seen but Noah and his family did not disembark till they had been in the Ark a year and a month and twenty days. Upon the top of this chest or Ark is perched a bird, whilst another flies toward it carrying a branch between its feet. ) ( The scene of the deluge --Hugh Miller, in his "Testimony of the Rocks," argues that there is a remarkable portion of the globe, chiefly on the Asiatic continent, though it extends into Europe, and which is nearly equal to all Europe in extent, whose rivers (some of them the Volga, Oural, Sihon, Kour and the Amoo, of great size) do not fall into the ocean, but, on the contrary are all turned inward, losing themselves in the eastern part of the tract, in the lakes of a rainless district in the western parts into such seas as the Caspian and the Aral. --Noah's great act after he left the Ark was to build an altar and to offer sacrifices
Eben-Ezer - In this extremity the Israelites fetched the Ark out of Shiloh and carried it into their camp. And the Ark of God was taken" (1 Samuel 4:10 )
Footstool - In Psalm 99:5 and Lamentations 2:1 it is difficult to determine with certainty whether God's footstool is the Ark, the Temple, or Zion. ) Only 1 Chronicles 28:2 is an unambiguous reference to the Ark as a resting place for God's feet. It served as the basis for Jesus' riddle about David's son who is also his lord ( Matthew 22:44 ; Mark 12:36 ; Luke 20:43 )
Facets - Some scholars believe the stone was a stone slab occupying the place held by the Ark of the covenant in the first Temple. In this case the seven eyes represent the full presence of God in a way corresponding to the Ark of the covenant
Nachon's Threshing Floor - Where Uzzah put forth his hand to the Ark when the oxen shook it, and God smote him for his rashness, on its way from Kirjath Jearim or Baale (Abinadab's house in Gibeah) to Zion (2 Samuel 6:6)
Jahaziel - One of the two priests who blew trumpets before the Ark when it was brought by David to Jerusalem ( 1 Chronicles 16:6 )
Noah - He therefore entered and stayed in the Ark which he built, and was saved from the great flood of GOD's wrath
Chest - By this word are translated in the Authorized Version two distinct Hebrew terms:
Aron ; this is invariably used for the Ark of the covenant, and, with two exceptions, for that only
Azazi'ah - (whom the Lord strengthens )
A Levite musician in the reign of David, appointed to play the harp in the service which attended the procession by which the Ark was brought up from the house of Obed-edom
Jeiel - ...
...
One of the Levites who took part in praising God on the removal of the Ark to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 16:5 )
Ashdod - Here stood the temple of Dagon; and hither the Ark was first brought, after the fatal battle at Ebenezer, 1 Samuel 5:1
Amasai - ...
...
One of the priests appointed to precede the Ark with blowing of trumpets on its removal from the house of Obed-edom (1 Chronicles 15:24 )
Ark - Called also the Ark of the Covenant. ) A large flatboat used on Western American rivers to transport produce to market
Tool - An illustration is found in the way David tried to bring up the Ark on a new cart
Elkanah - Door-keeper for the Ark
Ephraim - The Psalmist, when speaking of looking out a place for the Ark, saith, we found it in Ephratah
Ahimelech - Priest at the time the Ark was at Nob
Braided - 1: πλέγμα (Strong's #4117 — Noun Neuter — plegma — pleg'-mah ) signifies "what is woven" (from pleko, "to weave, plait"), whether a net or basket (Josephus uses it of the Ark of bulrushes in which the infant Moses was laid), or of a web, plait, braid
Cloud, Pillar of - " ( Numbers 12:5 ; Exodus 33:9,10 ) It preceded the host, apparently resting on the Ark which led the way
Holy of Holies - In the middle of the holy of holies of Solomon's temple stood the Ark of the Covenant, overshadowed by the wings of the two colossal cherubim. As the Ark disappeared at the time of the ruin of that temple (586 B
Mercy Seat - 1: ἱλαστήριον (Strong's #2435 — Noun Neuter — hilasterion — hil-as-tay'-ree-on ) "the lid or cover of the Ark of the covenant," signifies the Propitiatory, so called on account of the expiation made once a year on the great Day of Atonement, Hebrews 9:5 . This mercy seat, together with the Ark, is spoken of as the footstool of God, 1 Chronicles 28:2 ; cp
Shiloh - Years later, following a defeat at Aphek, the Israelite army sent for the Ark of the covenant from Shiloh. Mistakenly thinking that the Ark would bring victory, the Israelites lost the second battle of Aphek to the Philistines. Results included losing the Ark; the deaths of Hophni, Phinehas, and Eli; and the apparent conquering of Shiloh (1 Samuel 4:1 ). Supporting this was the fact that when the Philistines finally returned the Ark of the covenant, it was housed at Kiriath-jearim rather than Shiloh (1 Samuel 7:1 )
Mercy-Seat - (ἱλαστήριον, propitiatorium)...
The mercy-seat was the cover of the Ark (q. Ritschl maintains that in both the OT and the NT ἱλαστήριον designates ‘the piece of furniture over the Ark of the covenant in the holy of holies’ (Rechtfertigung und Versöhnung3, ii. ) also gives the word a material sense, regarding it, however, as denoting a kind of penthouse (Schutzdach, Deckplatte) for the Ark. , ἱλαστήριος), it is scarcely possible that he conceives the Messiah as a ‘mercy-seat,’ or ‘covering of the Ark,’ sprinkled with blood-His own blood
Flood, the - and Noah only remained alive, and they that were with him in the Ark. Man was the head of creation, and all was involved in the consequences of his sin, and there must be a new start under the figureof the death and resurrection of Noah in the Ark. ...
Another difficulty felt is as to the great number of species being all preserved in the Ark, such, it is said, as 1500 mammalia, 6000 species of birds, and some hundreds of thousands of reptiles and insects! It is very probable that at that time a great many of these did not exist. All the original generic types then existing were gathered into the Ark, from which the species, under many varying circumstances, may have greatly increased. If, on the other hand, because sin had come in, they had been previously living on one another, God could have altered this while in the Ark, as He certainly will do in the millennium. ...
By faith Noah prepared the Ark. The same faith believes that it was fully carried out as described; and there is no real difficulty in the matter, except by shutting out God, which must not be, for it was His flood, The old world was then destroyed except those in the Ark, and they were perfectly safe,for God shut them in. See Ark
Armenia - Here the Ark of Noah rested after the Deluge (Genesis 8:4 )
Uriel - Chief of the Kohathites under David (1 Chronicles 15:5; 1 Chronicles 15:11), with 120 brethren brought up the Ark from Obed Edom's house (1 Chronicles 15:12)
Cherub - ) A symbolical winged figure of unknown form used in connection with the mercy seat of the Jewish Ark and Temple
Asaiah - A Merarite who took part in bringing the Ark to Jerusalem, 1 Chronicles 6:30 ; 1Ch 15:6 ; 1 Chronicles 11:4
Amminadab - He helped carry the Ark of the covenant to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:11-29 )
Beth-Shemesh - (Joshua 15:10) This place is rendered remarkable from the slaughter the Lord made on the men of Beth-shemesh for their curiosity in looking into the Ark
Ashdod, Azoth - Here the Ark of Jehovah triumphed over the Philistine idol Dagon, 1 Samuel 5:2
Eleazar - A son of Abinadab, honored with the charge of the Ark while it was in his father's house, 1 Samuel 7:1
Eli - In battle with the Philistines his two sons were slain, and Israel defeated; but it was the capture of the Ark of God that broke his heart, 1 Samuel 4:1-22
Ekron - It is memorable for its connection with the captivity of the Ark and its restoration to the Jews, 1 Samuel 5:10 6:1-18
Propitiantion - The same Greek word is used in the Septuagint to denote an "atonement," Numbers 5:8 ; a "sin-offering," Ezekiel 44:27 ; and the covering of the Ark of the Covenant, Leviticus 16:14 Hebrews 9:5
Miriam - The sister of Moses and Aaron, probably the one who watched over Moses in the Ark of bulrushes, Exodus 2:4,5 Numbers 26 59 Micah 6 4
Wagons - The same vehicle, translated "cart" in 1 Samuel 6:7 , was employed to transport some of the sacred utensils, Numbers 7:3,6 , and in one instance the Ark itself
Ararat - A mountainous region of Asia which borders on the plain of the Araxes, and is mentioned (1) as the resting-place of Noah's Ark. The mountains of Ararat, Genesis 8:4, properly refer to the entire range of elevated table land in that portion of Armenia; and upon some lower part of this range, rather than upon the high peaks popularly called Ararat, the Ark more probably rested
Amasai - A priest and musician who blew trumpets before the Ark of God in David's time (1 Chronicles 15:24 )
Dagon - This was the idol that fell to pieces before the Ark of Israel, and it was in its temple subsequently that the Philistines hung the head of Saul
Jahaziel - Priest whom David appointed to blow the trumpet before the Ark (1 Chronicles 16:6 )
Curtains - 2 Samuel 7:2; "the Ark of God dwelleth within curtains" or "the curtain" meaning the curtain covered tabernacle (Exodus 26:1-13; Exodus 36:8-17), implying its transitoriness and slightness
Michal - After the accession of David to the throne she was restored to him, 2 Samuel 3:13-14; but an estrangement soon took place between them, and on the occasion of one of the greatest triumphs of David's life—the bringing up of the Ark to Jerusalem—it came to an open rupture between them, after which her name does not again occur
Moriah - After David captured the site, he purposed to build there a Temple for the Ark of the covenant
Eliel - a Levite mentioned in connexion with the removal of the Ark from the house of Obed-edom ( 1 Chronicles 15:9 ; 1 Chronicles 15:11 )
Cart - The vehicle on which the Philistines sent back the Ark
Abinadab - A Levite of Kirjath-jearim, with whom the Ark of the Lord was deposited when it was brought back from the Philistines
Beth-Shemesh - A city on the north of Judah belonging to the priests, Joshua 15:10; Joshua 21:16; perhaps Ir-shemesh and Mount Heres, Joshua 19:41; Judges 1:35; noted as the place to which the Ark was returned, 1 Samuel 6:9-20; now a heap of ruins near ʾAin Shems, about 14 miles west of Jerusalem
Carts - Wagons were used to carry Israel into Egypt, and for the conveyance of the Ark, Genesis 45:27 ; Numbers 7:3-9
Wood, Gopher - Mentioned in the Bible, as the material out of which Noe's Ark was made (Genesis 6)
Eben-Ezer - The scene of a disastrous battle in which the Ark was lost ( 1 Samuel 4:1 ; 1 Samuel 5:1 )
Matithi'ah - ...
One of the Levites appointed by David to minister before the Ark in the musical service, (1 Chronicles 16:5 ) "with harps upon Sheminith," comp
Hoph'ni - (1 Samuel 3:11-14 ) They were both cut off in one day in the flower of their age, and the Ark which they had accompanied to battle against the Philistines was lost on the same occasion
Asai'ah - (1 Chronicles 6:30 ) With 120 of his brethren he took part in bringing the Ark from the house of Obed-edom to the city of David
Ichabod - And when she heard the tidings that the Ark of God was taken, and that her father-in-law and her husband were dead, she bowed herself and travailed" (1 Samuel 4:19-22 )
Cart - GOD had said that the priests were to carry the Ark on their shoulders. The Philistines substituted a cart for the Ark
Shiloh - The Ark and the tabernacle continued at Shiloh, from B. In honor of the presence of the Ark, there was "a feast of the Lord in Shiloh yearly;" and at one of these festivals the daughters of Shiloh were seized by a remnant of the Benjamites, Judges 21:19-23
e'li - (1 Samuel 2:27-36 ) with 1 Kings 2:27 Notwithstanding this one great blemish, the character of Eli is marked by eminent piety, as shown by his meek submission to the divine judgment, ( 1 Samuel 3:18 ) and his supreme regard for the Ark of God. He died at the advanced age of 98 years, (1 Samuel 4:18 ) overcome by the disastrous intelligence that the Ark of God had been taken in battle by the Philistines, who had also slain his sons Hophni and Phinehas
Cherubim - In Israel’s tabernacle, two cherubim images were attached to the lid of the Ark of the covenant in the Most Holy Place. The lid of the Ark, known as the mercy seat, was the symbolic throne of God, and the cherubim were symbolic guardians of that throne (Exodus 25:18-22; 1 Samuel 4:4; 2 Samuel 6:2; 2 Kings 19:15; Psalms 80:1; Hebrews 9:5)
Abinadab - Resident of Kirjath-jearim whose house was resting place of Ark of the covenant for 20 years after the Philistines returned it
Shem - He and his wife were saved in the Ark (7:13)
Ekron - It was the last place to which the Philistines carried the Ark before they sent it back to Israel (1 Samuel 5:10 ; 6:1-8 )
Kiriath-Jearim - It is chiefly remembered because during the time of Saul and David the Ark of the covenant rested there for twenty years (1 Samuel 7:1-2; 2 Samuel 6:2; for maps see BENJAMIN; JUDAH, TRIBE AND KINGDOM)
Elkanah - One of two gatekeepers for the Ark of the covenant (1 Chronicles 15:23 )
Nest - Used literally of birds’ nests ( Deuteronomy 22:6 ; Deuteronomy 32:11 , Job 39:27 , Psalms 84:3 ; Psalms 104:17 , Proverbs 27:8 , Isaiah 16:2 ); metaphorically for a lofty fortress ( Numbers 24:21 , Jeremiah 49:16 , Obadiah 1:4 , Habakkuk 2:9 ); Job refers to his lost home as a nest ( Job 29:18 ); in Genesis 6:14 the ‘ rooms ’ of the Ark are (see mg
Obed-Edom - In his house David deposited the Ark after the death of Uzzah, and here it remained three months, bringing a blessing by its presence ( 2 Samuel 6:10 f
Footstool - It is symbolical of 'the place of rest:' David had it on his heart to build a house of rest for the Ark of the covenant of the Lord, and for the 'footstool' of God, wherein God could find rest among His people, and where He was to be worshipped
Eleazar - ELEAZAR, the son of Aminadab, to whose care the Ark was committed when it was sent back by the Philistines, 1 Samuel 7
Dagon - In another, at Ashdod, the Philistines deposited the Ark of God, 1 Samuel 5:1-3
Cherub - Two cherubim were placed on the mercy-seat of the Ark; two of colossal size overshadowed it in Solomon's temple. Those on the Ark are called the "cherubim of glory" (Hebrews 9:5 ), i. " They were anointed with holy oil, like the Ark itself and the other sacred furniture
Ararat - a mountain of Asia, in Armenia, on which the Ark of Noah rested after the cessation of the deluge. In confirmation of this opinion, it is alleged that the remains of the Ark were to be seen on these mountains; and it is said, that Berosus and Abydenus both declare, that such a report existed in their time. Epiphanius pretends, if we may credit his assertion, that the relics of the Ark were to be seen in his day; and we are further told, that the emperor Heraclius went from the town of Thamanin, up the mountain Al-Judi, and saw the place of the Ark. Ararat seems to be a part of that vast chain of mountains called Caucasus and Taurus; and upon these mountains, and in the adjacent country, were preserved more authentic accounts of the Ark than in almost any other part of the world. It is a detached mountain in form of a sugar loaf, in the midst of a very extensive plain, consisting of two summits; the lesser, more sharp and pointed; the higher, which is that of the Ark, lies north-west of it, and raises its head far above the neighbouring mountains, and is covered with perpetual snow. ...
The summit of Ararat has never been reached, though several attempts have been made; and if the Ark rested on the summit, it is certain that those who have spoken of its fragments being seen there in different ages, must have been imposed upon. It is, however, not necessary to suppose that the Ark rested upon either of its tops; and that spot would certainly be chosen which would afford the greatest facility of descent. Porter, "have never been trodden by the foot of man since the days of Noah, if even then; for my idea is, that the Ark rested in the space between these heads, and not on the top of either
Emblems - ...
THE SHIP is a symbol of the Church as the Ark of Salvation, in whichwe are saved, as Noah was saved by the Ark. MARK, a winged Lion; ST
Noah - He had three sons, each of whom married a wife; he built the Ark in accordance with divine direction; and was 600 years old when the flood came. On coming from the Ark he built an altar, made an offering, and received a promise that the world should never again be destroyed by a flood
Benaiah - In 1 Chronicles 15:18 , a Levitical musician involved in the processional when the Ark of the covenant was brought to Jerusalem. In 1 Chronicles 15:24 , a priest who sounded a trumpet when the Ark was brought to Jerusalem
Antitype - In the latter passage, the apostle, speaking of Noah's flood, and the deliverance only of eight persons in the Ark from it, says, Baptism being an antitype to that, now saves us; not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience towards God, &c. The meaning is, that righteousness, or the answer of a good conscience towards God, now saves us, by means of the resurrection of Christ, as formerly righteousness saved these eight persons by means of the Ark during the flood
Eli - And his anxiety for the Ark of God, carried with the Israelitish army to battle, is graphically depicted in the sacred history. He sat watching for news in the open road; and when he heard the disastrous intelligence, the death of his two sons, and, worst of all the capture of the Ark by the Philistines, he who could have borne the desolation of his own house sank down in grief, and his neck brake, and he died
Ark - An Ark was a box-like container. ...
Noah’s Ark...
God’s purpose in commanding Noah to build an Ark was to provide a way of preserving people and animals through the judgment of the great flood (Genesis 6:5-13; see FLOOD). The Ark was not designed to sail the seas like a huge boat, but to float on the floodwaters like a huge box. Noah’s building of the Ark demonstrated his faith and made possible the survival of a nucleus of believers through whom God could build a new people (Hebrews 11:7; 1 Peter 3:20; see NOAH). ...
Ark of the covenant...
The gold covered wooden box known as the Ark of the covenant, or covenant box, was Israel’s most sacred religious article. (For fuller details of the Ark and for its significance in the tabernacle rituals see TABERNACLE. )...
Dancing - (Old High German: dinsan, to draw out, as in forming a chain) ...
Expression of feeling by rhythmical movement of the body, mentioned in Scripture as expressing joy on the part of the women of Israel, led by Mary, the sister of Moses (Exodus 15), and of David before the Ark (2Kings)
Nethaneel - ...
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A priest who blew the trumpet before the Ark when it was brought up to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:24 )
Baalah - David kept the Ark there before moving it to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 13:6 )
Asaiah - He is apparently the same as the chief of the sons of Merari, who led 220 of his clan in helping bring the Ark of the covenant from the house of Obed-edom to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:1 )
Slime - Moses' mother made the Ark watertight with pitch and "slime" (asphalt; Speaker's Commentary Exodus 2:3, makes it mud to bind the papyrus stalks together, and to make the surface smooth for the infant)
Aaron's Rod - According to Hebrews 9:4 , the rod was kept in the Ark of the covenant
Pitch - The Ark of Noah and that of Moses were rendered waterproof by it; and the bricks of the tower of Babel were cemented with it
Mouse - Mice made great havoc in the fields of the Philistines, after that people had taken the Ark of the Lord; which induced them to send it back with mice and emerods of gold, 1 Samuel 5:6,9,11 6:4-5
Dagon - In that at Ashdod, Dagon twice miraculously fell down before the Ark of God; and in the second fall his head and hands were broken off, leaving only the body, which was in the form of a large fish, 1 Samuel 5:1-9
Badger Skins - KJV translation of the skin used to cover the tabernacle (Exodus 26:14 ; Exodus 36:19 ; Exodus 39:34 ), the Ark, and other sacred objects (Numbers 4:6-14 ). There seems to be no clear answer to the question: What kind of hides were used as a covering for the tabernacle, Ark, and other sacred objects?...
Phil Logan...
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Breadth - In its first biblical occurrence the word is used of Noah’s Ark: “The length of the Ark shall be three hundred cubits, the breadth of it fifty cubits, and the height of it thirty cubits” ( High Places - They seem to have been tolerated under the judges; and Samuel offered sacrifices in several places where the Ark was not present. But after the temple was built at Jerusalem, and the Ark had a fixed settlement, it was no longer allowed to sacrifice out of Jerusalem
Cherub, Cherubim - (Genesis 3:24 ) Figures of Cherubim were placed on the mercy-seat of the Ark. (1 Kings 6:27 ) Those on the Ark were to be placed with wings stretched forth, one at each end of the mercy-seat. " It is remarkable that with such precise directions as to their position, attitude and material, nothing, save that they were winged, is said concerning their shape
Testimony - Mark 6 . Thou shalt put into the Ark the testimony which I shall give thee. The Ark
Shiloh (2) - The Ark, which had been at Gilgal during the conquest of Canaan, was removed on the completion of the conquest to Shiloh where it remained from Joshua's closing days to Samuel's (Joshua 18:1-10; Judges 18:31; 1 Samuel 4:3). Here Eli judged Israel and died of grief at the capture of the Ark by the Philistines. The sin of Hophni and Phinehas caused the loss of the Ark and God's forsaking of His tabernacle at Shiloh (called in spiritual sense "the house of God," though not of stone: Judges 18:31; 2 Samuel 7:6; 1 Kings 3:2), so that this became a warning beacon of God's wrath against those who sin in the face of high spiritual privileges (Jeremiah 7:12; Psalms 78:60-61). There is a curious excavation in the rock which may have been the actual spot where the Ark rested; for its guardians would select a place sheltered from the bleak winds of the highlands
Ephratah - " In Psalm 132:6 it is mentioned as the place where David spent his youth, and where he heard much of the Ark, although he never saw it till he found it long afterwards at Kirjath-jearim; i
Nethaneel - Priest who helped in the bringing up of the Ark
Eli - Eli's death was precipitated by the news of the death of his sons and the capture of the Ark of God by the Philistines (1 Samuel 4:18 )
Shittim Wood, Shittah Tree - The wood was extensively used in building the tabernacle, and the Ark, the table of showbread, and the altars were also made of the same
Abinadab - "
A Levite of Kirjath-jearim, in whose house the Ark of the covenant was deposited after having been brought back from the land of the Philistines (1Samuel 7:1)
Propitiation - Romans 3:25, hilastrion , "the propitiatory" or mercy seat, the bloodsprinkled lid of the Ark, the meeting place between God and His people represented by the priest (1 John 2:2; 1 John 4:10)
Gath - One of the five cities of the Philistines, 1 Samuel 5:8; 1 Samuel 6:17; Amos 6:2; Micah 1:10; a stronghold of the Anakim, Joshua 11:22; home of Goliath, 1 Samuel 17:4; place whither the Ark was carried, 1 Samuel 5:8; where David sought refuge, 1 Samuel 21:10-15; was strengthened by Rehoboam, 2 Chronicles 11:8; taken by Hazael of Syria, 2 Kings 12:17; probably recovered by Jehoash, 2 Kings 13:25; broken down by Uzziah, 2 Chronicles 26:6; was probably destroyed before the time of the later prophecies, as it is omitted from the list of royal cities
Sin, Desert of - To perpetuate the memorial of "this bread from heaven" to future generations, a pot of manna, which was preserved fresh, by a standing miracle, was ordered to be laid up beside the Ark of the covenant, in the sanctuary, Exodus 16
Gold - The Ark of the Covenant was overlaid with pure gold; the mercy seat, the vessels and utensils belonging to the tabernacle, and those also of the house of the Lord, as well as the drinking-vessels of Solomon, were of gold
Ekron - The Ark of God was carried there from Ashdod, and from thence was returned to Israel
Rainbow, - the token of the covenant which God made with Noah when he came forth from the Ark that the waters should no more become a flood to destroy all flesh
Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - These chapters include descriptions of Samuel's birth and call to be a prophet (1-3); Israel's defeat by the Philistines and the capture of the Ark (4-6); and the role of Samuel as a judge and deliverer (7). Among the most significant of these subthemes are: the role of the prophet in relation to the king; the significance of the Ark; and the messianic idea and the Davidic covenant. ...
The Significance of the Ark . In addition to the narratives that focus primarily on Samuel, Saul, and David there are a group of narratives in 1-2Samuel that focus on the Ark of the covenant (1 Samuel 4-6 ; 2 Samuel 6 ). Instructions for the building of the Ark are recorded in Exodus 25:10-22 . The Lord told Moses that he would be present in the space above the lid of the Ark between the two cherubim, and from this place he would give Moses commandments for Israel (v. Subsequently, the Ark held the two tablets of the Decalogue (Exodus 25:16,21 ; 40:20 ; Deuteronomy 10:5 ). Because of the close identification of the Ark with the presence of God among his people, he is said to be "enthroned between the cherubim" (1 Samuel 4:4 ; 2 Samuel 6:2 ), which suggests that the Ark was viewed as the throne of the Lord from which he guided and ruled over his people. ...
Because of the close identification of the Ark with God's presence (cf. , the role it played at the crossing of the Jordan [7]) it is not surprising that when the Israelites were defeated by the Philistines (1 Samuel 4 ) the elders requested that the Ark be brought to the battlefield. To their dismay, they were again defeated, and, worst of all, the Ark was captured by the Philistines. From this incident it is clear that God cannot be manipulated by his people, and that his connection with the Ark was not automatic or mechanical, but spiritual. ...
When the Philistines placed the Ark in the temple of their god, Dagon, at Ashdod, the next day they found that the image of their deity had fallen to the floor and broken in pieces before the Ark of the Lord (1 Samuel 5 ). When the Ark was moved to other cities the same tumors appeared among their inhabitants. Eventually the Philistines were forced to send the Ark back to Israel where it remained for twenty years in the house of Abinadab in Kiriath Jearim (1 Samuel 6:1-7:2 ). ...
The Ark remained in obscurity during the reign of Saul. It was not until David was made king that the Ark was returned to its rightful place at the political and religious center of the nation. David brought the Ark to his capital city, Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6 ). ...
When, in his later years, David was driven from Jerusalem by the revolution led by his son, Absalom, the Ark was brought along by the priests who fled from the city. But David said, "Take the Ark of God back into the city. Here David recognizes the true significance of the Ark as a symbol of the presence and power of the great King of Israel. He knew that possession of the Ark was not an automatic guarantee of the Lord's blessing. He also understood that it was proper for the Ark to remain in Jerusalem, because ultimately the Lord was the true Sovereign of the land
Mark - M`ARK, n. A visible line made by drawing one substance on another as a mark made by chalk or charcoal, or a pen. A line, groove or depression made by stamping or cutting an incision a channel or impression as the mark of a chisel, of a stamp, of a rod or whip the mark of the finger or foot. The Lord set a mark upon Cain. There are scarce any marks left of a subterraneous fire. The confusion of tongues was a mark of separation. The laws ...
Stand like the forfeits in a barber's shop, ...
As much for mock as mark. France was a fairer mark to shoot at than Ireland. The dome of the State house in Boston is a good mark for seamen. Any thing visible by which knowledge of something may be obtained indication as the marks of age in a horse. Civility is a mark of politeness or respect. Levity is a mark of weakness. M`ARK, ...
1. To draw or make a visible line or character with any substance as, to mark with chalk or with compasses. To stamp to impress to make a visible impression, figure or indenture as, to mark a sheep with a brand. To make an incision to lop off a part to make any sign of distinction as, to mark sheep or cattle by cuts in their ears. To form a name or the initials of a name for distinction as, to mark cloth to mark a handkerchief. Mark them who cause divisions and offenses. Romans 16 ...
Mark the perfect man, and behold the upright, for the end of that man is peace. To mark out, to notify, as by a mark to point out to designate. The ringleaders were marked out for seizure and punishment. ...
M`ARK, To note to observe critically to take particular notice to remark. ...
Mark, I pray you,and see how this man seeketh mischief
Eli - " His patriotism and piety especially appear in his intense anxiety for the safety of the Ark; "his heart trembled for the Ark of God. " The announcement after the battle, of the slaughter of the people and even of his sons did not so much overwhelm him as that of the Ark of God: instantly "he fell from off the seat backward by the side of the gate, and his neck broke and he died; for he was old and heavy
Part - The Ark, altars, and table of the Bread of the Presence were carried by staves passed through rings attached to these articles: “And thou shalt put the staves into the rings by the sides of the Ark, that the Ark may be borne with them” ( Mercy Seat - An oblong piece of solid gold, 212 by 112 cubits (about 30 by 18 inches), which was placed over the Ark of the Covenant (Exodus 25:37)
Maaseiah -
One of the Levites whom David appointed as porter for the Ark (1 Chronicles 15:18,20 )
Raven - 'orebh, from a root meaning "to be black" (Compare Song of Solomon 5:11 ); first mentioned as "sent forth" by Noah from the Ark (Genesis 8:7 )
Berechiah - A Levite in charge of the Ark when David moved it to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:23 )
Gerizim - Six tribes were placed on Gerizim, and six on Ebal, Deuteronomy 27:12-13; the Ark was probably in the valley between them, and Joshua read the blessings and cursings successively
Kirjathjearim - The Ark was removed to the hill of the city and remained there many years (see ABINADAB)
Kohath, Kohathites - The Kohathites carried the 'most holy things' of the tabernacle — the Ark, table of show bread, golden altar, etc
Kirjath-Jearim - Hither the Ark was brought from Beth-shemesh, 1 Samuel 6:21; 1 Samuel 7:1-2, and here it remained until it was removed by David
Araunah - Araunah (a-rau'nah), Ark? a large ash or pine
Michal - ...
When David brought the Ark of God to Jerusalem, she conceived and expressed great disgust at his pious joy, and the affections of the king remained alienated from her till her death, 2 Samuel 6:16-23
Canon of Scripture - " Moses directed the Levites, "Take this book of the law, and put it in the side of the Ark of the covenant of the Lord your God" (Deuteronomy 31:25-26). "The testimony," or Decalogue written by God's finger on the tables of stone, was put into the Ark (Exodus 25:16; Exodus 40:20; 1 Kings 8:9)
Raven - Genesis 8:7, Noah's first messenger from the Ark, which kept going forth and returning, resting on the Ark but never entering, feeding on the floating carcasses; type of the carnal soul that having left God finds no rest (Isaiah 57:20-21); like Satan (Job 1:7; Job 2:2)
Pitch - In the first of these places it is mentioned as used for smearing the Ark, and closing its interstices. A coat of it spread over both the inside and outside of the Ark would make it perfectly water proof
Hophni And Phinehas - The curse was accomplished when Hophni and Phinehas were slain at the battle of Aphek, and the Ark of God was lost an incident which was the cause of the death of Eli (ch
Gath - A wine-vat, one of the five royal cities of the Philistines (Joshua 13:3 ) on which the Ark brought calamity (1 Samuel 5:8,9 ; 6:17 )
Miriam - The daughter of Amram, and the sister of Moses and Aaron, 1 Chronicles 6:3, appointed to watch the Ark of bulrushes in which her infant brother was laid among the flags of the river
Merarites - Representatives of the Merarites participated in David's move of the Ark to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:6 ), served as tabernacle musicians (1Chronicles 15:17,1 Chronicles 15:19 ) and gatekeepers (1Chronicles 26:10,1 Chronicles 26:19 ), shared in Hezekiah's (2 Chronicles 29:12 ) and Josiah's (2 Chronicles 34:12 ) reforms, and returned from Exile to assist in the new Temple (Ezra 8:19 )
Doorkeeper - Some Levites were designated doorkeepers (or “gatekeepers”) for the Ark (1 Chronicles 15:23-24 )
Fashion - ) The make or form of anything; the style, shape, appearance, or mode of structure; pattern, model; as, the fashion of the Ark, of a coat, of a house, of an altar, etc
Eliel - Chief of the sons of Hebron, a Levite: he assisted in bringing up the Ark
Beth-Shemesh - It is memorable for a battle between Judah and Israel, in which Amaziah was defeated, 2 Kings 14:12-14 ; and for the return of the Ark from among the Philistines, and the punishment of those who then profaned it, 1 Samuel 6:1-21
Eli'el - (1 Chronicles 12:11 ) ...
A Kohathite Levite at the time of transportation of the Ark from the house of Obed-edom to Jerusalem
Atonement - The corresponding NT words are hilasmos, "propitiation," 1 John 2:2 ; 4:10 , and hilasterion, Romans 3:25 ; Hebrews 9:5 , "mercy-seat," the covering of the Ark of the covenant
Noah - The phrase, "these are the generations of Noah" (Genesis 6:9) marks him as the patriarch of his day. He was now 480 years old, because he entered the Ark at 600 (Genesis 7:6). In the 120 years' respite Noah was "a preacher of righteousness," "when the long suffering of God was continuing to wait on to the end (apexedecheto , and no 'once' is read in the Alexandrinus, the Vaticanus, and the Sinaiticus manuscripts) in the days of Noah, while the Ark was a preparing," the limit of His long suffering (1 Peter 3:20; 2 Peter 2:5; Hebrews 11:7). "Warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with reverential (not slavish) fear (eulabetheis , contrasted with the world's sneering disbelief of God's word and self deceiving security) prepared an Ark by faith (which evidenced itself in acting upon God's word as to the things not yet seen) to the saving of his house (for the believer tries to bring 'his house' with him: Acts 16:15; Acts 16:33-34; Acts 16:31; Acts 10:2), by the which he condemned the world (since he believed and was saved, so might they; his salvation showed their condemnation just: John 3:19) and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith. The Ark which Noah built by God's order was like a ship in proportions, but with greater width (Genesis 6:14-15). The Hebrew teebah is the same as Moses' Ark of bulrushes (Exodus 2:3): an Egyptian word for a "chest" or "coffer," fitted for burden not for sailing, being without mast, sail, or rudder. (See Ark. Dei, 15) notices that the Ark's proportions are those of the human figure, the length from sole to crown six times the width across the chest, and ten times the depth of the recumbent figure measured from the ground. "A window system" (Gesenius) or course of windows ran for a cubit long under the top of the Ark, lighting the whole upper story like church clerestory windows. The physical preservation of the species cannot have been the sole object; for if the flood were universal the genera and species of animals would exceed the room in the Ark, if partial there would be no need for saving in the Ark creatures of the limited area man then tenanted, for the flooded area might easily be stocked from the surrounding dry land after the flood. ...
The Ark typified the redemption of the animal as well as of the human world. The regeneration of the creature (the animal and material world) finally with man, body as well as soul, is typified by Noah and the animals in the Ark and the renewed earth, on which they entered (Romans 8:18-25; Revelation 21:1; 2 Peter 3:13; Matthew 19:28). five months of 30 days each; and the Ark rested on Ararat the 17th of the seventh month (Genesis 7:11-12; Genesis 7:24; Genesis 8:4). Noah successively sent, to ascertain the state of the earth, at intervals of seven days, a raven which rested on the Ark but never entered it, wandering up and down and feeding on the floating caresses (emblem of the restless worldly spirit), and a dove, which finding no rest for the sole of her foot returned and Noah put forth his hand and took her and pulled her in unto him into the Ark (emblem of the soul first drawn by Jesus to Himself: John 6:44; John 10:28-29); next she brought a fresh olive leaf (emblem of peace and the Holy Spirit, the earnest of our inheritance: Ephesians 1:13-14), which can live under a flood more than most trees; Theophrastus (Hist. At the third sending she returned no more (the emblem of the new heavens and earth which shall be after the fiery deluge, 2 Peter 3:1-13; Romans 8:21, when the Ark of the church to separate us from the world shall be needed no more, Romans 4:3); contrast Isaiah 57:20 with 2 Peter 3:3-13; Matthew 11:29. ...
Noah did not leave the Ark until God gave the word; as Jesus waited in the tomb until with the third messenger of day the Father raised Him (Ephesians 1:20). A medal of Apamea, a pagan monument, in Septimius Severus' reign represented the current tradition namely, a floating Ark, two persons within, two going out of it; a bird is on the Ark, another flying to it with a branch; No is on some coins: evidently borrowed from the Hebrew record. is called "the city of the Ark. "...
The "ark" becomes a "ship," it is launched into the sea in charge of a pilot. ...
(4) The birds sent forth before leaving the Ark, in the Babylonian. ...
(8) The bitumen, in the Erech version; also shutting the door; the cause, sin; the seven days, the dove returning, the raven not so; the mountain; the Deity bringing out from the Ark and establishing a covenant; the retribution for taking life. Moses implies the Ark did not drift far from where it was first lifted up, and grounded about the same place
Mercy-Seat - , propitiatorium), the covering or lid of the Ark of the covenant (q
Bethshemesh - A Levitical town on the north border of Judah, whither the Ark was miraculously guided by God when sent back by the Philistines from Ekron, and where the people were smitten for looking into it
Eliezer - One of the priests who blew the trumpets when the Ark of the covenant was brought to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:24 )
Mercy Seat - A slab of pure gold measuring about 45 inches by 27 inches which sat atop the Ark of the covenant which was the same size
Mercy-Seat - Mercy-seat was the name of the lid or cover of the Ark of the covenant
Badgers' Skins - It is a good protection from the weather, and we find the tachash was used for the outer covering of the tabernacle, and to cover the Ark when it was being carried
Window - There was a window in the Ark Noah built, and windows in the temple; and many are to be made in the temple described by Ezekiel
Gibeah - 4 Gibeah in Kirjath-jearim was no doubt a hill in that city, 2 Samuel 6:3-4, on which the house of Abinadab stood, where the Ark was left
Phinehas - Son of Eli: he degraded the priesthood by his wickedness, and was slain with his brother Hophni by the Philistines when the Ark was taken
Michal - She did not share David's zeal for the Lord, for when he brought up the Ark and danced in joy before it, she not only despised him in her heart but reproached him for it
Bulrush - The stalks are pliable, and capable of being interwoven very closely, as is evident from its being used in the construction of the "ark" or boat-cradle in which Moses was hid by his mother. It was made of the inside bark, which was cut into strips, and the edges cemented together, and dried in the sun
Sanctuary - A sacred place particularly among the Israelites, the most retired part of the temple at Jerusalem, called the Holy of Holies, in which was kept the Ark of the covenant, and into which no person was permitted to enter except the high priest, and that only once a year to intercede for the people
Pilgrimage - Jerusalem was not the goal of religious pilgrims until David relocated the Ark there (2 Samuel 6:12-19 ). Mosaic law required adult male Israelites to appear before the Lord (where the Ark of the covenant rested) three times a year (Exodus 23:14-17 ; Exodus 34:18-23 ; Deuteronomy 16:16 )
Eli - " A pious remark, but which did not correct the evil. He trembled when the Ark of God was carried to the war, which ended so disastrously. His two sons were killed and the Ark was taken by the Philistines, and 'Ichabod' — 'the glory is departed' — marked the state of Israel through Eli's sin
Cherubim - They were all of one piece with the golden lid of the Ark of the covenant in the Holy of Holies, signifying that the prospect of redeemed and glorified creatures was bound up with the sacrifice of Christ. In the NT the word is found in Hebrews 9:5 , where the reference is to the Ark in the Tabernacle, and the thought is suggested of those who minister to the manifestation of the glory of God
Eli - " A pious remark, but which did not correct the evil. He trembled when the Ark of God was carried to the war, which ended so disastrously. His two sons were killed and the Ark was taken by the Philistines, and 'Ichabod' — 'the glory is departed' — marked the state of Israel through Eli's sin
Zadok - At Absalom's revolt Zadok and the Levites bearing the Ark accompanied David in leaving Jerusalem, but at his request returned with the Ark and along with Hushai and Abiathar became David's medium of knowing events passing in the city, through Jonathan and Ahimaaz. Abiathar bad charge of the Ark in Jerusalem; so formerly Eleazar and Ithamar, Hophni and Phinehas, were joint chief priests
Ararat - This is the traditional landing-place of the Ark; and, through a misunderstanding of Genesis 8:4 (‘in [2] the mountains of Ararat’), the name was transferred from the surrounding district to the two peaks of this mountain, Great Ararat and Little Ararat, the latter about 7 m. His statement about relics of the Ark being shown in his time appeals to be borrowed from Berosus, and applies to whatever mountain that writer had in mind possibly Jebel Jûdî! The Targums and Peshiá¹­ta, however, which are influenced by this tradition, read Ḳardû (Kurdistan), in verbal agreement with Berosus. Assuming, therefore, that the Biblical and Babylonian narratives have a common origin, the landing-place of the Ark would seem to have been pushed gradually northward, the natural tendency of such a tradition being to attach itself to the highest mountain known at the time
Dove - "...
The first mention of the dove in the Scripture is Genesis 8:8 ; Genesis 8:10-12 , where Noah sent one from the Ark to ascertain if the waters of the deluge had assuaged. The first time she speedily returned; having, in all probability, gone but a little way from the Ark, as she must naturally be terrified at the appearance of the waters. At the end of other seven days, the dove, being sent out a third time, returned no more; from which Noah conjectured that the earth was so far drained as to afford sustenance for the birds and fowls; and he therefore removed the covering of the Ark, which probably gave liberty to many of the fowls to fly off; and these circumstances afforded him the greater facility for making arrangements for disembarking the other animals
Jesse, Rod of - "And the Ark of the Testament
Curtain - The tabernacle which was constructed to carry the Ark of the covenant was made of ten curtains (Exodus 26:2 )
Dates - As part of the celebration of bringing the Ark to Jerusalem, David gave gifts of food to each Israelite gathered in Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6:19 ; 1 Chronicles 16:3 )
Eliezer - ...
...
One of the priests who blew the trumpet before the Ark when it was brought to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:24 )
Gath - It was to this city that the Ark was carried when taken in war
Benaiah - Priest who blew the trumpet before the Ark
Bulrush - It used to be platted into rope; Job 41:2," canst thou put an hook (rather a rope of rushes) into his nose?" Moses' Ark was woven of it (gomeh ): Exodus 2:3; Isaiah 18:2
Michal - David's dancing before the Ark of the covenant as he brought the sacred box to Jerusalem enraged Michal, who criticized the king to his face
Beth-Shemesh - Hither the Ark was brought when sent back by the Philistines, and the inhabitants were smitten because of their profane curiosity ( 1 Samuel 6:1-21 )
Elkanah - A door-keeper for the Ark ( 1 Chronicles 15:23 )
Michal - David’s dance before the Ark was unseemly in the eyes of Michal, and she rebuked him
Miriam - It was she who watched Moses in the Ark of bulrushes ( Exodus 2:4 ff
Calves, Golden - The only such pedestal Old Testament teaching allows was the Ark of the covenant
Aaron, Rod of - "And the Ark of the Testament
Evening - During this period, the dove returned to Noah’s Ark ( je-i'el - (1 Chronicles 15:21 ) or the psaltery and harp, (1 Chronicles 16:5 ) in the service before the Ark
Raven - The raven, when sent from the Ark by Noah, could doubtless find food (though the dove could not), because it can feed upon carrion, though it went 'to and fro' till the waters were dried up
Mercy Seat - In that version, ιλαστηριον generally answers to the Hebrew כפרת , from the verb כפר , to cover, expiate, and was the lid or covering of the Ark of the covenant, made of pure gold, on and before which the high priest was to sprinkle the blood of the expiatory sacrifices on the great day of atonement, and where God promised to meet his people, Exodus 25:17 ; Exodus 25:22 ; Exodus 29:42 ; Exodus 30:36 ; Leviticus 16:2 ; Leviticus 16:14
Rod of Jesse - "And the Ark of the Testament
Scripture, Rod in - "And the Ark of the Testament
Aphek - A place where the Philistines encamped before the Ark was taken, 1 Samuel 4:1, northwest of Jerusalem and near Shocho, now Belled el-Foka
Sanctuary - 1 ; sometimes of the "Holy place," where the altar on incense, the golden candlestick, and the showbread stood, 2 Chronicles 26:18 Hebrews 9:2 ; and sometimes of the "Holy of Holies," the most secret and retired part of the temple, in which was the Ark of the covenant, and where none but the high priest might enter, and he only once a year on the day of solemn expiation
Oracle - The sanctuary or most holy place in the temple, in which was deposited the Ark of the covenant
Bitumen - ]'>[4] pitch ) is used in the construction of the Ark ( Genesis 6:14 ). In Exodus 2:3 hçmar is one of the substances with which the Ark of bulrushes was made watertight, the other being zepheth (EV Ararat - (ehr' uh rat) A mountainous region in western Asia mentioned on four occasions in the Bible: (1) the place where the Ark came to rest after the flood (Genesis 8:4 ); (2) the region where Sennacherib's sons, Adrammelech and Sharezer, fled for refuge after murdering their father (2 Kings 19:37 ); (3) Isaiah's version of 2 Kings 19:37 ( Isaiah 37:38 ); (4) Jeremiah's prophetic call for a war league as judgment against Babylon (Jeremiah 51:27 ). Considering the high elevation, the region is remarkably fertile and pasturable. See Noah ; Ark ; and Flood
za'Dok - When Absalom revolted and David fled from Jerusalem, Zadok and all the Levites bearing the Ark accompanied him. (2 Samuel 15:35,36 ; 19:11 ) The duties of the office were divided, Zadok ministered before the tabernacle at Gibeon, (1 Chronicles 16:39 ) Abiathar had the care of the Ark at Jerusalem
Ahijah - The Ark of God was in his charge, and with it and the ephod he used to consult Jehovah. In Saul's later years, probably after the slaughter of the priests at Nob the Ark was neglected as a means of consulting Jehovah. Saul's irreverent haste of spirit appears in his breaking off in the midst of consulting God through Ahijah with the Ark and ephod, because he was impatient to encounter the Philistines whose approach he discerned by the tumult
Rabbah - The Ark apparently accompanied the camp (2 Samuel 11:11), a rare occurrence (1 Samuel 4:3-6); but perhaps what is meant is only that the Ark at Jerusalem was "in a tent" (2 Samuel 7:2; 2 Samuel 7:6) as was the army at Rabbah under Jehovah the Lord of the Ark, therefore Uriah would not go home to his house. Its temple, theater, and forum are remarkable ruins
Witness - ...
God having for fifteen hundred years manifested His patience towards the guilty antediluvian world, He, after warning the people by the preaching of Noah, bore witness to His righteousness and His power by the deluge, and at the same time manifested His grace in saving Noah and his family in the Ark. ' The Ark was often called the "Ark of the testimony," and the tabernacle was the "Tent of witness," the witness of good things to come
Bulrush - It was used for the construction of the Ark of Moses ( Exodus 2:3,5 ). The inside bark was cut into strips, which were sewed together and dried in the sun, forming the papyrus used for writing
Jerusalem - Its most famous rulers were David, who brought the Ark of the Covenant into the city, and his son Solomon, who built the Temple, and during whose reign Jerusalem attained the height of its glory and grandeur
Shechinah - It is probable that after the entrance into Canaan this glory-cloud settled in the tabernacle upon the Ark of the covenant in the most holy place
Shemaiah - ...
...
A Levite in the time of David, who with 200 of his brethren took part in the bringing up of the Ark from Obed-edom to Hebron (1 Chronicles 15:8 )
Shi'Loh - " In this case the allusion would be to the primacy of Judah in war, (Judges 1:1,2 ; 20:18 ; Numbers 2:3 ; 10:14 ) which was to continue until the promised land was conquered and the Ark of the covenant was solemnly deposited at Shiloh
Aphek - The place of the Philistines' encampment before the Israelites' defeat in which Eli's sons were killed and the Ark was taken (1 Samuel 4); also before the battle in which Saul was slain (1 Samuel 29); on the Philistines' high road to Jezreel
Heart - A similar verdict is found in Genesis 8:21 , after Noah came out of the Ark. Mark 7:21
Sabbath-Day's Journey - times it was understood that a person might travel two thousand cubits (about five furlongs); this extent had been fixed on because when the Israelites were marching they were commanded to keep the above named distance from the Ark, and it was concluded that when they were encamped, there was the same distance between the tabernacle and the tents, and that this space was constantly travelled for worship
Curtain - Also, the hangings about the Ark, among the Israelites
Ephod - David, in transferring the Ark to Jerusalem, was "girt with a linen ephod," 2 Samuel 6:14
Window - A window shalt thou make to the Ark
Kir'Jath-je'Arim - (the city of forests ), first mentioned as one of the four cities of the Gibeonites, ( Joshua 9:17 ) it next occurs as one of the landmarks of the northern boundary of Judah, ch (Joshua 15:9 ) and as the point at which the western and southern boundaries of Benjamin coincided, ch. At this place the Ark remained for twenty years
Shi'Loh - " In this case the allusion would be to the primacy of Judah in war, (Judges 1:1,2 ; 20:18 ; Numbers 2:3 ; 10:14 ) which was to continue until the promised land was conquered and the Ark of the covenant was solemnly deposited at Shiloh
Dancing - There were, however, indecent kinds of dancing, such as those associated with idolatry and certain forms of entertainment (Exodus 32:19; Mark 6:21-22). Dancing was part of Israel’s public expression of praise to God after the crossing of the Red Sea (Exodus 15:20-21) and during the bringing of the Ark of the covenant to Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6:14-15)
Kohathites - The Kohathites were to camp on the south side of the tabernacle and were responsible to care for and move the Ark, table, lampstand, altars, vessels of the sanctuary, and the screen (Numbers 3:29-31 ). ...
David appointed 120 Kohathites under the leadership of Uriel to bring the Ark to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:5 )
Abel - Abel (Hebrews 1 Samuel 16:18 ), the name given to the great stone in Joshua's field whereon the Ark was "set down. " The Revised Version, however, following the Targum and the Septuagint, reads in the Hebrew text 'Ebhen (= a stone), and accordingly translates "unto the great stone, whereon they set down the Ark
Zion, Sion, Mount Zion - It represents the intervention of sovereign grace in the person of God's elect king, when Israel were utterly helpless, and the Ark had been given into the hands of the enemy. The Ark was brought by David to the city of David, and this may have led to Zion being regarded as the centre of blessing, and as a source from whence blessing proceeded, as it often is in the Psalms
Cherubim - It was these figures that invested the Ark with its special significance as an emblem of the immediate presence of Jehovah. In the Temple two huge cheruhim of olive wood, overlaid with gold, overshadowed the Ark with their wings ( 1 Kings 6:23-28 ). In both these passages they perform the function of guardians of sacred things, and in view of this it is probable that, in the Temple and Tabernacle, they were looked upon as guardians of the contents of the Ark as well as emblems of the Divine presence. 236) imagines that the cherubim of the sanctuary were composite figures with feet of oxen, wings of eagles, manes of lions, and human bodies and faces, standing upright and spreading their wings over the Ark
Hilkiah - ...
Still the place where it was found, the temple, and its not having been found before but only brought to light during the repairs, and that by the high priest, identify it with the original temple copy deposited by Moses' command by the side of the Ark within the veil (Deuteronomy 31:9; Deuteronomy 31:26). The two tables of the Decalogue were in the Ark (1 Kings 8:9); the book of the law by the Ark, probably in a chest, securing its safety, attesting its divine authority, and witnessing against Israel's breach of the covenant of which the Ark was the symbol
Tabernacle, the - Inside the second veil was the holy of holies, in which was the Ark (q. ...
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PLAN OF THE TABERNACLE. The Ark was taken by the Philistines and was not returned to the tabernacle; nor, when David removed the Ark, did he restore it to the tabernacle, but placed it on Mount Zion. When the temple was built, the tabernacle was brought up, with the Ark and the holy vessels. The Ark was placed in the most holy place, and the staves drawn out, for it had found its settled rest
Ham - AND HAM SAW HIS FATHER, AND HE TOLD HIS TWO BROTHERS WITHOUT...
THERE was an old vagabond, to vice industrious, among the builders of the Ark. All the time the Ark was a-building, and for long before that, Ham had been making himself vile under the old pitch-boiler's instructions and examples. Ham's old instructor and exemplar had gone down quick to hell as soon as the Ark was finished and shut in. Not the Ark, lifted up above the waters of the flood, but the midnight streets of the cities of the plain were Ham's proper place. Every vessel in the Ark and every instrument held an unclean association for Ham, Within all those steaming walls the onlv truly brute beast was Noah's second son. '...
It is not in as many words in Moses, but I have read it elsewhere, that there was a woman who clung to the door of the Ark which was in the side thereof; and the woman cried and prayed. My own blood is on his hands! Cursed be Ham! And the Ark shook under her words and her blows. And Ham, Noah's second son, listened in the darkness and through the seams of pitch. After the clean beasts and the beasts tlmt are not clean shall have witnessed against Ham, and before Ham is taken away, he will be taken and questioned and made to tell how busy his father was, day and night, all these years, preaching righteousness and building the Ark. And thus it was that, as soon as the preacher of righteousness stepped out of the Ark, he did exactly what we could have told you he would do. And the sons of Noah that went forth of the Ark were Shem, Ham, and Japheth; and Ham is the father of Canaan. Or, to make another guess where we do not know, perhaps it was the anniversary of the laying of the keel of the Ark; or of the shutting-to of the door of the Ark; or of the day when the tops of the mountains were seen; or of the day when the dove came into the window of the Ark with an olive-leaf in her mouth plucked off. Let us think of Noah as a preacher of righteousness; as the builder of the Ark; as elected, protected, and delivered by God; and as, with all his falls, all the time in God's sure covenant of peace, and under God's rainbow and God's oath
Slime, - ( Genesis 11:3 ) The bitumen pits in the vale of Siddim are mentioned in the ancient fragment of Canaanitish history, (Genesis 14:10 ) and the Ark of papyrus in which Moses was placed was made impervious to water by a coating of bitumen and pitch
Sanctuary - The inner shrine, or Most Holy Place, was in particular known as the sanctuary; for there, over the Ark of the covenant, God symbolically dwelt (Leviticus 4:6; Psalms 96:6; Hebrews 13:11)
Ekron - A landmark of Judah on the northern boundary which ran thence to the sea at Jabneel (Joshua 15:45-46; Judges 1:18). There the Ark of the covenant was taken last before its return to Israel
Nisroch - " Jarchi explains Nisroch "a beam of Noah's Ark
Michal - She was actually hostile to him when he danced for joy at bringing the Ark to Jerusalem
Amminadab - Chief of Uzziel's 112 sons, whom David sent for to bring the Ark to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:10-12)
Ashkelon - It is referred to in the story of the return of the Ark ( 1 Samuel 6:17 ), and in David’s lament ( 2 Samuel 1:20 ), and with the other Philistine cities is made an object of denunciation by various prophets
Flood - Men and women were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noah entered the Ark; and did not know until the Flood came and took them all away
Miriam - ' She was probably the sister who watched the Ark in which her brother Moses was laid
Nethan'e-el - (1 Chronicles 2:14 ) ...
A priest in the reign of David who blew the trumpet before the Ark when it was brought from the house of Obededom
Flood - Men and women were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noah entered the Ark; and did not know until the Flood came and took them all away
Ephraim, the Tribe of - The tabernacle and the Ark were deposited within its limits at Shiloh, where it remained for four hundred years. When the Ark was removed from Shiloh to Zion the power of Ephraim was humbled
Christ - Some types of CHRIST:...
Aaron, Exodus 28:2 (c)...
Adam, Genesis 5:2 (c)...
Ark, (covenant), Exodus 25:10 (c)...
Ark, (Noah's), Genesis 6:14 (c)...
Ass, Genesis 49:14 (c)...
Author, Hebrews 5:9 (c)...
Bishop, 1 Peter 2:25 (a)...
Body, 1 Corinthians 12:12 (a)...
Branch, Zechariah 3:8 (a)...
Bread, John 6:51 (a)...
Bridegroom, Matthew 25:1 (b)...
Bullock, Leviticus 1:5 (c)...
Burnt Offering, Leviticus 1:3 (b)...
Calf, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Captain, Hebrews 2:10 (a)...
Chief, Song of Solomon 5:10 (b)...
Commander, Isaiah 55:4 (b)...
Cornerstone, Isaiah 28:16 (a)...
Covert, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
David, 2 Samuel 19:10 (c)...
Day, Psalm 118:24 (b)...
Door, John 10:9 (a)...
Eagle, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Flour, Leviticus 2:1 (c)...
Foundation, Isaiah 28:16 (b)...
Fountain, Zechariah 13:1 (b)...
Garment, Isaiah 61:10 (b), Romans 13:14...
Gate, Psalm 118:20 (b)...
Gold, Isaiah 13:12 (a)...
Headstone, Psalm 113:22 (b)...
Heir, Hebrews 1:2 (a)...
Hen, Matthew 23:37 (a)...
Hiding Place, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
High Priest, Hebrews 4:14 (a)...
Isaac, Genesis 24:36 (c)...
Jacob, Genesis 32:28 (c)...
Jonah, Matthew 12:40 (a)...
Joseph, Genesis 37:7 (c)...
Joshua, Joshua 1:1 (c)...
Judge, Acts 17:31 (a)...
King, Psalm 2:6 (a)...
Lamb, Revelation 5:6 (a)...
Leaves, Revelation 22:2 (c)...
Light, John 8:12 (a)...
Lily of the Valleys, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Lion, Revelation 5:5 (a)...
Manna, John 6:32 (a)...
Master of the House, Luke 13:25 (b)...
Meal, 2 Kings 4:41 (c)...
Mediator (umpire), 1 Timothy 2:5 (a)...
Melchizedek, Genesis 14:18 (c)...
Merchantman, Matthew 13:45 (b)...
Owl, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Ox:, Ezekiel 1:10 (b)...
Passover, 1 Corinthians 5:7 (a)...
Peace Offering, Leviticus 3:1 (c)...
Pelican, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Physician, Jeremiah 8:22 (c)...
Pigeon, Leviticus 12:6 (c)...
Propitiation (mercy seat), Romans 3:25 (a)...
Ram, Genesis 22:13 (a)...
Rock, Matthew 16:18 (a)...
Rock of Ages, Isaiah 26:4 (margin) (a)...
Rose of Sharon, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Root, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sabbath, Colossians 2:16-17 (b)...
Seed, Genesis 3:15 (a)...
Serpent, John 3:14 (a)...
Shepherd, John 10:11 (a)...
Sin, 2 Corinthians 5:21 (a)...
Sin Offering, Leviticus 4:32 (c)...
Solomon, 1 Kings 10:13 (c)...
Sower, Matthew 13:37 (a)...
Sparrow, Psalm 102:7 (a)...
Star, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sun, Malachi 4:2 (a)...
Temple, John 2:19 (a)...
Thief, Revelation 3:3 (a)...
Tree, Revelation 22:2 (b)...
Trespass Offering, Leviticus 5:6 (c)...
Turtle dove, Leviticus 1:14 (c)...
Vine, John 15:5 (a)...
Worm, Psalm 22:6 (a)...
Hormah - After the manifestation of God's anger against the Israelites, on account of their rebellion and their murmurings when the spies returned to the camp at Kadesh, in the wilderness of Paran, with an evil report of the land, they quickly repented of their conduct, and presumed to go up "to the head of the mountain," seeking to enter the Promised Land, but without the presence of the Lord, without the Ark of the convenant, and without Moses
Shiloh - " Here the tabernacle was set up after the Conquest (Joshua 18:1-10 ), where it remained during all the period of the judges till the Ark fell into the hands of the Philistines
Dove - (Matthew 13:6) And it was the dove that brought the tidings of the waters being assuaged into the Ark, by the olive branch in his mouth
Michal - This happened on that memorable day when the Ark was brought up in great triumph from its temporary resting-place to the Holy City
Kohath - side of the tabernacle, to bear (Numbers 4:15) the Ark, the table, the candlestick, the altars, and vessels of the sanctuary, and the hangings, but not to take off the coverings put on by the sons of Aaron or touch them, on pain of death; Uzzah's fatal error (2 Samuel 6:6-7)
Rest - The "rest" in Hebrews 4:8 is katapausis ; Hebrew noach , "rest from weariness": as the Ark rested on Ararat after its tossings; as Israel, under Joshua, rested from war in Canaan
Sabbath Day's Journey - As they followed the priests bearing the Ark of the covenant, they must maintain a distance of 2,000 cubits from it
Eliab - One of the musicians who were appointed by the Levites, at David’s command, to accompany the procession which was formed on the occasion of bringing the Ark from the house of Obededom up to Jerusalem ( 1 Chronicles 15:18 )
Raven - The raven is classed among the unclean by the law, (Leviticus 11:15) Notwithstanding, we have an account in Scripture of the ministry of this bird upon two remarkable occasions. The former from the Ark of Noah, (Genesis 8:7) and the other feeding the prophet Elijah at the brook Cherith
Ahijah - He brought the Ark of God to Saul (1 Samuel 4:18 )
Gibeah - Place where Abinadab dwelt, in whose house the Ark of God remained until fetched by David
Male - ...
In some contexts the word represents a “male animal”: “And of every living thing of all flesh, two of every sort shalt thou bring into the Ark, to keep them alive with thee; they shall be male and female” ( a'Phek - ...
A place at which the Philistines encamped while the Israelites pitched in Eben-ezer, before the fatal battle in which the sons of Eli were killed and the Ark was taken
Ekron - Hither the captured Ark was brought from Ashdod ( 1 Samuel 5:10 ), and on its restoration the Philistine lords who had followed it to Beth-shemesh returned to Ekron ( 1 Samuel 6:16 )
Israelites - Ephraim, the leading tribe among the ten, seems to have shown an early spirit of rivalry towards Judah; Joshua had belonged to Ephraim, the Ark had long rested within its borders at Shiloh, and Jeroboam was also an Ephraimite
mi'Chal - (2 Samuel 3:13-16 ) How Michal comported herself in the altered circumstances of David's household we are not told; but it is plain from the subsequent occurrences that something had happened to alter the relations of herself and David, for on the day of David's greatest triumph, when he brought the Ark of Jehovah to Jerusalem, we are told that "she despised him in her heart
Eleazar - Son of Abinadab, set apart to keep the Ark at Kirjath-jearim
Ephod - It was worn by Samuel (1 Samuel 2:18 ) and by David when he danced before God on the occasion of the transfer of the Ark of the covenant to David's capital city of Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6:14 ). See Priests ; Tabernacle ; Ark of the Covenant ; Teraphim
Presence of God - ...
Perhaps the primary tangible symbol of God's presence with the people was the Ark of the covenant, the container for the tablet of the law and the seat of God's throne. The Ark was associated with the sanctuary and eventually came to rest in the Temple, the place of the presence of God
a'Arat - (high or holy ground ), a mountainous district of Asia mentioned in the Bible in connection with the following events:-- (1) As the resting-place of the Ark after the deluge. Various opinions have been put forth as to the spot where the Ark rested, as described in (Genesis 8:4 ) (but it is probable that it rested on some of the lower portions of the range than on the lofty peak to which exclusively) Europeans have given the name Ararat, the mountain which is called Massis by the Armenians, Agri-Dagh , i
Tabernacle - Third, the “Davidic” tabernacle was erected in Jerusalem for the reception of the Ark (2 Samuel 6:17 ). It did not contain an Ark or those items necessary for worship, nor did it possess a priesthood. ...
The center of attention in the wilderness narratives is the tabernacle with rich decorations, curtains, bread of the presence, Ark, lights, and altar
Baptism - He is the Ark of safety into which we enter for protection from the deluge of GOD's anger against sin. They were "in the Ark," which is a type of the Lord JESUS. " Those who stayed out of the water were saved by the Ark which was in the water
Abiathar - He bore the Ark before David when it was brought up from Obed-Edom's house to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:11-12; 1 Kings 2:26). David had evidently for some time previous given the first place in his confidence to Zadok, a preference the more galling as Abiathar was the high priest and Zadok only his vicar, or sagan; thus it was to Zadok he gave the command to take the Ark back in Absalom's rebellion. Abiathar had the first place, with the ephod, Urim and Thummim, and the Ark, in the tent pitched by David at Jerusalem Zadok officiated before the tabernacle and brazen altar made by Moses and Bezaleel in the wilderness, which were now in Gibeon (1 Chronicles 16:1-7; 1 Chronicles 16:37; 1 Chronicles 16:39-40; 1 Samuel 2:31-35; 1 Chronicles 27:34; 2 Chronicles 1:3-5). All these undesigned proprieties mark the truth of the history. The Lord Jesus (Mark 2:26) names Ahimelech as the high priest in whose time David ate the shewbread
Tabernacle - , where God promised to meet with Israel (Exodus 29:42 ); the "tabernacle of the testimony" (Exodus 38:21 ; Numbers 1:50 ), which does not, however, designate the whole structure, but only the enclosure which contained the "ark of the testimony" (Exodus 25:16,22 ; Numbers 9:15 ); the "tabernacle of witness" (Numbers 17:8 ); the "house of the Lord" (Deuteronomy 23:18 ); the "temple of the Lord" (Joshua 6:24 ); a "sanctuary" (Exodus 25:8 ). ...
The holy of holies, a cube of 10 cubits, contained the "ark of the testimony", i. It was afterwards removed to Shiloh (Joshua 18:1 ), where it remained during the time of the Judges, till the days of Eli, when the Ark, having been carried out into the camp when the Israelites were at war with the Philistines, was taken by the enemy (1 Samuel 4 ), and was never afterwards restored to its place in the tabernacle. A new tabernacle was erected by David at Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6:17 ; 1 Chronicles 16:1 ), and the Ark was brought from Perez-uzzah and deposited in it (2 Samuel 6:8-17 ; 2 Chronicles 1:4 )
Dagon - Likewise the overthrow of the idol of Dagon before the Ark of the covenant demonstrated God's predominance (1 Samuel 5:1-7 )
Kirjath Jearim - ) Psalms 132:6, "we (David and his people) when in Ephratah heard of the Ark" as a hearsay, not as the religious center of the nation as when it was in Shiloh; "we found it in the fields of the wood," i
Badger - Badger skins were the outer covering of the tabernacle, in the wilderness; and of the Ark, the table, the candlestick, the golden altar, and altar of burnt offering (Numbers 4:6-14)
Ararat - Sacred land or high land, the name of a country on one of the mountains of which the Ark rested after the Flood subsided (Genesis 8:4 )
Heman - Colleague of Asaph and Ethan or Jeduthun ("the praise man") in arranging the vocal and instrumental music of the temple service, under David "after that the Ark had rest" (1 Chronicles 15:16-22; 1 Chronicles 25:1-3)
Nethaneel - One of several priests to blow the trumpet before the Ark of God (2 Chronicles 17:7-946 )
An - Definitely, as "Noah built an Ark of Gopher wood
Ashdod - It was to this city that the Ark was taken by the Philistines, and where Dagon their fish-god fell before it
Ashdod - Hither the Phliistines brought the Ark, and sent it thence to Gath, on account of an outbreak probably of bubonic plague ( 1 Samuel 5:1-8 )
Aphek - City whose king Joshua defeated (Joshua 12:18 ), where Philistine armies formed to face Israel in days of Samuel (1 Samuel 4:1 ) resulting in Philistine victory and capture of Israel's Ark of the covenant. ...
Aphek is located at modern Tell Ras elAin near the source of the Yarkon River in the Sharon plain northeast of Joppa
Lime - The book of the law, in order to render it the more sacred, was deposited beside the Ark of the covenant
Aphek - City whose king Joshua defeated (Joshua 12:18 ), where Philistine armies formed to face Israel in days of Samuel (1 Samuel 4:1 ) resulting in Philistine victory and capture of Israel's Ark of the covenant. ...
Aphek is located at modern Tell Ras elAin near the source of the Yarkon River in the Sharon plain northeast of Joppa
Samuel - " The chiefs of the people thought to repair this great disaster by carrying with them the Ark of the covenant as the symbol of Jehovah's presence. At the sight of the Ark among them the people "shouted with a great shout, so that the earth rang again. " A second battle was fought, and again the Philistines defeated the Israelites, stormed their camp, slew 30,000 men, and took the sacred Ark. The tidings of this fatal battle was speedily conveyed to Shiloh; and so soon as the aged Eli heard that the Ark of God was taken, he fell backward from his seat at the entrance of the sanctuary, and his neck brake, and he died. This was the spot where, twenty years before, the Israelites had suffered a great defeat, when the Ark of God was taken
Street - The absence of justice in the marketplace was an indication of the wickedness of the whole population of Jerusalem. 6:14: “Make thee an Ark of gopher wood; rooms shalt thou make in the Ark, and shalt pitch it within and without [1] with pitch
Ebal - The priests, with the Ark, and Joshua at the head of the elders of Israel, took their station in the middle of the valley which lies between the two mountains. The Levites ranged themselves in a circle about the Ark; and the elders, with the people, placed themselves at the foot of the mountain, six tribes on a side
Witness - They were therefore called the testimony (Exodus 25:21), the Ark of the covenant in which they were placed was called the Ark of the testimony (Exodus 25:16), and the tabernacle (or tent) in which the Ark was kept was called the tabernacle of the testimony (Exodus 38:21). Mark 14:55-56)
Nest - The compartments in Noah's Ark are literally "nests" or berths (Genesis 6:14)
Ahijah - ]'>[1] Ahiah ), a priest, son of Ahitub, who had charge of the oracular ephod and consulted it for Saul [2]
Sign - ...
Second, The Ark of the covenant from whence the Jews observed JEHOVAH gave answers by revelation
Commandments, the Ten - The two stones are also called the 'tables of the testimony,' Exodus 34:29 , and they were laid up in the Ark of the covenant, Exodus 40:20 ; 1 Kings 8:9 ; Hebrews 9:4 ; over which were the two cherubim as guardians of God's rights together with the mercy-seat
Oracle - It is doubtless so called because God said, "There I will meet with thee, and I will commune with thee from above the mercy seat, from between the two cherubims which are upon the Ark of the testimony, of all things which I will give thee in commandment unto the children of Israel
Eleazar - The son of Abinadab of Kirjath-jearim, "sanctified" or appointed to take charge of the Ark after its restoration by the Philistines
Seven - Clean beasts were taken into the Ark by sevens, Genesis 7:1-24 . The years of plenty and famine in Egypt were marked by sevens, Genesis 41:1-57
Ararat - ) A mountainous district in Armenia; the resting place of the Ark after the deluge (Genesis 8:4). frontier of Armenia, the Ark's resting place: Nachdjevan, on the Araxes, is thought to be Noah's place of landing, from Josephus' statement ( Ark is surmised to have rested. Thus it appears the Ararat plateau was one especially suited for being the Ark's appointed resting place, and its geographical and physical features fitted it as the center for the even distribution of the human race
Family - 8:19: “Every beast, every creeping thing, and every fowl, and whatsoever creepeth upon the earth, after their kinds, went forth out of the Ark. ...
A further extension of the meaning “division” or “clan” is the idiomatic usage of “class” or “group,” such as “the families” of the animals that left the Ark ( Bag - A also gives in 2 Samuel 6:11 (the Ark). coffin (Genesis 50:26), the Ark (Exodus 37:1, 1 Samuel 5:1, 2 Samuel 6:11). 472) remarks, without exposing him to the others, and precipitating his moral destruction
Names - God also applied to Israel symbolical names: as Lo-ammi, 'not my people;' and Lo-ruhamah, 'not having obtained mercy,' to mark His attitude towards them. persons often gave their children names of significance: thus the wife of Phinehas, when she heard that the Ark of God was taken, and that her husband and her father-in-law were dead, called her child Ichabod, 'where is the glory?' for the glory was departed from Israel, the Ark being taken
House - …” In this connection bayith can also represent the inside of a building or some other structure as opposed to the outside: “Make thee an Ark of gopher wood; rooms shalt thou make in the Ark, and shalt pitch it within and without with pitch” (Job 17:13). , a “household”: “Come thou and all thy house into the Ark …” ( Olive-Tree - The dove from the Ark brought an olive-branch to Noah (Genesis 8:11 )
Commandments, the Ten - These tables were afterwards placed in the Ark of the covenant (Deuteronomy 10:5 ; 1 Kings 8:9 )
Eliezer - Priest who assisted in bringing up the Ark to Jerusalem
Ephod - David's ephod, in bringing the Ark to Jerusalem, differed from the priests' in being of ordinary linen (baad ), whereas theirs was of fine linen (sheesh )
Flag - This flag is a species of papyrus, distinct from and less than that commonly used in Egypt to construct light boats, namely, the "Bulrush papyrus (from whence comes our paper), of which Moses' Ark was made
Holy - Holy of holies, in Scripture, the innermost apartment of the Jewish tabernacle or temple, where the Ark was kept,and where no person entered, except the high priest, once a year
Zion - He built there a citadel, his own palace, houses for the people, and a place for the Ark of God
Incense - On the great day of expiation, the high-priest burnt incense in his censer as he entered the Holy of Holies, and the smoke which arose from it prevented his looking with too much curiosity on the Ark and mercy seat, Leviticus 16:13
Urim And Thummin - When this oracle was to be used in inquiring of the Lord, if at Jerusalem, the high-priest put on his robes, and going into the Holy Place, stood before the curtain that separated the Holy Place from the Most Holy Place; then, turning his face directly towards the Ark and the mercy-seat, upon which the divine presence rested, he proposed the subject respecting which he desired "light and truth
Bethel - Here the Ark of the covenant, and probably the tabernacle, long remained, Judges 20:26 1 Samuel 10:3
Bena'Iah - " (1 Chronicles 15:18,20 ; 16:5 ) ...
A priest in the time of David, appointed to blow the trumpet before the Ark
Samuel, First Book of - Israel was smitten before the Philistines; but instead of turning to the Lord and confessing their sins, they sent for the Ark of the covenant, saying that it should save them, and made a great shout; but God was not in this act, the Israelites were smitten, including the two sons of Eli, and the Ark was captured by the Philistines. 5,1 Samuel 6 rehearse the judgements of God on the Philistines while the Ark was in their possession, and the fall of their god Dagon. Also the return of the Ark, and God's judgement on the men of Bethshemesh for looking into it. The Ark was taken to Kirjath-jearim. The days of Samuel were exceptional: he was not a priest, but he offered sacrifices, and had this altar without either the tabernacle or the Ark. Not only had the priest failed in the house of Eli, but the Ark of the covenant, the symbol of Israel's relationship with God, was in the hands of their enemies, this being permitted by God to bring things to an issue
David, King - By his successful wars David made Israel an independent state, established his capital in Jerusalem, and transported thither the Ark of the Covenant
Almond - Moses was directed to make certain parts of the candlestick for the Ark of carved work "like unto almonds" (Exodus 25:33,34 )
Ashdod - A seat of the worship of (See DAGON; there the idol fell before God's captive Ark, the head and palms cut off, and only the fishy stump (margin) left (1 Samuel 5:3-8)
Dance - Hence the peculiarity of David's conduct in dancing before the Ark of the Lord (2 Samuel 6:14 )
Gilgal - This was one of the three towns to which Samuel resorted for the administration of justice (1 Samuel 7:16 ), and here also he offered sacrifices when the Ark was no longer in the tabernacle at Shiloh (1 Samuel 10:8 ; 13:7-9 )
Ekron - Judges 1:18 reports that Judah captured Ekron along with other parts of the Philistine coast, but Ekron was certainly in Philistine hands at the time the Ark was captured ( 1 Samuel 5:10 )
Accad - The Accadians who came from the "mountains of the east," where the Ark rested, attained to a high degree of civilization. These tablets in a remarkable manner illustrate ancient history
Eliezer - One of the priests appointed to blow with the trumpets before the Ark of God when David brought it from the house of Obed-edom to Jerus
Flood - Genesis 6:17 (c) This is emblematic of the great judgment of GOD upon those who are out of CHRIST, even as this flood came upon those who were out of the Ark
Crown - the word 'crown' represents the word zer , the borderor moulding placed round the top of the Ark, the table of showbread, and the altar of incense
Fashion - The make or form of any thing the state of any thing with regard to its external appearance shape as the fashion of the Ark, or of the tabernacle
Altar - The first altar we read of was built by Noah on leaving the Ark, on which he offered burnt offerings of every clean beast and clean fowl. Abraham, Isaac and Jacob alsobuilt altars to the Lord: these would have been constructed of stoneor earth, but it is remarkable that we seldom read of their offering sacrifices on them
Ham - (Genesis 9:18-19) The prophecy of Noah concerning his three sons is very remarkable, and was literally fulfilled. So that we see, from the Ark in this man's family, how effectually the Lord provided for the eventful circumstances that were to follow the new world
Rest, Remain - 8:4: “And the Ark [1] … upon the mountains of Ararat
Eli - At length, however, Hophni and Phineas, the sons of Eli, were slain by the Philistines, the Ark of the Lord was taken, and Eli himself, hearing this melancholy news, fell backward from his chair and broke his neck, in the ninety-eighth year of his age, 1 Samuel 4:12 ; 1 Samuel 4:18
Ephraim - The Ark and tabernacle remained long in this tribe at Shiloh; and after the separation of the ten tribes, the seat of the kingdom was in Ephraim, and hence Ephraim is frequently used to denote the whole kingdom
Mouse - It is known what spoil was made by mice in the fields of the Philistines, 1 Samuel 6:5-6 , &c, after this people had brought into the country the Ark of the Lord; so that they were obliged to take the resolution to send it back, accompanied with mice and emerods of gold, as an atonement for the irreverence they had committed, and to avert from their land the vengeance that pursued them
Ride - A ship rides at anchor the Ark rode on the flood a balloon rides in the air
High Places - Under the judges, they seem to have been tolerated in some exceptional cases; and Samuel offered sacrifice in several places where the Ark was not present
Raven - ) A raven was sent out by Noah from the Ark
Phin'Ehas - (1 Samuel 1:3 ; 2:34 ; 4:4,11,17,19 ; 14:3 ) Phinehas was killed with his brother by the Philistines when the Ark was captured
Ashdod - (assh' dahd) One of five principal cities of the Philistines, where the Philistines defeated Israel and captured the Ark of the covenant. Perhaps the most infamous contact between Ashdod and Israel is reported in 1 Samuel 4-6 when the Philistines defeated the army of Israel in battle, killed the two sons of Eli, Hophni and Phinehas, and captured the Ark of the covenant
Animals, Clean And Unclean - The first time we read of clean and unclean animals is when Noah went into the Ark: he was instructed to take seven pairs of each of the clean beasts and clean fowls and only two of the unclean; we have no instructions as to how Noah distinguished them, but it shows that in early days there was a distinction between the clean and unclean. When Noah came out of the Ark he offered of every clean beast and every clean fowl for burnt offerings. Of beasts the clean were those that divided the hoof and chewed the cud: those that had only one of these distinguishing marks were unclean
Come - 7:7, where it is said that Noah and his family “entered” the Ark. The Philistines felt that God had “come” into the Israelite camp when the Ark of the covenant arrived ( Tent - Eventually the Ark of the covenant was moved into the tabernacle ( Ark of the covenant and the tables of testimony ( Tabernacle - In the tabernacle was the Ark of the covenant, the table of shew bread, the golden candlestick, and the altar of incense; and in the court opposite to the entrance of the tabernacle, or holy place, stood the altar of burnt- offerings, and the laver or bason for the use of the priests. When it was set up, a dark cloud covered it by day, and a fiery cloud by night. Its next station was Gibeah, and here it continued till the Ark was removed to the temple
Altar - The first altar of which we have any account is that built by Noah when he left the Ark. This altar stood in the holy place, "before the vail that is by the Ark of the testimony
Sabbath - Smith discovered an Assyrian calendar which divides every month into four weeks, and the seventh days are marked out as days in which no work should be done. So Christ condemns the burdensome sabbath restraints multiplied by the Pharisees, violating the law of mercy and man's good for which the sabbath was instituted (Matthew 12:2; Matthew 12:10-11; Luke 13:14; Luke 14:1; Luke 14:5; John 7:22; Mark 2:23-28); yet inviting guests to a social meal was lawful, even in their view (Luke 14:5). "Remember" marks that the sabbath was already long known to Israel, and that they only needed their "minds stirred up by way of remembrance. Thus it was not cut off from the week but marked as the day of days, implying the sanctification of the daily life of the Lord's people. The Decalogue was proclaimed with peculiar solemnity from Mount Sinai (Exodus 19:16-24); it was written on tables of stone, and deposited in the Ark (representing Himself) covered by the mercy-seat on which rested the Shekinah cloud of His glory; Moses significantly states "these vows the Lord spoke, and He added no more. " The Decalogue was "the covenant," and the Ark containing it "the Ark of the covenant;" and therefore the Decalogue sums up all moral duty. not for Israel only, but for universal "man" (Mark 2:27-28). A lawful Sabbath day's journey (Acts 1:12) was reckoned from the distance between the Ark and the tents, judged by that between the Ark and the people in Joshua 3:4, to repair to the Ark on the Sabbath being a duty; namely, 2,000 paces, or about six furlongs, reckoned not from each man's house but from the wall of the city. ) Ganneau thinks Bethphage marked on the E
Tabernacle - The latter was the most holy place , or the holy of holies , containing the Ark, surmounted by the cherubim, with the two tables inside. It was called the veil, (Sometimes the second veil, either is reference to the first, at the entrance of the holy place, or as below the vail of the second sanctuary;) ( Hebrews 9:3 ) as it hid from the eyes of all but the high priest the inmost sanctuary, where Jehovah dwells on his mercy-seat, between the cherubim above the Ark. The first sanctuary contained three objects: the altar of incense in the centre, so as to be directly in front of the Ark of the covenant ( 1 Kings 6:22 ) the table of shew-bread on its right or north side, and the golden candlestick on the left or south side. [2] ...
In the holy of holies, within the veil, and shrouded in darkness, there was but one object, the Ark of the covenant, containing the two tables of stone, inscribed with the Ten Commandments. [3] III. (Joshua 3:11-16 ) Upon the tabernacle, abode always the cloud, dark by day and fiery red by night, (Exodus 10:38 ) giving the signal for the march, (Exodus 40:36,37 ; Numbers 9:17 ) and the halt. (Joshua 9:27 ; 18:1 ) Here it remained during the time of the judges, till it was captured by the Philistines, who carried off the sacred Ark of the covenant. When the Ark was recovered, it was removed to Jerusalem, and placed in a new tabernacle (2 Samuel 6:17 ; 1 Chronicles 15:1 ) but the old structure still had its hold on the veneration of the community and the old altar still received their offerings
Flood, the - The flood narrative contains the first mention in the biblical canon of the motif and terminology of remnant: "Only Noah and those who were with him in the Ark remained [2]" (Genesis 7:23 ). God's grace is revealed already before the flood in his directions for the building of the Ark to save those faithful to him (Genesis 6:14-21 ); and again after the flood in his covenant/promise never again to destroy the earth with a flood, even though human nature remained evil (Genesis 8:20-22 ; 9:8-17 ). The salvation of Noah and his family in the Ark through the waters of the flood finds its antitypical counterpart in New Testament eschatological salvation connected with water baptism (1 Peter 3:18-22 ). Isaiah 54:9 ) is wrapped up in the universality of the flood; if only a local flood occurred, then God has broken his promise every time another local flood has happened; (6) the universality of the flood is underscored by the enormous size of the Ark (Genesis 6:14-15 ) and the stated necessity for saving all the species of animals and plants in the Ark (Genesis 6:16-21 ; 7:2-3 ); a massive Ark filled with representatives of all nonaquatic animal/plant species would be unnecessary if this were only a local flood; (7) the covering of "all the high mountains" by at least twenty feet of water (Genesis 7:19-20 ) could not involve simply a local flood, since water seeks its own level across the surface of the globe; (8) the duration of the flood (Noah in the Ark over a year, Genesis 7:11-8:14 ) makes sense only with a universal flood; (9) the New Testament passages concerning the flood all employ universal language ("took them all away" [3]; "destroyed them all " [4]; Noah "condemned the world " [5]); and (10) the New Testament flood typology assumes and depends upon the universality of the flood to theologically argue for an imminent worldwide judgment by fire (2 Peter 3:6-7 )
Deluge - According to the most approved systems of chronology, this remarkable event happened in the year 1656 after the creation, or about 2348 before the Christian aera. They discover allusions to the Ark, in many of the ancient mysteries, and traditions with respect to the dove and the rainbow, by which several of these allegorical personages were attended, which are not easily explicable, unless they be supposed to relate to the history of the deluge. By the celebrated Ogdoas of the Egyptians, consisting of eight persons sailing together in the sacred baris or Ark, they imagine the family of Noah, which was precisely eight in number, to have been designated; and in the rites of Adonis or Thammuz, in particular, they point out many circumstances which seem to possess a distinct reference to the events recorded in the sixth and seventh chapters of Genesis. Acosta, in his history of the Indies, says, that the Mexicans speak of a deluge in their country, by which all men were drowned; and that it was afterward peopled by viracocha, who came out of the lake Titicaca; and, according to Herrera, the Machoachans, a people comparatively in the neighbourhood of Mexico, had a tradition, that a single family was formerly preserved in an Ark amid a deluge of waters; and that along with them, a sufficient number of animals were saved to stock the new world. During the time that they were shut up in the Ark, several ravens were sent out, one of which brought back the branch of a tree. According to Josephus, there were a multitude of ancient authors who concurred in asserting that the world had once been destroyed by a flood; "This deluge," says he, "and the Ark are mentioned by all who have written barbaric histories, one of whom is Berosus the Chaldean. Abydenus, after giving an account of the deluge from which Xisuthrus, the Chaldean Noah, was saved, concludes with asserting, in exact concurrence with Berosus, that the Ark first rested on the mountains of Armenia, and that its remains were used by the natives as a talisman; and Plutarch mentions the Noachic dove being sent out of the Ark, and returning to it again, as an intimation to Deucalion that the storm had not yet ceased. In obedience to a divine nomination, he entered, with his sons and their wives, into a large Ark, which they had built for their preservation; and immediately swine, and horses, and lions, and serpents, and all other animals which live on earth, came to him by pairs, and were admitted by him into the Ark. ...
Scarcely less remarkable is the Hindoo tradition. This prince was performing his ablutions in the river Critimala, when Vishnu appeared to him in the shape of a small fish, and after several augmentations of bulk in different waters, was placed by Satyavrata in the ocean, where he thus addressed his amazed votary: ‘In seven days all creatures who have offended me shall be destroyed by a deluge, but thou shalt be secured in a capacious vessel miraculously formed; take therefore all kinds of medicinal herbs, and esculent grain for food, and, together with the seven holy men, your respective wives, and pairs of all animals, enter the Ark without fear: then shalt thou know God face to face, and all thy questions shall be answered. While the mind is in this situation, Scripture comes forward, and, presenting a narrative more simple, better connected, and bearing an infinitely greater resemblance to authentic history, than any of those mythological accounts which occur in the traditions of Paganism, immediately flashes the conviction upon the understanding, that this must be the true history of those remarkable facts which other nations have handed down to us, only through the medium of allegory and fable. To this may be added, though less decisive in proof, yet certainly strong as presumptive evidence, that the very aspect of the earth's surface exhibits interesting marks both of the violent action, and the rapid subsidence, of waters; as well as affords a most interesting instance of the divine goodness in converting what was ruin itself into utility and beauty
Sabbath - (Matthew 11:28-30) It is worthy remark that Noah, a type of Christ in the Ark, is so called, from Nuach, which signifies rest. redeemed, when like the dove returning to the Ark whom she found no rest out of the Ark for the sole of her foot, we return to the Lord Jesus, the only rest for the soul, and our salvation for ever
Abiathar - Being confirmed in the high priesthood on David's accession to the throne, he aided in bringing up the Ark to Jerusalem, 1 Corinthians 15:11,12 , and adhered to David during the rebellion of Absalom, 2 Samuel 15:35 , but afterwards was led to follow Adonijah, thus strangely betraying his royal friend in his old age. See under Mark 2:26 , where Abiathar is said to have given David the showbread, in allusion to 1 Samuel 21:1-6 , where it is Ahimelech
Witness - So in the NT the dust on the feet of the disciples was to be a witness against the Jews ( Mark 6:11 ). Ark, § 1 ; Tabernacle, § 7 ( a )
Degrees, Songs of - for the going up (Jerusalem and its temple being regarded as on a moral elevation above other places, as it was in fact on the most elevated tableland of the country, requiring a going up from all sides) to the three great feasts (Exodus 34:24; 1 Kings 12:27-28); Psalms 122:1; Psalms 122:4, which is the oldest, being composed by David to supply the northern Israelites with a pilgrim song in their journeys to Zion, where Asaph had warned them to repair now that the Ark was transferred from Shiloh there (Psalms 78:67-69)
Cloud - This pillar preceded the people as they marched, resting on the Ark (Exodus 13:21 ; 40:36 )
Sepharvaim - )...
Nebuchadnezzar built the old temple, as the sacred spot where Xisuthrus deposited the antediluvian annals before entering the Ark, from whence his posterity afterward recovered them (Berosus Eight - ...
1 Peter 3:20 (c) The eight souls in the Ark represented a new manifestation of GOD's grace, a new exhibition of His terrible judgment, and a new message to the world
Glory - In scripture, the divine presence or the Ark, the manifestation of it
Mercy-Seat - " (Revelation 13:8)...
The form of the mercy-seat, or propitiatory, was that of an Ark, covered with gold, at the two ends of which were placed the cherubim to cover over the mercy-seat, from whence JEHOVAH was supposed to speak
Shiloh - The Ark and the tabernacle of the Lord continued at Shiloh from A
Dancing - Harmer is extremely probable, that David did not dance alone before the Lord, when he brought up the Ark, but as being the highest in rank, and more skilful than any of the people, he led the religious dance of the males
Cedar - The Ark of the covenant, and much of the temple of Solomon, and that of Diana at Ephesus, were built of cedar
Jeiel - A Levite who served as worship leader at the Ark of the covenant under David (1 Chronicles 16:5 )
Genesis - It contains an account of the creation; the primeval state and fall of man; the history of Adam and his descendants, with the progress of religion and the origin of the arts; the genealogies age, and death of the patriarchs until Noah; the general defection and corruption of mankind, the general deluge, and the preservation of Noah and his family in the Ark; the history of Noah and his family subsequent to the time of the deluge; the repeopling and division of the earth among the sons of Noah; the building of Babel, the confusion of tongues, and the dispersion of mankind; the lives of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph
Fasting - Joshua and the elders of Israel remained prostrate before the Ark from morning till evening, without eating, after Israel was defeated at Ai, Joshua 7:6 . The eleven tribes which fought against that of Benjamin, fell down on their faces before the Ark, and so continued till evening without eating, Judges 20:26 . The synagogues were filled with suppliants, whose prayers were long and mournful, and their countenances dejected with all the marks of sorrow and repentance
Altar - Noah built an altar when he left the Ark. This altar stood in the holy place, "before the vail that is by the Ark of the testimony
Flood - In every geological or archaeological endeavor to use sedimentary deposits to develop a time frame for such a catastrophic deluge and all efforts to recover an Ark have failed. God announced His intentions to Noah and instructed him to build an enormous Ark for himself, his family, and the lower orders—even for unclean, creeping things! The expansiveness of the Ark was expressive of the greatness of God's love; the extension of safety to “every” type of fauna elaborates the wideness of His concern
Ravels - On the decrease of the waters of the flood, so that the tops of the mountains became visible, Noah sent forth out of one of the windows of the Ark a raven, a bold and adventurous bird, by way of experiment, to see whether the waters were sunk or abated. In the original text, in the Samaritan, in the Chaldee and Arabic, it is said that the raven "returned" to the Ark; but the Greek interpreters, the Syriac, the Latin, and most of the eminent fathers and commentators, say that it did not return any more. For if the raven had returned, what occasion had Noah to send forth a dove? Or why did he not take the raven in unto him into the Ark, as he did afterward the dove? Or why did he not send forth the same raven again, as he did afterward the same dove again? It is not improperly expressed in our translation, that "the raven went forth to and fro," flying hither and thither, "until the waters were dried up from off the face of the earth
Tabernacle - In the Most Holy Place, into which only the high priest entered once a year, Hebrews 9:7 , was the Ark, covered by the mercy-seat and the cherubim. The remarkable and costly structure thus described was erected in the wilderness of Sinai, on the first day of the first month of the second year, after the Israelites left Egypt, Exodus 40. In 2 Samuel 6:17 , and 1 Chronicles 15:1 , it is said that David had prepared and pitched a tabernacle in Jerusalem for the Ark, which before had long been at Kirjath-jearim, and then in the house of Obed-edom, 1 Chronicles 13:6,14 2 Samuel 6:11,12 . In 1 Chronicles 21:29 , it is said that the tabernacle of Moses was still at Gibeon at that time; and it would therefore seem that the Ark had long been separated from it. This is the last mention made of it; for apparently the tabernacle brought with the Ark into the temple, 2 Chronicles 5:5 , was the tent in which the Ark had been kept on Zion, 2 Chronicles 1:4 5:2
Pentateuch - put it in the side of the Ark that it may be a witness against thee," as it proved under Josiah. ...
The two tables of the Decalogue were IN the Ark (1 Kings 8:9); the book of the law, the Pentateuch, was laid up in the holy of holies, close by the Ark, probably in a chest (2 Kings 22:8; 2 Kings 22:18-19). " Compare also as to the Ark, Joshua 3:3; Joshua 3:6; Joshua 3:8; Joshua 7:6; circumcision, Joshua 5:2; Passover, Joshua 5:10; with the Pentateuch. The Ark in the tabernacle still symbolizes God's presence (1 Samuel 4:3-4; 1 Samuel 4:18; 1 Samuel 4:21-22; 1 Samuel 5:3-7; 1 Samuel 6:19). The Levites alone should handle the sacred vessels and Ark (1 Samuel 6:15; 1 Samuel 6:19). The sacrificing in other places besides at the tabernacle was allowed because the Ark was in captivity, and even when restored it was not yet in its permanent seat, Mount Zion, God's one chosen place (1 Samuel 7:17; 1 Samuel 10:8; 1 Samuel 16:2-5)
Deluge, the -
The collecting, housing in the Ark, and feeding of such an enormous number of animals seems impossible
Flood, the -
The collecting, housing in the Ark, and feeding of such an enormous number of animals seems impossible
Ararat - On the mountains of Ararat the Ark rested, Genesis 8:4
Eleazar - Abinadab's son, of the "hill" of Kirjath Jearim; appointed by its inhabitants to take care of the Ark on its return from the Philistines (1 Samuel 7:1)
Dragon - The Ark is often associated with it, as the preserver from the waters. ...
Apollo's slaying Python is the Greek legend implying the triumph of light over darkness and evil
Ephratah - This would be Kiriath-jearim, though two different resting points of the Ark—Bethlehem and Kiriath-jearim—may be intended here
Kiriath-Jearim - From there David brought up the Ark ( 2 Samuel 6:2 , 1 Chronicles 13:5 , 2 Chronicles 1:4 ). There, too, are ancient remains, and a great rock platform which would appear to mark an ancient ‘high place
Abiathar - Abiathar shared with Zadok the responsibility of taking the Ark to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:11-12 ; 2 Samuel 15:24 ). ...
Mark 2:26 records Jesus' statement that David took the showbread from the place of worship when Abiathar was high priest at Nob. Or a copyist of the Gospel of Mark may have copied the text wrong
Gath - The Ark was brought here from Ashdod ( 1 Samuel 5:8 ), and thence to Ekron ( 1 Samuel 5:10 )
Gibeon - The statement of the parallel passage, 2 Chronicles 1:3 , that the Ark was placed here at the time, is probably due merely to the desire of the Chronicler to explain Solomon’s sacrificing there in the light of the Deuteronomic legislation. It is remarkable chiefly for its copious springs a reputation it evidently had in antiquity ( 2 Samuel 2:13 , Jeremiah 41:12 )
Phinehas - ...
Lastly Phinehas stood before the Ark inquiring of Jehovah for Israel, "shall I go yet again
Step - 25:12 the word is applied to the “pedestals or feet” of the Ark of the covenant: “And thou shalt cast four rings of gold for it, and put them in the four [1] thereof; and two rings shall be in the one side of it, and two rings in the other side of it
Face - Therefore, there was no image or likeness of God in the innermost sanctuary—only the Ark of the covenant was there, and God spoke from above it ( Cherub - The cherubim are variously represented as living creatures, Genesis 3:24; Ezekiel 1:1-28; Revelation 4:1-11; or as images wrought in tapestry, gold, or wood, Ezekiel 41:1-26; Exodus 37:7; Ezekiel 41:25; as having one, two, or four faces, Exodus 25:20; Ezekiel 41:18; Ezekiel 10:14, as having two, four, or six wings, 1 Kings 6:27; Ezekiel 1:6; Revelation 4:8; in the simplest form, as in the golden figures above the Ark of the covenant; or in the most complex and sublime form, as in Ezekiel's wonderful visions of the glory of God—discerning and ruling all things, and executing irresistibly and with the speed of thought all his wise and just decrees
Dance - Thus David danced before the Lord at the bringing up of the Ark into Jerusalem
Seven - Notice, the animals went into the Ark by sevens; the years of plenty and famine were marked by sevens, Genesis 7:2; Genesis 41:2-3; the golden candlestick had seven branches, and there were "seven stars" and seven churches
Gaza or Azzah - The Ark of God was there in the days of Eli, 1 Samuel 6:1-21
Beth'el - " Here was the Ark of the covenant
Gib'e-ah - ch (1 Samuel 11:4 ) ...
Gibeah in Kirjath-jearim was no doubt a hill in that city, and the place in which the Ark remained from the time of its return by the Philistines till its removal by David
Rest (And Forms) - Only in CHRIST, represented by the Ark, is there a safe place for rest and peace. (See Mark 6:31). The Ark was to be carried about no more
Atone - ” Here God gives Noah instructions concerning the Ark, including, “Cover it inside and out with pitch” (RSV). It refers to a slab of gold that rested on top of the Ark of the covenant
Take Away - ...
Primarily this word means “to take, grasp, take hold of,” as when Noah reached out and “took hold of” the dove to bring it back into the Ark ( Ark ( Tabernacle - — In the most holy place, which the high priest alone entered, was the Ark of the covenant; in the holy place, where the priests ministered—to the north the table of shew-bread, to the south the golden candlestick, in the centre the altar of incense. David seems to have constructed a second tabernacle to receive the Ark when it was brought to Jerusalem
Synagogue - At the upper or Jerusalem end stood the Ark, the chest which, like the older and more sacred Ark contained the Book of the Law. (James 2:2,3 ) Here too, in front of the Ark, still reproducing the type of the tabernacle, was the eight-branched lamp, lighted only on the greater festivals. In two of the passages referred to-- ( Matthew 10:17 ; Mark 13:9 ) --they are carefully distinguished from the councils
Michal, Saul's Daughter - The things that had become dearer and dearer to David's heart every day, those were the very things that drove Michal absolutely mad; furiously and ungovernably mad that day on which the Ark of God was brought up to the city of David. You must understand all that the Ark of God was to David, and the home-bringing of the Ark, before you can fully understand the whole catastrophe of that day. It would take me till midnight to tell you all that was in David's heart as he sacrificed oxen and fatlings at six paces, and leaped and danced before the Ark of God all the way up to the city of David. But Michal's ear had never been opened to the music of the Ark. Arise, O Lord, into Thy rest; Thou and the Ark of Thy strength. And Michal's heart became harder and darker and fiercer as the day went on. Harder and darker and fiercer at David, and at all the ordinances and delights of that day. And then, when all Jerusalem rang with the Ark just at her door, Michal stole to her shut window and saw nothing but David dancing before the Lord. 'Both less and more than king,' is Dante's whole remark on David's dance
Bethel - Here the Ark of the covenant was kept for a long time under the care of Phinehas, the grandson of Aaron (20:26-28)
Benaiah - A priest in David's time who blew the trumpet before the Ark (1 Chronicles 15:24; 1 Chronicles 16:6)
Figure - , pointing to the present time, not "then present," AV (see below); (b) "a corresponding type," 1 Peter 3:21 , said of baptism; the circumstances of the flood, the Ark and its occupants, formed a type, and baptism forms "a corresponding type" (not an antitype), each setting forth the spiritual realities of the death, burial, and resurrection of believers in their identification with Christ
Dagon - The cutting off of Dagon's head and hands before Jehovah's Ark, and their lying on the threshold (from whence his devotees afterward did not dare to tread upon it), prefigure the ultimate cutting off of all idols in the great day of Jehovah (Isaiah 2:11-22)
Ahimaaz - Zadok and Abiathar, who took back the Ark to the city at David's request, were to tell them while staying outside the city at Enrogel whatever Hushai directed. ...
David's estimate of Ahimaaz appears in his remark on his approach after the battle (2 Samuel 18:27): "he is a good man, and cometh with good tidings
Philistines - Nazariteship in Samson is God's way of deliverance, but the Nazarite utterly failed, and in the days of Eli the Israelites were conquered by them and the Ark taken
Gilgal - Here the Ark was long stationed, and consequently the place was much resorted to by the Israelites. The idea, however, appears fanciful, and there is an essential difference between stones erected for memorials, and those used to mark sacred, or supposed sacred, places for worship
Josh'ua - ...
An inhabitant of Beth-shemesh, in whose land was the stone at which the milch-kine stopped when they drew the Ark of God with the offerings of the Philistines from Ekron to Beth-shemesh
Num'Bers, - ( Numbers 6:24-26 ) Such too are chants which were the signal for the Ark to move when the people journeyed, and for it to rest when they were about to encamp
Japheth - He and his wife were two of the eight saved in the Ark (1 Peter 3:20 ). It is important to notice that modern ethnological science, reasoning from a careful analysis of facts, has arrived at the conclusion that there is a three-fold division of the human family, corresponding in a remarkable way with the great ethnological chapter of the book of Genesis (10)
Bethel - ‘house of God’) by Jacob, after he had a remarkable dream that made him feel he was in the dwelling place of God. ...
For a brief period after the conquest, the Ark of the covenant was kept at Bethel (Judges 20:18; Judges 20:27-28)
Beast - " Noah is not said to take into the Ark beasts of the earth; but in Genesis 9:9-10, "beasts of the earth" are distinguished from "all that go out of the Ark
Dove - After God's wrath for sin had been executed upon the earth, the dove was thrice sent forth; at the first sending she found no rest for the sole of her foot until she put herself in Noah's (or "comforter") hand, and was drawn into the Ark; on the second trip, she brought back the olive leaf, the earnest of the restored earth; on the third trip, she was able to roam at large, no longer needing the Ark's shelter. As the raven messenger "going forth to and fro," alighting on but never entering into the Ark, symbolizes the unbelieving that have "no peace," "like the troubled sea, when it cannot rest" (Isaiah 57:20-21): so the dove, in its threefold embassy, represents respectively the first return of the soul to its rest, the loving hand of Jesus; its subsequent reception of the dovelike spirit, the earnest of the final inheritance (Ephesians 1:13-14); and its actual entrance finally on the new heaven and new earth (Revelation 21), where there will be no need of the Arklike church to separate between the world and God's people, between the saved and unsaved, where all shall be safe and blessed forever and the church shall be co-extensive with the world. ...
The change from the Egyptian bondage amidst the face blackening potteries to the freedom and beauty of Israel's theocratic state is expressed in Psalms 68:13-14, "though ye have lien (lain) among the pots yet shall ye be as the wings of a dove covered with silver, and her feathers with yellow gold," the dove's outspread wings reflecting a golden or silver splendor according to the direction in which the sunshine falls on them, typifying the dovelike spirit of joy and peace beaming forth from the believer, once darkness, but now light in the Lord
Joshua, Book of - To impress upon people the religious significance of the invasion, the narrative emphasizes such matters as the ritual cleansing of the people, the leadership of the priests, the prominence of the Ark of the covenant, the miraculous crossing of the Jordan, and the obedience to the covenant commands by those who were till then uncircumcised. ...
The overthrow of Jericho gave more examples of the religious significance of Israel’s conquest: the role of the priests and the Ark, the repeated use of the symbolic number ‘seven’ in the proceedings, and the judgment that followed disobedience to God’s commands (6:1-7:26)
Levites - The antiquity and genuineness of Genesis are marked by the absence of all notice of Levi's subsequent greatness as the priest tribe. The Kohathites held the highest office and bore the Ark (except on solemn occasions when the priests bore it: Joshua 3:3; Joshua 3:15) and vessels, after the priest had covered them (2 Chronicles 19:8-114). "The priests the Levites" on the peculiar use of Levites without distinction from the priests) were to determine controversies and to preserve the law in the side of the Ark, and in the seventh year at the feast of tabernacles read it before Israel, and pronounce the curses from Ebal (Deuteronomy 17:9-12; Deuteronomy 31:9-13; Deuteronomy 31:26; Deuteronomy 27:14). ) Micah's consecration of the homeless Levite as his household priest implies a relapse in dark times to the original household priesthood. The Ark after its restoration from the Philistines was in charge of Abinadab in the hill, or Gibeah, or Kirjath Jearim (1 Samuel 7:1; 2 Samuel 6:3), probably an old Canaanite highplace sanctuary. David's words (1 Chronicles 15:2) imply that heretofore Levites had not been in charge of the Ark, therefore that Abinadab was not a Levite possibly (?). to carry the Ark of God but the Levites, for them hath Jehovah chosen
David - ...
David's great thought, when established in the kingdom, was to find a resting place for the Ark, to bring God into the midst of His people. He attempted to bring up the Ark, but at first not in God's way, and Uzzah was smitten, which displeased David and made him afraid; but he learned better, and the Ark was carried up on the shoulders of the Levites, with sacrifices and much rejoicing. David, girded with a linen ephod, danced before the Ark, and as the anointed of God he blessed the people and distributed his good things. ...
David thought to build a house to Jehovah, for the Ark was only within curtains; but God's message by Nathan was that God would build David a house: his kingdom should be established for ever. "...
David is a remarkable type of Christ: when he was hunted by Saul, he foreshadowed Christ in His rejection; and when on the throne he was a type of Christ as a man of war, putting down His enemies previous to His peaceful reign in the millennium, typified in Solomon
Forest - That "of Kirjath Jearim" (1 Samuel 8:2; Psalms 132:6), meaning" town of the woods", on the confines of Judah and Benjamin; "the fields of the wood" from which David brought up the Ark to Zion mean this forest town. A third term is pardeec , related to "paradise" (Nehemiah 2:8), "forest") a park, a plantation under a "keeper
Eleazar - ...
...
An inhabitant of Kirjath-jearim who was "sanctified" to take charge of the Ark, although not allowed to touch it, while it remained in the house of his father Abinadab (1 Samuel 7:1,2 ; Compare Numbers 3:31 ; 4:15 )
Moriah - So thenceforth David sacrificed there, and no longer on the altar at Gibeon where the tabernacle was, separate from the Ark, which was at Zion; for he could not go to Gibeon on account of the sword of the Angel, i
Throne - ...
The lid of the Ark of the covenant in the tabernacle was a symbolic throne for the invisible God
Jeduthun - He sounded the cymbals of brass, marking time, while those under him played the harp (Psalms 150:5). Asaph and his brethren ministered before the Ark at Jerusalem, Jeduthun and Heman "before the tabernacle of Jehovah in the high place at Gibeon
Zadok - ...
In a touching scene Zadok with Abiathar carried the Ark to go with David in his flight from Absalom (2 Samuel 15:24 )
Gibeon - ) Here immediately at "the great stone in Gibeon," some old landmark, Joab pursuing the Benjamite rebel Sheba among the towns of his tribe met and treacherously murdered Amasa (2 Samuel 20:5-10). David put the brazen altar before the tabernacle (2 Chronicles 1:5) probably at the same time lie removed the Ark to Zion and appointed the priests under Zadok to offer the daily sacrifices, and Heman and Jeduthun to direct the music (2 Chronicles 1:3)
Increase - The waters increased and bore up the Ark
City - ...
This word can represent “those who live in a given town”: “And when he came, lo, Eli sat upon a seat by the wayside watching: for his heart trembled for the Ark of God
Glory - The Ark of God is called the glory of Israel; and the glory of God, 1 Samuel 4:21-22 ; Psalms 26:8
Incense - One reason of this was, that so the smoke which rose from the censer might prevent his looking with too much curiosity on the Ark and mercy-seat
Flood - One of the most remarkable events in the history of our world. And every living thing was destroyed which was upon the face of the ground, both man, and cattle, and creeping things, and fowl of the heaven; and they were destroyed from the earth; and Noah only was left, and they that were with him in the Ark
Joshua - A Beth-shemite in whose field the cows stopped when they brought up the Ark from the Philistines
Deluge - the waters, Moses assures us, covered the whole earth, buried all the mountains; every thing perished therein that had life, excepting Noah and those with him in the Ark. Can an universal deluge be more clearly expressed? If the deluge had only been partial, there had been no necessity to spend an hundred years in the building of an Ark, and shutting up all sorts of animals therein, in order to re-stock the world: they had been easily and readily brought from those parts of the world not overflowed into those that were; at least, all the birds never would have been destroyed, as Moses says they were, so long as they had wings to bear them to those parts where the flood did not reach
Manna - To commemorate their living upon manna, the Israelites were directed to put one omer of it into a golden vase; and it was preserved for many generations by the side of the Ark. It is evident that the Israelites never saw it before; for Moses says, "He fed thee with manna which thou knewest not, neither did thy fathers know," Deuteronomy 8:3 ; Deuteronomy 8:16 ; and it is very likely that nothing of the kind had ever been seen before; and by a pot of it being laid up in the Ark, it is as likely that nothing of the kind ever appeared after the miraculous supply in the wilderness had ceased. It has been remarked that at this day, what is called manna is found in several places; in Arabia, on Mount Libanus, Calabria, and elsewhere
Tabernacle - )...
The Ark contained it; and the lid of the Ark, the mercyseat, was the place where Jehovah met or communed with Israel. As the Israelite theocracy was God's kingdom, so the tabernacle was His palace, where the people had audience of God and whence He issued His commands, embodied in the testimony within the Ark. The altar of burnt offering outside marks that only through shedding of blood can sinful man be admitted within His courts; and the mercy-seat within the veil, sprinkled with blood of the victim slain outside, typifies Christ, our propitiation or propitiatory within the heavenly holy of holies (Romans 3:25), who is the sinner's only meeting place with God. The separation of the church from the world is marked by the exclusion of any but priests from the holy place, and of the people from the congregation while unclean; the need of holiness by the various purifications (compare Psalm 24). Then the Ark was taken by the Philistines, and returned to Baale or Kirjath Jearim; then the tabernacle was at Nob and Gibeon until the temple was built (1 Samuel 4; 1 Samuel 6; 1 Samuel 21:1; 1 Chronicles 13:5; 1 Chronicles 16:39; Leviticus 13:47-59; 2 Samuel 6:17). ...
Moses' own "tent" (not mishkam , "tabernacle") in this transition stage was pitched far off from the camp (to mark God's withdrawal from apostate Israel) as "the tent of meeting" provisionally, to which only Moses the mediator and his faithful minister Joshua were admitted (Exodus 33:3-11). ...
The cloud, dark by day, fiery red by night, rested on the tabernacle so long as Israel was to stay in the same encampment; it moved when Israel must move (Exodus 40:36-38; 1618384275_37). Moses' authorship of the Pentateuch is marked by the fact that all his directions concerning impurity through a dead body relate to a tent such as was in the wilderness, nothing is said of a house; but in the case of leprosy a house is referred to (Numbers 19:11; Numbers 19:14; Numbers 19:21; 2 Samuel 6:2). , set out between the first and second camp; but the holy of holies, the Ark and altar, did not set out until after the second camp
Dancing - ” The two terms are used five times in the New Testament (Matthew 11:17 ; Matthew 14:6 ; Mark 6:22 ; Luke 7:32 ; Luke 15:25 ). Salome danced before the princes and politicans gathered to celebrate her father's birthday (Matthew 14:6 ; Mark 6:22 ). David danced before the Ark as it was brought into Jerusalem (2Samuel 6:14,2 Samuel 6:16 ; 1 Chronicles 15:29 )
Infant Baptism - Those favoring infant baptism raise the following arguments: (1) household baptisms likely included some infants (Acts 16:5 ,Acts 16:5,16:33 ; Acts 18:8 ; 1 Corinthians 1:16 ); (2) Jesus' welcome and blessing of children is a mandate to baptize infants (Mark 10:13-16 ); “hinder” is a technical term associated with baptism (Acts 8:36 ); (3) circumcision which prefigured baptism (Colossians 2:11 ) included children (Genesis 17:12 ); (4) in the Old Testament children participated in ceremonies of covenant renewal (Deuteronomy 29:10-13 ; Joshua 8:35 ; Joel 2:16 ). ...
Baptists and other adherents of believer's baptism raise the following arguments and counter-arguments: (1) The New Testament prerequisite of baptism is faith (Acts 18:8 ) which is evidenced by confession (Romans 10:9-10 ) and repentance (Acts 2:38 ); (2) infant baptism rests ultimately on the fear that infants are held accountable for organic sin; Baptists counter with a doctrine of an age of accountability at which conscious sin occurs (Genesis 8:21 ; Psalm 25:7 ; Jeremiah 3:25 ) and at which a conscious response to God is possible (1 Kings 18:12 ; Psalm 71:5 ,Psalms 71:5,71:17 ); (3) household baptisms need not have included children; baptism is prefigured in the salvation of Noah and his exclusively adult household in the Ark (1 Peter 3:20-21 ); (4) Jesus' blessing of the children demonstrates Christ's love for children; children are presented as an example to disciples rather than as disciples themselves (Matthew 18:2-4 ); (5) circumcision is an imperfect analogy to baptism; only males participated in circumcision, whereas in baptism there is “neither male nor female” (Galatians 3:28 ); the witness of the New Testament is that “what is born of the flesh is flesh” and that a spiritual birth is necessary to enter God's kingdom (John 3:5-6 ); it is not the Israel of the flesh that inherits the promises of God but those who are spiritual Israel by a faith commitment (Romans 6-8 ; Galatians 6:16 ); (6) the responsibility of the faith community to its children is instruction in the way of the Lord (Deuteronomy 4:9-10 ; Deuteronomy 11:19 ; Proverbs 22:6 ); participation in covenant renewal is educational for children
Manna - The most remarkable things about the manna of the Israelites were: 1. To commemorate this wonderful miracle a golden pot was provided, Exodus 16:33; Hebrews 9:4, and an omer (or one man's portion) of the manna put up for preservation and placed in or near the Ark, that succeeding generations might see with their own eyes the very substance on which their fathers were miraculously fed in their long and perilous journeyings from Egypt to Canaan
Gath - " Gath was one of the five cities to which the Philistines carried about the Ark of God (the five formed one political unity), and thereby brought on the people God's heavy visitation with emerods
High Place - ' The reason of this implied disapproval is doubtless because the Ark was not there, the symbol of God's presence, which was the true place of worship
Temptation - The covenant stands firm as the Ark did in the waters of Jordan, amidst all the beating waves, until the people are all clean gone over
Earth - The Ark was lifted above the earth
Generation - ”...
First the concrete meaning of “generation” is the “period during which people live”: “And the Lord said unto Noah, Come thou and all thy house into the Ark; for thee have I seen righteous before me in this generation” ( Die - Usually, both the subject and object of this usage are personal, although there are exceptions—as when the Philistines personified the Ark of the covenant, urging its removal so it would not “kill” them ( Baptism - John (called "the Baptist," Matthew 11:11;) preached "the baptism of repentance," and baptized in the river Jordan those confessing their sins, Mark 1:4-5. Peter compares baptism to the saving of Noah from the flood in the Ark, 1 Peter 3:21
Michal - ...
His ardor for her was certainly at first the same, as his keenness to claim her proves; but she alienated him from her forever by her cutting sneer when, after dancing with all his might before Jehovah, in a thin ephod with short-shoulder dress, as representative of the priestly nation, stripped of royal robes in the presence of the great King, "he returned to bless his household"; instead of pious and affectionate congratulations at the bringing up of Jehovah's Ark to Zion, already "despising him in her heart" she came out to meet him, and said in bitter irony, "how glorious was the king of Israel today, who uncovered himself today in the eyes of the handmaids of his servants, as one of the vain fellows shamelessly uncovered himself!"...
Michal had teraphim (1 Samuel 19:13), but like Saul she had no regard for Jehovah's Ark (1 Chronicles 13:3), and was offended at the king because in pious enthusiasm he humbled himself to the level of the priests and nation before Jehovah
David - ...
David now resolved to bring up the Ark of the covenant to his new capital (2 Samuel 6 ). In consequence of the death of Uzzah (for it was a divine ordinance that only the Levites should handle the Ark, Numbers 4 ), who had put forth his hand to steady the Ark when the cart in which it was being conveyed shook by reason of the roughness of the road, David stayed the procession, and conveyed the Ark into the house of Obed-edom, a Philistine from Gath. After three months David brought the Ark from the house of Obed-edom up to Jerusalem. After the successful termination of all his wars, David formed the idea of building a temple for the Ark of God. On receiving it he went into the sanctuary, the tent where the Ark was, and sat before the Lord, and poured out his heart in words of devout thanksgiving (18-29). Now cloudy and dark days came
Temple of Jerusalem - Solomon's Temple may not have actually been the first temple which housed the Ark of the covenant, since there was a house of Yahweh, also called a temple, at Shiloh (1Samuel 1:7,1Samuel 1:9,1 Samuel 1:24 ; 1 Samuel 3:3 ) but in Judges 20:26-272 (NIV) it is called “tent of meeting,” whether the wilderness tabernacle or not. ...
The primary meaning of the Temple was the same as that of the Ark it was constructed to enshrine: a symbol of God's presence in the midst of His people (Exodus 25:21-22 ). The most holy place, a windowless cube of about 30 feet, housed the Ark of the covenant and was dominated by two guardian cherubim 15-feet tall with outstretched wings spanning fifteen feet to touch in the middle and at each side wall (Deuteronomy 12:5 ). The Ark, the mercy-seat lid of which had its own guardian cherubim (Exodus 25:18-20 ), was Yahweh's “footstool. The story begins with a procession of the Ark containing the two tables of the decalogue, God's glory in the shining cloud of His presence filled the sanctuary (1 Kings 8:1-11 ). As Jeremiah had foreseen, the Ark of the covenant was never replaced (Jeremiah 3:16 ). He predicted the Temple's destruction by the Romans, and His warnings to His followers to flee when this happened actually saved many Christians' lives (Mark 13:2 ,Mark 13:2,13:14-23 ). See Ark of the Covenant ; Herods; Holy of Holies ; Moriah ; Shiloh ; Solomon ; Tabernacle, Tent of Meeting; Zerubbabel
Poetry - In later alphabetical psalms there is more regularity than in David's, and less simplicity; as Psalm 111; 112, have every half verse marked by a letter, and Psalm 119 has a letter appropriated to every eight verses. Its peculiar excellence is that, whereas poetry of other nations suffers much by translation, (for the versification depends on the recurrence of certain sounds at regular intervals), Hebrew poetry suffers but little, for its principle is the parallel correspondence of thoughts, not sounds, thought/rhythm Ewald designates it; a remarkable proof that from the first the Spirit designed Holy Scripture for nations of every tongue. The Masoretic punctuation marks the metrical arrangement by distinctive accents; the thought in the inspired volume is more prominent than the form. Israel's song at the Red Sea (Exodus 15), the priests' benediction (Numbers 5:22-26), Moses' chant at the moving and resting of the Ark Numbers 9:35-36), Deborah's song (Judges 5), and Hannah's song (1 Samuel 2) laid the foundation for the full outburst of psalmody in David's days; and are in part appropriated in some of the psalms. Besides, there were 4,000 Levite singers (1 Chronicles 25); Asaph with his company was with the Ark on Zion; Heman and Jeduthun with the tabernacle at Gibeon (1 Chronicles 16:37-42). Trumpets with loud hoarse note accompanied the bringing in of the Ark (1 Chronicles 15:24); also at the temple's consecration (2 Chronicles 5:12); also at the restoration of temple worship under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:26-27); also at the founding of the second temple (Ezra 3:10). ...
David's lament over Jonathan is a beautiful specimen of another feature of Hebrew poetry, the strophe; three strophes being marked by the thrice recurrence of the dirge, sung by the chorus; the first dirge sung by the whole body of singers representing Israel; the second by a chorus of damsels; the third by a chorus of youths (2 Samuel 1:17; 2 Samuel 1:27)
Altar - The first of which we have mention was built by Noah after leaving the Ark (Genesis 8:20). on the contrary are introduced in the temple yet future (Ezekiel 43:17), marking its distinctness from any past temple. A ledge (Hebrew karkob ) projected on the side for the priest to stand on, to which a slope of earth gradually led up on the S. Except in emergencies (as Judges 6:24; 1 Samuel 7:9-10; 2 Samuel 24:18; 2 Samuel 24:25; 1 Kings 8:64; 1 Kings 18:31-32) only the one altar was sanctioned (Leviticus 17:8-9; Deuteronomy 12:13-14), to mark the unity and ubiquity of God, as contrasted with the many altars of the manifold idols and local deities of pagandom. The divine fire on the altar; the shekinah cloud, representing the divine habitation with them, which was given to the king and the high priest with the oil of unction; the spirit of prophecy; the Urim and Thummim whereby the high priest miraculously learned God's will; and the Ark of the covenant, whence God gave His answers in a clear voice, were the five things of the old temple wanting in the second temple. It was "before the veil that is by the Ark of the testimony, before the mercy seat;" between the candlestick and the shewbread table. The altar of incense also was close by the second veil, directly before the Ark (1 Kings 6:22), "by (Hebrew belonging to) the oracle," i. Therefore the inner altar was ornate and golden, the outer altar bore marks of humiliation and death
u'Rim And Thum'Mim - In side the breastplate, as the tables of the covenant were placed inside the Ark, ( Exodus 25:16 ; 28:30 ) are to be placed "the Urim and the Thummim," the light and the perfection; and they too are to be on Aaron's heart when he goes in before the Lord
Reed - The gomee , of the sedge kind (Cyperaceae ), the papyrus or paper reeds of which Moses' Ark was formed (Exodus 2:3)
Manna - This jar was later placed in the Ark of the covenant together with Aaron’s rod and the stone tablets inscribed with the law (Exodus 16:31-35; Hebrews 9:4)
Joshua - An inhabitant of Beth-shemesh, in whose land was the stone at which the milch-kine stopped when they drew the Ark of God with the offerings of the Philistines from Ekron to Beth-shemesh
Soul, Spirit - Soul is often employed to express the moral undying part of man's being, and it is used sometimes to signify the person: as "all the souls that came with Jacob into Egypt," Genesis 46:26 ; "eight souls" were saved in the Ark. ...
The SPIRITis distinctively the higher part of man, it marks the conscious individuality, and distinguishes man thus from the inferior creation
Woman - 8:16: “Go forth of the Ark, thou, and thy wife, and thy sons, and thy sons’ wives with thee
Samson - However their rule ceased not until the judgeship of Samuel, which retrieved their capture of the Ark (1 Samuel 7:1-14). So the close of Samson's judgeship must have coincided with the beginning of Samuel's, and the capture of the Ark in Eli's time must have been during Samson's lifetime
Moses - When the baby could no longer be hidden, the mother constructed an Ark, a basket of bulrushes made waterproof with bitumen and pitch. She found the Ark, opened it, and recognized the child as a Hebrew. As a part of that process, the princess committed the child to a wet nurse suggested by the girl watching the Ark. ...
The death of Moses is marked by tragic loneliness, yet graced with God's presence
Typology - Blow, strike, mark A literal meaning tupos is found in the narrative about Thomas' skepticism: “If I do not see in his hands the mark ( tupos ) of the nails and place my finger into the mark of the nails and place my hand into his side, I will not believe” ( John 20:25 ). Baptism as a fulfillment of the type Peter, after discussing Christ's work in preaching in the spiritual realm to spirits in prison, mentioned Noah's Ark and the flood: “Into which Ark a few [2] were saved through water, which water [3] as a fulfullment of the type now saves you through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, not through removing of dirt from the body but as a pledge of a good conscience towards God” (1618384275_61 ). Noah and his family were delivered by the Ark and the water; Christians expressing in baptism genuine faith are delivered from bondage to sin
Cherub (1) - Revelation 2:7; Revelation 22:14; they, with the flaming sword, were the forerunners of the sanctuary, where the Cherub on either side of the bright Shekinah cloud (from which, as on Sinai, the flame might at any moment dart) looked down on the blood-sprinkled mercy-seat of the Ark, God's meeting place in reconciliation with sinners by the stoning blood; mercy and justice meeting together in man's redemption. ...
The Christian fathers identify them with the four Gospels: Matthew, the lion, the kingly aspect of Christ's manifestation; Mark, the ox, Christ's laborious endurance; Luke, the man, Christ's brotherly sympathy with our whole race; John, the eagle, the soaring majesty of the divine Word made flesh. As the mercy-seat (typifying Christ as our propitiation) interposed between the law inside the Ark and the cherubim outside, so Christ interposes between the divine justice and the redeemed. ...
As the cherubim were of one piece with the Ark, so the redeemed are one with Christ, and one with Him as their propitiation (2 Peter 1:4; Hebrews 2:11; Exodus 29:42-46; Exodus 25:22; 1 Corinthians 3:16-17; Galatians 2:20)
Jericho - ...
The capture of the city was altogether of God, after it had been compassed six days by the people, accompanied by the Ark and the priests blowing the trumpets: in that way they proclaimed the rights of the Lord of all the earth to the land, while Jericho was the fortress of the enemy. Matthew 20:29 ; Mark 10:46 ; Luke 18:35 ; Luke 19:1 . ...
The Ain es Sultan, 31 52' N, 35 27' E , is held to be the fountain healed by Elisha, and the ruins around mark the site of the ancient city, five miles from the Jordan; but this is not the site of the Jericho of N
Cherubim - In Solomon’s Temple there were two colossal cherubim whose out-spread wings filled the most holy place (1 Kings 6:23-28), but in the ideal description of the Tabernacle two much smaller figures are represented as standing on the Ark of the covenant itself (which was only about four feet long), facing each other and overshadowing the place of God’s presence
Jehoshaphat - The faithfulness of the Lord in chastening Jehoshaphat is very marked, and in not allowing him to be in a false position which practically denied the name of the Lord. Priest who assisted in bringing up the Ark
Amen - So when David brought up the Ark, and delivered a psalm of thanksgiving, all the people said, Amen, and praised the Lord
Ephod - And David, in the ceremony of removing the Ark from the house of Obed-edom to Jerusalem, was girt with a linen ephod, 2 Samuel 6:14 . The ephod of Gideon is remarkable for having become the occasion of a new kind of idolatry to the Israelites, Judges 8:27
Miz'Pah - (Genesis 31:25 ) to serve both as a witness to the covenant then entered into and as a landmark of the boundary between them. With the conquest of Jerusalem and the establishment there of the Ark, the sanctity of Mizpah, or at least its reputation, seems to have declined
Josiah - The Ark was restored to its place in the temple, from which apparently it had been removed for some purpose
Urim And Thummim - Prideaux espouses, is, that when the high priest appeared before the veil, clothed with his ephod and breastplate, to ask counsel of God, the answer was given with an audible voice from the mercy seat, within the veil; but, it has been observed, that this account will by no means agree with the history of David's consulting the oracle by Abiathar, 1 Samuel 23:9 ; 1 Samuel 23:11 ; 1 Samuel 30:7-8 ; because the Ark, on which was the mercy seat, was then at Kirjathjearim; whereas David was in the one case at Ziklag, and in the other in the forest of Hareth. Thus prepared, he presented himself before the Lord to ask counsel on public matters, not in the inner sanctuary, which he presumed not to enter, except on the great day of national atonement, but without the veil, with his face toward the Ark of the covenant, inside; and behind him, at some distance, without the sanctuary, stood Joshua, the judge, or person who wanted the response, which seems to have been given with an audible voice from within the veil, Numbers 27:21 , as in the case of Joshua 6:6-15 ; of the Israelites during the civil war with Benjamin, Judges 20:27-28 ; on the appointment of Saul to be king, when he hid himself, 1 Kings 6:16 ; of David, 1 Samuel 22:10 ; 1 Samuel 23:2-12 ; 1 Samuel 30:8 ; 2 Samuel 5:23-24 ; of Saul, 1 Samuel 28:6
Tabernacle - In the most holy place are placed two distinct yet connected sacred objects, the Ark and the propitiatory or mercy-seat ( Exodus 25:10-22 , Exodus 37:1-9 ). ]'>[2] ’s characteristic name for the former is the Ark of the testimony . ]'>[2] for the Decalogue ( Exodus 25:16 ), which was written on ‘the tables of testimony’ ( Exodus 31:18 ), deposited, according to an early tradition, within the Ark. The Ark itself occasionally receives the simple title of ‘the testimony,’ whence the Tabernacle as sheltering the Ark is named in P Altar - It is evident that sacrifices were offered long before the flood; but the first mention of an altar in Scripture is when Noah left the Ark
Synagogue - The arrangements for the women's place in a separate gallery or behind a partition of lattice-work; the desk in the centre, where the reader, like Ezra in ancient days, from his 'pulpit of wood,' may 'open the book in the sight of all of people and read in the book of the law of God distinctly, and give the sense, and cause them to understand the reading' (Nehemiah 8:4,8 ); the carefully closed Ark on the side of the building nearest to Jerusalem, for the preservation of the rolls or manuscripts of the law; the seats all round the building, whence 'the eyes of all them that are in the synagogue' may 'be fastened' on him who speaks (Luke 4:20 ); the 'chief seats' (Matthew 23:6 ) which were appropriated to the 'ruler' or 'rulers' of the synagogue, according as its organization may have been more or less complete;", these were features common to all the synagogues. ) ...
The synagogue was also sometimes used as a court of judicature, in which the rulers presided (Matthew 10:17 ; Mark 5:22 ; Luke 12:11 ; 21:12 ; Acts 13:15 ; 22:19 ); also as public schools. ...
Christ and his disciples frequently taught in the synagogues (Matthew 13:54 ; Mark 6:2 ; John 18:20 ; Acts 13:5,15,44 ; 14:1 ; 17:2-4,10,17 ; 18:4,26 ; 19:8 )
Jonathan - Saul discovered that Jonathan was missing, called for the Ark of God, went to battle, and defeated the Philistines
Dance - " The special feature of David's conduct before the returning Ark (2 Samuel 6:5-22) is that he was choir leader, the women with their timbrels (2 Samuel 6:5; 2 Samuel 6:19-20; 2 Samuel 6:22) taking a prominent part. Herod's extravagant promise to Herodias' daughter shows that it was a rare deed in those regions (Mark 6:22-23)
Miriam - She watched her infant brother in the Ark on the Nile, and suggested to Pharaoh's daughter the mother as a nurse. Hath the Lord indeed spoken only by Moses? Hath He not spoken also by us?" But the phrase "sister of Aaron" (a phrase not likely to have been applied to Miriam by a later writer than Moses) marks her as ranking, not with Moses but with Aaron, and like him subordinate to Moses, the mediator of the Old Testament, and standing to Aaron "instead of God" (Exodus 4:16). "...
The Lord hearkened, but excluded her from the camp seven days; and such was her popularity, "the people journeyed not (from Hazeroth) until Miriam was brought in again
Gibeah - The Ark was lodged on a hill (Hebrew, Gibeah ) during the period between its return by the Philistines and David's initial effort to move it to Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6:4 KJV)
Manna - ]'>[3] Hebrews 9:4 , Revelation 2:17 ) the Ark
Maryland - He and Father John Altham, with a lay-brother, Thomas Gervase, had accompanied the expedition in the Ark and the Dove from England, and when the permanent site was chosen, March 27, at Saint Mary's, on tke river of the same name, about 12 miles above the mouth of the Potomac, the wigwam of one of the Indian chiefs was given over to them to be transformed into the first chapel. At the last place a bark chapel was erected for the baptism of the chief, Chitomachen or Chilomacon, and his wife
Tabernacle - In the Holy of Holies was the Ark of the covenant which contained the Ten Commandments (Exodus 25:16)
Hobab - The Ark of the covenant was their main guide (Numbers 10:33)
Beth-Shemesh - ) when the Ark of the covenant passed through the city upon returning from the Philistines (1 Samuel 6:13 )
Bethel - Hither the Ark was brought from Gilgal ( Judges 20:18 LXX Naming - Conditions of the times proved imaginative as well: Ichabod, “The glory has departed from Israel,” (NRSV) came about by the Ark of the covenant falling into Philistine hands (1 Samuel 4:21-22 ) and the symbolic names of Isaiah's sons: Shear-jashub, “a remnant shall return,” (Isaiah 7:3 ); Maher-Shalal-hash-baz, “swift is the booty, speedy is the prey,” (Isaiah 8:3 , NASB). Titles and kinship terms (Abimelech, melech means “king”; Abigail, Ab(i) means “father”) and foreign names occur: Aramaic, Greek, and Roman (Martha, Salome, Alexandra, John Mark)
Lydda - His relics were taken to Lydda, and round his name was gradually woven a tissue of legend, in which the Greek myth of Perseus and Andromeda (see Joppa), the Moslem idea of Elijah (or alternatively of Jesus) as the destined destroyer of the Impostor (al-dajjâl) or Antichrist, and the old Hebrew story of the fall of Dagon before the Ark, were all inextricably intertwined, till Lydda became the shrine of St
Lamp - It is said in the history of Samuel, "that ere the lamp of God went out in the temple of the Lord where the Ark of God was, and Samuel was laid down to sleep, that the Lord called Samuel
Benjamin - " So in the blessings of Psalm 68:27 Benjamin is the first named of the four tribes; and in Psalm 80:2 , where God is called upon to save them, Benjamin is mentioned with Ephraim and Manasseh, being the three tribes which followed the Ark
Temple - the Ark of the covenant; 3
Cloud - ”...
When the Ark of the covenant was brought into the holy place, “The cloud filled the house of the Lord, so that the priests could not stand to minister because of the cloud: for the glory of the Lord had filled the house of the Lord” (1 Kings 8:10-11). So the psalmist wrote that God was surrounded by “clouds and darkness” (
War - God’s presence in “battle” was symbolized by the Ark of the covenant ( Multiply, Increase - 7:17 the waters are said to have “increased, and bare up the Ark, and it was lifted up above the earth
Mountain Range - ...
In its first biblical appearance har refers to the “mountain range” upon which Noah’s Ark came to rest ( Josiah - The Ark was restored to its proper place; the temple was purified; idolatrous utensils were removed, and those appropriate to the worship of God substituted in their room
Sion - This hill was, perhaps, on this account, made choice of by the Jebusites for building a fort or citadel upon; which fort was taken by David, who transferred his court thither from Hebron, and brought the Ark of the Lord and set it in a tabernacle or tent pitched for it. We have here another remarkable instance of the special fulfilment of prophecy
Benjamin - " So in the blessings of Psalm 68:27 Benjamin is the first named of the four tribes; and in Psalm 80:2 , where God is called upon to save them, Benjamin is mentioned with Ephraim and Manasseh, being the three tribes which followed the Ark
Baptism, Baptist, Baptize - have the word in Matthew 20:22,23 ; it is used in Mark 10:38,39 , with this meaning. ...
A — 2: βαπτισμός (Strong's #909 — Noun Masculine — baptismos — bap-tis-mos' ) as distinct from baptisma (the ordinance), is used of the "ceremonial washing of articles," Mark 7:4,8 , in some texts; Hebrews 9:10 ; once in a general sense, Hebrews 6:2 . " The experience of those who were in the Ark at the time of the Flood was a figure or type of the facts of spiritual death, burial, and resurrection, Christian "baptism" being an antitupon, "a corresponding type," a "like figure," 1 Peter 3:21
God, Name of - The Ark was God's throne and footstool (1 Samuel 4:4 ; 2 Samuel 6:2 ; 1 Chronicles 28:2 ; Ezekiel 43:7 ). Wherever the Ark went, God went. Some have argued that the development of a "name theology" in ancient Israel was given impetus by the loss of the Ark itself
Temple - The holy of holies was a small square chamber, absolutely dark except by the light received through the entrance. In it were two huge golden figures, standing upright on their feet, on each side of the Ark, which rested upon a protuberance of rough rock. Above the Ark the wings of these cherubim met. This second temple, though inferior in many respects to the first—having no Ark, no mercy-seat, no visible revelation of the divine glory, no sacred fire, no Urim and Thummim, and no spirit of prophecy, Ezra 3:12-13—still was in breadth and height, in almost every dimension, one-third larger than Solomon's. " Matthew 24:2; Mark 13:2; Luke 21:6
Miriam - AARON AND MOSES, AND MIRIAM THEIR SISTER...
WATCH well, Miriam, and never let thine eyes off that Ark of bulrushes Watch that little Ark with all thy wit, for no other maiden shall ever have such another watch till the fulness of time, when another Miriam shall watch over another child still more fair to God. Watch well, Miriam, the brink of the river, and that Ark among its waters, and thou shalt not want thy wages. For far greater riches are hidden in that little Ark than all the treasures of Egypt. Look at her watching the Ark of bulrushes. She will buy the two birds on her way home after dark
Tabernacle - This literary structure shows that the ultimate need of the people was not for deliverance from physical oppression or from theological darkness, but from alienation from God. Deliverance from bondage and from spiritual darkness are not ends, but means to the end of fellowship with God. Here, in the starkest visual terms, is the representation of the truth that "without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness" (Hebrews 9:22 ). This represented the light that God was to his people in the darkened world of sin (Psalm 27:1 ). 1611 term "ark, " but that is just an archaic word for "box. ...
But the Ark has positive significance as well. The Ark tells us that we cannot manipulate the essence of God; we can only remember what he has done for us and relate to him and one another accordingly. Oswalt...
See also Aaron ; Altar ; Ark ; Exodus, Theology of ; Hebrews, Theology of ; Israel ; Moses ; Offerings and Sacrifices ; Priest, Priesthood ; Temple ...
Bibliography
Incense - outside the veil, before the golden altar of incense; from its relation to the Ark thus it became" most holy," as was also the altar of incense (Leviticus 30:10). " In the second temple, where there was no Ark, a stone was substituted. ...
For prayer was offered by the pious Jews at the times of the morning and evening sacrifices on the altar of burnt offering, which were accompanied with the incense on the altar of incense, thus marking that prayer rests upon propitiation By sacrifice
Miracle - ...
Lice brought, Mark 8:22-25 . ...
Darkness brought, Exodus 10:22 . ...
Dagon falls before the Ark, etc. ...
Return of the Ark, 1 Samuel 6:12 . ...
Many miracles of Christ, Matthew 4:23-24 8:16 14:14,36 15:30 Mark 1:34 Luke 6:17-19 . ...
Paralytics healed, Matthew 9:2-6 Mark 2:3-12 . ...
The dumb restored, Matthew 9:32-33 12:22 Mark 7:33-35
High Priest - ...
The death of the high priest marked the end of an epoch. Neither Eli, Ahimelech, Abiathar, nor Zadok are called high or chief priest, though all four headed priestly families and are mentioned in connection with items usually associated with the high priest (the Ark, the ephod, the Urim and Thummim: 1 Samuel 3:3 ; 1 Samuel 4:4-11 ; 1 Samuel 21:6 , 1 Samuel 21:9 ; 2 Samuel 15:24-29 ). Part of his ministry before the Ark involved consulting the Lord for battle counsel (Judges 20:27-28 ). When David moved the Ark to Jerusalem, Abiathar and Zadok apparently officiated jointly as chief priests (2Samuel 8:17;2Samuel 15:24-29,2 Samuel 15:35 ; 2 Samuel 19:11 ), though Zadok already appears as the dominant figure in 2Samuel
Temple - ]'>[1] is that of Shiloh ( 1 Samuel 1:9 ), ‘where the Ark of God was’ ( 1 Samuel 3:3 ) in the period of the Judges, under the guardianship of Eli and his sons. It was evidently destroyed by the Philistines after their decisive victory which resulted in the capture of the Ark, as recorded in 1 Samuel 4:10 ff. With the capture of Jerusalem by David, and the transference thither of the Ark, a new political and religious centre was provided for the tribes of Israel. ’...
The remarkable persistence of sacred sites in the East is a phenomenon familiar to all students of religion, and there can be little doubt that the Chronicler is right in identifying the site of ‘the altar of burnt-offering for Israel’ (1 Chronicles 22:1 ) with the spot ‘by the threshing-floor of Oman [3] the Jehusite,’ where the angel of the plague stayed his hand, and on which David by Divine command erected his altar of commemoration (see, further, § 6 ( b )). The only possible alternative is to regard the rock as marking the site, not of the altar of burnt-offering, but of ‘the holy of holies’ of the successive Temples a view beset with insuperable difficulties. ...
On the completion of the Temple, the sacred memorial of earlier days, the already venerable Ark of J″ Shiloh - The loss of the Ark and the disaster to his sons proved fatal to Eli ( 1 Samuel 4:12 ff
Censer - He may be supposed to have been misled (a) by the ambiguous instructions regarding it given in Exodus 30:6 : ‘thou shall put it before the veil that is by the Ark of the testimony, before the mercy-scat that is over the testimony’; (b) by its designation as ἅγιον τῶν ἁγίων in Exodus 30:10; and (c) especially by the fact that in Exodus 25:23-40; Exodus 26:35, only the candlestick and the table are mentioned as standing in the holy place
Zechariah - ...
...
A Levite who assisted at the bringing up of the Ark from the house of Obededom (1 Chronicles 15:20-24 )
Linen - The child Samuel in Shiloh ( 1 Samuel 2:18 ), and David, bringing back the Ark ( 2 Samuel 6:14 etc. It probably corresponded to the sindôn ‘linen cloth’ of Mark 14:51 , and the shroud of Matthew 27:59 etc
Peter, First Epistle of - ...
It is remarkable that, in touching on duties connected with social relationships, the apostle addresses himself to husbands and wives and domestic servants (not slaves), and the peculiar delicacy of his reference to the conduct relatively of the two former classes is a marked feature of beauty in the epistle. ...
The peculiar character of this moment, in which judgement as the issue of God's moral government is imminent, is marked by the reference to the time of Noah, whose testimony in preparing the Ark was that of coming judgement; but at the same time of a way of salvation
Gospel, the, - It was good news to Noah (when God made known that He was going to destroy all flesh) that he and his family should be saved in an Ark, and that God would establish His covenant with him
Heart - David had it in his heart to build a house of rest for the Ark
Thirteen - ...
1ch13 - Uzza is killed by the Lord for touching the Ark
Ephod - David, on the occasion of bringing up the Ark, wore a linen ephod
Dispensation, - Then the world was 'spoken to' by God in the person of Noah, who was 'a preacher of righteousness;' and their repentance was waited for in long-suffering mercy while the Ark was preparing
Manna - Moreover, a specimen of manna as laid up in a golden vase in the Ark of the covenant in memory of a substance which would otherwise have perished, Hebrews 9:4
Jehoshaphat - ...
...
One of the priests who accompanied the removal of the Ark to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:24 )
Ephod - David, on the occasion of bringing up the Ark, wore a linen ephod
Temple - " The Ark, cherubim, and the tent of the meeting become the institutional representations of the Lord's presence among his people. Even the Ark itself is divested of its throne-like setting by its role as the "container" of the tablets of the law (Deuteronomy 10:1-5 ). ...
The paradoxical and symbolic nature of the temple is thus seen as the author(s) construct the parameters of temple theology: the transcendent deity graciously appears before his holy people in the place of his choosing, a dwelling symbolically rich by virtue of its ability to generate varied metaphoric associations (fire, cloud, tent, Ark, and most especially "name" in the Pentateuch). Although Jeremiah held little esteem for the Ark/temple, he nevertheless prophesied that God's throne would be Jerusalem itself (3:17), and Torah would be written in their hearts (31:31-34). In Ezekiel's new temple a remarkable event takes place: water flows from the temple (in Jerusalem) with such abundance that it calls to mind the rivers of paradise (see also Psalm 46:4 ; Revelation 21:6 ). Thus, when the temple practices are compromised, Jesus assails those who jeopardize the sanctity of the temple: "My house will be called a house of prayer But you have made it a den of robbers" (Mark 11:17 )
Live - ...
The intensive form of châyâh means “to preserve alive”: “… Two of every sort shalt thou bring into the Ark, to keep them alive with thee …” ( Ark …” ( Litany of Loreto - ...
Ark of the covenant, pray for us
Temple, the Second - On the invitation of Zerubbabel, the governor, who showed them a remarkable example of liberality by contributing personally 1,000 golden darics (probably about ,000), besides other gifts, the people with great enthusiasm poured their gifts into the sacred treasury (Ezra 2 ). This second temple had not the Ark, the Urim and Thummim, the holy oil, the sacred fire, the tables of stone, the pot of manna, and Aaron's rod
Bethel - He set up a pillar, and anointed it with oil, to mark the place where God spoke with him. During the civil war with Benjamin the tribes took the Ark thither to consult God (compare 1 Samuel 10:3)
Zebulun - ; and to Jesus the true Light, ministering most in Galilee, the land of Zebulun and Naphtali, the darkest and most Gentilized part of Palestine. of Israel in the procession of the Ark to Zion after Ammon's overthrow (2 Samuel 11:11; 2 Samuel 12:26-31)
Gath - Gath was one of the locations to which the Philistines took the Ark (1 Samuel 5:8-9 ) and was the hometown of Goliath (1 Samuel 17:4 ) and Obed-edom (1 Chronicles 13:13 )
Loreto, Litany of - ...
Ark of the covenant, pray for us
Uncleanness - The sacredness attached to the human body is parallel to that which invested the Ark of the covenant itself. There is an emphatic reminder of human weakness in the fact of birth and death-man's passage alike into and out of his mortal state-- being marked with a stated pollution
Aaron - This is a most remarkable incident demonstrating the grace and compassion of God. He ministered before Yahweh, whose presence-cloud dwelt above the mercy seat over the Ark of the covenant in the Most Holy Place of the tabernacle (Exodus 40:38 )
Condemnation - ...
Little difficulty attaches to the use of the term in the sense of ‘destruction’ in the case of Sodom (2 Peter 2:6), to the reference to the Ark as a visible sign of the destruction about to come upon the unbelieving (Hebrews 11:7), or to the denunciation by James (James 5:6) of men who unjustly ascribe blame to others and exact penalty for the imagined fault. Mark 9:47 ff
Anger (Wrath) of God - So ‘jealous’ is God for His holiness, that even accidental profanation of its symbol, the Ark, is visited by extreme penalty ( 1 Samuel 6:18 ; 1 Samuel 6:20 , 2 Samuel 6:7 )
Anchor - But, in view of what the writer says at a later stage about the Most Holy Place with its Ark of the covenant and cherubim of glory overshadowing the mercy-seat (Hebrews 9:4 f
Manasseh - In Psalm 80:2 we read, "Before Ephraim and Benjamin and Manasseh stir up thy strength, and come and save us," in allusion to these three being the tribes that immediately followed the Ark of God in the wilderness
Journey, Journeyings - A — 1: ὁδός (Strong's #3598 — Noun Feminine — hodos — hod-os' ) "a way, path, road," used of a traveler's way, a "journey," is rendered "journey" in Matthew 10:13 ; Mark 6:8 ; Luke 2:44 , "a day's journey" (probably to Beeroth, six miles north of Jerusalem); Luke 9:3 ; 11:6 ; Acts 1:12 , "a Sabbath day's journey," i. The regulation was not a Mosaic enactment, but a rabbinical tradition, based upon an exposition of Exodus 16:29 , and a comparison of the width of the suburb of a Levitical city as enjoined in Numbers 35:4,5 , and the distance between the Ark and the people at the crossing of the Jordan, Joshua 3:4 . ...
B — 8: ἀποδημέω (Strong's #589 — Verb — apodemeo — ap-od-ay-meh'-o ) denotes "to go on a journey to another country, go abroad," Matthew 21:33 ; 25:14,15 ; Mark 12:1 ; Luke 15:13 ; 20:9 . ...
Note: For the adjective apodemos, Mark 13:34 , AV, "taking a far journey," RV, "sojourning in another country," see COUNTRY
Day of Atonement - Then, as he opened the curtain to enter the Most Holy Place, incense floated in and covered the mercy seat (lid of the Ark, or covenant box), the symbolic throne of God
King - Saul, failing herein, forfeited his throne; he usurped the place of God's will: "we inquired not at the Ark in the days of Saul" (1 Chronicles 13:3). David, on the contrary, could not bear that God's throne, the Ark, should lie neglected while his throne was so elevated, and he stripped off his royal robe for the linen ephod to do homage before the symbol of God's throne (2 Samuel 6:14)
Priest - In war they sounded the holy trumpets and carried the Ark of the covenant
Altar - ...
...
The altar of incense (Exodus 30:1-10 ), called also "the golden altar" (39:38; Numbers 4:11 ), stood in the holy place "before the vail that is by the Ark of the testimony
Lord's Name Taken in Vain - Superstitiously, as when the Israelites carried the Ark to the field of battle, to render them successful against the Philistines, 1 Samuel 4:1-22
Lord of Hosts - And once more there is evidently a special connexion between the title ‘Lord of hosts’ and the Ark which is regarded as the habitation of Jahweh in His capacity as War-God (cf. So we are brought to another view, which may merely mark a later stage: the ‘hosts’ are the spiritual forces which stand at God’s disposal
Uriah - ...
David's attempt to hide his sin by bringing Uriah home to his wife from the war with Ammon was foiled by Uriah's right sentiment as a soldier and chivalrous devotion to Israel and to God: "the Ark and Israel and Judah abide in tents, and my lord Joab and the servants of my lord are encamped in the open fields; shall I then go into mine house to eat, drink, and lie with my wife?" This answer was well fitted to pierce David's conscience, but desire of concealment at all costs urged David on
Veil - —‘The veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom’ when Jesus died (Matthew 27:51, Mark 15:38, Luke 23:45). 1, where the mention of the Ark shows that the writer is thinking of the Temple of Solomon. 329]'>[1]) says: ‘There are three remarkable things, which the Jews do date from forty years before the destruction of the Temple—namely this of the Temple-doors’ opening of themselves, and the Sanhedrin’s flitting from the room Gazith, and the scarlet list on the scapegoat’s head not turning white
Camp - " This alludes to those three being the tribes which immediately followed the Ark, the symbol of God's presence
Month - We meet with constant mention in the Bible concerning the months; but it is remarkable, that the Israelites had no particular names for their months until alter their connection, with Egypt. We read in Genesis 7:11 of the second month, when the fountains of the great deep were broken up, and the Ark rested on the seventh month upon the mountains of Ararat, (Genesis 8:4) —and the waters decreased continually until the tenth month. ...
It is probable, however, that the Jews learnt in Babylon, the custom of the Chaldeans, to mark their months as they did by names, and from thence (or the Persians, under whom for a time they dwelt when the monarchy of Babylon was destroyed), they formed the following to all the months in the year
Eat - Hence, Noah was commanded to bring into the Ark two of every kind ( Apocrypha - The word Apocrypha is of Greek origin, and is either derived from the words απο της κρυπτης , because the books in question were removed from the crypt, chest, Ark, or other receptacle in which the sacred books were deposited whose authority was never doubted, or more probably from the verb αποκρυπτω , to hide or conceal, because they were concealed from the generality of readers, their authority not being recognised by the church, and because they are books which are destitute of proper testimonials, their original being obscure, their authors unknown, and their character either heretical or suspected
Levites - This innovation was displeasing to the priests; and the Jewish historian remarks, that the ancient customs of the country were never forsaken with impunity. The Gershonites, whose number was seven thousand five hundred, were employed in the marches through the wilderness in carrying the veils and curtains of the tabernacle; the Kohathites, whose number was eight thousand six hundred, in carrying the Ark and sacred vessels of the tabernacle; the Merarites, whose number was six thousand two hundred, in carrying the several pieces of the tabernacle which could not be placed upon the chariots; and the Aaronites were the priests who served the sanctuary
Veil - —‘The veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom’ when Jesus died (Matthew 27:51, Mark 15:38, Luke 23:45). 1, where the mention of the Ark shows that the writer is thinking of the Temple of Solomon. 329]'>[1]) says: ‘There are three remarkable things, which the Jews do date from forty years before the destruction of the Temple—namely this of the Temple-doors’ opening of themselves, and the Sanhedrin’s flitting from the room Gazith, and the scarlet list on the scapegoat’s head not turning white
Synagogue - ...
As regards the furniture of the synagogue, the most important item was the chest or cupboard ( tçbâ , the ‘ark’), in which the sacred rolls of the Law and the Prophets were kept. In front of the ‘ark’ a lamp burned day and night. It was usual however, to appoint an official called ‘ the ruler of the synagogue ’ ( Mark 5:22 , Luke 8:41 , and oft. He was responsible for the cleaning and lighting of the building; and during service it was his special duty to convey the sacred rolls from the Ark to the readers at the desk, and to restore them when the reading was over, as recorded in Luke 4:17-20 . Their recitation by the congregation was preceded and followed by one or two short benedictions, such as that beginning, ‘Blessed be thou, Adonai, our God, King of the universe, who didst form the light and create darkness. The preacher sat while giving his exposition, which is so often described in NT as ‘teaching’ (Matthew 4:23 , Mark 1:21 ; Mark 6:2 etc
Chronicles, Theology of - Most important, one does so through the proper religious means and in the proper place, that is, in the presence of the Ark of Yahweh or the temple. David, in turn, establishes the proper worship of Yahweh in regard to the Ark, the appointment of religious officials, and preparations for the temple (chaps. Chronicles focuses on how this relationship was expressed through the establishment and maintenance of the institutions that represented the presence of Yahweh: the Ark of the covenant, Jerusalem, the temple, the sacrificial system, the officiating priests, their levitical assistants and musicians, and the Davidic king, who sat on Yahweh's throne. ...
The exile marked a historical turning point
High Place, Sanctuary - In the period of the Judges the chief sanctuary in Ephraim was that consecrated by the presence of the Ark at Shiloh ( Judges 21:19 , 1 Samuel 1:3 etc. Thus the excavations at Gezer, Taanach, and elsewhere have laid hare a series of rock surfaces fitted with cup-marks , which surely can have been intended only for the reception of sacrificial blood. The sanctuary of the Gezer cave-dwellers measures 90 by 80 feet, and ‘the whole surface is covered with cup-marks and hollows ranging from a few inches to 5 or 6 feet in diameter. If the sanctuary possessed an image of the deity, such as the golden bulls at Dan and Bethel, or other sacred object an Ark, an ephod, or the like a building of some sort was required to shelter and protect it. The Ark was housed at Shiloh in a temple ( 1 Samuel 1:9 ; 1 Samuel 3:3 ), and a similar building is presupposed at Nob ( 1 Samuel 21:5 ; 1 Samuel 21:9 ). But there was a darker side to the picture
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - Jesus' enemies accused him of casting out demons by invoking Beel-zebul (Mark 3:22 ) and even of being his embodiment (Matthew 10:25 ). When they brought the Ark of the covenant from Shiloh and took it into battle against the Philistines, it did not result in their victory. However, the presence of the Ark in Philistine hands led to the challenge to their god, Dagon, and the return of the Ark to the Israelites
Numbers, Book of - The brazen altar was covered with purple; the table of showbread was covered with scarlet (Israel's glory), and the Ark alone had blue on the outside (Christ exhibiting the heavenly). When Moses entered into the tabernacle he heard "one speaking unto him from off the mercy seat that was upon the Ark of testimony, from between the two cherubim:" cf. The pillar of cloud was above, and the Ark went before them
Moses - ...
Of high theological significance for the Israelites, this structure was rectangular in shape and contained a tent where the cultic structure known as the covenant Ark was housed. God's presence rested upon the Ark, which was so sacred that the Israelites were prohibited from even seeing it. Distinctiveness in society as God's people, strictness of living in obedience to his laws, and unswerving trust in his power to save and keep were to be the hallmarks of Hebrew life. At the transfiguration of Christ, Moses appears with Elijah and converses with Jesus, signifying the harmony of law, prophecy, and the gospel (Mark 9:4 )
Solomon - Solomon returned to Jerusalem, where he offered a great number of sacrifices on the altar before the Ark of the Lord, and made a great feast for his servants. When the Ark was placed in the sanctuary, while the priests and Levites were celebrating the praises of the Lord, the temple was filled with a miraculous cloud, so that the priests could no longer stand to perform the functions of their ministry
Jordan - It may be said to have two banks, of which the inner marks the ordinary height of the stream; and the outer, its ancient elevation during the rainy season, or the melting of the snows on the summits of Lebanon. This fact is distinctly recorded by the sacred historian: "And as they that bare the Ark were come unto Jordan, and the feet of the priests that bare the Ark were dipped in the brim of the water; for Jordan overfloweth all his banks all the time of harvest," Joshua 3:15 . But although the state of this river in modern times completely justifies the incidental remarks of the sacred writers, it is evident that Maundrell was disconcerted by the shallowness of the stream, at the time of the year when he expected to see it overflowing all its banks; and his embarrassment seems to have increased when he contemplated the double margin within which it flowed. This difficulty, which has perhaps occurred to some others, may be explained by a remark which Dr
Pentateuch - Add what he says concerning the Ark of Noah, of its construction, of the place where it rested, of the wood wherewith it was built, of the bitumen of Babylon, &c. The Abbe Torne, in a sermon preached before the French king in Lent, 1764, makes the following remarks: "The legislator of the Jews was the author of the Pentateuch; an immortal work, wherein he paints the marvels of his reign with the majestic picture of the government and religion which he established! Who before our modern infidels ever ventured to obscure this incontestable fact? Who ever sprang a doubt about this among the Hebrews?...
What greater reasons have there ever been to attribute to Mahomet his Alcoran, to Plato his Republic, or to Homer his sublime poems? Rather let us say, What work in any age ever appeared more truly to bear the name of its real author? It is not an ordinary book, which, like many others, may be easily hazarded under a fictitious name
Amalekites - The Amalekites are mentioned with the Canaanites as having discomfited Israel at Hormah, on the borders of Canaan, permitted by God because of Israel's unbelief as to the spies' report, and then presumption in going up to possess the land in spite of Moses' warning and the non-accompaniment of the Ark (Numbers 14:43-45)
Remove, Depart - 7:17 (the first occurrence of this word), where it is reported that the waters “lifted up” the Ark
Descent Into Hades - ...
Thus we find the way prepared for explanation of the difficult passage 1618384275_4 : ‘Because Christ also suffered for sins once, the righteous for the unrighteous, that he might bring us to God; being put to death in the flesh, but quickened in the spirit; in which also he went and preached unto the spirits in prison, which aforetime were disobedient, when the long-suffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the Ark was a preparing’; cf. 22, which marks the time that Christ preached and excludes the idea that Christ in Noah preached to the men of Noah’s time, which was first suggested by St
Temple - ) The building of the temple marks an era in Israel's history, the nation's first permanent settlement in peace and rest, as also the name Solomon," man of peace, implied. At the end are blocks half quarried, the marks of the chisel as fresh as on the day the mason ceased; but the temple was completed without them, still they remain attached to their native bed, a type of multitudes, impressed in part, bearing marks of the teacher's chisel, but never incorporated into the spiritual temple. ...
The masons' Phoenician marks still remain on the stones in this quarry, and the unique beveling of the stones in the temple wall overhanging the ravine corresponds to that in the cave quarry. angle are the Phoenician red paint marks. ...
These marks cut into or painted on the bottom rows of the wall at the S. Two cherubim were placed over the Ark, much larger than those in the tabernacle; they were ten cubits high, with wings five cubits long, the tips of which outstretched met over the Ark, and in the other direction reached to the N. Not merely (Haggai 2:3) was this temple inferior to Solomon's in splendour and costly metals, but especially it lacked five glories of the former temple:...
(1) the Ark, for which a stone served to receive the sprinkling of blood by the high priest, on the day of atonement;...
(2) the sacred fire;...
(3) the Shekinab;...
(4) the spirit of prophecy;...
(5) the Urim and Thummim. But "the glory of this latter house was greater than of the former" (Haggai 2:9) because of the presence of Messiah, in whose face is given the light of the knowledge of the glory of God (2 Corinthians 4:6; Hebrews 1:2) as Himself said, "in this place is one (Greek 'a something greater,' the indefiniteness marking the infinite vastness whereby He is) greater than the temple" (Matthew 12:6), and who "sat daily teaching in it" (Matthew 26:55). No Ark is in it, for Jehovah the Ark's Antitype shall supersede it (Jeremiah 3:16-17; Malachi 3:1). As the sacrificial serrate at the tabernacle at Gibeon and the Ark service of sacred song for the 30 years of David's reign, before separate (2 Samuel 6:17; 2 Chronicles 1:3-4; called "the tabernacle of David" Amos 9:11-12; Acts 15:16; 1 Chronicles 13:3; 1 Chronicles 16:37; 1 Chronicles 16:39), were combined in Solomon's temple, so the priestly intercessory functions of our High priest in heaven and our service of prayer and praise carried on separately on earth, during our Judaeo universal dispensation, shall in the millennial temple at Jerusalem be combined in perfection, namely, Christ's priesthood manifested among men and our service of outward and inward liturgy
Solomon - undisturbed repose and wealth without the anxieties of the worldly, in a way they know not how (Mark 4:27). )...
He walked in David's godly ways but there being no one exclusive temple yet, he sacrificed in high places, especially at the great high place in Gibeon, where was the tabernacle with its altar, while the Ark was in Zion. Still he did not let her as a foreigner stay in the palace of David, sanctified as it was by the presence of the Ark, but assigned her a dwelling in the city of David and then brought her up out of the city of David to the palace he had built for her (2 Chronicles 8:11; 1 Kings 9:24; 1 Kings 3:1). 10,000 a month, the other 20,000 having two months' relief, cut timber in Lebanon; 70,000 bore loads; 80,000 hewed stone in the mountains and under the rock, where the mason's Phoenician marks have been found; chiefly Canaanites, spared on conforming to Judaism; 3,300 officers were over these workmen. The building of the temple began in Ζif , the second month of his fourth year; the stones were brought ready, so that no sound of hammer was heard in the house; in seven years it was completed, in the month Βul ('November"), his 11th year (1 Kings 6:37-38); eleven months later Solomon offered the dedication prayer, after the Ark had been placed in the holiest place and the glory cloud filled the sanctuary; this was during the feast of tabernacles. )...
His apostasy was the more glaring, contrasted with God's goodness in appearing to him twice, blessing him so much, and warning him so plainly; also with his own former scrupulous regard for the law, so that he would not let his Egyptian queen remain in the neighbourhood of the Ark; and especially with his devout prayer at the dedication
Altar - The rationale was probably to locate the altar as close as possible to the focal point of God's presence, near the Ark itself. With the building of the Solomonic Temple, the presence of God was associated especially with the Ark of the covenant
Synagogue - The structure, though essentially different from the temple (for it had neither altar nor sacrifice), resembled in some degree that of the temple: the Ark at the far end contained the law in both; the lid was called the kopereth or "mercy-seat"; a veil hung before it. Besides the Ark for "the law" (torah ) there was a chest for the haphtaroth or "roll of the prophets". The synagogue officers had judicial power to scourge, anathematize, and excommunicate (Matthew 10:17; Mark 13:9; Luke 12:11; Luke 21:12; John 12:42; John 9:22): so the church (1 Corinthians 6:1-8; 1 Corinthians 16:22; Galatians 1:8-9; 1 Corinthians 5:5; 1 Timothy 1:20; Matthew 18:15-18); also to seize and send for trial before the Sanhedrin at Jerusalem (Acts 9:2; Acts 22:5). ...
The Great Synagogue (Mark 7:3 "the elders"; Matthew 5:21-27; Matthew 5:33, "they of old time") is represented in the rabbinical book, Ρirke Αboth ("The Sayings of the [1] Fathers"), of the second century A
Jonathan - It marks how prone to idolatry were the Israelites, that the priest to Micah's images and afterward to the Danites was a Levite, whose special duty it was to maintain pure Jehovah's worship, and he a descendant of Moses himself! Idolatry begins with the people, it being natural to our sensuous cravings; then it seeks the sanction of the church. The priesthood remained hereditary in the family of Jonathan "until the captivity of the Ark" (the taking of the Ark by the Philistines), and Micah's images of his own making remained set up "all the time that the house of God was in Shiloh. At once "a wise man and learned scribe and counselor" (for the Hebrew dod , "uncle," means a relative and so "nephew": 1 Chronicles 27:32; 2 Samuel 21:21; 1 Chronicles 20:7), and a brave warrior who like David slew a giant Philistine, of Gath, remarkable for six toes and six fingers
Baptism - )...
Ceremonial washings had been multiplied by tradition, before the Lord's coming (Mark 7:3-4). But Christ's baptism was performed by His disciples, not Himself, that He might mark His exclusive dignity as baptizer, with the Holy Spirit (John 4:2), and that the validity of baptism might not depend on the worth of the minister but on God's appointment. "...
It saves us also, not of itself (any more than the water saved Noah of itself; the water saved him only by sustaining the Ark, built in faith), but the spiritual thing conjoined with it, repentance and faith, of which it is the seal: as Peter proceeds to explain, "not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God (the instrument whereby it so saves, being) by the resurrection of Jesus Christ" (Colossians 2:12; Ephesians 1:19-20); not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but of the soul. The Ark (Christ) and His Spirit-filled true church saves, by living union with Him and it; not the water which only flowed round the Ark and buoyed it up, and which so far from saving was the very instrument of destroying the ungodly. Figuratively, death is called a "baptism" (Matthew 20:22; Mark 10:38; Luke 12:50). The Greek word does not necessarily mean immersion of the whole body: compare Mark 7:3-4; Luke 11:38; Hebrews 9:10)
Law - The giving of the law marked the transition of Israel from nonage to full national life. 12) is the heart of the whole, and therefore was laid up in the Ark of the covenant beneath the "mercy-seat" or "propitiatory" (hilasteerion ), intimating that it is only as covered over by divine atoning mercy that the law could be the center of the (Romans 3:25-26) covenant of God with us. Its preeminence is marked by its being the first part revealed; not like the rest of the code through Moses, but by Jehovah Himself, with attendant angels (Deuteronomy 33:2; Acts 7:53; Galatians 3:19; Hebrews 2:2); written by God's finger, and on stone tables to mark its permanence. They were "the tables of the covenant," and the Ark, because containing them, was called "the Ark of the covenant" (Deuteronomy 4:13; Joshua 3:11). Piety toward the earthly father is closely joined to piety towards the heavenly (Hebrews 12:9; 1 Timothy 5:4; Mark 7:11)
Testimony - The Ark and the tabernacle are also occasionally called the Ark of the Testimony (Exodus 25:22 ; Numbers 4:5 ; Joshua 4:16 ) and the tabernacle/tent of the Testimony (Acts 1:21-22 ; Numbers 10:11 ; 2 Chronicles 24:6 ). Here, by the Ark in the tabernacle, God testifies to his own existence in the act of revealing himself to Moses (Exodus 25:22 ; 33:9-11 ; Numbers 7:89 ) and to future generations (Exodus 29:42 ). Jesus announced to his followers that they will stand trial before Jewish and Gentile authorities as witnesses to them on account of him (Matthew 10:18 ; Mark 13:9 ; Luke 21:13 ; John 15:27 ; Acts 10:42 ). To preach the gospel to the nations is to challenge them with the fact of Jesus (Matthew 24:14 ; Mark 13:10 ; Luke 24:48 ; Acts 1:8 )
Judges, the Book of - the removal of the Ark by the Philistines (compare Psalms 78:59-64; Jeremiah 7:12-14; 1 Chronicles 16:34-35). Jehovah's giving up His glory (the Ark) into captivity was a virtual giving over of Israel to captivity, i. all the time that the house of God was in Shiloh" (awful perversity! in the face of divine light close to them) imply that the book was written after the Philistine capture of the Ark, and after its return and setting up at, Nob in Saul's reign (1 Samuel 21); it remained at Shiloh only until its capture at Eli's death (1 Samuel 1:3; 1 Samuel 3:21; 1 Samuel 4:3), in David's reign the tabernacle was at Gibeon (1 Chronicles 16:39; 1 Chronicles 21:29)
Samuel - ...
After the death of Eli and the return of the Ark from the Philistines, Samuel becomes ‘judge’ of Israel, calls the people to repentance at Mizpah, and saves them miraculously from the invading Philistines (ch
Exodus, Book of - The two tables were renewed, but were to be placed in an Ark (comp
Dan (1) - until the Israelite reverse whereby the Philistines carried away the Ark; what aggravated their idolatry was it was at the very time "that the house of God was in Shiloh," within their reach
Chronicles, Books of - ) the list of David's heroes (1 Chronicles 12:1-37 ), the removal of the Ark from Kirjath-jearim to Mount Zion (1 Chronicles 13 ; 15:2-24 ; 16:4-43 ; Compare 2 Samuel 6 ), Uzziah's leprosy and its cause (2 Chronicles 26:16-21 ; Compare 2 Kings 15:5 ), etc
Levi - Yet the Lord was graciously pleased to choose this tribe for his own more immediate service, and placed this, highly honourable and distinguished mark upon it: At that time the Lord separated the tribe of Levi, to bear the Ark of the covenant of the Lord to stand before the Lord to minister unto him, and to bless in his name unto this day: wherefore Levi hath no part nor inheritance with his brethren; the Lord is his inheritance, according as the Lord thy God promised him
Build - 8:20, where Noah is said to have “constructed” an Ark
Go Out, Go Forth - ...
In comparison to this continuing “going out,” there is the one-time (punctiliar) “coming forth,” as seen when all the animals “came out” of the Ark ( Synagogue (2) - Hence the germs of the institution are to be sought far back in the exigencies that arose as civilization became more complex; and the Exile marks not the first stage in the origin of the synagogue, but an important modification of its functions, worship becoming thenceforward the principal though far from the sole occupation, and the administrative functions falling for a time into abeyance. Mention is made in the Gospels of those at Nazareth (Matthew 13:54, Mark 6:2, Luke 4:16) and at Capernanm (Mark 1:21, Luke 7:5, John 6:59). Of the equipment the most important item was the press or Ark containing the sacred writings. In small synagogues, near the Ark, which stood probably against the wall opposite the entrance, was a raised tribune, furnished with a lectern for the reader and a chair for the speaker (Luke 4:20). The chief seats (Matthew 23:6, Mark 12:39, Luke 11:43; Luke 20:46) were in front of the platform and Ark, or in larger synagogues at the further end of the building, opposite the doors, and in either case faced the congregation, who generally sat on chairs or mats arranged across the building, sometimes lengthways, with an open space between the first ranks on either side. In the course of the services he presented the sacred roll to the reader, and in due course replaced it ceremoniously in the Ark. Of the four principal parts (a) the first was the Shema‘ (so called from the opening word of Deuteronomy 6:4, which should read ‘Hear, O Israel; the Lord our God, the Lord is one,’ as cited in Mark 12:29), with introductory and closing benedictions. These paraphrases were not literal translations, but rather condensed interpretations, of a passage, and mark an important stage in the history of preaching. The next development was an extended exposition, which was the usage in NT times (Matthew 4:23, Mark 1:21; Mark 6:2, Luke 6:6, John 18:20). Here the council, or local Sanhedrin (Matthew 5:22; Matthew 10:17, Mark 13:9), met in the synagogue, where their plans were matured, their decisions taken, and often their penalties exacted. Thus a secularizing—or, from a Jewish point of view, a communal—tendency developed, such as had already shown itself in the case of the courts of the Temple (Matthew 21:12, Mark 11:15, John 2:14 ff
Ten Commandments - The two stones were immediately placed in the Ark, which had been prepared by Moses specially for that purpose ( Deuteronomy 10:1-5 Deluge - ]'>[3] alone gives the directions with regard to the size and construction of the Ark, the blessing of Noah, the commands against murder and the eating of blood, and the covenant with the sign of the rainbow. ]'>[2] one pair of the unclean and seven of the clean ( Genesis 7:2-3 ), are to be taken into the Ark
Samuel - And ere the lamp of God went out in the temple of the Lord where the Ark of God was, and Samuel was laid down to sleep, that the Lord called Samuel, and he answered, Here am I"...
There are a great number of very interesting things in this relation that I must not stay to dwell upon. But I must passover the consideration of these things, however interesting, to notice with more special marks of attention the call of Samuel, and the manner of it. Such are the marks of distinguishing grace in all ages of the church. Who can mark the properties of distinguishing grace in their own case and circumstances without having the heart melted into the fullest sense of affection?"Lord "Lord how is it (said the astonished disciple) that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us and not unto the world. " (Genesis 28:11; Gen 28:17) I cannot prevail upon myself to dismiss our view of Samuel before that I have first requested the reader to remark with me some features in the portrait of this great prophet, which bear resemblance, however faint, to the person and offices of the Lord God of the prophets, Jesus Christ
Ebal - There is still a rocky amphitheatrical recess on the side of Ebal, and a corresponding one of the same dimensions on the side of Gerizim; probably formed for the accommodation of the people, when all Israel, their elders, officers, and judges, stood: half of them, the six blessing tribes, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Issachar, Joseph, and Benjamin (sprung from Jacob's proper wives), over against Gerizim; and half, the six cursing tribes (four sprung from Zilpah and Bilhah, and Reuben the incestuous oldest and Zebulun the youngest) over against Ebal: with the Ark and the priests and Levites in the center between the two mountains. of Gerizim and on the brow of lofty hills, a suitable landmark, 2 Kings 2:1-2), "and beside the oaks (not 'plains,' but terebinths) of Moreh. " These "terebinths of Moreh" near Shechem were familiar to the people, as marking the spot where Abraham first entered the land (Genesis 12:6)
Levi - Others say ‘those who were attached to the Ark’ as priestly attendants
Sanctuary - , Exodus 26:33 ; 1 Kings 8:10 ; 2 Chronicles 5:11 ; Ezekiel 42:14 ), and the inner "holy place" (Leviticus 16:2 ; 4:6 ]'>[1]) which is the "Most Holy Place"), where the Ark of the covenant was located
Glory - Thus, God's glory is seen in the plagues and other miracles (Numbers 14:22 ), in the cloudy pillar (Exodus 16:10 ), in the theophany at Mount Sinai (Exodus 24:17 ; Deuteronomy 5:24 ), in the tabernacle (Exodus 29:43 ; 40:34-35 ; Numbers 14:10 ; 16:19,42 ; 20:6 ), in the fire initiating the sacrificial system (Leviticus 9:23 ), and in the Ark of the covenant (1 Samuel 4:21-22 ) and the temple of Solomon (1 Kings 8:11 ; Proverbs 26:1 )
Presence of God - Beyer...
See also Ark ; Cloud, Cloud of the Lord ; Glory ; God ; Tabernacle ; Temple ...
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Zechariah - A priest who blew the trumpet in the procession of the Ark (1 Chronicles 15:24)
Type - ...
ZION as the place where David pitched a tent for the Ark and had his throne and ruled over God's chosen people — type of delivering grace established in power and blessing in Christ: Zion will yet be the seat of Messiah's power on earth in millennial blessing
Remnant - ...
Noah and his family were a “remnant” delivered by the Flood: “… And Noah only remained alive, and they that were with him in the Ark” ( Remember - This marks the history of Israel at every major point: “And I have also heard the groaning of the children of Israel, … and I have remembered my covenant. David appointed “Levites as ministers before the Ark of the Lord, to invoke … the Lord …” ( Zechari'ah - Generally speaking, Zechariah's style is pure, and remarkably free from Chaldaisms. ) ...
One of the priests who accompanied the Ark from the house of Obed-edom
Weights And Measures - The measures of the former class have been universally derived, in the first instance, from the parts of the human body; but it is remarkable that, in the Hebrew system, the only part used for this purpose is the hand and fore-arm, to the exclusion of the foot, which was the chief unit of the western nations. ) which appears as the chief Oriental unit from the very building of Noah's Ark. " (Exodus 16:29 ) An exception was allowed for the purpose of worshipping at the tabernacle; and, as 2000 cubits was the prescribed space to be kept between the Ark and the people as well as the extent of the suburbs of the Levitical cities on every side, (Numbers 35:5 ) this was taken for the length of a Sabbath-day's journey measured front the wall of the city in which the traveller lived. ( Mark 7:4,8 ) Authorized Version "pot. " (d) The modius , similarly applied to describe any vessel of moderate dimensions, ( Matthew 5:15 ; Mark 4:21 ; Luke 11:33 ) Authorized Version "bushel," though properly meaning a Roman measure, amounting to about a peck
Benjamin - ...
The "morning" and "night" in Jacob's prophecy mark that Benjamin, as he was in the beginning, so he should continue to the end of the Jewish state. ...
This choice of Jerusalem as the seat of the Ark and David's place of residence formed a strong He between Judah and Benjamin, though Saul's connection with the latter had previously made the Benjamites, as a tribe, slow to recognize David as king (1 Chronicles 12:29; 2 Samuel 2:8-9). The hilly nature of the country is marked by the names Gibeon, Gibeah, Geba, Ramah, Mizpeh (watchtower), "the ascent of Bethhoron," the cliff Rimmon, the pass of Michmash. The presence of the Ark at Kirjath Jearim in Benjamin, the prophet Samuel's residence in the sanctuary Ramah (1 Samuel 7:17; 1 Samuel 9:12), the great assemblies of "all Israel" at Mizpeh (1 Samuel 7:5), and the sanctity attached of old to Bethel, "the great high place" at Gibeon (1 Kings 3:4; 2 Chronicles 1:3), all tended to raise B. "The high gate of Benjamin" (Jeremiah 20:2) marked the tribe's individuality even in the joint metropolis of Benjamin and Judah; compare Ezra 2; Ezra 10:9; Nehemiah 7; Nehemiah 11:31-35 in proof of this individuality even after the return from Babylon
Atonement - Κaphar and kopher is in Genesis 6:14, "Thou shalt pitch the Ark with pitch," the instrument of covering the saved from the destroying flood outside, as Jesus' blood interposes between believers and the flood of wrath that swallows up the lost. flee lid of the Ark, covering the law inside, which is fulfilled in Messiah who is called by the corresponding Greek term, hilasterion , "the propitiatory" or mercy-seat, "whom God hath set forth to be a propitiatory through faith in His blood" (Romans 3:23). This is the more remarkable in Hindostan, where it is considered criminal to take away the life of any animal. ...
Penal and vicarious satisfaction for our guilt to God's law by Christ's sacrificial death is taught Matthew 20:28; "the Son of man came to give His life a ransom for (anti) many" (anti implies vicarious satisfaction in Matthew 5:28; Mark 10:45). ...
At the same time it is a true remark of Macdonell (Donellan Lectures): "Christ's work of redemption springs from an intimate relationship to those whom He redeems
Joshua, Theology of - These include the memorial stones set up at Gilgal to commemorate the crossing of the Jordan River (4:19-24) with a special role for the priesthood and the Ark of the covenant (chaps. 3-4); the Israelite circumcision (5:1-3); the Passover celebration (5:10); Joshua's confrontation with the commander of the Lord's army (5:13-15); the special instructions for crossing the Jordan with the Ark (chaps. 6); the identification of the sin of Achan, his capital punishment, and the marking of the site of his burial (chap
Propitiation - The word ιλαστηριον is used in the Septuagint version, and in the Epistle to the Hebrews, to express the mercy seat or covering of the Ark. The covering of the Ark was rendered a propitiatory only by the blood of the victims sprinkled before and upon it; and when the Apostle says, that God hath set forth Jesus Christ to be a propitiatory, he immediately adds, having the ceremonies of the temple in his view, "through faith in his blood
David - He was remarkable for the grace of his figure and countenance, well made, and of immense strength and agility. He went backwards and forwards, as the king's dark hour was upon him, and his services were needed. He consolidated his power at home, took Jerusalem and made it his capital, removing thither the Ark of God, 2 Samuel 6:1-23, organized his army, 1 Chronicles 11:1-47, and regulated the services of the sanctuary, 15:16, enlarged his harem, 2 Samuel 3:2-5; 2 Samuel 5:13-16, opened commercial intercourse with the king of Tyre, 2 Samuel 5:11, and also extended his power abroad, subduing the Philistines, Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites. And, though we cannot with precision point out all he wrote, or describe the times and circumstances under which those were penned that we know did come from him, yet we delight to couple particular compositions with various crises of David's life—as Psalms 42:1-11 with his flight across the Jordan in Absalom's rebellion; Psalms 24:1-10 with the bringing up of the Ark to Jerusalem; Psalms 18:1-50 with David's deliverance from his enemies, and to see his emotions of praise, and hope, and repentance, and gratitude, and faith, at the wonderful dealings of God with him
Samuel - ...
A national leader...
There was an early indication of Samuel’s leadership role after the capture and subsequent return of the Ark by the Philistines
Oil - The New Testament Greek word that corresponds to Hebrew shemen [ Matthew 26:36 ; Mark 14:32 ). First, Moses was to use this oil to anoint the whole tabernacle, all its furniture (even the Ark of the covenant), and all the vessels used therein (vv
Samuel, Second Book of - ...
2 Samuel 6 ; 2 Samuel 7 give the bringing up of the Ark of God to Jerusalem
Come - To draw nigh to approach to arrive to be present Come thou and all thy house into the Ark. Mark 9
Shewbread - The staves were never taken out of the golden rings by which the Ark was to be borne; so translated 1618384275_60 "put the staves thereof in order," not "put in," they would need merely adjustment after motion (Exodus 25:14-15)
Hand - sometimes denotes the vengeance of God: "The hand of the Lord was heavy upon them of Ashdod," after they had taken the Ark, 1 Samuel 5:6-7 . To lean upon any one's hand, in a mark of familiarity and superiority. Our Saviour laid his hands upon the children that were presented to him, and blessed them, Mark 10:16
Synagogue - Their number appears to have been very considerable; and when the erection of a synagogue was considered a mark of piety, Luke 7:5 , or a passport to heaven, we need not be surprised to hear that they were multiplied beyond all necessity, so that in Jerusalem alone there were not fewer than 460 or 480. The westerly part of the building contained the Ark or chest in which the book of the law and the section of the prophets were deposited, and was called the temple by way of eminence. ...
The service of the synagogue was as follows: The people being seated, the "angel of the synagogue" ascended the pulpit, and offered up the public prayers, the people rising from their seats, and standing in a posture of deep devotion, Matthew 6:5 Mark 11:25 Luke 18:11,13 . See Matthew 13:54 Mark 6:2 John 18:20 Acts 13:5,15,44 14:1 17:2-4,10 18:4,26 19:8 . Hence we read of persons being beaten in the synagogue, and scourged in the synagogue, Matthew 10:17 Mark 13:9 Acts 22:19 26:11 2 Corinthians 11:24
ba'Bel - Scattered over the country on both sides of the Euphrates are a number of remarkable mounds, usually standing single, which are plainly of the same date with the great mass of ruins upon the river bank. The mound of the Kasr marks the site of the great palace of Nebuchadnezzar. On the seventh stage there was probably placed the Ark or tabernacle, which seems to have been again 15 feet high, and must have nearly, if not entirely, covered the top of the seventh story The entire original height, allowing three feet for the platform, would thus have been 156 feet, or, without the plat-form, 163 feet
Jerusalem - ...
David transformed Jerusalem into the religious center of his kingdom by bringing into it the Ark of the covenant (2 Samuel 6:1-19 ). Although David was not allowed to construct a temple, the arrival of the Ark forever linked Jerusalem with the cult of Yahweh. The move of the Ark of the covenant from the tent in the city to the temple proper may have prompted the shift of name. ...
Mark's references to Jerusalem are set mainly in the Passion narrative; however, he notes the "massive stones" of the temple (13:1). Barker, The Gate of Heaven: The History and Symbolism of the Temple in Jerusalem ; G
Jerusalem - The moving of the Ark (2 Samuel 6:1 ) made Jerusalem the religious center of the nation. It was understood to be a dwelling place for God (1 Kings 8:13 ), and the sacred Ark, symbolizing His presence, was placed in the holy of holies. The prophecy of the destruction of Jerusalem (Matthew 24:1 ; Mark 13:1 ; Luke 21:1 ), is mixed with prophecies concerning the coming of the Son of man at the end of the age when forsaken and desolated Jerusalem will welcome the returning Messiah (Matthew 23:39 )
Cosmas (3), Indian Navigator - Here men lived till the Deluge, when Noah and his family crossed the intervening flood in the Ark, and peopled the present world. One of his strongest arguments in support of his plan of the universe is drawn from the form of the Tabernacle of Witness which the words ἅγιον κοσμικόν (Heb_9:1) warrant him in considering to have been like Noah's Ark expressly constructed as an image of the world. and faithful description of the more remarkable animal and vegetable productions of India and Ceylon, the rhinoceros, elephant, giraffe, hippopotamus, etc. ...
His remarks on Scripture manifest a not altogether uncommon mixture of credulity and good sense. He mentions that to the discomfiture of unbelievers the marks of the chariot wheels of the Egyptians were still visible at Clysma where the Israelites crossed the Red Sea (v
Temple, Solomon's - The Ark was solemnly brought from the tent in which David had deposited it to the place prepared for it in the temple, and the glory-cloud, the symbol of the divine presence, filled the house. The feast of dedication, which lasted seven days, followed by the feast of tabernacles, marked a new era in the history of Israel. It was to them a perpetual reminder and visible symbol of God's presence and protection, a strong bulwark of all the sacred traditions of the law, a witness to duty, an impulse to historic study, an inspiration of sacred song
Fasting - Joshua and the elders of Israel fell upon their faces before the Ark, and put dust upon their heads, when the men of Ai had a momentary triumph over Israel
Manasseh (1) - " The book of Numbers (Numbers 2:17-24) represents these three kindred tribes together marching after the Ark; so in the Psalms
Propitiation - it is used adjectivelly in connection with epithema, "a cover," in Exodus 25:17 ; 37:6 , of the lid of the Ark (see MERCY SEAT), but it is used as a noun (without epithema), of locality, in Exodus 25:18-22 ; 31:7 ; 35:12 ; 37:7,8,9 ; Leviticus 16:2,13-15 ; Numbers 7:89 , and this is its use in Hebrews 9:5
Manna - ...
The local coloring is marked. ...
To commemorate Israel's living on omers or tenth deals of manna one omer was put into a golden pot and preserved for many generations beside the Ark
Tabernacle - It was also called the tent of the testimony (Exodus 38:21), to remind the people that within it, in the Ark, was the testimony of God, the law, which was to guide and control their lives
Philistines, the - The threat reached crisis proportions in the battle of Ebenezer (1 Samuel 4:1-18 ), when the Israelites were soundly defeated and the Ark of the covenant, brought over from Shiloh (1 Samuel 4:3-4 ), was captured
Samuel, the Books of - In the disestablishment of the Mosaic ritual consequent on the Philistine capture of the Ark, and in the unsettled times that followed, even the godly followed Moses less strictly
Synagogue - ...
An Ark was placed at one end, in which were deposited the sacred books. Mark 5:22,35,36,38 ; Luke 8:49 ; Luke 13:14 ; Acts 13:15 ; Acts 18:8,17
David - 1085; one of the most remarkable men in either sacred of secular history. His character as a monarch is remarkable for fidelity to God, and to the great purposes for which he was called to so responsible a position. The Ark of God he conveyed to the Holy City with the highest demonstrations of honor and of joy. ...
The mental abilities and acquirements of David were of a high order; his general conduct was marked by generosity, integrity, fortitude, activity, and perseverance; and his religious character eminently adorned by sincere, fervent, and exalted piety. ...
In his kingly character, David was a remarkable type of Christ; and his conquests foreshadowed those of Christ's kingdom
Philistines - During the time of Eli these invaders were trying to make their way into the central ridge of Palestine, and in one of the battles captured the Ark of Jahweh, which a pestilence (probably bubonic plague) induced them to return ( 1 Samuel 4:1-22 ; 1 Samuel 5:1-12 ; 1 Samuel 6:1-21 )
Jericho - Walls enclosed it, and its gate was regularly shut, according to eastern custom, when it was dark. Six successive days the armed host marched round the city, the priests bearing the Ark, as symbol of His presence, in the middle between the armed men in front and the rereward or rearguard, and seven priests sounding seven ramshorn (rather Jubilee) trumpets, the sign of judgment by "the breath of His mouth"; compare the seven trumpets that usher in judgments in Revelation, especially Revelation 11:13; Revelation 11:15. The miracle wrought independently of all conflict on their part at the outset marked that the occupation of the whole Holy Land was to be by His gift, and that it was a, fief held under God at His pleasure
Victor, Bishop of Capua - is remarkable for containing the Gospels in the form of a Harmony. There is a short general preface to the seven Catholic Epistles and also the remarkable preface purporting to be St. In the same hand are occasional glosses, the most remarkable being the explanation of the number of the beast in the Revelation as Teitan. Another work is the Reticulus , or On Noah's Ark (p. Matthew marks numerous passages as derived from Victor. Mark and St
Eli - Eli had many bitter memories as he sat by the wayside watching for the Ark of God. Broken neck; dead sons and daughters lying strewed all around him; the Ark taken; the temple in ruins, and the glory departed, and all-Eli is not lost. How the Ark of God was taken, and the two sons of Eli, Hophni and Phinehas, were slain
Transportation And Travel - Better marked and smoother roads were needed for travelers and for the transport of larger amounts of goods from place to place. Here they would make their devotions before a sacred image or the Ark of the covenant. A similar two-wheeled cart was used by David to carry the Ark of the covenant from Kiriath-jearim (also called Baale of Judah) to his new capital in Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6:2-17 )
Sacrifice And Offering - Upon embarking from the Ark after the great flood, Noah immediately built an altar and offered burnt sacrifices. While the sacrificial altar was placed in the courtyard, just before the door of the tabernacle, the incense altar was positioned inside the tabernacle, just before the Ark of the covenant. Jesus chided the Pharisees neglecting family responsibilities by claiming that something was “corban,” or offered to God, and thus unavailable for the care of their parents (Mark 7:1 )
Priest - David himself sacrificed, (at least the text expresses it so,) at the ceremony of bringing the Ark to Jerusalem, and at the floor of Araunah, 2 Samuel 6:13 . According to Josephus it was a hand's breadth in width, woven in such a manner as to exhibit the appearance of scales, and ornamented with embroidered flowers in purple, dark blue, scarlet, and white. In time of war their business was to carry the Ark of the covenant, to consult the Lord, to sound the holy trumpets, and encourage and harangue the army
War - ? His presence with the host was secured by ‘the Ark of J″ le'Vites - They were to bear all the vessels of the sanctuary, the Ark itself included
Building - God's glory rested over the Ark of the covenant (Exodus 25:22 ), in the tabernacle (Exodus 40:34-38 ; Numbers 9:15 ; 2 Samuel 7:5-7,13 ), and in Solomon's temple, God's house (1 Kings 8:10-21 ; Psalm 26:8 ; 27:4 ; 84:1-4 ; Ezekiel 10:18 ), and in Jerusalem (Psalm 50:1-2 ; 76:2 ; 132:13-14 ; Ezekiel 48:35 ). Nevertheless, as the drama unfolds, Jesus is revealed to be greater than the temple (Matthew 12:6 ); he is driven to purify it (Mark 11:15-18 ; cf. Malachi 3:1-3 ), foresees its destruction (Matthew 24:2 ; Mark 13:2 ; John 4:21 ), and is tried, in part, for his alleged antitemple stance (Matthew 26:61 ). In 2 Corinthians 6:16-7:1 the church is called the temple of the living God ( naos theou zomntos ) in stark contrast to a world characterized by lawlessness, darkness, disbelief, and idolatry. Mark 14:58 ; Colossians 2:11 ), and it far surpasses the earthly tent of this life, which is subject to decay and death (2 Corinthians 4:16 ; 5:1 ; cf
Purity-Purification - This is probably the background for the preparation made for the theophany, a manifestation of God's presence, in Exodus 19:1 and for the death of Uzzah when he was unprepared (not purified) to touch the Ark of the covenant, a most holy object ( 2 Samuel 6:1-11 ). Perfection is the meaning in Mark 14:3 ; this is mixed with religious purity in Hebrews 10:22 ; 1 John 3:3 . Purity is also listed among virtues (2 Corinthians 6:6 ; Philippians 4:8 ; 1 Timothy 4:12 ; compare Mark 7:15 )
Travel (2) - This was purely Rabbinical, and deduced from (1) Exodus 16:29 ‘Abide ye every man in his place, let no man go out of his place on the seventh day’; (2) from the distance between the Ark and the people on the march (Joshua 3:4); and (3) from the conditions laid down as to the cities of refuge (Numbers 35:5)
Levite - ...
During the temple period, with the Ark permanently in Jerusalem and in view of their numbers, the Levites were given additional responsibilities as officials, judges, gatekeepers, and musicians, all of which assisted the priests (1 Chronicles 23:4-5 )
Mansion - 131: Pausanias the victor of Plataea, intriguing with the Persians in Asia Minor, was ‘prolonging his stay to no good purpose’ (οὐκ ἐπ ̓ ἀγαθῷ τὴν μονὴν ποιούμενος), μονήν, as the Scholiast remarks, being practically equivalent to ἀργίαν, ‘idleness. Their consummation realizes the ideal of John 17:21; John 17:23; meanwhile they are the NT fulfilment of the two OT ideals of rest: ‘Rest in the Lord and wait patiently for him’ (Psalms 37:7), and ‘Arise, O Lord, into thy resting-place; thou, and the Ark of thy strength’ (Psalms 132:8). Parker, City Temple Pulpit, i
Art And Aesthetics - New Testament—Matthew 14:6 ; Matthew 26:30 ; Mark 6:22 ; Luke 15:25 ; Acts 17:22-29 ; 1 Kings 7:13-1468 ,Acts 19:26,19:29 ; Revelation 5:9 ; Revelation 21:22 . After all, God had commanded the Israelites not only to accept the Egyptian artifacts when they left Egypt (Exodus 12:35 ), but also to use them to build the tabernacle (Exodus 25-27 ; Exodus 35:20-29 ) with its fancy Ark (Exodus 37:7-9 , 1 Samuel 4:4 ), elaborate veils (Exodus 36:35-37 ), and other furnishings (Exodus 36:9-38:20 ). ...
The New Testament Era Though the New Testament has little to say directly about art and aesthetics, artistic endeavors such as singing (Matthew 26:30 ; Luke 15:25 ) and dancing (Matthew 14:6 ; Mark 6:22 ) were apparently quite common
Temple, the - The Ark was placed in the temple, and had found there its abiding resting place: it was the token of God's presence. ...
Another thing remarkable in the rearing of the temple was that it was built of stones made ready before being brought, so that there should be no noise of hammer, or axe, or iron tool, while it was in progress. Mark 13:1,2 ; Luke 21:5,6
Clean, To Be - Thus the Ark of the covenant, the incense altar, and the porch of the temple were “overlaid with pure gold” ( Jericho - The soldiers marched first, probably out of the reach of the enemies' arrows, and after them the priests, the Ark, &c
Music - David brought the Ark to Jerusalem with triumphant and joyful music, 1 Chronicles 13:8 15:16-28 ; and in the same manner Solomon was proclaimed king, 1 Kings 1:39-40
Priest - (Leviticus 10:11 ; 33:10; 2 Chronicles 15:3 ; Ezekiel 44:23,24 ) During the journeys in the wilderness it belonged to them to cover the Ark and all the vessels of the sanctuary with a purple or scarlet cloth before the Levites might approach them
Chronicles, Books of - Having been made king, David brought the Ark to Jerusalem and began organizing the singing and music that were to characterize public worship in Israel (13:1-16:36)
Kings, Books of - Upon completing the temple (7:13-51), he placed in it the Ark of the covenant (8:1-21) and dedicated the temple to God (8:22-9:9)
Temple (2) - In this wide sense it is used in Matthew 12:6; Matthew 24:1-2, Mark 11:11; Mark 13:1; Mark 13:3; Mark 14:49, Luke 19:47; Luke 21:37-38; Luke 22:52; Luke 24:53; but in a number of passages it is used in a more restricted sense, viz. : in reference to the Court of the Gentiles, Matthew 21:12-16; Matthew 21:23, Mark 11:15-18; Mark 11:27, Luke 19:45; Luke 22:53, John 2:14-15; John 5:14; John 8:59; in reference to the Court of the Women, Mark 12:41, Luke 2:27; Luke 2:37; Luke 21:1; in reference to the Court of the Israelites, Matthew 26:55, Mark 12:33, Luke 2:46; Luke 18:10; Luke 20:1, John 7:14; John 7:28; John 11:56; John 18:20. Other references to the Sanctuary are: Matthew 23:18-19; Matthew 23:35, which speak of the altar; Matthew 27:5-6, the treasury (but see below); Luke 1:9, the altar of incense (here the phrase ὁ ναὸς τοῦ κυρίου occurs for the only time); Matthew 27:51, the heavy veil between the Holy of Holies and the Holy Place (see also Mark 15:38, Luke 23:45). Matthew 26:61 (where the only occurrence of the phrase ὁ ναὸς τοῦ θεοῦ is found) Matthew 27:40, Mark 14:58; Mark 15:29. A few other expressions used for the temple may be briefly referred to: ὁ οἶκός μου,* [2] Matthew 21:13, Mark 11:17, Luke 19:46, John 2:17; οἶκος προσευχῆς, Matthew 21:13, Mark 11:17, Luke 19:46; ὁ οἶκος τοῦ πατρός μου, John 21:6. the space between the outer veil (see below) and the altar for burnt-offerings; in Matthew 24:15, ἐστὸς ἐν τὸπῳ ἁγίῳ, but in the parallel passage (Mark 13:14) the reading is ἑστηκότα ὅπου οὐ δεῖ. It is to this outer court that reference is made in Matthew 21:12-18, Mark 11:15 ff. The ‘treasury’ spoken of in Mark 12:41; Mark 12:43, Luke 21:1 was clearly entered by women; the discrepancy may, however, be explained by supposing that one of the trumpet-shaped receptacles into which offerings were cast, and which usually stood in the Men’s Court, was at certain times placed in the eastern portion of the court, so that every one, including the women, might have the opportunity of making the offerings; on such occasions the Women’s Court was, for the time being, a treasury. It was properly the place wherein the Ark should have rested; but nothing is heard of the Ark after the Captivity, and the Holy of Holies was, therefore, quite empty. The ‘foundation stone’ (אָבָן שְׁתִיָה) upon which, in the first temple, the Ark had stood, was nearly in the centre of the Holy of Holies; in the second temple it was exposed to the extent of about six inches;* Priests And Levites - ( Leviticus 24:9 , Mark 2:26 , Leviticus 14:1-57 etc. They had charge of the sacred furniture and vessels the Ark, altars, candlestick, and table, while the other families divided between them the charge of the different parts of the building ( Numbers 3:21-39 ). ...
In this temple was the Ark, and the infant Samuel slept inside the sanctuary to protect it (1 Samuel 3:3 ). Had these been in vogue at the time, we should certainly have found some reference to them in 2 Samuel 6:1-23 such as we find abundantly in the parallel in 1 Chronicles 15:1-29 , where 1 Chronicles 15:2 suggests that the death of Uzzah was a punishment for other than Levites having carried the Ark. It speaks of different sanctuaries Mizpah (Judges 20:1 ) and Bethel ( Judges 20:18 ; Judges 20:26 ), besides Shiloh, which is a place of comparatively small importance, yet marked, as in 1 Samuel
Deuteronomy, the Book of - Hence, the discourses, being delivered about the same time, exhibit marked unity of style, inconsistent with their being composed at distant intervals. And whosoever will not hearken unto My words which He shall speak in My name, I will require it of him. It at once foretells Christ's coming and their own chastisement from God ("I will requite it") for "not hearkening" to Him. But if it was the whole Pentateuch put by the Levites, at Moses' command, in the sides of the Ark (Deuteronomy 31:9; Deuteronomy 31:26; 2 Chronicles 34:14), still Deuteronomy was the part that mainly awakened the conscience of king and people (Deuteronomy 12:2-3; Deuteronomy 12:16; Deuteronomy 12:18; 1618384275_12; compare 2 Kings 22:13-17; 2 Kings 22:23). landmark which they of old time have set in thine inheritance which thou shalt inherit," "they of old time" are those about first to occupy the land. Moses tells us that all the words of this law he wrote and gave to the Levites to be put in the side of the Ark at the one time (Deuteronomy 31:9; Deuteronomy 31:22-26
Birds - Among the birds specifically named in the RSV translation of the Bible are: cock (Proverbs 30:31 ; Matthew 26:34 ,Matthew 26:34,26:74-75 ; Mark 14:30 ,Mark 14:30,14:72 ; Luke 22:34 ,Luke 22:34,22:60-61 ; John 13:38 ; John 18:27 ), carrion vulture (Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:17 ), crane (Isaiah 38:14 ; Jeremiah 8:7 ), dove/turtledove (Genesis 8:8-12 ; Luke 12:6-71 ; Isaiah 59:11 ; Matthew 3:16 ; Matthew 10:16 ; Luke 2:24 ; John 1:32 ), eagle (Exodus 19:4 ; Leviticus 11:13 ; Deuteronomy 14:12 ; Deuteronomy 32:11 ; Job 9:26 ; Job 39:27-30 ; Psalm 103:5 ; Proverbs 30:19 ; Jeremiah 4:13 ; Jeremiah 49:16 ,Jeremiah 49:16,49:22 ), falcon (Leviticus 11:14 ; Job 28:7 ), hawk (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ; Job 39:26 ), hen (Matthew 23:37 ; Luke 13:34 ), heron (Leviticus 11:19 ; Deuteronomy 14:18 ), kite (Genesis 8:8-12 ; Deuteronomy 14:13 ), osprey (Leviticus 11:13 ; Deuteronomy 14:12 ), ostrich (Leviticus 11:16 ; Job 39:27-28 ; Job 30:29 ; Job 39:13-18 ; Isaiah 13:21 ; Isaiah 34:13 ; Isaiah 43:20 ; Jeremiah 50:39 ; Lamentations 4:3 ; Micah 1:8 ), owl (Leviticus 11:17 ; Deuteronomy 14:16 ), partridge (1 Samuel 26:20 ; Jeremiah 17:11 ), peacock (1 Kings 10:22 ; 2 Chronicles 9:21 ), pelican (Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:17 ), pigeon (Genesis 15:9 ; Leviticus 1:14 ; Leviticus 5:7 ; Leviticus 12:8 ; Leviticus 14:22 ; Luke 2:24 ; John 2:14 ), quail (Exodus 16:13 ; Numbers 11:31-32 ; Psalm 105:40 ), raven (Genesis 8:7 ; Leviticus 11:15 ; Deuteronomy 14:14 ; 1 Kings 17:4-6 ; Proverbs 30:17 ; Luke 12:24 ), sea gull (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ), sparrow (Psalm 84:3 ; Matthew 10:29 ,Matthew 10:29,10:31 ; Luke 12:6-7 ), stork (Leviticus 11:19 ; Psalm 104:17 ; Jeremiah 8:7 ), swallow (Psalm 84:3 ; Isaiah 38:14 ; Jeremiah 8:7 ), vulture (Leviticus 11:13 ; Deuteronomy 14:12 ), and water hen (Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:16 ). All of the New Testament references to the cock (except the mention of “cockcrow” in Mark 13:35 ) relate to Peter's denial of Christ. Jesus warned Peter that before the cock crowed twice, Peter would deny Him three times (Mark 14:30 ). Noah released a dove from the Ark to determine if the flood waters had subsided from the earth. ...
All four Gospels describe the Spirit of God descending like a dove upon Jesus after His baptism (Matthew 3:1 ;Matthew 3:1;16:1 ; Mark 1:10 ; Luke 3:22 ; John 1:32 ). ...
The raven was the first bird Noah sent forth from the Ark following the flood (Genesis 8:7 ). Finally, the raven is a resourceful bird with a remarkable memory
Abel - " Thus he argues that Abraham believed God, "and it was accounted to him for righteousness,"—"that faith was reckoned to Abraham for righteousness,"—"that he received the sign of circumcision, a seal," a visible confirmatory, declaratory, and witnessing mark "of the righteousness which he had by faith. The faith of Noah had immediate respect to the threatened flood, and to the promise of God to preserve him in the Ark which he was commanded to prepare. So Noah built the Ark, which indicated that he had heard the threat of the world's destruction by water, and had received the promise of his own preservation, and that of his family, as well as that of a part of the beasts of the earth
Sabbath - There are not wanting indirect evidences of its observance, as the intervals between Noah's sending forth the birds out of the Ark, an act naturally associated with the weekly service, (Genesis 8:7-12 ) and in the week of a wedding celebration, (Genesis 29:27,28 ) but when a special occasion arises, in connection with the prohibition against gathering manna on the Sabbath, the institution is mentioned as one already known. " (Leviticus 23:3 ) When we come to the New Testament we find the most marked stress laid on the Sabbath. (Matthew 12:1-13 ; John 5:10 ) That this perversion of the Sabbath had become very general in our Saviour's time is apparent both from the recorded objections to acts of his on that day and from his marked conduct on occasions to which those objections were sure to be urged. (Matthew 12:1-16 ; Mark 3:2 ; Luke 6:1-5 ; 13:10-17 ; John 6:2-18 ; 7:23 ; 9:1-34 ) Christ's words do not remit the duty of keeping the Sabbath, but only deliver it from the false methods of keeping which prevented it from bestowing upon men the spiritual blessings it was ordained to confer
Furniture - Lovingly detailed accounts of the Ark of the covenant, the altar of incense, and other furnishings are so clear that we can easily visualize and reconstruct them in the form of models
Death - You behold Moses and Aaron bearing the Ark of the covenant; David and Elijah presenting the oracle of testimony. This was the hour of Christ's triumph over all the powers of darkness; the hour in which he overthrew dominions and thrones, led captivity captive, and gave gifts unto men; then it was that the foundation of every pagan temple shook; the statue of every false god totterd on its base; the priest fled from his falling shrine, and the heathen oracles became dumb for ever!...
This was the hour when our Lord erected that spiritual kingdom which is never to end
Cattle - David sacrificed these before the Ark ( 2 Samuel 6:13 ; compare 1 Kings 1:9 )
Thankfulness, Thanksgiving - For example, when David brings the Ark of the covenant to Jerusalem, the people sing psalms that call Israel to give thanks again and again (1 Chronicles 16:4,7,8,34,35,41 ). ...
In the Gospels and Acts thanksgiving most often occurs in prayer over a meal, such as the feeding of the multitudes (Matthew 15:36 ; Mark 8:6 ; John 6:11,23 ) or at the last supper (Matthew 26:27 ; Mark 14:23 ; Luke 22:17,19 ). On the other hand, thanklessness marks godless and wicked men who suppress the truth about God (Romans 1:18-21 )
God - Again in Genesis 7:16 Elohim ordered Noah to make the Ark but Jehovah shut him in. ...
Scripture reveals what God is in Himself, 'God is love' (used absolutely), 1 John 4:8 ; and 'God is light' (used relatively, in opposition to darkness), 1 John 1:5 ; and Christ is the expression of both in a Man
Numbers as Symbols - 1 Corinthians 8:6 ; Galatians 3:20 ; Mark 12:29 ; Ephesians 4:6 ; 1 Timothy 2:5 . Eight souls were saved in the Ark, to commence a new world. Mark 1:13
Gather - Eventually, the food was to go into the Ark
Psalms, the Book of - Temple hymns; sung at the consecration of the temple, the entrance of the Ark, etc. Lord Bacon has remarked that many prophetic passages in the Old Testament are "of the nature of their Author, to whom a thousand years are as one day; and therefore they are not fulfilled punctually at once, but have springing and germinant accomplishment through many ages, though the height or fullness of them may refer to some one age. How dark and gloomy is it there, from anxious and troubled views of the wrath of God! I hold, however, that no better or finer book of models, or legends of saints and martyrs, has existed, or can exist on earth, than the Psalter
Sabbath - Noah sent forth the raven from the Ark, and the dove thrice, at intervals of seven days, Genesis 8:1-22 . Pliny the younger, proconsul of Pontus near the close of the first century, in a letter to the emperor Trajan, remarks that the Christians were "accustomed on a stated day to meet together before daylight, and to repeat a hymn to Christ as God, and to bind themselves by a solemn bond not to commit any wickedness," etc. ...
The "preparation of the Sabbath" was the Friday before; for as it was forbidden to make a fire, to bake bread, or to dress victuals, on the Sabbath-day, they provided on the Friday every thing needful for their sustenance on the Sabbath, Mark 15:42 Matthew 27:62 John 19:14,31,42
Moses - A mark of genuineness; a forger would have made them prominent. Then she placed him in an Ark of papyrus, secured with bitumen, and laid it in the "flags" (tufi , less in size than the other papyrus) by the river's brink, and went away unable to bear longer the sight. She placed me in an Ark of bulrushes and closed up the door with slime and pitch. ...
Pharaoh's daughter (holding an independent position and separate household under the ancient empire; childless herself, therefore ready to adopt Moses; Thermutis according to Josephus) coming down to bathe in the sacred and life giving Nile (as it was regarded) saw the Ark and sent her maidens to fetch it. Reuel's daughters, in telling of Moses' help to them in watering their flocks, called him "an Egyptian," judging from his costume and language, for he had not yet been long enough living with Israelites to be known as one; an undesigned coincidence and mark of genuineness. The spiritual progress in Moses between his first appearance and his second is very marked. Jehovah gave Moses two signs as credentials to assure him of his mission: the transformation of his long "rod" of authority (as on Egyptian monuments) or pastoral rod into a "serpent," the basilisk or cobra, the symbol of royal and divine power on the Pharaoh's diadem; a pledge of victory over the king and gods of Egypt (compare Mark 16:18; Moses' humble but wonder working crook typifies Christ's despised but allpowerful cross). ...
His song in Exodus 15 abounds in incidents marked by the freshness and simplicity which we should expect from an eye-witness: he anticipates the dismay of the Philistines and Edomites through whose territories Israel's path lay to the promised land
Grace - ...
Moses then makes one of the most remarkable requests of God ever made in Scripture, asking God to "show me your glory. " Just as remarkable is that God answers his request positively. " This is a remarkable example of the unconditional and full character of the grace of God. ...
Remarkably, the life of David is devoid of references to finding favor in the eyes of the Lord, though often he finds favor in the eyes of men, or requests such favor (1 Samuel 16:22 ; 20:3,29 , etc. As David flees the city of Jerusalem after hearing that Absalom has been crowned king in Hebron, he takes the Ark with him. The procession continues into the desert, where it stops so that they can offer sacrifices with the Ark in their midst. Then the king tells Zadok the priest to take the Ark back into the city because he knows it belongs in the temple of the Lord. In a remarkable display of trust in God and in his sovereignty, David says that if he finds favor in the Lord's eyes, then God will bring him back. " Here, while the language of the slave market may be implied in the use of the word "redemption, " and that of the cultus in the use of the phrase "sacrifice of atonement" in the next verse, the strongest linking with grace in this passage is with the word "justified" in verse 24
Temple - Above the sacred Ark, which was placed, as of old, in the most holy place, were made new cherubim, one pair of whose wings met above the Ark, and another pair reached to the walls behind them. A different feeling, however, marked the commencement of the work, which met with some opposition from the fear that what Herod had begun he would not be able to finish
Exodus, the Book of - " Its separation from Genesis is marked by the different circumstances under which it presents Israel at its commencement as compared with the close of Genesis. Its close is marked by the completion of the tabernacle. Of the third plague no warning was given; so the third is marked in each of the other two groups of plagues. in blossom, marks the time as the middle of February, when also the "barley" is "in the ear. The third of the third group followed, as in the close of the former two groups, without warning; the three days "darkness which might be felt" (probably owing to the S. wind from the desert after the spring equinox filling the air densely with fine sand, so that none during it rise from their place, men and beasts hide, this darkness could literally be "felt". Cook, whose remarks are here epitomized, gives a list of words found only in Exodus, or in the pentateuch, derived from roots common to Hebrew and Egyptian, or found only in Egyptian; and these occur indiscriminately in the so-called Jehovistic and Elohistic passages. In the two accounts the order is reversed; in the instructions the inner and essential objects stand first, as being those on which the people should fix chief attention, the Ark, mercy-seat, cherubs, table of shewbread, golden candlesticks; then the accessories of the tabernacle, and lastly the dress of the priests. But in the account of the work executed the tabernacle comes first, being that which would naturally be begun first, then the Ark, etc
Saul - )...
The same reckless and profane impatience appears in Saul; he consults Jehovah by the priest Ahiah (1 Samuel 14:18 read with Septuagint, "bring here the ephod, for he took the ephod that day in the presence of Israel"; for the Ark was not usually taken out, but only the ephod, for consultation, and the Ark was now at Kirjath Jearim, not in Saul's little camp); then at the increasing tumult in the Philistine host, impatient to join battle, interrupted the priest, "withdraw thine hand," i
Psalms - Not only do they breathe through every part a divine spirit of eloquence, but they contain numberless illustrious prophecies that were remarkably accomplished, and are frequently appealed to by the evangelical writers. " With regard to the Jews, Bishop Chandler very pertinently remarks, that "they must have understood David, their prince, to have been a figure of Messiah. Thus it may be said, Are we concerned with the affairs of David and of Israel? Have we any thing to do with the Ark and the temple? They are no more. What then do we mean, when, taking such expressions into our mouths, we utter them in our own persons, as parts of our devotions, before God? Assuredly we must mean a spiritual Jerusalem and Sion; a spiritual Ark and temple; a spiritual law; spiritual sacrifices; and spiritual victories over spiritual enemies; all described under the old names, which are still retained, though "old things are passed away, and all things are become new," 2 Corinthians 5:17 . Most of them, it is apprehended, have a double sense, which stands upon this ground and foundation, that the ancient patriarchs, prophets, priests, and kings, were typical characters, in their several offices, and in the more remarkable passages of their lives, their extraordinary depressions and miraculous exaltations foreshowing him who was to arise as the head of the holy family, the great prophet, the true priest, the everlasting king. ...
On this book Bishop Horsley remarks:—These Psalms go, in general, under the name of the Psalms of David. Christ, in his incarnate state, is personated sometimes as a priest, sometimes as a king, sometimes as a conqueror; and in those Psalms in which he is introduced as a conqueror, the resemblance is very remarkable between this conqueror in the book of Psalms and the warrior on the white horse in the book of Revelation, who goes forth with a crown on his head, and a bow in his hand, conquering and to conquer
Presence (2) - True, the Divine presence had been manifested, according to the OT, in cloudy pillar and burning bush, had, indeed, been localized in the Ark of the covenant. Even those who followed hard after it, like Saul of Tarsus and the rich young ruler, thirsted only the more for the living God (Mark 10:17, cf. Mark, even though in Mark 1:1 υἱὸς θεοῦ is a secondary reading. The people marvelled because He spoke with authority, although an unlettered man (Matthew 7:28-29, Mark 6:2). His eyes were as a flame of fire (Mark 3:5, Luke 22:61). In the awe of His presence the Temple-courts were cleared, and the tempest calmed (Mark 11:15; Mark 6:51); so that His disciples cried, ‘What manner of man is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?’ (Colossians 1:9-20,8). It was enough for the disciples that they should be with Him (Mark 3:14). It is the essential nearness of God that gives all significance to the Beatitudes (Matthew 5:8-9), to the teaching on prayer (Matthew 6:8; Matthew 6:8), to the interpretation of worship (Mark 7:8, cf. This is expressed in terms of (a) relationship (Mark 3:35, Matthew 5:16; Matthew 5:44, John 1:12), (b) identification (Matthew 10:40; Matthew 25:40), (c) indwelling (John 14:16-17). ‘Ark of the Covenant,’ ‘Shekinah’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible ; Beyschlag, NT Theol
David - After defeating the Philistines, David sought to move the Ark of the covenant to Jerusalem, succeeding on his second attempt (2 Samuel 6:1 )
Joel - Leader among the Levites under David (1Chronicles 15:7,1Chronicles 15:11,1 Chronicles 15:18 ), who brought the Ark of the covenant up to Jerusalem
Solomon - ) ...
For some years before his death David was engaged in the active work of collecting materials ( 1 Chronicles 29:6-9 ; 2 Chronicles 2:3-7 ) for building a temple in Jerusalem as a permanent abode for the Ark of the covenant. ...
Solomon's reign was not only a period of great material prosperity, but was equally remarkable for its intellectual activity. The bright day of Solomon's glory ended in clouds and darkness
Jehoiachin - Now he cut the gold off (not "cut in pieces," 2 Kings 24:13) the larger vessels which were plated, the altar of burnt offering, the table of shewbread, and the Ark, so that at the third conquest of Jerusalem under Zedekiah there were only the large brazen vessels of the court remaining, beside a few gold and silver basins and firepans (2 Kings 25:13-17)
Number - ...
Two notes "intensification" (Genesis 41:32), "requital in full" (Job 42:10; Jeremiah 16:18; Isaiah 61:7; Revelation 18:6); the proportions of the temple were double those of the tabernacle; two especially symbolizes "testimony" (Zechariah 4:11; Zechariah 11:7; Isaiah 8:2; Joshua 5:13-6), two tables of the testimony (Exodus 31:18), two cherubim over the Ark of the testimony. 606-610, and his flight from Mecca, 622: these figures added may mark the closing epochs of Mahometan power. As Christ's seamless vest marks its unity, so the rending of the outer garment into four by the four Roman soldiers symbolizes its ultimate worldwide extension (John 19:23-24). Satan mimics the "divine" seven (Proverbs 6:16; Proverbs 26:25): Mary Magdalene's seven devils (Mark 16:9; Luke 8:2); the unclean spirit returning with seven (Matthew 12:45); the seven Canaanite nations subdued by Israel (Deuteronomy 7:1; Acts 13:19); the dragon with seven heads and s
Atonement, Day of - This done, he returned to the court, to enter immediately, for the second time, the inner sanctuary, carrying a basin with the blood of the bullock, which he sprinkled on the front of the mercy-seat once, and seven times on the ground before the Ark
Moses - He was born after the mandate by the king that all male children of the Hebrews were to be killed, but his parents by faith hid him three months, and when he could no longer be hidden he was put in an Ark of bulrushes and placed among the reeds in the river. With him will I speak mouth to mouth, even apparently, and not in dark speeches. , called the Pentateuch, there are many proofs in scripture; such as "have ye not read in the book of Moses?" Mark 12:26 ; "If they hear not Moses and the prophets," Luke 16:31 ; Luke 24:27 ; "When Moses is read," 2 Corinthians 3:15
Judah, Kingdom of - Also Jerusalem shall be the religious center of the nations, amidst universal peace, the Lord's manifested presence there (Isaiah 60-62; Isaiah 65; Isaiah 66) eclipsing the former Ark of the covenant (Jeremiah 3:16-18; Jeremiah 23:6-8; Ezekiel 37-48)
Priest - In time of war their duty was to carry the Ark of the Covenant, to consult the Lord, to sound the holy trumpets, and to encourage the army, Numbers 10:8-9 Deuteronomy 20:2
Priest - Declared clean or unclean, and purified ceremonially, lepers (Leviticus 13; 14; Mark 1:44). They covered the Ark and sanctuary vessels with a scarlet cloth before the Levites might approach them (Numbers 4:5-15). After the Philistine capture of the Ark, and its re
Samuel, Books of - See 1 Samuel 1-3 ), the Ark (1 Samuel 4:1-7:1 ), the Rise of Kingship (1 Samuel 9:1-11:15 ), Battles of Saul (1 Samuel 13-15 ), the History of David's Rise to Power (1Samuel 16:142 Samuel 5:25 ), and the Succession to the Throne of David (2 Samuel 9-20 ; 1 Kings 1-2 )
Old - Golden - As Moses' Ark was covered both within and without by the golden plates, so CHRIST JESUS was pure holiness in His outward actions, and in His inward being, in His private life and in His public actions
Exodus - He returns ( Exodus 19:2 ), deposits the testimony in an Ark he has caused to be prepared, and constructs the Tabernacle ( Exodus 34:35 ). We give the broad lines of the separation, but remark that in certain passages this must remain tentative. The Israelites, however, have no immunity except from the darkness
Animal - Some have thought it symbolical, intended to teach the avoidance of those evil qualities for which the unclean animals were remarkable; others, that, in order that the Hebrews might be preserved from idolatry, they were commanded to kill and eat many animals which were sacred among the Egyptians, and were taught to look with abhorrence upon others which they reverenced. Not only are the beasts, which Noah was to receive, spoken of as clean and unclean; but it will be noticed, that, in the command to take them into the Ark, a difference is made in the number to be preserved—the clean being to be received by sevens, and the unclean by two of a kind
Language - The Armenians allege, that as the Ark rested in their country, Noah and his children must have remained there a considerable time, before the lower and marshy country of Chaldea could be fit to receive them; and it is therefore reasonable to suppose they left their language there, which was probably the very same that Adam spoke. On this subject the remarks of Delaney are conclusive: "That God made man a sociable creature, does not need to be proved; and that when he made him such, he withheld nothing from him that was in any wise necessary for his well being in society, is a clear consequence from the wisdom and goodness of God; and if he withheld nothing any way necessary to his well being, much less would he withhold from him that which is the instrument of the greatest happiness a reasonable creature is capable of in this world. "...
It is true that many languages bear marks of being raised to their improved state from rude and imperfect elements, and that all are capable of being enriched and rendered more exact; and it is this which has given some colour to those theories which trace all language itself up from elemental sounds, as the necessities of men, their increasing knowledge, and their imagination led to the invention of new words and combinations
Poetry of the Hebrews - While the historical books and legislative writings of Moses are evidently prosaic compositions, the book of Job, the Psalms of David, the Song of Solomon, the Lamentations of Jeremiah, a great part of the prophetical writings, and several passages scattered occasionally through the historical books, carry the most plain and distinguishing marks of poetical writing. " "Clouds and darkness are round about him," sung the one; the other replied, "Judgment and righteousness are the habitation of his throne. The twenty-fourth Psalm, in particular, which is thought to have been composed on the great and solemn occasion of the Ark of the covenant being brought back to Mount Zion, must have had a noble effect when performed after this manner, as Dr. "...
Here the semi-chorus plainly breaks in, as with a lower voice, "Who is this King of glory?" And at the moment when the Ark is introduced into the tabernacle, the response is made by the burst of the whole chorus: "The Lord, strong and mighty; the Lord, mighty in battle. Conciseness and strength are two of its most remarkable characters. Light and darkness, trees and flowers, the forest and the cultivated field, suggest to them many beautiful figures. The two most remarkable mountains of the country were Lebanon and Carmel; the former noted for its height, and the woods of lofty cedars that covered it; the latter, for its beauty and fertility, the richness of its vines and olives. It is farther to be remarked under this head, that, in the images of the awful and terrible kind, with which the sacred poets abound, they plainly draw their descriptions from that violence of the elements, and those great concussions of nature, with which their climate rendered them acquainted. Earthquakes were not unfrequent; and the tempests of hail, thunder, and lightning, in Judea and Arabia, accompanied with whirlwinds and darkness, far exceed any thing of that sort which happens in more temperate regions. " And those circumstances of terror, with which an appearance of the Almighty is described, in Psalms 18, when his pavilion round about him was darkness: when hail stones and coals of fire were his voice; and when, at his rebuke, the channels of the waters are said to be seen, and the foundations of the hills discovered; though there may be some reference, as Dr. In this respect they have an advantage over the Greek and Roman authors; whose comparisons, by the length to which they are extended, sometimes interrupt the narration too much, and carry too visible marks of study and labour; whereas, in the Hebrew poets, they appear more like the glowings of a lively fancy, just glancing aside to some resembling object, and presently returning to its track
Samuel, Books of - is made up of three sections: (1) The childhood and youth of Samuel, to the downfall of Eli’s house and the captivity of the Ark ( 1 Samuel 1:1 to 1 Samuel 7:1 ); (2) Samuel’s career as Judge, including his defeat of the Philistines, his anointing of Saul, and his farewell address ( 1 Samuel 7:2-12 ); (3) Saul’s reign till his rejection ( 1 Samuel 13:1-23 ; 1 Samuel 14:1-52 ; 1 Samuel 15:1-35 ). one of the most marked examples of a doublet; ( g ) the differing descriptions of the death of Saul given in 1 Samuel 31:1-13 and 2 Samuel 1:1-27 ; ( h ) the varying traditions of Absalom’s family found in 2 Samuel 14:25 ff; 2 Samuel 18:18 ; ( i ) the inconsistency of 1 Samuel 7:13 f
Holiness - ), the flesh of a sacrifice ( Haggai 2:12 ), the incense ( Exodus 30:36 ), the table ( Exodus 30:27 ), the shew-bread ( 1 Samuel 21:6 ), the candlestick ( Exodus 30:27 ), the Ark ( Exodus 30:26 , 2 Chronicles 35:3 ), and the anointing oil ( Exodus 30:25 ). The epithet is used in 10 passages of Christ (‘the Holy One of God,’ Mark 1:24 , Luke 4:34 , John 6:69 ; also Luke 1:35 , Acts 3:14 ; Acts 4:27 ; Acts 4:30 , Heb 7:26 , 1 John 2:20 , Revelation 3:7 ). ]'>[8] Mark 6:20 , Acts 3:14
Covenant - Sprinkling of sacrificial blood ( Exodus 24:8 , Zechariah 9:11 , Hebrews 9:20 ) was a specially solemn indication of God’s approving presence and of the obligations undertaken; and its significance survives and is deepened in the death of Christ ( Hebrews 10:29 ; Hebrews 13:20 ) and in the Eucharist ( Matthew 26:28 , Mark 14:24 , Luke 22:20 , 1 Corinthians 11:25 ). It was really a constitution given to Israel by God, with appointed promise and penalty, duly inscribed on the tables of the covenant ( Deuteronomy 9:9 ; Deuteronomy 9:11 ; Deuteronomy 9:15 ), which were deposited in the Ark ( Deuteronomy 10:2 ; Deu 10:5 , 1 Kings 8:9 ; 1Ki 8:21 , 2 Chronicles 5:10 , Hebrews 9:4 ). The Exile is sometimes thought of as marking the dissolution of the Old Covenant ( Jeremiah 31:31 ff
Pre-Existence of Jesus Christ - Such a light often appeared at the door of the tabernacle, and fixed its abode on the Ark, between the cherubims. Watts supposes, that the doctrine of the pre-existence of the soul of Christ explains dark and difficult scriptures, and discovers many beauties and proprieties of expression n the word of God, which on any other plan lie unobserved: For instance, in Colossians 1:15 , &c
Honor - Phinehas’ wife named their son Ichabod, “saying, The glory is departed from Israel: because the Ark of God was taken, and because of her father-inlaw and her husband” (they, the high priests, had died; Jeremiah - It is observable, however, that though many of these prophecies have their particular dates annexed to them, and other dates may be tolerably well conjectured from certain internal marks and circumstances, there appears much disorder in the arrangement, not easy to be accounted for on any principle of regular design, but probably the result of some accident or other, which has disturbed the original order. This is most evident in the Lamentations, where those passions altogether predominate; but it is often visible also in his prophecies, in the former part of the book more especially, which is principally poetical: the middle parts are chiefly historical; but the last part, consisting of six chapters, is entirely poetical, and contains several oracles distinctly marked, in which this prophet falls very little short of the lofty style of Isaiah. ...
Jeremiah survived to behold the sad accomplishment of all his darkest predictions. He saw the strong holds of the city cast down, the palace of Solomon, the temple of God, with all its courts, its roofs of cedar and of gold, levelled to the earth, or committed to the flames; the sacred vessels, the Ark of the covenant itself, with the cherubim, pillaged by profane hands
Jerusalem - Here he built an altar to the Lord on the threshing-floor of Araunah the Jebusite (2 Samuel 24:15-25 ), and thither he brought up the Ark of the covenant and placed it in the new tabernacle which he had prepared for it
Psalms, Book of, - But after the conquest of Jerusalem his psalmody opened afresh with the solemn removal of the Ark to Mount Zion; and in Psal 24-29 which belong together, we have the earliest definite instance of David's systematic composition or arrangement of psalms for public use
Bible - It is certain, however, that the five books of Moses, called the Pentateuch, were collected into one body within a short time after his death; since Deuteronomy, which is, as it were, the abridgment and recapitulation of the other four, was laid in the tabernacle near the Ark, according to the order which he gave to the Levites, Deuteronomy 31:24 . The original of the Pentateuch had been carefully preserved in the side of the Ark, and had been probably introduced with the Ark into the temple at Jerusalem. These sections were divided into verses, called by the Jews pesukim, and they are marked out in the Hebrew Bible by two great points at the end of them, called from hence, sophpasuk, that is, the end of the verse. "Beside our Gospels, and the Acts of the Apostles," says Paley, "no Christian history claiming to be written by an Apostle, or Apostolical man, is quoted within three hundred years after the birth of Christ, by any writer now extant or known, or, if quoted, is quoted with marks of censure and rejection. " This agreement of Christians respecting the Scriptures, when we consider their many differences in other respects, is the more remarkable, since it took place without any public authority being interposed
Weights And Measures - But the Rabbinical tradition allowed 144 barley-corns of medium size, laid side by side, to the cubit; and it is remarkable that a recent careful attempt made on these lioes resulted in a cubit of 17. This was the distance by which the Ark preceded the host of the Israelites, and it was consequently presumed that this distance might be covered on the Sabbath, since the host must be allowed to attend worship at the Ark. ‘cup’ in Mark 7:4 ), the following, among others, have been noted
Synagogue - The Gospels mention the synagogues of Capernaum (Mark 1:21 and ||s) and Nazareth (Luke 4:16 and ||) wherein Jesus taught. ...
The chief furniture was the תֵּבָה, ‘ark’ (Meg. 7) = ἀρχισυνάγωγος (Mark 5:22, Luke 13:14, Acts 13:15; cf. For the various functions of the service itself no permanent official existed in the ancient time, and he who was to lead in prayer was selected by the congregation-mostly through its ruler-as the representative, or ‘the delegate of the community,’ shelîaḥ zîbbûr, and upon being invited in the usual formula-at least in the Talmudic period-‘Come and bring for us the offering,’ he stepped in front of the Ark to offer the prayer (Ber. On Monday and Thursday the villagers coming to the cities for the court or the market attended the synagogue in sufficient numbers to have a portion of the Torah read (Tôs
High Priest - ...
The high priest's special designation, "the priest that is anointed" (Leviticus 4:3), implies a marked distinction between his anointing and theirs, besides what was common to both, namely, the "sprinkling. Previously Moses bidding him lay up the pot of manna before the Lord implied that the Ark would, when made, be under his charge. Clark (Speaker's Commentary) thinks that some means of casting lots were kept in the bag formed by the doubled fold of the choshen or breast-plate, and that these were the Urim and Thummim: Revelation 1:13"thou shalt put in the breast-plate of judgment the Urim and Thummim. During the captivity of the Ark and its neglect in Saul's days Samuel the prophet stands prominent as the interpreter of God's will, and Ahiah the high priest is more in the background (Judges 20:27-28; 1 Chronicles 13:3; 1 Samuel 7:2; 1 Samuel 14:18)
Covenant - Its covenant character marks off the religion of Israel as a religion of real, conscious, spiritual fellowship between God and His people, in distinction from the religions of paganism, in which either the Deity and the creature are pantheistically fused, or the God-head after a deistic fashion is so far removed from the creature as to render true communion impossible, and where the relation between a national god and his worshippers is not a matter of choice but of necessity on both sides. Acts 3:25 υἱαὶ τῆς διαθήκης; Galatians 4:24 διαθήκη γεννῶσα εἰς δουλείαν)...
In the Authorized Version of the NT διαθήκη is in 14 instances rendered by ‘testament’ (Matthew 26:28, Mark 14:24, Luke 22:20, 1 Corinthians 11:25, 2 Corinthians 3:6; 2 Corinthians 3:14, Hebrews 7:22; Hebrews 9:15 bis. In all these cases, except in Hebrews 9:16-17, the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 has replaced ‘testament’ by ‘covenant,’ offering, however, the former as a marginal alternative in Matthew 26:28, Mark 14:24, Luke 22:20, 1 Corinthians 11:25, 2 Corinthians 3:6; 2 Corinthians 3:14, Galatians 3:15; Galatians 3:17, Hebrews 7:22; Hebrews 8:6-9 bis. ’ This will explain Matthew 26:28, Mark 14:24, Luke 22:20, 1 Corinthians 11:25, 2 Corinthians 3:6; 2 Corinthians 3:14, Hebrews 7:22. Strange and unexplained is Revelation 11:19 (‘the Ark of his testament’), cf. Hebrews 9:4 (‘the Ark of the covenant’). Mark 8:38 and Matthew 12:39 speak of the Jews as an ‘adulterous generation,’ and probably the later prophetic representation of the covenant as a marriage-covenant lies at the basis of this mode of statement. Mark (Mark 14:24), τοῦτό ἐστιν τὸ αἷμά μου τῆς διαθήκης (AD in Matthew and A in Mark τῆς καινῆς διαθήκης); according to St
Moses - But when the task of concealment became difficult, Jochebed contrived to bring her child under the notice of the daughter of the king by constructing for him an Ark of bulrushes, which she laid among the flags which grew on the edge of the river at the spot where the princess was wont to come down and bathe
Captivity - ...
The market was glutted with Jewish slaves, and Moses' words were fulfilled: "Ye shall be sold unto your enemies . "Captivity of the land" (Judges 18:30) refers to the capture of the Ark
Atonement, Day of - Then he took of the bullock's blood (going out probably for it, and coming in again) and sprinkled it with his finger upon the mercy-seat: not on the top, butt on its front, then seven times before the mercy-seat, upon the ground in front of it; "eastward" (Leviticus 16:14) means the side of the Ark toward the veil
Chronicles, i - In 2 Chronicles 8:11 the removal of the daughter of Pharaoh, whom Solomon had married, from the city of David to the house that he had built for her, is said to have been occasioned by the house of David having become too holy because of the coming of the Ark
Jehoshaphat - Blew the trumpet before the Ark in its passage from Obed Edom's house to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:24). This remark is introduced to show how Jehoshaphat was able to make ships of Tarshish (i
Names of God - In the crucifixion narrative ( Mark 15:34 ), Jesus employed a form of El when he cried from the cross, “Eloi, Eloi,” “my God, my God,” quoting Psalm 22:1 . ” It represents God's power over the nations and was closely tied to Shiloh, to the Ark of the covenant, and to prophecy
Psalms, Book of - '...
In some places the appropriateness of the sequence of the psalms, as already remarked, is very apparent, as for instance Psalm 22,23,24 . In Psalm 40 there comes forth from God One divinely perfect — the true Ark of the covenant — who was competent to bring into effect the will of God in all its extent; and at the same time able (by the offering of Himself) to take away the whole system of sacrifices, in which God had found no pleasure
Guilt - A like feature is observable in the attitude of the Philistines when restoring the sacred ‘ark of the covenant’ to the offended Jehovah. How widely diffused this special rite had become is evidenced by the numerous incidental references of Ezekiel ( Ezekiel 40:39 ; Ezekiel 42:13 ; Ezekiel 44:29 ; Ezekiel 46:20 ); while perhaps the most remarkable allusion to this service of restitution occurs in the later Isaiah, where the ideal Servant of Jehovah is described as a ‘guilt-offering’ ( Isaiah 53:10 ). The nearest and yet how distant! an approach to it in our experience we recognize, not in the wild sin-terrified cry of the guilty, but rather in those whose profound self-identification with the guilty overshadows them with a darkness and a shame, vital indeed to their being, yet at heart tranquil, because it is not confused with the blurring consciousness of a personal sin’ (Moberly, Atonement and Personality , p
David - Having rescued Jerusalem out of the hands of the Jebusites, he made it the capital of his kingdom, and the place of his residence; and being willing to honour it with the presence of the Ark of God, he brought it to Jerusalem in triumph, and divesting himself of his royal robes, out of reverence to God, he clothed himself in the habit of his ministers, and with them expressed his joy by dancing and music; contemned only by one haughty woman; whom, as a just punishment of her insolence, he seems ever after to have separated from his bed. Though his crimes were heinous, and highly aggravated in the affair of Uriah and Bathsheba, he patiently endured reproof, humbly submitted to the punishment appointed him, deeply repented, and obtained mercy and forgiveness from God, though not without some severe marks of his displeasure, for the grievous offences of which he had been guilty. ...
To this abstract a few miscellaneous remarks may be added
da'Vid - His bright eyes are specially mentioned, (1 Samuel 16:12 ) and generally he was remarkable for the grace of his figure and countenance ("fair of eyes," "comely," "goodly,") (1 Samuel 16:12,18 ; 17:42 ) well made and of immense strength and agility. " (2 Samuel 5:9 ; 1 Chronicles 11:7 ) The Ark was now removed from its obscurity at Kirjath-jearim with marked solemnity, and conveyed to Jerusalem. (2 Samuel 10:1-19 ; 12:26-31 ) Three great calamities may be selected as marking the beginning, middle and close of David's otherwise prosperous reign, which appear to be intimated in the question of Gad, (2 Samuel 24:13 ) "a three-years famine, a three-months flight or a three-days pestilence. Underneath the splendor of his last glorious campaign against the Ammonites was a dark story, known probably at that time only to a very few --the double crime of adultery with Bath-sheba and the virtual murder of Uriah
Animals - Camel hair was used for tents and for clothes (Mark 1:6 ). In Mark 7:27 , Jesus probably was referring to the small dogs that people kept as pets. The ruins of Solomon's well-known horse stables at ancient Megiddo are today marked as an historical and archeological site. As a guilt offering for stealing the Ark of the covenant, the Philistines were advised to send “five golden mice” to the Israelites when they returned the Ark to them (1 Samuel 6:4 , KJV; “rats,” NIV)
Feasts - They marked the three points of time as to the fruits of the earth. They marked three epochs in Israel's past history. They marked the three points of time as to the fruits of the earth. They marked three epochs in Israel's past history. Each of the three marked a step in the HISTORICAL progress of Israel. ...
(2) Pentecost marked the giving of the law on Sinai, the second grand era in the history of the elect nation. ...
Solomon (appropriately to his name, which means king of peace) also did so, for his reign was preeminently the period of peaceful possession when every man dwelt under his own vine and figtree (1 Kings 4:25); immediately after that the last relic of wilderness life was abolished by the Ark being taken from under curtains and deposited in the magnificent temple of stone in the seventh month (2 Chronicles 5:3), the feast of tabernacles was celebrated on the 15th day, and on the 23rd Solomon sent the great congregation away glad in heart for the goodness that the Lord had showed unto David, Solomon, and Israel His people
Work - God commanded Noah: “Make thee an Ark of gopher wood …” ( Prophets - Some persons have imagined that the Ark, or at least a synagogue, or some place of public worship, was at this time at Geba, and that this is the reason of its being styled in the former passage גבעת האלהים , the hill of God. Upon some important occasions, when it was necessary to rouse the fears of a disobedient people, and to recall them to repentance, the prophets, as objects of universal attention, appear to have walked about publicly in sackcloth, and with every external mark of humiliation and sorrow
Jordan - Yet it is remarkable as the river of the great plain (ha Arabah, now el Ghor) of the Holy Land, flowing through the whole from N. ...
The Lord of the whole earth made the descending waters stand in a heap very far from their place of crossing, namely, by the town of Adam, that is beside Zarthan or Zaretan, the moment that the feet of the priests bearing the Ark dipped in the water. ...
Grove remarks of the Jordan: "so rapid that its course is one continued cataract, so crooked that in its whole lower and main course it has hardly a half mile straight, so broken with rapids that no boat can swim any distance continuously, so deep below the adjacent country that it is invisible and can only be with difficulty approached; refusing all communication with the ocean, and ending in a lake where navigation is impossible useless for irrigation, it is in fact what its Arabic name signifies, nothing but a 'great watering place,' Sheriat el Khebir
Jephthah - "...
Jephthah accepted the terms, and "uttered all his words (repeated the conditions and obligations under which he accepted the headship) before Jehovah (as in His presence; not that the Ark or any altar of Jehovah was there; simply Jephthah confirmed his engagement by an oath as before Jehovah) in Mizpeh," where the people were met in assembly, Ramoth Mizpeh in Gilead, now Salt. The marked agreement of Jephthah's appeal with the Pentateuch account proves his having that record before him; compare Judges 11:17; Judges 11:19-22 agreeing almost verbatim with Leviticus 20:2-5; Numbers 21:21-25
Feasts And Festivals of Israel - ...
Of all of Israel's festivals, Passover is of the greatest importance to the New Testament because the Lord's Supper was a Passover meal (Matthew 26:17-27 ; Mark 14:12-25 ; Luke 22:7-22 ; notwithstanding problems posed by the Johannine chronology, as in John 18:28 ; see the major commentaries on John ). The slaughter of the Passover lamb recalled the great deliverance of the exodus and marked the beginning of the harvest with the gift of firstfruits, and the Feast of Weeks was the great celebration in thanksgiving for the grain harvest. ...
The very fact that Tishri is the seventh month should call into question whether it marked the beginning of the year. ...
The use of trumpets to mark the beginning of this month is noteworthy. He offered a bull for the sin of himself and his house, and then took a censer with burning coals and incense into the Most Holy Place and sprinkled some blood from the bull on the Ark of the covenant. He sacrificed the one goat for the sin of the people and sprinkled some of its blood on the Ark
God - The world was educated ‘precept upon precept, line upon line’ ( Isaiah 28:10 ); and it is noteworthy that even when the gospel age arrived, our Lord did not in a moment reveal all truth, but accommodated His teaching to the capacity of the people ( Mark 4:33 ); the chosen disciples themselves did not grasp the fulness of that teaching until Pentecost ( John 16:12 f. , Mark 5:7 , Acts 16:17 , and so in Hebrews 7:1 , where it is taken direct from Genesis 14:18 LXX Family Life And Relations - Rahab's favorable treatment of the Israelite spies brought her family mercy from human agencies (Joshua 2:12-14,17-20 ; 6:22-25 ), and the house of Obed-Edom obtained blessing because he gave shelter to the Ark (2 Samuel 6:11 ). Genesis 2:24 is cited with approbation twice in the Gospels ( Matthew 19:5 ; Mark 10:8 ) and twice in the Pauline corpus (1 Corinthians 6:16 ; Ephesians 5:31 ) as indicating the close bonds between husband and wife and, therefore, of the family unit
Festivals - It was called “day of firstfruits” (Numbers 28:26 ) because it marked the beginning of the time in which people were to bring offerings of firstfruits. Then he took some of the blood from the slain bullock and sprinkled it on the mercy seat (“atonement cover,” Leviticus 16:13 NIV) and also on the ground in front of the Ark, providing atonement for the priesthood ( 1618384275_23 )
Family - In Genesis 7:1 Noah and his household were directed to enter the Ark. Following Jesus often meant leaving one's family (Mark 1:16-20 ; Luke 9:59-60 ). There was to be marriage between one man and one woman (Mark 10:6-8 ; Ephesians 5:31 ). Jesus believed that the love bond made the marriage vows sacred, and they were not to be broken (Mark 10:11-12 ; Luke 16:18 ). ...
Children were given a place of high honor by Jesus (Mark 10:13-16 )
Angel - When the wilderness tabernacle was being fashioned, God ordered two gold cherubim to be placed on top of the "mercy seat" or lid of the covenant Ark to screen it. He described angels as holy creatures (Mark 8:38 ) who could rejoice when a sinner repented (Luke 15:10 )
the Man Who Took a Rain of Mustard Seed And Sowed it in His Field - The kingdom of heaven is like that, He said, as often as He saw a field of wheat all sown over with tares; or a vineyard with a husbandman working in it; or a lost sheep; or a prodigal son; or a marriage procession; or a few little children playing at marriages and funerals in the market-place. What could be a smaller seed, at the time, than the emigration of the son of Terah out of Ur of the Chaldees and into the land of the Canaanites? Again, what seed could well be smaller than that Ark of bulrushes, daubed with slime and pitch, and hidden away among the flags by the river's brink? And, then, what less likely to spring up into all the psalms and hymns and spiritual songs of the Church of God than those little snatches of sacred psalmody that a shepherd boy sang to his few sheep on the plains of Bethlehem? And to come to Old Testament institutions and ordinances also
Aaron - " This rod therefore was laid up by the Ark, to perpetuate the remembrance of the miracle, and to be a token of Aaron's right to his office. His sepulchre was left unmarked and unknown, perhaps to prevent the superstitious reverence of future ages
Chronicles, Books of - Under God he made the city of Jerusalem his capital (1 Chronicles 11:4-9 ), transferred the Ark of God to the city (1 Chronicles 16:1 ), and began to prepare for the building of the Temple (1 Chronicles 22:1-2 )
mo'Ses - (Exodus 3:2-6 ) (b) In the giving of the law from Mount Sinai, the outward form of the revelation was a thick darkness as of a thunder-cloud, out of which proceeded a voice. (Exodus 19:19 ; 20:21 ) on two occasions he is described as having penetrated within the darkness. The law is written out and ordered to be deposited in the Ark
Numbers, Book of - Words which Moses used to address to the Ark
Atonement - ...
The New Testament The so-called ransom saying, found in the Gospel of Mark (10:45; cf. ...
The second Gospel passage relating to atonement appears in the eucharistic words of Jesus recorded in all three Gospels (Matthew 26:26-29 ; = Mark 14:22-25 ; = Luke 22:15-20 ). Some now argue that Paul intends a quite specific reference to the mercy seat of the Ark of the Covenant and that hilasterion [4] should be translated "mercy seat
Prayer - None prayed so often as Jesus; early in the morning "a great while before day" (Mark 1:35), "all the night" (Luke 6:12), in Gethsemane with an "agony" that drew from Him "sweat as it were great drops of blood falling to the ground" (Luke 22:44); "when He was being baptized, and praying, the heaven was opened" (James 5:14-162); "as He prayed" He was transfigured (Luke 9:29); "as He was praying in a certain place" (Romans 16:25-271) one disciple struck by His prayer said, "Lord teach us to pray as John also taught his disciples" (Luke 11:1) (an interesting fact here only recorded). The threefold Aaronic blessing (Numbers 6:24-26), and Moses' prayer at the moving (expanded in Psalm 68) and resting of the Ark (Numbers 10:35-36), are other forms of prayer in the Mosaic legislation. Standing: 1 Samuel 1:26; Matthew 6:5; Mark 11:25; Luke 18:11. Hindrances to acceptance are pride (Job 35:12-13; Luke 18:14), hypocrisy (2 Chronicles 14:11), doubt, double mindedness, and unbelief (James 1:6; Jeremiah 29:13; Mark 11:24-25; Matthew 21:22), not forgiving another, setting up idols in the heart (Ezekiel 14:3)
Jonah - ) (Genesis 8:8-9, seeking rest in vain, fleeing from Noah and the Ark; so Jonah). Jonah embarked at Joppa for the far off Tartessus of Spain or Tarshish in Cilicia; compare as to the folly of the attempt Psalms 139:7-10; Genesis 3:8-10; Jeremiah 23:24. The storm, the strange sleep (of self hardening, weariness, and God forgetfulness; contrast Mark 4:37-39, spiritually with Ephesians 5:14), the lot casting, and detection of Jonah and casting into and consequent calming of the sea, followed
Expiation - Now, much of this may be granted, without any prejudice to the argument; and, indeed, is no more than the most orthodox writers on this subject have often remarked. For it is to be remarked, that the ceremony of the scape-goat is not a distinct one: it is a continuation of the process, and is evidently the concluding part and symbolical consummation of the sin offering: so that the transfer of the iniquities of the people upon the head of the scape-goat, and the bearing them away into the wilderness, manifestly imply, that the atonement effected by the sacrifice of the sin offering consisted in the transfer and consequent removal of those iniquities. Here is confession of sin; confession before God at the door of the tabernacle; the substitution of a victim; the figurative transfer of sins to that victim; the shedding of blood, which God appointed to make atonement for the soul; the carrying the blood into the holiest place, the very permission of which clearly marked the divine acceptance; the bearing away of iniquity; and the actual reconciliation of the people to God. The sacrificial character of this offering is strongly marked; for it was an offering brought to the tabernacle; it was slain in the sanctuary; and the blood was sprinkled upon the altar by the priests. After he had perfumed the sanctuary with this incense, he came out, took some of the blood of the young bullock he had sacrificed, carried that also into the sanctuary, and, dipping his fingers in it, sprinkled it seven times between the Ark and the vail, which separated the holy from the sanctuary, or most holy. The blood of this goat he carried into the most holy sanctuary, and sprinkled it seven times between the Ark and the vail, which separated the holy from the sanctuary: from thence he returned into the court of the tabernacle, and sprinkled both sides of it with the blood of the goat
Assur - All over the vast flat on both sides of the Tigris rise "grass covered heaps, marking the site of ancient habitations" (Layard). Erech is the modern Warka; Accad, now Akkerkuf. city markets), Calah, Resen, and Nineveh (in the restricted sense), formed one great composite city, Nineveh (in the larger sense): Jonah 3:3. He records that his mother placed him at his birth in an Ark of rushes and set it afloat on the Euphrates; seemingly copied from the account of Moses
Music, Instruments, Dancing - Other technical musical expressions consisting of remarks that concern types or kinds of performances include “with stringed instruments” (“neginoth ,” see Psalm 4:1 ; Psalm 6:1 ; Psalm 54:1 , perhaps meant to exclude percussion and wind instruments) and “for the flutes” (“nehiloth ”), though both meanings are dubious. Judges 21:16-24 accords dancing a role in the celebration of the yearly feast at Shiloh, and David is pictured as dancing before the Lord as the Ark was brought to Jerusalem ( 2 Samuel 6:14 )
Evangelize, Evangelism - ...
What is true on a personal level is true for the nation as the people return the Ark of the covenant to its rightful place at the center of Israel's worship (1 Chronicles 16:23-25 /Psalm 16:23-25/96:2-4 ). ...
The message Jesus proclaims is revelational (Acts 10:36 ) and points to the arrival of endtime salvation in terms of the coming of God's reign or of peace (Matthew 24:14 ; Mark 1:14-15 ; Luke 8:1 ; Acts 10:36 ; Ephesians 2:17 ; cf. The response looked for is repentance and faith (Mark 1:15 ). Still, when Mark entitles his account of Jesus' life and ministry, he labels it "The beginning of the gospel about Jesus Christ, the Son of God" (Mark 1:1 ). World evangelism is the one positive feature of the time between his return to heaven and his second coming (Matthew 24:14 /Mark 24:14/13:10 ; Matthew 26:13 /Mark 26:13/14:9 ): "And this gospel of the kingdom will be preached in the whole world as a testimony to all nations, and then the end will come
Joshua - The Bethshemite in whose field was the stone on which the Ark was set, on its return from the land of the Philistines ( 1 Samuel 6:14 ; 1 Samuel 6:18 ). This is the more remarkable since at Joshua 8:30-35 we have a statement of how Joshua built an altar at Ebal, before the country between Gilgal and Mount Ephraim was subdued
Angels - Of these the Apocalypse, as might be expected from the subject, calls for special attention; no book of the OT or the NT is so full of references to the angels, and it is the more remarkable that the other Johannine writings have so few. In the Gospels ἄγγελος is used of John Baptist in Matthew 11:10, Mark 1:2, Luke 7:27 (from Malachi 3:1 but not from Septuagint , which, however, also has ἄγγελος), of John’s messengers in Luke 7:24, and of Jesus’ messengers to a Samaritan village in Luke 9:52. It is explicitly stated in Matthew 24:36, Mark 13:32. ...
The good angels are angels of light, as opposed to the powers of darkness (2 Corinthians 11:14; contrast Ephesians 6:12); so, when the angel came to St. ...
They neither marry nor are given in marriage; and so in the resurrection life there is no marrying, for men will be ‘as angels in heaven’ (Matthew 22:30, Mark 12:25), ‘equal to angels’ (ἰσάγγελοι, Luke 20:36). ...
The unfallen angels are holy (Revelation 14:10, Mark 8:38, Luke 9:26, and some Manuscripts of Matthew 25:31; so perhaps 1 Thessalonians 3:13, Judges 1:14 [5]; cf. ’ The cherubim of the Ark (Exodus 25:18) are mentioned in Hebrews 9:5. The attendance of the angels on the Great Judge is mentioned in all four Gospels (Matthew 13:41; Matthew 16:27; Matthew 24:31; Matthew 25:31, Mark 8:38; Mark 13:27, Luke 9:26; Luke 12:8 f. They ministered to our Lord on earth, in His human nature, after the Temptation in the wilderness (Matthew 4:11, Mark 1:13, not in || Lk. ’ For this function in the Gospels see Matthew 1:20; Matthew 2:13; Matthew 2:19; Matthew 28:2-5, Mark 16:5-7, Luke 1:11; Luke 1:13; Luke 1:19; Luke 1:26; Luke 1:30;
Pentateuch - ...
The dividing lines between the individual books of the Pentateuch generally mark a change in the direction of the materials. The division between Exodus and Leviticus marks the change from the building of the tabernacle in Exodus 35-40 to the inauguration of worship ( Leviticus 1-10 ). Guidance of a rebellious people through the great and terrible wilderness marks Numbers 10-21 ; and preparations for going over Jordan and conquering Canaan are the major topics of Numbers 22:1Deuteronomy 22:1—34:1 . Narratives describe creation, judgment (flood), travel (wilderness wanderings), buildings (Ark, tabernacle), marriages (Isaac and Rebekah), and births (Moses)
Temple - The Most Holy place was separated from the Sanctuary by an impervious veil, Luke 23:45 , and was perhaps wholly dark, 1 Kings 8:12 , but for the glory of the Lord which filled it. From this court of the Gentiles our Savior drove the persons who had established a cattle-market in it, for the purpose of supplying those with sacrifices who came from a distance, Matthew 21:12-13 . It wanted the five principal things which could invest it with this: namely, the Ark and mercy seat, the divine presence or visible glory, the holy fire on the altar, the urim and thummin, and the Spirit of prophecy. To these there is no doubt a reference in Mark 13:1 Luke 21:5 : "And as he went out of the temple, one of his disciples saith unto him, Master, see what manner of stones, and what buildings are here!" Luke says, "goodly stones. According to our blessed Lord's prediction, that "there should not be left one stone upon another that should not be thrown down," Mark 13:2 , the whole structure above ground was completely demolished by the Roman soldiers, under Titus, A. Near the southwest corner certain huge stones mark the beginning of an arch, a part of the stately bridge which anciently connected the temple are with Mount Zion; and a little north of this spot is the celebrated wailing-place of the Jews
Dress - ]'>[1] ‘girdle’) of leather’ ( 2 Kings 1:8 ), and John the Baptist ( Matthew 3:4 , Mark 1:6 ). David, as priest, dancing before the Ark shows to have been of the nature of a short kilt. ]'>[3] , Mark 13:16 RV [3] ‘cloke’); the ‘garment’ of Mark 13:16 , and so on. It may, however, have been of goats’ or camels’ hair, as in the case of John the Baptist ( Matthew 3:4 , Mark 1:6 ). In this last respect it resembled the NT sindôn , the ‘linen cloth’ of Matthew 27:59 , Mark 15:46 RV Prayer - (Apart from Christ’s prayer in Gethsemane [7]); ( b ) kneeling ( Psalms 95:6 , Isa 45:23 , 1 Kings 8:54 , Ezra 9:6 , Daniel 6:10 , Luke 22:41 , Acts 7:60 ; Acts 9:40 ; Acts 20:35 ; Acts 21:5 , Ephesians 3:14 ); ( c ) prostrate, face to ground ( Exodus 34:6 , Nehemiah 8:6 , 1Es 8:91 , Jdt 9:1 , 2Ma 13:12 , Matthew 26:39 ); face between knees ( 1 Kings 18:42 , cf. ]'>[3] ): Matthew 17:21 , Mark 9:29 , Acts 10:30 , Psalms 90:1-17 . As a ‘cry in the dark’ the book re-echoes prayers like Psalms 88:1-18 ; but the conflict of doubt culminates in the colloquy between God and Job, in which the latter expresses the reverent submission of faith ( Job 42:1-6 )
Number - There were eight persons in the Ark; a boy was circumcised on the eighth day
Ethics - Morality is under Divine protection: are not the tables of the Law in the Ark that occupies the most sacred place in Jehovah’s shrine ( Exodus 40:20 , Deuteronomy 10:5 , 1 Kings 8:9 , Hebrews 9:4 )? The commandments, instead of being arbitrary, are the outflowings of the character of God. , Job 32:1-22 , Mark 2:21-22 , Isaiah 58:6 ff. In response to this manifested generosity, an unmercenary spirit was begotten in Israel, so that God was loved for His own sake, and His smile was regarded as wealth and light when poverty and darkness had to be endured. To the same purport is the remarkable appreciation of the beauty and splendour of wisdom recorded in Proverbs 8:1-36 . passim ); a missing of the mark, violence, transgression, rebellion, pollution ( Psalms 51:1-19 ). Ability to sin is a mark of that high rank in nature denoted by ‘personality. Actions are looked at on their inner side ( Matthew 5:21-22 ; Matthew 5:27-28 ; Matthew 6:1 ; Matthew 6:4 ; Matthew 6:6 ; Matthew 6:18 ; Matthew 12:34-35 ; Matthew 23:5 ; Luke 10:25-37 , Mark 7:2-8 ; Mark 7:18-23 , Luke 16:15 ; Micah 7:18 , John 4:23 f. The family with its parents, children, and servants ( Ephesians 5:22 to Ephesians 6:9 , Colossians 3:18 to Colossians 4:1 ); the Church with its various orders of character and gifts ( 1 Samuel 16:7 ; Romans 15:1-33 , Galatians 6:1-2 , 1Co 13:1-13 ; 1 Corinthians 14:1-40 ; 1 Corinthians 15:1-58 ); the State with its monarch and magistrates ( Mark 12:14-17 , Romans 13:1-7 , 1 Timothy 2:1-2 ), provide the spheres wherein the servant of Christ is to manifest his devotion to the Most High. As to (1), we mark the upward look, His readiness to let the heat of His love burst into the flame of praise and prayer, His dutifulness and submissiveness: He lived ‘in the bosom of the Father,’ and wished to do only that which God desired. Christian Ethics is marked quite as much by promises of assistance as by loftiness of standard. The virtues to be acquired ( Matthew 5:1-16 , 1618384275_47 , Colossians 3:12-17 , 2 Peter 1:5-7 , Titus 2:12 ) and the vices to be shunned ( Mark 7:21-22 , Galatians 5:19-21 , Colossians 3:5-9 ) are viewed in connexion with the assurance of efficient aid
War, Holy War - Liturgical markings indicate it was used in worship. Hophni and Phineas made the fatal mistake of assuming victory would be guaranteed by bringing a sacred cult object into the camp, namely, the Ark of Yahweh (1 Samuel 4 )
Fire - Judgment fell upon Uzza as described in1Ch 13:10, because he and David imitated the Philistines in handling the Ark of GOD. (See also Matthew 18:8; Mark 9:44)
Letters - marks for the purpose of expressing sounds, used in writing. But the author and the era of this discovery, if such it be, are both lost in the darkness of remote antiquity. The latter had, likewise, abbreviated marks, which were used as symbols; and thus made an approach to letters, although they never reached this discovery. The opinion of this learned prelate was, that the primitive mode of writing among the Egyptians was by figurative delineations or hieroglyphics; that this becoming too tedious and voluminous, by degrees they perfected another character, which he calls the running-hand of hieroglyphics, resembling the Chinese characters; which being at first formed only by the outlines of figures, became at length a kind of marks; and at last led to the compendious use of letters by an alphabet. This, as I have already observed, though originally the same with that used by the Egyptians, became, in process of time, materially different, being made up of arbitrary marks, which are for the most part ideo-graphical. The priests, however who had already invented a new set of arbitrary marks, as a shorter way of hieroglyphical writing, which they employed exclusively in transactions which concerned their body and their pursuits, after the invention of the alphabet, turned these marks into letters, and thus they formed another set of characters, or mode of writing, to which they gave the appellation of hieratic, as belonging exclusively to their order. Many arts were invented before the flood; and the Ark itself is a vast monument of mechanical skill
Temple - ...
Before we proceed to describe this venerable edifice, it may be proper to remark, that by the temple is to be understood not only the fabric or house itself, which by way of eminence is called the temple, namely, the holy of holies, the sanctuary, and the several courts both of the priests and Israelites, but also all the numerous chambers and rooms which this prodigious edifice comprehended; and each of which had its respective degree of holiness, increasing in proportion to its contiguity to the holy of holies. This remark it will be necessary to bear in mind, lest the reader of Scripture should be led to suppose, that whatever is there said to be transacted in the temple was actually done in the interior of that sacred edifice. ...
The temple erected by Solomon was more splendid and magnificent than the second temple, which was deficient in five remarkable things that constituted the chief glory of the first: these were, the Ark and the mercy seat: the shechinah, or manifestation of the divine presence, in the holy of holies; the sacred fire on the altar, which had been first kindled from heaven; the urim and thummim; and the spirit of prophecy. This outer court being assigned to the Gentile proselytes, the Jews, who did not worship in it themselves, conceived that it might lawfully be put to profane uses: for here we find that the buyers and sellers of animals for sacrifices, and also the money-changers, had stationed themselves; until Jesus Christ, awing them into submission by the grandeur and dignity of his person and behaviour, expelled them; telling them that it was the house of prayer for all nations, and was not to be profaned, Matthew 24:15 ; Mark 11:15-17 . In this court was the treasury, over against which Christ sat, and beheld how the people threw their voluntary offerings into it, for furnishing the victims and other things necessary for the sacrifices, Mark 12:41 ; John 8:20 . "When all these things are considered," says Harwood, "how natural is the exclamation of the disciples, when viewing this immense building at a distance: ‘Master, see what manner of stones' (ποταποι λιθοι , ‘what very large ones') ‘and what buildings are here!' Mark 13:1 : and how wonderful is the declaration of our Lord upon this, how unlikely to be accomplished before the race of men who were then living should cease to exist! ‘Seest thou these great buildings? There shall not be left one stone upon another that shall not be thrown down
Israel, History of - ...
For a period of approximately two centuries, the Israelites were centrally joined as autonomous tribes around the Ark of the covenant, a loose relationship centering in common worship commitments. ” The fall of Samaria in 721 marked the end of Israel as a part of the United Monarchy. ...
The death of Solomon in 922 marked the beginning of Judah as the separated Southern Kingdom also. This was, indeed, a dark period in Judah's history. ...
The Babylonian Exile, in spite of its relative brevity, was the benchmark in the religious development of the people
Kings, the Books of - The opening "now" marks that the books of Kings continue the books of Samuel, carrying on the history of the development of the kingdom, as foretold in the fundamental promise (2 Samuel 7). ...
Nevertheless, the uniformity of the treatment of the history, and the unity of the language, mark that the work is independent of 1 and 2 Samuel. In 1 Kings 8:8 the staves of the Ark in the holy place the author says "are unto this day"; this must be a retention of the words of his source, for he survived the destruction of the temple (2 Kings 25)
David - Thither he brought up the Ark with great ceremony ( 2 Samuel 6:1 ff. ...
One of the darker traits of David’s character is illustrated by the detailed account of the Bathsheba episode (2 Samuel 11:2 ; 2 Samuel 12:25 ); so far from seeking to curb his passion for her on hearing that she is married, he finds ways and means of ridding himself of the husband, after whose death Bathsheba becomes his queen
Sabbath - Much has been written upon the subject on each side, and much research and learning employed, sometimes to darken a very plain subject. The seventh day was hallowed at the close of the creation; its sanctity was afterward marked by the withholding of the manna on that day, and the provision of a double supply on the sixth, and that previous to the giving of the law from Sinai: it was then made a part of that great epitome of religious and moral duty, which God wrote with his own finger on tables of stone; it was a part of the public political law of the only people to whom almighty God ever made himself a political Head and Ruler; its observance is connected throughout the prophetic age with the highest promises, its violations with the severest maledictions; it was among the Jews in our Lord's time a day of solemn religious assembling, and was so observed by him; when changed to the first day of the week, it was the day on which the first Christians assembled; it was called, by way of eminence, "the Lord's day;" and we have inspired authority to say, that both under the Old and New Testament dispensations, it is used as an expressive type of the heavenly and eternal rest. Paul, in which he speaks of Jewish Sabbaths, with their Levitical rites, and of a distinction of days, the observance of which marked a weak or a criminal adherence to the abolished ceremonial dispensation; touch not the Sabbath as a branch of the moral law, or as it was changed, by the authority of the Apostles, to the first day of the week. " Now, the sense in which the Apostle uses the term, "the law," in this argument, is indubitably marked in Romans 7:7 : "I had not known sin but by the law; for I had not known lust, except the law had said, Thou shalt not covet:" which, being a plain reference to the tenth command of the decalogue, as plainly shows that the decalogue is "the law" of which he speaks. The difference in the mode of expression here, from that which the sacred historian has used in the first chapter, is very remarkable. It deserves consideration, too, on this subject, that Noah, in sending forth the dove out of the Ark, observed the septenary revolution of days, Genesis 8:10 ; Genesis 8:12 ; and at a subsequent period, in the days of the Patriarch Jacob, a week is spoken of as a well known period of time, Genesis 29:27 ; Judges 14:12 ; Judges 14:15 ; Judges 14:17
Philo - -About the life of Philo we have only very scanty information; apart from occasional remarks in his own writings (in particular in Flaccum and de Virtut. Long before Astruc he remarked the interchange of the two Divine names in the Law-‘God’ (θεὸς = Elohim) and ‘Lord’ (κύριος = Jahweh); he explains them as indicating the two main powers in God-goodness and might, the former creating and saving, the latter judging and punishing. Paradise, Ark, tabernacle are representations of the world
Magic, Divination, And Sorcery - It would be quite in accordance with this that Balaam’s ass should see what was hidden from her master ( Numbers 22:27 ); a similar belief in the significance of the movements of animals is shown in the lords of the Philistines watching the way the kine took with the Ark of God ( 1 Samuel 6:12 ). Matthew 2:1-23 , where the wise men, who appear to have been astrologers, were met by God in their darkness, and led to the infant Saviour Type - From that time onward He had pointed out repeatedly that what was written in the OT Scriptures was now being accomplished, that what prophets and righteous men of old had desired to see and hear was now being seen and heard by those around Him (Mark 7:6, Matthew 13:17). In 1 Peter the Apostle takes the unblemished lamb of the Passover (Exodus 12:5) to typify Christ as a lamb without blemish and without spot (1 Peter 1:19), and sees in Noah’s Ark a prefiguration of baptism as a means of salvation (1 Peter 3:21)
Sanctification - He was rightly called the "Holy One of God" (Mark 1:24 ), sanctified by the Father (John 10:36 ). In addition, the return of Christ will mark the beginning of remade heaven and earth (2 Peter 3:10-13 ). Everything to do with the tabernacle and temple was holy: garments (Exodus 28:2 ), anointing oil (Exodus 30:25 ), crown (Exodus 39:30 ), linen tunic (Genesis 12:1-77 ), convocation of the people (Leviticus 23:2 ), water (Numbers 5:17 ), vessels (Numbers 31:6 ), utensils (1 Kings 8:4 ), Ark (2 Chronicles 35:3 ), day (Nehemiah 8:11 ), and place (Exodus 28:29 ; 1 Kings 6:16 )
Samuel - Yea, the darkness hideth not from Him; but the night shineth as the day; the darkness and the light are both alike to God. ...
If Samuel's mother was still in this world when the Ark was taken, and when Shiloh was laid waste, then the likelihood is that he went back to live with his mother till he should see what the Lord had for him to do. The darkness shall cover us, they said, and it did. It did, till a Hand out of the darkness struck them down in their sin. Samuel planned and set up an institution, so to call it, that has made far more mark on the world than anything else that survives to us out of Israel or Greece or Rome
Law of Moses - (c) Nor is it less essential to remark the period of the history at which it was given. It marked and determined the transition of Israel from the condition of a tribe to that of a nation, and its definite assumption of a distinct position and office in the history of the world. (a) The tabernacle with the Ark, the vail, the altars, the laver, the priestly robes, etc
Propitiation - This difference of construction marks a difference between pagan and biblical ideas; for although propitiating God may be indirectly involved in phrases used in the OT, it is not direct and prominent as in non-biblical writers. Moreover, the apostles’ application of the term as interpretative of the meaning of Christ’s offering of His sinless life to do away with the power of sin to separate between God and man was marked by a certain personal freedom of usage. by Luther, Calvin, Ritschl, Cremer, Bruce), that ἱλαστήριον signifies ‘the mercy-seat,’ ‘the lid of the Ark,’ as in Hebrews 9:5, is now generally rejected as fanciful and inadequate (for reasons see Deissmann, Bibelstudien, Marburg, 1895, p
Jerusalem - of Moriah the valley of the Asmonaeans running transversely (marked still by the reservoir with two arches, "the pool of Bethesda" so-called, near St. "David was buried in the city of David (here used in a vague sense (see Birch's remark quoted at the close of this article) of the Ophel S. side where the lower town joined it; and brought up the Ark, making it thus the political and religious center of the nation (2 Samuel 5:6-9; 2 Samuel 5:2 Samuel 6-7). Also he made engines to be on the towers and bulwarks, to shoot arrows and great stones with. He made strong or fortified the ΜΙLLΟ (the article marks it as a well known place), probably a large tower at one particular part of the wall (Judges 9:6; Judges 9:46; Judges 9:49, where Μille is interchanged with Μigdol "a tower"
Lord's Day - See Mark 16:2, Luke 24:1, John 20:1 (τῇ μιᾷ τῶν σαββάτων), Matthew 28:1 (εἰς μίαν σαββάτων), the fragment Mark 16:9-20 (πρώτῃ σαββάτου), John 20:19 (τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ἑκείνη τῇ μιᾷ σαββάτων). 357) marks this as the only instance he knows of in which a Christian writer uses the term ‘Sunday’ in pre-Constantine times (see also Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics , article ‘Festivals and Fasts [4]’). Between the 11th and the 15th centuries we meet with a wide-spread fiction of a ‘Letter from Heaven’ inculcating Sunday observance, wherein the largest claims are made for the day: how that on it the angels were created, the Ark rested on Ararat, the Exodus took place, also the Baptism of Jesus, His great miracles
Terah - For by faith Noah, being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear, prepared an Ark to the saving of his house; by the which he condemned the world, and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith. Till Lot only put words upon the terrible darkness that fell on Abram's overwhelmed heart when he upbraided Abram, and said, Would God we also had died in Haran! Would God we had listened to our kinsmen in Chaldea when they dissuaded us from this folly and from this wilderness! The hands of the pitiful women have sodden their own children; they that did feed delicately are desolate in the streets; they that were brought up in scarlet embrace the dung-hill
Revelation, the - The mark discerned by Christ was that it had left its first love. The governmental powers are disorganised and in darkness. A star — one in power — falls from heaven: moral darkness and Satanic influence follow. The temple of God was opened in heaven, the Ark of His covenant was seen there, and there were judgements on earth. A third warns against worshipping the beast or receiving his mark
Covenant - There are marked similarities between biblical and the nonbiblical covenants. Jeremiah spoke of the covenant of the day and the night that no one can alter (33:19-20); this covenant is understood to have been initiated in creation when God separated light from darkness and gave the sun and moon their appointed place and role (Genesis 1:3-5,14 ). When commanded to build the Ark, he proved to be a capable servant in the cultural dimension of life (6:14-16; 7:5)
Egypt - "...
The hieroglyphic name for Egypt is Κem , "black," alluding to its black soil, combining also the idea of heat, "the hot dark country. This accurately marks the time just before Passover. The "flags" are a species called tuff or sufi , Hebrew suph , smaller than that of which the Ark was made (Exodus 2:3), "bulrushes," "flags" (Isaiah 18:2; Isaiah 19:7). , and it is remarkable that his widow imported many trees from Arabia Felix. The ninth, darkness, the S. wind from the desert darkening the arm: sphere with dense masses of fine sand, would fill with gloom the Egyptians, whose chief idol was Ra, the sun god
Israel - The accounts of it in which the priests and the Ark figure are of later origin
Psalms, Theology of - Generally speaking, they exhibit the formal structure of the hymns but are marked by the distinctives in content these designations suggest. Psalm 24:7-10 describes another kind of procession into the templethis one involving Yahweh himself whose presence is presumably symbolized by the Ark of the covenant. ...
Five of the preceding psalms (2; 21; 72; 101; 110) seem to have been created for use during the king's coronation and/or to mark the anniversary of his accession. The psalmists looked for the king's reign to be an enduring one marked by righteousness, peace, prosperity, and blessing of every sort (21:1-7; 72:5-7,15-17)
Christ in Art - It is often surrounded by a wreath, and often has the A and Ω on either side to mark the divinity of our Lord; in a 4th cent, lead coffin from Saida in Phœnicia, the letters of the old symbol ΙΧΘΥϹ he between the arms of the monogram. Thus the first representations of the Cross are very indirect; the cross-marks on the round Eucharistic loaves, which are found as early as the 2nd cent, (on a sarcophagus in the Catacomb of Priscilla), merely represent the folding up of the corners of the bread to make it round. ) often has a crossbar so marked as to be clearly symbolic; it was, in fact, according to Marucchi, a hidden form of the Cross, a symbolized hope in the Cross. Early Christian literature (the reliability of which is illustrated by every fresh discovery in the realm of archaeology) is markedly silent on the subject, the first mention of a picture of the Crucifixion being in the middle of the 6th century. It is remarkable that the moral value of the better elements of mythology should have been thus recognized at the very tombs of martyrs who had suffered at the hands of paganism. , but the Ark is a symbol both of deliverance and of Baptism (1 Peter 3:21), so that Noah represents the saved rather than the Saviour. In spite of the realism of the Good Shepherd pictures, there is a certain hieratic grace and dignity about the figure that marks it at once as a Christian subject, though the figure of a shepherd was common enough in pagan art (e. Apollinare Nuove at Ravenna must he mentioned: along one wall of the nave a procession of male martyrs approaches Christ enthroned between angels, and along the other a procession of female martyrs approach the Virgin and Child similarly enthroned between angels; the Virgin has a plain nimbus and that of the Child contains the cross, while both figures are of the lofty hieratic type that endured for so many subsequent centuries; but it is remarkable that (while the figure of the enthroned Christ on the oth
Jerusalem - The passage describing his capture of the city is 2 Samuel 5:4-10 , and few passages in the historical books of the Old Testament are more obscure, owing partly to textual corruption and partly to topographical allusions clear to the writer, but veiled in darkness for us. As soon as David had established himself in his new surroundings, his first care was to bring the Ark of Jahweh into the city ( 2 Samuel 6:1-23 ), but his desire to erect a permanent building for its reception was frustrated by Nathan the prophet ( 2 Samuel 7:1-29 ). A fortiori these remarks apply to the rival sites that in more recent years have been suggested. The so-called ‘Gordon’s Calvary’ and similar fantastic identifications we can dismiss at once with the remark that the arguments in their favour are fatuous; that powerful arguments can be adduced against them; that they cannot even claim the minor distinction of having been hallowed by the devotion of sixteen centuries; and that, in short, they are entirely unworthy of the smallest consideration
Enoch Book of - Darkness and chains and burning fire, valleys and the abyss, loom large in all descriptions of the place and mode of punishment. ); Noah is told that the angels are making an Ark for him (lxvii. 1-4); woes of sinners who died in honour-their spirits descend into darkness, chains, and burning flame (ciii. ); Noah is told that the angels are making an Ark for him (lxvii
Archaeology And Biblical Study - Petrie and Bliss's work marks the beginning of a scientific, disciplined approach to archaeology in Palestine. ” Dagon to whose temple the Ark was taken while in Philistine territory (1 Samuel 5:2 ) is now known from occurrences of his name all over the
Jews - Though this second temple, or, as it is sometimes called, the temple of Zerubbabel, who was at that time governor of the Jews, was of the same size and dimensions as the first, or Solomon's temple, yet it was very inferior to it in splendour and magnificence; and the Ark of the covenant, the Shechinah, the holy fire upon the altar, the Urim and Thummim, and the spirit of prophecy, were all wanting to this temple of the remnant of the people. This sudden change in the disposition of Alexander excited no small astonishment among his followers; and when his favourite Parmenio inquired of him the cause, he answered, that it was occasioned by the recollection of a remarkable dream he had in Macedonia, in which a person, dressed precisely like the Jewish high priest, had encouraged him to undertake the conquest of Persia, and had promised him success: he therefore adored the name of that God by whose direction he believed he acted, and showed kindness to his people. Justice was administered in the name and by the laws of Rome; though in what concerned their religion, their own laws, and the power of the high priest, and sanhedrim, or great council, were continued to them; and they were allowed to examine witnesses, and exercise an inferior jurisdiction in other causes, subject to the control of the Romans, to whom their tetrarchs or kings were also subject; and it may be remarked that, at this very period of time, our Saviour, who was now in the twelfth year of his age, being at Jerusalem with Joseph and Mary upon occasion of the passover, appeared first in the temple in his prophetic office, and in the business of his Father, on which he was sent, sitting among the doctors of the temple, and declaring the truth of God to them
Holy Ghost - Owen remarks, "As the vital breath of a man has a continual emanation from him, and yet is never separated utterly from his person, or forsaketh him, so doth the Spirit of the Father and the Son proceed from them by a continual divine emanation, still abiding one with them. " On this refined view little can be said which has clear Scriptural authority; and yet the very term by which the Third Person in the Trinity is designated, Wind or Breath, may, as to the Third Person, be designed, like the term Son applied to the Second, to convey, though imperfectly, some intimation of that manner of being by which both are distinguished from each other, and from the Father; and it was a remarkable action of our Lord, and one certainly which does not discountenance this idea, that when he imparted the Holy Ghost to his disciples, "He breathed on them, and saith unto them, Receive ye the Holy Ghost," John 20:22 . It is not surely here meant, that the Spirit by which the generations of animals are perpetuated, is wind; and if he be called an attribute, wisdom, power, or both united, where do we read of such attributes being "sent," "sent forth from God?" The personality of the Spirit is here as clearly marked as when St. Peter to have preached by Noah while the Ark was preparing;—in allusion to the passage, "My Spirit shall not always, strive (contend, debate) with man. The same remark applies to Revelation 1:4-5 : "Grace be unto you, and peace, from Him which was, and which is, and which is to come; and from the seven spirits which are before his throne," (an emblematical reference, probably to the golden branch with its seven lamps,) "and from Jesus Christ