What does Archelaus mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἀρχέλαος A son of Herod the Great by Malthace 1

Definitions Related to Archelaus

G745


   1 A son of Herod the Great by Malthace, the Samaritan woman.
   He and his brother Antipas were brought up with a certain private man in Rome.
   After the death of his father, he ruled as ethnarch over Judaea, Samaria and Idumaea, (with the exception of the cities of Gaza, Gadara and Hipo).
   The Jews and the Samaritans having accused him at Rome of tyranny, he was banished by the emperor Augustus to Vienna of the Allobroges and died there.
   Additional Information: Archelaus = “prince of the people”.
   

Frequency of Archelaus (original languages)

Frequency of Archelaus (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Herod Archelaus
(Matthew 2:22 ), the brother of Antipas (q.v.).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Archelaus
Ruler of the people, son of Herod the Great, by Malthace, a Samaritan woman. He was educated along with his brother Antipas at Rome. He inherited from his father a third part of his kingdom viz., Idumea, Judea, and Samaria, and hence is called "king" (Matthew 2:22 ). It was for fear of him that Joseph and Mary turned aside on their way back from Egypt. Till a few days before his death Herod had named Antipas as his successor, but in his last moments he named Archelaus.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Archelaus
Son of Herod the Great by Malthake, a Samaritan. Brought up at Rome with his brother Antipas. Originally Herod excluded him from any share in his dominions, because of his elder brother Antipater's accusations. But at Herod's death the kingdom, by a change in the will, was divided between his three sons, Antipus, Archelaus, and Philip. Archelaus received Idumea, Judaea, Samaria, and the cities Caesarea, Sebaste, Joppa, and Jerusalem, which yielded 600 talents income. Augustus refused him the title "king," and only allowed him the title "ethuarch"; but he had the reality of kingship (Matthew 2:22), "did reign." For the short time only between his father's death and his going to Rome, to seek confirmation of the kingship from Augustus, had he the title. Josephus (Ant. 17:9, sec. 2) at this period calls him "king." How seemingly near to error, yet how accurately Matthew expresses himself.
In the tenth year of his reign (A.D. 6) his brothers and his subjects complained of his tyranny. So he was dethroned, and exiled to Vienne in Gaul, where he died; but Jerome says his sepulchre was near Bethlehem. When Joseph, at Herod's death, was about to return with the child Jesus from Egypt to the Holy Land, "he heard that Archelaus did reign in Judaea;" and "he was afraid to go thither" (Matthew 2:22). Archelaus must therefore have given at the outset of his reign some notorious specimen of his cruelty. Josephus undesignedly supplies this confirmation of Scripture. One of Herod's last deeds was the putting Judas and Matthias to death for instigating young men to pull down a golden eagle set up contrary to Moses' law over the temple gate by Herod; at the Passover which succeeded Herod's death, before Archelaus had as yet the emperor's ratification of his accession, Archelaus, finding several commiserating the martyrs, caused his cavalry to inclose at the temple and slay 3,000 men.
The rest fled to the mountains; and all by Archelaus's command "left the feast, fearing lest something worse should ensue." A deputation of Jews in consequence went to Rome to beg Augustus not to ratify his appointment; but the emperor confirmed Herod's will (Ant. 17:9, sec. 3). That this cruel act was what made Joseph afraid of him is the more likely, as before his accession he had no public post whereby men might have known his character. Joseph turned to Galilee, where the less cruel brother Antipas reigned. The kingdom was originally designed for Antipas; its unexpected transference to Archelaus made Joseph change his direction. The fact of Joseph's fear is stated, the cause is not; but Archelaus's character otherwise known accounts for it. He wedded illegally his brother Alexander's former wife, Glaphyra, who had children by Alexander, thereby giving much offense to the Jews.
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Archelaus, Supposed Bishop of Carchar
Archelaus , supposed bp. of Carchar (perhaps Carrhoe Harrom in Mesopotamia). A work is attributed to him called Acta Disputationis Archel. Ep. Mesop. et Manetis haeresiarchae. It is extant in a Latin translation from a Greek text, but some think the Greek is derived from a Syriac original. The author was probably (cf. Phot. Cod. 85) a certain Hegemonius. The disputation and Archelaus himself seem to be fictitious; but the work affords valuable information respecting the Manichean system (cf. Bardenhewer, 1908, pp. 208–269).
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Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Archelaus
ARCHELAUS . Matthew 2:22 . See Herod, No. 2.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Herod Archelaus
Son of Herod the Great. Succeeded as ethnarch of half his father's kingdom, but excited opposition by marrying his brother's wife, and was finally exiled to Gaul, A.D. 7; through fear of him the Holy Family went to reside in Nazareth.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Archelaus
The prince of the people
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Archelaus
ARCHELAUS (Ἀρχέλαος) is named once in the NT (Matthew 2:22), and probably is referred to in the parable of the Pounds (Luke 19:12 ff.). He was the elder of the two sons of Herod the Great by Malthace, a Samaritan woman (Josephus BJ i. xxviii. 4, xxxiii. 7). Judaea, with the title of ‘king,’ was bequeathed to him by his father’s will; but he would not assume the royal dignity till he had obtained confirmation of that will from the emperor Augustus (Ant. xvii. viii. 2–4). Before his departure to Rome a rebellion broke out in Jerusalem; and in quelling it his soldiers put three thousand men to death, among whom were pilgrims visiting the Holy City for the passover (ib. xvii. ix. 3). Thus at the beginning of his reign an evil reputation was gained by Archelaus, and the alarm of Joseph may be understood (‘But when he heard that Archelaus did reign in Judaea in the room of his father Herod, he was afraid to go thither’).
After the rebellion, Archelaus proceeded to Rome (Ant. xvii. ix. 3–7, cf. Luke 19:12). Augustus, dealing with Herod’s will, received a deputation from the people of Judaea, who begged that neither Archelaus nor any of his brothers should be appointed king (cf. Luke 19:14). The emperor finally decided that Archelaus should receive Judaea, Samaria, and Idumaea, with the title not of ‘king,’ but of ‘ethnarch’ (Ant. xvii. xi. 1–4; BJ ii. vi. 3). On his return from Rome the ethnarch sought vengeance against his enemies (cf. Luke 19:27) in Judaea and Samaria. In the ninth or tenth year of his reign, after many acts of tyranny and violence, he was banished by the emperor to Vienne in Gaul (Ant. xvii. xiii. 2). According to Jerome, the tomb of Archelaus was pointed out near Bethlehem (de Situ et Nomin. Loc. Hebraic. 101. 11).
Literature.—Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews, Wars of the Jews [1], as cited above; references s. ‘Archelaus’ in Index to Schürer’s Geschichte des Judischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi, 1898–1901 [2]; and Hausrath’s Neutestamentliche Zeitgeschichte, 1873–77 [3]. Of the last named work, vol. i. [4] was published in a 3rd ed. in 1879.
J. Herkless.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Archelaus
(ahr chih lay' uhss) Son and principal successor of Herod the Great (Matthew 2:22 ). When Herod died in 4 B.C., his sons Herod Antipas and Philip were named tetrarchs; but his son Archelaus was the principal successor. Aware of the hostility of the Jews toward his family, Archelaus did not attempt to ascend the throne immediately. First, he tried to win the Jews over. His efforts were not successful; as the Jews revolted, and Archelaus ordered his army to retaliate.
Archelaus encountered opposition to his reign from his brothers, in particular Herod Antipas, who felt entitled to the throne. The brothers presented their case to the emperor Augustus, who gave Archelaus one half of his father Herod's land and split the remainder between Antipas and Philip. Archelaus was given the title Tetrarch, but was promised the title of King if he reigned virtuously.
Archelaus interfered in the high priesthood, married against Jewish law, and oppressed the Samaritans and Jews through brutal treatment. In revolt, the people sent deputations to Caesar to have Archelaus denounced. His rule was ended in A.D. 6 when the Roman government banished him to Gaul and added his territory to Syria.
Joseph was warned in a dream to avoid Judea because of Archelaus' rule. He decided to take Mary and the child Jesus to Galilee when they returned from Egypt rather than go to Judea (Matthew 2:22 ).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Archelaus
Son of Herod the Great by Malthace, a Samaritan. He succeeded his father as Ethnarch of Idumea, Judaea, Samaria, and the maritime cities of Palestine. From his known oppressive character Joseph feared to bring back the infant Jesus into his territory, and turned aside to Galilee, which was under the jurisdiction of his brother Antipas. Matthew 2:22 . He reigned 10 years. Josephus relates that soon after his accession he put to death 3,000 Jews: eventually, for his tyranny to the Jews and the Samaritans he was deposed and banished to Vienne in Gaul.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Archelaus
son of Herod the Great, and Maltace, his fifth wife. Herod having put to death his sons Alexander, Aristobulus, and Antipater, and expunged out of his will Herod Antipas, whom he had declared king, he substituted Archelaus, and gave Antipas the title of tetrarch only. After the death of Herod, Archelaus ordered that king's will to be read, wherein he, Archelaus, was declared king, on condition that Augustus consented. Hereupon the assembly cried, "Long live king Archelaus!" and the soldiers promised the same fidelity to him as they had shown to his father.
Archelaus buried his father magnificently, came to Jerusalem, and there mourned seven days, according to custom. He then gave a splendid entertainment to the people, went to the temple, harangued the multitude, promised them good treatment, and declared he would not assume the title of king till the emperor had confirmed it, A.M. 4001; B.C. 3. The people, notwithstanding, tumultuously demanded the execution of those who advised Herod to slay certain zealots, who had pulled down a golden eagle from one of the temple gates. They also required Archelaus to divest Joazar of the high priesthood; and they vehemently reproached the memory of the late king. Archelaus sent troops to suppress the mutineers, and killed near three thousand of them about the temple. After this he embarked at Caesarea for Rome, to procure from Augustus the confirmation of Herod's will. Antipas, his brother, went to Rome likewise, to dispute his title, pretending that Herod's first will should be preferred to his last, which he alleged to have been made by him when his understanding was not sound.
The two brothers, Archelaus and Antipas, procured able orators to display their pretensions before the emperor; and when they had done speaking, Archelaus threw himself at Augustus's feet. Augustus gently raised him, said he would do nothing contrary to Herod's intention or his interest, but refused to decide the affair at that time. Some time afterward, the Jews sent a solemn embassy to Rome, to desire Augustus would permit them to live according to their own laws, and on the footing of a Roman province, without being subject to kings of Herod's family, but only to the governors of Syria. Augustus heard them, and likewise heard Archelaus in reply; then broke up the assembly without declaring himself. After some days, he sent for Archelaus, gave him the title, not of king, but of ethnarch, with one moiety of the territories which his father Herod had enjoyed; promising him the crown likewise, if his good conduct deserved it. Archelaus returned to Judea, and, under pretence that he had countenanced the seditions against him, he deprived Joazar of the high priesthood, and gave that dignity to his brother Eleazar. He governed Judea with so much violence, that, after seven years, the chiefs of the Samaritans and Jews accused him before Augustus. The emperor immediately sent for his agent at Rome, and without condescending to write to Archelaus he commanded the agent to depart instantly for Judea, and order Archelaus to Rome, to give an account of his conduct. On his arrival at Rome, the emperor called for his accusers, and permitted him to defend himself; which he did so insufficiently, that Augustus banished him to Vienne, in Gaul, where he continued in exile to the end of his life. See ANTIPAS .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Archelaus
Archelaus (är-ke-lâ'us), chief, or prince of the people. A son of Herod the Great, by Malthace his Samaritan wife. Herod bequeathed to him his kingdom, but Augustus confirmed him in the possession of only half of it—Idumea, Judea, and Samaria, with the title of ethnarch, or chief of the nation. After about ten years, on account of his cruelties, he was banished to Vienne in Gaul; and his territories were reduced to the form of a Roman province under the procurator Coponius. In Matthew 2:22, he is said to be king, referring to the interval immediately after the death of Herod, when he assumed the title of king.

Sentence search

Archelaus - , his sons Herod Antipas and Philip were named tetrarchs; but his son Archelaus was the principal successor. Aware of the hostility of the Jews toward his family, Archelaus did not attempt to ascend the throne immediately. His efforts were not successful; as the Jews revolted, and Archelaus ordered his army to retaliate. ...
Archelaus encountered opposition to his reign from his brothers, in particular Herod Antipas, who felt entitled to the throne. The brothers presented their case to the emperor Augustus, who gave Archelaus one half of his father Herod's land and split the remainder between Antipas and Philip. Archelaus was given the title Tetrarch, but was promised the title of King if he reigned virtuously. ...
Archelaus interfered in the high priesthood, married against Jewish law, and oppressed the Samaritans and Jews through brutal treatment. In revolt, the people sent deputations to Caesar to have Archelaus denounced. ...
Joseph was warned in a dream to avoid Judea because of Archelaus' rule
Archelaus - Herod having put to death his sons Alexander, Aristobulus, and Antipater, and expunged out of his will Herod Antipas, whom he had declared king, he substituted Archelaus, and gave Antipas the title of tetrarch only. After the death of Herod, Archelaus ordered that king's will to be read, wherein he, Archelaus, was declared king, on condition that Augustus consented. Hereupon the assembly cried, "Long live king Archelaus!" and the soldiers promised the same fidelity to him as they had shown to his father. ...
Archelaus buried his father magnificently, came to Jerusalem, and there mourned seven days, according to custom. They also required Archelaus to divest Joazar of the high priesthood; and they vehemently reproached the memory of the late king. Archelaus sent troops to suppress the mutineers, and killed near three thousand of them about the temple. ...
The two brothers, Archelaus and Antipas, procured able orators to display their pretensions before the emperor; and when they had done speaking, Archelaus threw himself at Augustus's feet. Augustus heard them, and likewise heard Archelaus in reply; then broke up the assembly without declaring himself. After some days, he sent for Archelaus, gave him the title, not of king, but of ethnarch, with one moiety of the territories which his father Herod had enjoyed; promising him the crown likewise, if his good conduct deserved it. Archelaus returned to Judea, and, under pretence that he had countenanced the seditions against him, he deprived Joazar of the high priesthood, and gave that dignity to his brother Eleazar. The emperor immediately sent for his agent at Rome, and without condescending to write to Archelaus he commanded the agent to depart instantly for Judea, and order Archelaus to Rome, to give an account of his conduct
Archelaus - Archelaus
Archelaus - ARCHELAUS (Ἀρχέλαος) is named once in the NT (Matthew 2:22), and probably is referred to in the parable of the Pounds (Luke 19:12 ff. Thus at the beginning of his reign an evil reputation was gained by Archelaus, and the alarm of Joseph may be understood (‘But when he heard that Archelaus did reign in Judaea in the room of his father Herod, he was afraid to go thither’). ...
After the rebellion, Archelaus proceeded to Rome (Ant. Augustus, dealing with Herod’s will, received a deputation from the people of Judaea, who begged that neither Archelaus nor any of his brothers should be appointed king (cf. The emperor finally decided that Archelaus should receive Judaea, Samaria, and Idumaea, with the title not of ‘king,’ but of ‘ethnarch’ (Ant. According to Jerome, the tomb of Archelaus was pointed out near Bethlehem (de Situ et Nomin. ‘Archelaus’ in Index to Schürer’s Geschichte des Judischen Volkes im Zeitalter Jesu Christi, 1898–1901 Herod - See: ...
Herod the Great
Herod Archelaus
Herod Antipas
Herod Agrippa I the Great
Herod Agrippa II
Archelaus, Supposed Bishop of Carchar - Archelaus , supposed bp. The disputation and Archelaus himself seem to be fictitious; but the work affords valuable information respecting the Manichean system (cf
Archelaus - But at Herod's death the kingdom, by a change in the will, was divided between his three sons, Antipus, Archelaus, and Philip. Archelaus received Idumea, Judaea, Samaria, and the cities Caesarea, Sebaste, Joppa, and Jerusalem, which yielded 600 talents income. When Joseph, at Herod's death, was about to return with the child Jesus from Egypt to the Holy Land, "he heard that Archelaus did reign in Judaea;" and "he was afraid to go thither" (Matthew 2:22). Archelaus must therefore have given at the outset of his reign some notorious specimen of his cruelty. One of Herod's last deeds was the putting Judas and Matthias to death for instigating young men to pull down a golden eagle set up contrary to Moses' law over the temple gate by Herod; at the Passover which succeeded Herod's death, before Archelaus had as yet the emperor's ratification of his accession, Archelaus, finding several commiserating the martyrs, caused his cavalry to inclose at the temple and slay 3,000 men. ...
The rest fled to the mountains; and all by Archelaus's command "left the feast, fearing lest something worse should ensue. The kingdom was originally designed for Antipas; its unexpected transference to Archelaus made Joseph change his direction. The fact of Joseph's fear is stated, the cause is not; but Archelaus's character otherwise known accounts for it
Archela'us - 4) his kingdom was divided between his three sons, Herod Antipas, Archelaus and Philip. Archelaus never properly bore the title of king, ( Matthew 2:22 ) but only that of ethnarch
Manaen - , Herod Antipas, the tetrach, who, with his brother Archelaus, was educated at Rome
Archelaus - Till a few days before his death Herod had named Antipas as his successor, but in his last moments he named Archelaus
Tetrarch - ) As Archelaus was "ethnarch" over half of Herod the Great's whole kingdom, so Philip and Antipus had divided between them the remaining half, and were each "tetrarch" over the fourth; Herod over Galilee; Philip over Ituraea and Trachonitis; Lysanias over Abilene
Archelaus - Archelaus (är-ke-lâ'us), chief, or prince of the people
Zealot - In the opening years of the New Testament era, the Romans exercised their rule over Judea firstly through Herod the Great and then through Herod’s son, Archelaus. But in AD 6 the Romans replaced Archelaus with a governor sent out from Rome, and Judea for the first time came under direct Roman rule (cf
Herod, Family of - Archelaus
Judaea - It was made a portion of the Roman province of Syria after Archelaus was deposed, a
Tetrarch - At the death of Herod the Great, he left half his kingdom to Archelaus, with the title of ethnarch; while the other half was divided between two of his other sons
Judae'a, - It was made a portion of the Roman province of Syria upon the deposition of Archelaus, the ethnarch of Judea, in A
Judaea - After the death of Herod, Archelaus became ethnarch of Judæa, and after his deposition it was added to the province of Syria, and governed by a procurator with his headquarters in Cæsarea
Galileans - In the twelfth year of Christ, about the time that Archelaus was sent away from his government, a secession was made from the sect of the Pharisees, and a new sect arose, called the Galileans
Manaen - As Archelaus was brought up with Herod Antipas at Rome, and Mahaen is mentioned in this relation with Antipas alone, perhaps "foster brother" is the true sense; he may have been brought up with Antipas also
Interest - Luke's parable in particular contains reminiscences of the hated Archelaus (Luke 19:12 ,Luke 19:12,19:14 ; compare Matthew 2:22 )
Theudas - after Archelaus' dethronement), a very turbulent period in which Josephus names three disturbers, leaving the rest unnamed; among the latter was probably Theudas; it is not strange that 50 years later another Theudas, an insurgent in Claudius' time, should arise
Nobleman - ’ The ‘nobleman’ of this parable is probably Archelaus, who, on the death of his father, Herod the Great, went to Rome in order to urge his claims to the kingdom. An ‘ambassage’ of fifty Jews followed Archelaus from Jerusalem to the ‘far country’ in order to protest against his being made king; in other words, they went to Rome to say, ‘We will not that this man reign over us’ (Luke 19:14)
Anitipas - Herod the Great, in his first will, declared him his successor in the kingdom; but he afterward named his son Archelaus king of Judea, and gave to Antipas only the title of tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea. Archelaus going to Rome, to persuade the emperor to confirm his father's will, Antipas also went thither. The emperor bestowed on Archelaus one moiety of what had been assigned him by Herod, with the quality of ethnarch, and promised to grant him the title of king when he had shown himself deserving of it by his virtues
Pound - Jericho (Luke 19:1) owed its magnificent palace to the son of Herod the Great, Archelaus, facts from whose history seem clearly drawn upon in the narrative. 4), and this same Archelaus was in such bad odour that an embassy of protest followed him (xv. The harshness of Matthew 25:27, however, as coming from His lips, can be escaped, on the theory that these words were used with reference to Archelaus, who had proved himself amply capable of cruelty
Herod the Great - Of these, Philip had the land east of Jordan, between Caesarea Philippi and Bethabara, Antipas had Galilee and Peraea, while Archelaus had Judea and Samaria
Judea - Upon the deposition of the ethnarch Archelaus, A
Ambassage - The former corresponds with the struggle between Antipas and his father-in-law, Hareth, king of Arabia; the latter is illustrated by Herod, by Archelaus, and by Antipas, each of whom went to Rome to obtain an enhancement of power. But details apply to the case of Archelaus, who put his friends in command of cities, and against whom the Jews sent to the emperor an embassy of fifty men (Josephus Ant
Political Conditions - Under the pressure of various palace intrigues, and with a view to separate elements between which at the time there was no possible cohesion, Herod left Judaea to Archelaus, Galilee and Peraea to Antipas, and the north-eastern districts beyond Jordan to Philip. Ethnarchy of Archelaus. —On the death of his father, Archelaus succeeded to the lordship of Judaea, with Samaria and Idumaea. Archelaus went in person to Rome (cf. Augustus substantially confirmed Herod’s appointment; and Archelaus returned as ethnarch of the three districts. He was disappointed with the inferior title (which denotes literally the ruler of a nation living, with separate customs, in the midst of another race, and was possibly chosen, in contempt, to identify Archelaus with his unwilling subjects), and proceeded to make his administration (b. Archelaus was fined and exiled to Vienne, and his domains were made directly subject to Rome. Accompanied by the legate Quirinius, he appeared at Jerusalem, took possession of the property of Archelaus, and turned his palace into the official abode of the procurator during the festivals, Caesarea becoming the seat of government
Taxing - There was a well-known enrolment (Acts 5:37) which took place in Judaea under his supervision, after the deposition of Archelaus in a
Pilate or Pontius Pilate - Was the fifth or sixth Roman procurator in the province of Judea, after the banishment of Archelaus
Jericho - This palace was rebuilt by Herod Archelaus after it had been burned down by Simon during the troubles which followed upon the death of Herod the Great (Josephus Ant. After the deposition of Herod Archelaus as tetrarch of Judaea, Jericho was held directly by the Roman procurator, who farmed out its revenues
New Testament - Death of Herod;...
Archelaus made ethnarch of Judaea, Samaria and Idumaea...
Herod Antipas tetrarch of Peraea and Galilee. ...
6 Quirinis (Cyrenius) governor of Syria the second time...
Archelaus banished, and Judaea made a province of Syria
Herod - After the death of Herod, half of his kingdom, including Judea, Ideumaea, and Samaria, was given to his son Archelaus, with the title of Ethnarch; while the remaining half was divided between two of his other sons, Herod Antipas and Philip, with the title of Tetrarchs; the former having the regions of Galilee and Perea, and the latter Batanea, Trachonitis, and Auranitis. HEROD ANTIPAS, Luke 3:1 , was the son of Herod the Great by Malthace his Samaritan wife, and own brother to Archelaus, along with whom he was educated at Rome
Jericho - This palace was rebuilt by Herod Archelaus after it had been burned down by Simon during the troubles which followed upon the death of Herod the Great (Josephus Ant. After the deposition of Herod Archelaus as tetrarch of Judaea, Jericho was held directly by the Roman procurator, who farmed out its revenues
Caesar - To Archelaus were assigned Judaea, Samaria, and Idumaea—not as king, but as ethnarch; to Antipas, Galilee and Peraea as tetrarch; Batanaea, Trachonitis, Auranitis, Gaulanitis, and Paneas to Philip, also as tetrarch (Josephus Ant. As it was in Jerusalem that the question as to the tribute money was raised, our subject in this article has to do only with Archelaus. After some nine years of rule over Judaea, Archelaus was summoned to Rome to answer charges brought against him by a deputation of leading men from Judaea and Samaria
Sanhedrin - After the removal of Archelaus, however, when Judea became one of the provinces ruled by procurators appointed by the emperor, criminal jurisdiction resided in these officials alone; the Sanhedrin had police powers permitting the arrest of alleged breakers of the law, and upon it devolved the duty of gathering the evidence and preparing the indictment for the procurator, who alone was qualified to hear the case and pronounce the sentence
Judea - Judea in this extent constituted part of the kingdom of Herod the Great, and afterwards belonged to his son Archelaus
Ethnarch - 4), where Caesar Augustus makes Archelaus not βασιλεύς, but ἐθνάρχης, of half of the territory that had belonged to Herod, promising him the higher title later, if certain conditions were fulfilled; and in Pseudo-Lucian (Macrob
Taxes - Besides there was a property tax, the registry and valuation for which took place at Christ's birth and was completed by Quirinus Cyrenius after Archelaus' deposition (Luke 2:1-2)
Jericho - It was burned down soon after, but was rebuilt by Archelaus
Cappadocia - On the death of King Archelaus in a
Shiloh (1) - After Archelaus a Roman procurator for the first time was sent there
Tribute - Yet in the latter times, that is, after Archelaus had been banished to Vienne in France, in the sixth year of the vulgar era, and after Judea was reduced to a province, Augustus sent Quirinius into this country to take a new poll of the people, and to make a new estimate of their substance, that he might thereby regulate the tribute that every one was to pay to the Romans
Jer'Icho - Soon afterward the palace was burnt and the town plundered by one Simon, slave to Herod; but Archelaus rebuilt the former sumptuously, and founded a new town on the plain, that bore his own name; and, most important of all, diverted water from a village called Neaera to irrigate the plain which he had planted with palms
Agrippa - He left a son of the same name, and three daughters— Bernice, who was married to her uncle Herod, her father's brother; Mariamne, betrothed to Julius Archelaus; and Drusilla, promised to Epiphanius, the son of Archelaus, the son of Comagena
Manaen (2) - Manaen may well have shared both the home-life and the subsequent education, under a private tutor at Rome, which Antipas and Archelaus enjoyed (Ant. On the other hand, Archelaus is not mentioned here, so perhaps the narrower sense of σύντροφος may be pressed, that Manaen’s mother was also nurse to Antipas
Judaea - After the death of Herod, the Roman emperor assumed the right to settle the dispute which had arisen among his sons concerning the division of the kingdom, and by his decree Judaea and Samaria were in the partition assigned to Archelaus. ’ When by the same authority Archelaus was deposed (a. Following Archelaus the province was administered by five procurators during the life and ministry of Jesus, viz
Judaea - After the death of Herod, the Roman emperor assumed the right to settle the dispute which had arisen among his sons concerning the division of the kingdom, and by his decree Judaea and Samaria were in the partition assigned to Archelaus. ’ When by the same authority Archelaus was deposed (a. Following Archelaus the province was administered by five procurators during the life and ministry of Jesus, viz
Manes, Called Also Mani - The Western story is derived from the Acts of Archelaus, bp. Herod - Not less than six Herods exclusive of Archelaus are noted in Scripture:...
1
Roman Empire - The Jews, however, were all this time tributaries of Rome, and their princes in reality were Roman procurators, On the banishment of Archelaus, A
Herod - His final one designated Archelaus to succeed him as king of Judea (Matthew 2:22 ), another son Antipas to be tetrarch (governor) of Galilee and Perea, and another son Philip as tetrarch of the Northeastern Districts. The Romans banished Archelaus after a ten-year rule, and the kingdom was then transformed into an Imperial Province of the Roman Empire with Coponius as the first procurator (governor)
Jonah - It builds on an earlier phenomenon, as the parable in Luke 19:11-27 builds on Archelaus' visit to Rome
Caesarea - After the banishment of Herod’s successor Archelaus, Cæsarea became the official residence of the Roman procurators of Palestine (broken only by the brief interval during which it was under the independent rule of Herod Agrippa I
Herod - Archelaus . His sons were set up in power, Archelaus over Judæa and Idumæa, Antipas over Galilee and Peræa, Philip over Batanæa, Trachonitis, and Auranitis. To Archelaus had fallen the greatest prize, and at the same time the hardest task
Joseph (2) - Obedience was at once given by Joseph, but he became afraid when he learned that Archelaus was reigning in Judaea. Again the angel appeared in a dream, and after a warning Joseph proceeded to Nazareth, which was not under the rule of Archelaus, who had an evil reputation, but under that of the milder Antipas (Matthew 2:14-23)
Caesarea - ...
After Archelaus was removed in 6 A
Dates (2) - and BJ, in which are found indications of the dates of Herod’s accession and death, and of the dates of his predecessor Antigonus, and of his immediate successors, Archelaus, Herod Philip, and Herod Antipas. ...
Of Herod’s successors (1) Archelaus, ethnarch of Judaea, was banished in the consulship of Lepidus and Arruntius (a. 6, after the deposition of Archelaus, and caused the revolt of Judas of Gamala (Ant. 6–5, as the census he mentions was made after and in consequence of the removal of Archelaus. 11), made out by the emperor himself, especially as Varus was slack, and inclined to favour Archelaus
Judea - When Herod died in 4 BC, his former territory was divided among his sons, the central and southern parts going to Archelaus (Matthew 2:22)
Army - Probably they had once belonged to the army of Herod the Great, and had been taken over by the Romans after the deposition of his son Archelaus in a
Jericho - Archelaus in our Lord's days had irrigated the plain and planted it with palms
Roman Empire - On Archelaus' banishment, A
Jews - Archelaus succeeded to the largest share, namely, to Judea Propria, Samaria, and Idumea. ) Archelaus acted with great cruelty and injustice; and in the tenth year of his government, upon a regular complaint being made against him by the Jews, Augustus banished him to Vienne, in Gaul, where he died. ...
After the banishment of Archelaus, Augustus sent Publius Sulpitius Quirinus, who, according to the Greek way of writing that name, is by St. Luke called Cyrenius, president of Syria, to reduce the countries over which Archelaus had reigned, to the form of a Roman province; and appointed Coponius, a Roman of the equestrian order, to be governor, under the title of procurator of Judea, but subordinate to the president of Syria
Quirinius - Farrar has suggested that, the above-mentioned rule of Augustus notwithstanding, Varus was displaced ‘because his close friendship with Archelaus, who resembled him in character, might have done mischief’; but of this there is no evidence, and the conjecture is but a make-shift
Pilate - Archelaus having been deposed (A
Sanhedrim - And most authors assert, that this privilege was taken from them ever since Judea was made a province of the Roman empire, that is, after the banishment of Archelaus
Palestine - He was succeeded by his son Archelaus, who was deprived of his power, however, by Augustus, A
Egypt - Joseph, however, feared to enter Judaea because of Archelaus, Herod’s son and successor; and in obedience to a second vision directed his course to Galilee, and settled at Nazareth (Matthew 2:22 f
Egypt - Joseph, however, feared to enter Judaea because of Archelaus, Herod’s son and successor; and in obedience to a second vision directed his course to Galilee, and settled at Nazareth (Matthew 2:22 f
Basilides, Gnostic Sect Founder - If the Alexandrian Gnostic is the Basilides quoted in the Acts of the Disputation of Archelaus and Mani (c. Our ultimate authorities therefore are Irenaeus (or the unknown author from whom he took this section of his work), the Compendium of Hippolytus (represented by Epiphanius [1], Philaster, and pseudo-Tertullian), Clement and the Refutation of Hippolytus, together with a short statement by Agrippa Castor, and probably a passing reference and quotation in the Acts of Archelaus. As regards Basilides personally, the only grounds for expecting from him an Oriental type of doctrine are the quotation in the Acts of Archelaus, which will be discussed further on, and the tradition of his connexion with Saturnilus of Antioch, which we have already seen to be founded on a misconception
Herod - He bequeathed his kingdom to his son Archelaus, with tetrarchies to his two other sons
Government - Archelaus forfeited his position (a
Boyhood of Jesus - Herod the Great had tried to kill the Child, Archelaus was considered by Joseph to be as dangerous, and therefore Jesus was kept out of his dominions. Now Archelaus was in exile; in 759 a
Canaan - On the death of Herod, Archelaus, his eldest son, succeeded to the government of Judea, Samaria, and Idumea, with the title of tetrarch; Galilee being assigned to Herod Antipas; and Perea, or the country beyond Jordan, to the third brother, Philip. But in less than ten years the dominions of Archelaus became annexed, on his disgrace, to the Roman province of Syria; and Judea was thenceforth governed by Roman procurators
Mary, the Virgin - The flight to Egypt followed; then the return, at first designed to be back to Bethlehem, but through fear of Archelaus to Nazareth of Galilee, their former home
Epicureans - He claims to have been his own teacher, and this is true to the extent that he rejected the prevalent philosophies of his time and turned to such predecessors as Democritus, Anaxagoras, and Archelaus
Euchites - The articles of the Asceticus were the subject of 24 anathemas by Archelaus (bp
Nation (2) - ; Antipas succeeding to Galilee and Peraea; and Archelaus, after a long suit at Rome, obtaining the most important part with an allotted income of 600 talents
Talents - It is probable that the parable rests on a historical incident, and the view of most interpreters is that it is the journey of Archelaus to Rome to secure his kingdom and the embassy of the Jews to thwart him to which Jesus here alludes
Pilate - This province comprised the former kingdom of Archelaus,—roughly Samaria and the territory south of it to Gaza and the Dead Sea,—and the procurator’s duties were both administrative and military
Judea - The principal places in the north-east quarter of the province were Jerusalem, the capital, which was entirely destroyed in the reign of Hadrian, and replaced by a new city named AElia, a little farther north, which is now the site of the modern Jerusalem; Jericho, the city of palm trees, about nineteen miles eastward of Jerusalem, and eight from the river Jordan; Phaselis, built by Herod in memory of his brother, fifteen miles north-west of Jericho; Archelais, built by Archelaus, ten miles north of Jericho; Gophna, fifteen miles north of Jerusalem, in the road to Sichem; Bethel, twelve miles north of Jerusalem, originally called Luz; Gilgal, about one mile and a half from Jericho; Engeddi, a hundred furlongs south south-east of Jericho, near the northern extremity of the Dead Sea; Masada, a strong fortress built by Judas Maccabeus, the last refuge of the Jews after the fall of Jerusalem; Ephraim, a small town westward of Jericho; Anathoth, a Levitical town, nearly four miles north of Jerusalem
Roman Law in the nt - Archelaus succeeded his father Herod the Great in Judaea and Samaria as ‘ethnarch,’ without the title of king, though St
Assumption of Moses - A date nearer to the deposition of Archelaus in a
Joannes, Bishop of Antioch - He dispatched a letter full of Christian persuasiveness, by the count Irenaeus, to Nestorius, in his own name, and that of his brother-bishops Archelaus, Apringius, Theodoret, Heliades, Melchius, and the newly appointed bp
Herod - Advocated Archelaus' claims before Augustus, on the death of his father
Jesus Christ - His Father's glory, not His own, was His absorbing aim (John 8:29; John 8:50; John 7:18); from His childhood when at 12 years old (for it was only in His 12th year that Archelaus was banished and His parents ventured to bring Him to the Passover: Josephus, Jesus Christ - , the family decided to return to Nazareth after hearing that Archelaus was ruling over Judea (where Bethlehem was) in place of his father
Samaria, Samaritans - During the period of unrest that followed the deposition of Archelaus (a
Josephus - the period from the execution of Antipater and the death of Herod till the deposition of Archelaus (a
Jesus Christ - 4, his dominions were divided among his three sons; but on the deposition of Archelaus in 6 a
Jesus Christ - During the very year, the twelfth of his age, in which Christ first publicly appeared in the temple, Archelaus the king was dethroned and banished; Coponius was appointed procurator; and the kingdom of Judea, the last remnant of the greatness of Israel, was debased into a part of the province of Syria