What does Archangel mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἀρχαγγέλου archangel 1
ἀρχάγγελος archangel 1

Definitions Related to Archangel

G743


   1 Archangel, or chief of the angels.
   Additional Information: The Jews, after the exile, distinguished several orders of angels; some reckoned four angels (according to the four sides of God’s throne) of the highest rank; but the majority reckoned seven (after the pattern of the seven Amshaspands, the highest spirits of the religion of Zoroaster).
   

Frequency of Archangel (original languages)

Frequency of Archangel (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Michael the Archangel
(Herew: who is like God?)
Archangel, one of the three angels mentioned by name in Holy Scripture (Daniel 10,12; Jude; Apocalypse 12). In this last text, the sin of the bad angels is pictured as an uprising against God, in which the faithful angels, with Michael at their head, defeated Lucifer and his host, and cast them out of heaven. Because of this victory, Michael is revered in Catholic tradition and liturgy as champion and protector of the Church. Although he is always referred to as "the Archangel," the Greek Fathers and many theologians place him over all the angels, making him the prince of the Seraphim. He became the patron of the sick and at Chairotopa, Colossae, Pythia, and elsewhere in Asia medicinal springs were dedicated to him. In Constantinople, Egypt, Rome, France, and Germany his cult was equally popular. Patron of France, Germany, of the sick, of knights, grocers, and mariners. Emblems: scales, banner, sword, and a dragon. Feast, Roman Calendar, September 29,; additional feast, May 8, the Apparition of Michael, which took place on Monte Gargano in southeastern part of Italy.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Archangel
The English term archangel is based on a Greek term archangelos which means “chief, or first angel.” Angelos is a Greek term translating the Hebrew mal'ak or “messenger.”
The thrust of the term “angel” in the Hebrew Bible is that of a messenger sent from God. Its primary significance has to do with the function of this agent of God, rather than expressing concerns of the nature or being of an angel. However, a clear distinction between God and the messenger/angel is not easily determined. For example, Hagar encountered an angel, but she referred to the Lord who spoke to her (Genesis 16:7 ,Genesis 16:7,16:13 ; Genesis 21:17 ). God commanded Abraham to sacrifice Isaac, but eventually Abraham is addressed by “the angel of the Lord” (Genesis 22:1 ,Genesis 22:1,22:11 ,Genesis 22:11,22:15 ). To further complicate the subject, mal'ak can also refer to a human messenger ( 1 Kings 19:2 ; Haggai 1:13 ; Malachi 2:7 ).
The general circumstances for angel references have to do with a messenger or envoy who is sent to perform specific tasks and speak for God. They include declaring edicts of God to a specific audience (Genesis 22:11-13 ), announcing special events (Genesis 16:7-12 ), protecting the faithful (individuals and groups; Exodus 14:19-20 ; Exodus 23:20 ; Psalm 91:11 ), and angels also serve as envoys of punishment against the wicked and unfaithful (Psalm 35:5-6 ). Frequently, they are set within a wider class of celestial beings that include “sons of God” (Genesis 6:2 ,Genesis 6:2,6:4 ; Psalm 29:1 , Psalm 89:6 ; Job 38:7 ), “holy ones” (Deuteronomy 33:2 ; Psalm 89:5 ,Psalms 89:5,89:7 ; Job 15:15 ; Zechariah 14:5 ), and “sons of the most High” (Psalm 82:6 ; Luke 6:35 ). On occasion, they are associated with a heavenly court (Joshua 5:13-14 ; 1 Kings 22:19 ).
In religious texts dating from the post-exilic period, there appears to be substantial change in perception of angels. Hierarchies emerge in the literature that stressed particular groupings headed by archangels [1] who were counted among number designations such as seven (Tobit 12:15 ; 4 Ezra 5:20 ), four (Enoch 4; 87:2-3; 88:1), three (Enoch 90:31). The archangels Michael (Daniel 10:13 ; Daniel 12:1 ; Enoch 9:1; 10:11), Gabriel (Daniel 8:16 ; Enoch 9:1; 20:7; 40:9), Raphael (Tobit 3:17 ; Tobit 12:15 ; Enoch 10:4; 40:9) and Uriel (Enoch 9:1; 19:1; 20:2) gain particular hero status. These special archangels function as mediators between God and humans, and frequently there is a perceptible character that stands in contrast (but not necessarily in opposition) to the messenger function. The archangels are interpreters of the message. Although angels generally represented a “guardian role,” common to the ancient near eastern world, archangels seem to be of a superior category. In particular, Michael (Daniel 10:13 ,Daniel 10:13,10:21 ; Daniel 12:1 ; Jude 1:9 ; Assumption of Moses 12:7-9), Gabriel (gabriel , “hero of God”; Daniel 8:16 ; Daniel 9:21 ; Luke 1:19 ,Luke 1:19,1:26 ), and Raphael (rapael “God has healed”; a chief figure in the book of Tobit, see Tobit 3:16-17 ) were cast as important interpreters, advocates, and intercessors.
The New Testament continues the idea of angels as messengers of God. Among the numerous references, an angel advises Joseph of Jesus' birth (Matthew 1:20 ), and warns of the advisability of the flight into Egypt (Matthew 2:13 ,Matthew 2:13,2:19 ). The archangel, Gabriel, is the messenger who speaks of the birth of John in Luke 1:11 , Luke 1:19 , and tells Mary of the birth of Jesus (Luke 1:26 ). The Book of Revelation appears to reflect tradition of archangels found in Enoch (although the term archangelos is found only in 1 Thessalonians 4:16 and Jude 1:9 ) that have holy creatures waiting on the throne of God, presiding over the corners of the earth, and are part of the cosmic reordering at the end of time (Revelation 1:4 ; Revelation 4:5 ; Revelation 7:1 ; Revelation 12:7 ; Enoch 9:1; 10:1; 40:2; 90:21).
Wayne McCready
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Archangel
This world is only twice used in the Bible, 1 Thessalonians 4:16 Jude 1:9 . In this last passage it is applied to Michael, who, in Daniel 10:13,21 12:1 , is described as having a special charge of the Jewish nation, and in Revelation 12:7-9 as the leader of an angelic army. So exalted are the position and offices ascribed to Michael, that many think the Messiah is meant.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Archangel
See Angel
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Archangel
(1 Thessalonians 4:16 ; Jude 1:9 ), the prince of the angels.
Webster's Dictionary - Archangel
(1):
(n.) A chief angel; one high in the celestial hierarchy.
(2):
(n.) A term applied to several different species of plants (Angelica archangelica, Lamium album, etc.).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Archangel
(Greek: ruling angel)
In its wider meaning, any angel of higher rank, thus all the higher orders of angels. Saint Michael, therefore, is called Archangel although he is the prince of the Seraphim. In its more restricted sense, the archangels are those blessed spirits who compose the second choir of the lowest order in the angelic hierarchy (see angel). As distinct from the guardian angels, the archangels are God's messengers to man in matters of graver moment, e.g., Gabriel to the Virgin Mary, Raphael to Tobias; and to the archangels God entrusts the care of persons of exalted rank or sanctity.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Archangel, Gabriel the
(Hebrew: hero of God)
One of the seven angels who "stand before God." Mention of him occurs four times in the Bible; he foretold the destruction of the Persian Empire by Alexander the Great and its division among his generals after his death (Daniel 8), interpreted to Daniel the Messianic visions (Daniel 9); predicted to Zachary the birth of the precursor (Luke 1); and announced to Mary that she was to be the mother of God (Luke 1). The Jews venerated Gabriel as the angel of judgment and placed him after Michael; Christian tradition holds that it was he who appeared to Saint Joseph and the angels, and who strengthened Our Lord in the garden at Gethsemane. Patron of postal employees. Feast, Roman Calendar, March 24,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Gabriel the Archangel
(Hebrew: hero of God)
One of the seven angels who "stand before God." Mention of him occurs four times in the Bible; he foretold the destruction of the Persian Empire by Alexander the Great and its division among his generals after his death (Daniel 8), interpreted to Daniel the Messianic visions (Daniel 9); predicted to Zachary the birth of the precursor (Luke 1); and announced to Mary that she was to be the mother of God (Luke 1). The Jews venerated Gabriel as the angel of judgment and placed him after Michael; Christian tradition holds that it was he who appeared to Saint Joseph and the angels, and who strengthened Our Lord in the garden at Gethsemane. Patron of postal employees. Feast, Roman Calendar, March 24,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Archangel, Michael the
(Herew: who is like God?)
Archangel, one of the three angels mentioned by name in Holy Scripture (Daniel 10,12; Jude; Apocalypse 12). In this last text, the sin of the bad angels is pictured as an uprising against God, in which the faithful angels, with Michael at their head, defeated Lucifer and his host, and cast them out of heaven. Because of this victory, Michael is revered in Catholic tradition and liturgy as champion and protector of the Church. Although he is always referred to as "the Archangel," the Greek Fathers and many theologians place him over all the angels, making him the prince of the Seraphim. He became the patron of the sick and at Chairotopa, Colossae, Pythia, and elsewhere in Asia medicinal springs were dedicated to him. In Constantinople, Egypt, Rome, France, and Germany his cult was equally popular. Patron of France, Germany, of the sick, of knights, grocers, and mariners. Emblems: scales, banner, sword, and a dragon. Feast, Roman Calendar, September 29,; additional feast, May 8, the Apparition of Michael, which took place on Monte Gargano in southeastern part of Italy.
King James Dictionary - Archangel
ARCHAN'GEL, n.
1. An angel of the highest order an angel occupying the eighth rank in the celestiai hierarchy. 2. The name of several plants, as the dead-nettle, or lamium a species of melittis and the galeopsis or hedge-nettle.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Archangel
See ANGEL.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Archangel
ARCHANGEL . See Angel.
CARM Theological Dictionary - Archangel
In the Bible, a Greek word found only in the New Testament in two places: 1 Thessalonians 4:16, "For the Lord Himself will descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trumpet of God; and the dead in Christ shall rise first"; and Jude 1:1:9, "But Michael the archangel, when he disputed with the devil and argued about the body of Moses, did not dare pronounce against him a railing judgment, but said, 'The Lord rebuke you.'" Archangels seem to of a class of angels of great rank and power. Apparently, there are three archangels named: Michael, Gabriel, and Lucifer.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Archangel
According to some divines, means an angel occupying the eighth rank in the celestial hierarchy; but others, not without reason, reckon it a title only applicable to our Saviour. Compare Judges 1:9 . with Daniel 12:1 . 1 Thessalonians 4:16 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Archangel
See Angel.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Archangel
I should not have thought it necessary, in a work of this kind, to have noticed this name, but for the purpose of noticing at the same time an error, into which, as I humbly conceive, not a few have fallen. I cannot find in all the Bible, the name archangel but twice; once in 1 Thessalonians 4:16; and once in Jude 1:1:9. And as for archangels, as if there were more than one, or many, the very name itself implies that it is an error. For arch-angel signifies the first, or prince of the order of angels, consequently, there cannot be many firsts, without making it necessary to altar the term. So that, what is said of angels and archangels, together in hymns of praise, seems to be founded in a misapprehension of Scripture in relation to one arch-angel only, for the word of God speaks of no more, and the name is not plural.
The question is, who is this archangel, twice, and but twice only, noticed as such in Scripture? if the reader will consult both places, he will find that of whomsoever it be spoken of it is only spoken of him in office. And if the reader will compare the passage, particularly in Jude, with what the prophet Daniel saith, (Daniel 10:13-21) I conceive that both together will throw light upon the subject. "Lo!" saith the prophet, "Michael, one of the chief princes, came to help me." And again, he calls the same person, (Daniel 10:21) "Michael, your prince." In the passage of the apostle Jude's Epistle, he saith,"Michael, the archangel, when contending with the devil, he disputed about the body of Moses." It should seem, therefore, pretty plain, that this Michael is one and the same person. In one he is called prince, in the other, archangel. But in both, it is evident, that the name is a name of office. For my own part, I do not hesitate to believe that it is Christ himself, which is meant by the name archangel in Scripture; and of whom it is said, in relation to his coming at the last day, that "he shall be revealed from heaven with his mighty angels." (2 Thessalonians 1:7) And elsewhere, the Lord Jesus describes this advent in similar words. (Matthew 25:31; Zechariah 14:5; Matthew 16:27) And whether this appearing of Christ hath respect to his coming in his thousand years' reign upon earth, or to the universal judgment, the sense of the words (in reference to the subject of the archangel we are now considering) is the same. Some have thought that the archangel spoken of by Jude cannot mean Christ, because it is there said, that he durst not bring against Satan a railing accusation, but said, The Lord rebuke thee. But this is not an objection in the smallest degree. The Lord Jesus durst not do it; not because he dared not, or had not the power, but because it belonged not to the Redeemer's character, "who, when reviled, reviled not again, but committed himself judgeth righteously." (See Zechariah 3:1-4) Here we have a similar contest. Now that he who spake was the Lord, appears by his saying, "Behold, I have caused thine iniquity to pass from thee, and I will clothe thee with a change of raiment." Hence, therefore, it is plain from this passage, that the angel before whom Joshua, as a type of the church, stood, was Christ, who is elsewhere called the angel of the covenant; (Malachi 3:1) the same as Jacob spake of. (Genesis 48:16) So that both the angel of the covenant and the archangel are one and the same; and both spoken of in the nature of the office and character of Christ, for Christ "took not on him the nature of angels, but the seed of Abraham." (Hebrews 2:16)
From the whole view of this subject, I venture to believe, that, as Scripture speaks but of one arch-angel, and that officially, that archangel is Christ. For on the supposition, that it be not so, it becomes a matter of greater difficulty to say, who this arch-angel can be. If it be not Christ, it must be some created angel. And is there a created angel higher than Christ. If, while Jesus is called the angel of the covenant, is there an archangel also, above this angel of the covenant? I leave these questions with any one, not satisfied with my former observations, that the Lord Jesus Christ is the person spoken of twice in Scripture as the arch-angel.
See Malachi and Michael
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Michael the Archangel
In Daniel he is called 'one of the chief princes,' 'your prince,' 'the great prince which standeth for the children of thy people.' He went to the assistance of one (probably an angel) who had been sent with a message to Daniel, but who had been detained twenty-one days by the prince of the kingdom of Persia (doubtless Satan, or one of Satan's angels, who was acting for the kingdom of Persia, as Michael was prince for the children of Israel). Daniel 10:13,21 ; Daniel 12:1 . It is also said of Michael that when he contended with Satan about the body of Moses, he durst not bring a railing accusation against him, but said, "The Lord rebuke thee." Michael and his angels will however fight with Satan and his angels, and will prevail, and Satan will be cast out of that portion of heaven to which he now has access. Jude 9 ; Revelation 12:7 : cf. Job 1:6 ; Job 2:1 . These are illustrations of the conflict of good and evil spirits in the unseen universe.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Archangel
according to some, means an angel occupying the eighth rank in the celestial order or hierarchy; but others reckon it a title only applicable to our Saviour; Judges 1:9 ; Daniel 12:1 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:16 . On this point Bishop Horsley has the following observations:—"It has been for a long time a fashion in the church to speak very frequently and familiarly of archangels as beings of an order with which we are perfectly well acquainted. Some say there are seven of them. Upon what solid ground that assertion stands, I know not; but this I know, the word ‘archangel' is not to be found in any one passage of the Old Testament: in the New Testament it occurs twice, and only twice. One of the two passages is in the First Epistle to the Thessalonians; where the Apostle, among the circumstances of the pomp of our Lord's descent from heaven to the final judgment, mentions ‘the voice of the archangel;' the other passage is in the Epistle of St. Jude, where the title of archangel is coupled with the name of ‘Michael the archangel.' This passage is so remarkably obscure that I shall not attempt to draw any conclusion from it but this, which manifestly follows, be the particular sense of the passage what it may: since this is one of the two texts in which alone the word ‘archangel' is found in the whole Bible; since in this one text only the title of archangel is coupled with any name; and since the name with which it is here coupled is Michael; it follows undeniably that the archangel Michael is the only archangel of whom we know any thing from holy writ. It cannot be proved from holy writ, and, if not from holy writ, it cannot be proved at all, that any archangel exists but the one archangel Michael, and this one archangel Michael is unquestionably the Michael of the book of Daniel.
"I must observe by the way, with respect to the import of the title of archangel, that the word, by etymology, clearly implies a superiority of rank and authority in the person to whom it is applied. It implies a command over angels; and this is all that the word of necessity implies. But it follows not, by any sound rule of argument, that, because no other superiority than that of rank and authority is implied in the title, no other belongs to the person distinguished by the title, and that he is in all other respects a mere
angel. Since we admit various orders of intelligent beings, it is evident that a being highly above the angelic order may command angels.
"To ascertain, if we can, to what order of beings the archangel Michael may belong, let us see how he is described by the Prophet Daniel, who never mentions him by that title; and what action is attributed to him in the book of Daniel and in another book, in which he bears a principal part.
"Now Daniel calls him ‘one of the chief princes,' or ‘one of the capital princes,' or ‘one of the princes that are at the head of all:'
for this I maintain to be the full and not more than the full import of the Hebrew words. Now we are clearly got above the earth, into
the order of celestials, who are the princes that are first, or at the head of all? Are they any other than the three persons in the Godhead? Michael, therefore, is one of them; but which of them? This is not left in doubt. Gabriel, speaking of him to Daniel, calls him ‘Michael your prince,' and ‘the great prince which standeth for the children of thy people;' that is, not for the nation of the Jews in particular, but for the children, the spiritual children, of that holy seed the elect people of God; a description which applies particularly to the Son of God, and to no one else; and in perfect consistence with this description of Michael in the book of Daniel, is the action assigned to him in the Apocalypse, in which we find him fighting with the old serpent, the deceiver of the world, and
victorious in the combat. That combat who was to maintain? in that combat who was to be victorious, but the seed of the woman?
From all this it is evident, that Michael is a name for our Lord himself, in his particular character of the champion of his faithful people, against the violence of the apostate faction and the wiles of the devil."
To this opinion there is nothing irreconcilable in the "voice of the archangel" mentioned in 1 Thessalonians 4:16 : since the "shout," the "voice," the "trump of God," may all be the majestic summons of the Judge himself. At the same time we must feel that the reasoning of Bishop Horsley, though ingenious, is far from being conclusive against the existence of one or more archangels.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Archangel
1: ἀρχάγγελος (Strong's #743 — Noun Masculine — archangelos — ar-khang'-el-os ) "is not found in the OT, and in the NT only in 1 Thessalonians 4:16 and Jude 1:9 , where it is used of Michael, who in Daniel is called 'one of the chief princes,' and 'the great prince' (Sept., 'the great angel'), 10:13,21; 12:1. Cp. also Revelation 12:7 .... Whether there are other beings of this exalted rank in the heavenly hosts, Scripture does not say, though the description 'one of the chief princes' suggests that this may be the case; cp. also Romans 8:38 ; Ephesians 1:21 ; Colossians 1:16 , where the word translated 'principalities' is arche, the prefix in archangel." * [1] In 1 Thessalonians 4:16 the meaning seems to be that the voice of the Lord Jesus will be of the character of an "archangelic" shout.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Archangel
Archangel, a chief angel, only twice used in the Bible. 1 Thessalonians 4:16; Judges 1:9. In this last passage it is applied to Michael, who, in Daniel 10:13; Daniel 10:21; Daniel 12:1, is described as "one of the chief princes," having a special charge of the Jewish nation, and in Revelation 12:7-9 as the leader of an angelic army.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Raphael the Archangel
(Hebrew: God has healed)
Archangel and saint. One of the three angels mentioned by name in Holy Scripture (see also Gabriel and Michael). This mention of Raphael occurs in the Book of Tobias, chapters 5-11. According to his own words he is of the seven angels who stand before the Lord (Tobias 12; Apocalypse 8). Hence with Saint Michael and Saint Gabriel, he is ranked in the choir of Seraphim and the name archangel when applied to these three has the generic meaning of an angel of high rank. Some identify Raphael as the angel who stirred the waters at the Probatic pool (John 5:4). Feast, October 24,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Scapular of Saint Michael the Archangel
The only scapular not oblong in shape. Designed as a shield, one part is blue, the other black, and the connecting bands are blue and black. Each part bears a picture of Michael the Archangel slaying the dragon, and the inscription Quis ut Deus? (Who is like to God?). It is the badge of an Archconfraternity of Saint Michael, founded in 1878. Blessed Pope Pius IX gave it his blessing, and it was indulgenced by Pope Leo XIII.

Sentence search

Michael - See Archangel
Michael - See Archangel
Archangel - Archangel
Christe, Sanctorum Decus Angelorum - (O Christ, the Glory of Angel Choirs!) Hymn for Lauds on September 29, feast of the Dedication of the Church of Saint Michael the Archangel; and for Vespers on October 24, feast of Saint, Raphael the Archangel
o Christ, the Glory of the Angel Choirs - (O Christ, the Glory of Angel Choirs!) Hymn for Lauds on September 29, feast of the Dedication of the Church of Saint Michael the Archangel; and for Vespers on October 24, feast of Saint, Raphael the Archangel
Archangelic - ) Of or pertaining to Archangels; of the nature of, or resembling, an Archangel
Michaelmas - ) The feat of the Archangel Michael, a church festival, celebrated on the 29th of September
Archangel - On this point Bishop Horsley has the following observations:—"It has been for a long time a fashion in the church to speak very frequently and familiarly of Archangels as beings of an order with which we are perfectly well acquainted. Upon what solid ground that assertion stands, I know not; but this I know, the word ‘archangel' is not to be found in any one passage of the Old Testament: in the New Testament it occurs twice, and only twice. One of the two passages is in the First Epistle to the Thessalonians; where the Apostle, among the circumstances of the pomp of our Lord's descent from heaven to the final judgment, mentions ‘the voice of the Archangel;' the other passage is in the Epistle of St. Jude, where the title of Archangel is coupled with the name of ‘Michael the Archangel. ' This passage is so remarkably obscure that I shall not attempt to draw any conclusion from it but this, which manifestly follows, be the particular sense of the passage what it may: since this is one of the two texts in which alone the word ‘archangel' is found in the whole Bible; since in this one text only the title of Archangel is coupled with any name; and since the name with which it is here coupled is Michael; it follows undeniably that the Archangel Michael is the only Archangel of whom we know any thing from holy writ. It cannot be proved from holy writ, and, if not from holy writ, it cannot be proved at all, that any Archangel exists but the one Archangel Michael, and this one Archangel Michael is unquestionably the Michael of the book of Daniel. ...
"I must observe by the way, with respect to the import of the title of Archangel, that the word, by etymology, clearly implies a superiority of rank and authority in the person to whom it is applied. ...
"To ascertain, if we can, to what order of beings the Archangel Michael may belong, let us see how he is described by the Prophet Daniel, who never mentions him by that title; and what action is attributed to him in the book of Daniel and in another book, in which he bears a principal part. "...
To this opinion there is nothing irreconcilable in the "voice of the Archangel" mentioned in 1 Thessalonians 4:16 : since the "shout," the "voice," the "trump of God," may all be the majestic summons of the Judge himself. At the same time we must feel that the reasoning of Bishop Horsley, though ingenious, is far from being conclusive against the existence of one or more Archangels
Archangel - In the Bible, a Greek word found only in the New Testament in two places: 1 Thessalonians 4:16, "For the Lord Himself will descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the Archangel, and with the trumpet of God; and the dead in Christ shall rise first"; and Jude 1:1:9, "But Michael the Archangel, when he disputed with the devil and argued about the body of Moses, did not dare pronounce against him a railing judgment, but said, 'The Lord rebuke you. '" Archangels seem to of a class of angels of great rank and power. Apparently, there are three Archangels named: Michael, Gabriel, and Lucifer
Raphael the Archangel - (Hebrew: God has healed) ...
Archangel and saint. Hence with Saint Michael and Saint Gabriel, he is ranked in the choir of Seraphim and the name Archangel when applied to these three has the generic meaning of an angel of high rank
Jeremiel - The Archangel who in 2Es 4:36 answers the questions of the righteous dead
o Christ, Thy Servants Spare! - Another hymn by this title is sung at Lauds on October 24, the feast of Archangel Raphael
Archangel - I cannot find in all the Bible, the name Archangel but twice; once in 1 Thessalonians 4:16; and once in Jude 1:1:9. And as for Archangels, as if there were more than one, or many, the very name itself implies that it is an error. So that, what is said of angels and Archangels, together in hymns of praise, seems to be founded in a misapprehension of Scripture in relation to one arch-angel only, for the word of God speaks of no more, and the name is not plural. ...
The question is, who is this Archangel, twice, and but twice only, noticed as such in Scripture? if the reader will consult both places, he will find that of whomsoever it be spoken of it is only spoken of him in office. " In the passage of the apostle Jude's Epistle, he saith,"Michael, the Archangel, when contending with the devil, he disputed about the body of Moses. In one he is called prince, in the other, Archangel. For my own part, I do not hesitate to believe that it is Christ himself, which is meant by the name Archangel in Scripture; and of whom it is said, in relation to his coming at the last day, that "he shall be revealed from heaven with his mighty angels. (Matthew 25:31; Zechariah 14:5; Matthew 16:27) And whether this appearing of Christ hath respect to his coming in his thousand years' reign upon earth, or to the universal judgment, the sense of the words (in reference to the subject of the Archangel we are now considering) is the same. Some have thought that the Archangel spoken of by Jude cannot mean Christ, because it is there said, that he durst not bring against Satan a railing accusation, but said, The Lord rebuke thee. (Genesis 48:16) So that both the angel of the covenant and the Archangel are one and the same; and both spoken of in the nature of the office and character of Christ, for Christ "took not on him the nature of angels, but the seed of Abraham. " (Hebrews 2:16)...
From the whole view of this subject, I venture to believe, that, as Scripture speaks but of one arch-angel, and that officially, that Archangel is Christ. If, while Jesus is called the angel of the covenant, is there an Archangel also, above this angel of the covenant? I leave these questions with any one, not satisfied with my former observations, that the Lord Jesus Christ is the person spoken of twice in Scripture as the arch-angel
Olive Branch - It is often shown in the hand of the Archangel Gabriel, the messenger who announced the coming of the Prince of Peace
Michael - These are the only references supplied by the OT, but they exercised a powerful influence upon the Jewish tradition that grew up regarding Michael (in which he further appears as one of the seven Archangels and the chief of the four great Archangels), and through this upon NT conceptions. In the NT he is twice mentioned by name (Judges 1:9, where he is described as ‘the Archangel,’ and Revelation 12:7), and in both cases discharges functions that are in keeping with the position assigned him in Daniel. 1, however, it is the angel of the presence who instructs Moses and delivers to him the tables of the Law, and in what was probably the original Assumption of Moses (preserved only in Greek fragments) ‘Michael the Archangel’ is expressly said to have taught Moses at the giving of the Law. (2) In 1 Thessalonians 4:16 ‘the voice of the Archangel and the trump of God’ suggests another reference to the Michael of Jewish tradition. This is the only place in the NT besides Judges 1:9 where the word ‘archangel’ occurs, and though the Archangel in this case is not named, it is natural to suppose that the great Archangel is meant. ‘The voice of the Archangel’ and ‘the trump of God’ are evidently to be taken as parallel expressions (cf. Matthew 24:31, ‘He shall send his angels with a great sound of a trumpet’), and it is a common feature of the later Jewish tradition of the Day of Judgment that the trumpet is blown by Michael the Archangel (see Bousset, op
Archangel - Archangel, a chief angel, only twice used in the Bible
Malachi - And such views of the name tend, in my humble opinion, to confirm what I have before remarked in the former part of this Concordance, under the word Archangel, (which see) that Christ, the glorious angel of the covenant, is the only Archangel of Scripture. For to admit the supposition of any other as Archangel, while Christ is expressly called the Angel of the covenant, must imply some inferiority in Christ: a thing impossible. ...
See Archangel
Michael, Saint - (Herew: who is like God?) ...
Archangel, one of the three angels mentioned by name in Holy Scripture (Daniel 10,12; Jude; Apocalypse 12). Although he is always referred to as "the Archangel," the Greek Fathers and many theologians place him over all the angels, making him the prince of the Seraphim
Michael the Archangel - (Herew: who is like God?) ...
Archangel, one of the three angels mentioned by name in Holy Scripture (Daniel 10,12; Jude; Apocalypse 12). Although he is always referred to as "the Archangel," the Greek Fathers and many theologians place him over all the angels, making him the prince of the Seraphim
Archangel, Michael the - (Herew: who is like God?) ...
Archangel, one of the three angels mentioned by name in Holy Scripture (Daniel 10,12; Jude; Apocalypse 12). Although he is always referred to as "the Archangel," the Greek Fathers and many theologians place him over all the angels, making him the prince of the Seraphim
Scapular of Saint Michael the Archangel - Each part bears a picture of Michael the Archangel slaying the dragon, and the inscription Quis ut Deus? (Who is like to God?)
Banner - A symbol of victory, belonging to military saints and to missionaries, and associated in Christian art with ...
Our Saviour after His Resurrection indicative of his victory over death
Saint Ansano
Saint Felix of Valois
Saint George
Saint Hubert
Saint Joan of Arc
Saint Julian
Saint Maurice and Companions
Michael the Archangel
Saint Reparata
Saint Ursula
It is the emblem and symbol of temporal victory, and of spiritual victory over sin, death, and idolatry
Michael - The Archangel. ...
MICHAEL (‘the Archangel’). In the passage in Jude ( Judges 1:9 ) a definite reference is made to the tradition already mentioned, ‘Michael the Archangel, when contending with the devil he disputed about the body of Moses, durst not bring against him a railing accusation, but said, The Lord rebuke thee’ (cf
Angel - According to this diversity of perfection, they are classified in three hierarchies, each hierarchy having three orders making, in all, nine choirs, in the following descending order: ...
Seraphim, Cherubim, Thrones ...
Dominations, Virtues, Powers ...
Principalities, Archangels, Angels ...
It should be noted that the term "angel," while applicable to all, is also used as a distinctive name for the lowest choir, from which the guardian angels are usually selected. ...
As an emblem in art, an angel is associated with ...
Gabriel the Archangel Michael the Archangel Raphel the Archangel Saint Angelus of Jerusalem Carmelite with an angel bringing him three crowns...
Saint Matthew the Evangelist man with an angel whispering in his ear as he writes...
Saint Roch...
man being healed by an angel...
Archangel - Saint Michael, therefore, is called Archangel although he is the prince of the Seraphim. In its more restricted sense, the Archangels are those blessed spirits who compose the second choir of the lowest order in the angelic hierarchy (see angel). As distinct from the guardian angels, the Archangels are God's messengers to man in matters of graver moment, e. , Gabriel to the Virgin Mary, Raphael to Tobias; and to the Archangels God entrusts the care of persons of exalted rank or sanctity
Angel - ) An ancient gold coin of England, bearing the figure of the Archangel Michael
Voice - 1: φωνή (Strong's #5456 — Noun Feminine — phone — fo-nay' ) "a sound," is used of the voice (a) of God, Matthew 3:17 ; John 5:37 ; 12:28,30 ; Acts 7:31 ; 10:13,15 ; 11:7,9 ; Hebrews 3:7,15 ; 4:7 ; 12:19,26 ; 2 Peter 1:17,18 ; Revelation 18:4 ; 21:3 ; (b) of Christ, (1) in the days of His flesh, Matthew 12:19 (negatively); John 3:29 ; 5:25 ; 10:3,4,16,27 ; 11:43 ; 18:37 ; (2) on the Cross, Matthew 27:46 , and parallel passages; (3) from heaven, Acts 9:4,7 ; 22:7,9,14 ; 26:14 ; Revelation 1:10,12 (here, by metonymy, of the speaker),15; 3:20; (4) at the resurrection "to life," John 5:28 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:16 , where "the voice of the Archangel" is, lit. , "a voice of an Archangel," and probably refers to the Lord's voice as being of an Archangelic character; (5) at the resurrection to judgment, John 5:28 [1]; (c) of human beings on earth, e
Dragon - It is an emblem of ...
Saint Adelard
Saint Beatus of Lungern
Saint Donatus
Saint George
Saint John of Reomay
Saint Juliana of Nicomedia
Saint Magnus of Fussen
Saint Margaret of Antioch
Saint Martha, symbolizing victory over tempation
Michael the Archangel
Saint Philip the Apostle
Saint Servatus
Saint Tudwal
Prince, Princess - The word sar is also employed for the Prince of peace in Isaiah 9:6 , and for Michael the Archangel, and for the prince of Persia who opposed him, and for the prince of Grecia
Christian - However, it is important to note that it is the true Christ that makes someone a Christian, not the Mormon one (brother of the devil), or the JW one (Michael the Archangel), the New Age Jesus (a man in tune with the divine Christ Consciousness), etc
Michael (st.) And All Angels - Michael's Day is November 8th, while March 26th and July 13th areobserved in honor of the Archangel Gabriel. These two, Michael andGabriel, are the only angels or Archangels whose names are mentionedin the Bible
Archangel - 1: ἀρχάγγελος (Strong's #743 — Noun Masculine — Archangelos — ar-khang'-el-os ) "is not found in the OT, and in the NT only in 1 Thessalonians 4:16 and Jude 1:9 , where it is used of Michael, who in Daniel is called 'one of the chief princes,' and 'the great prince' (Sept. also Romans 8:38 ; Ephesians 1:21 ; Colossians 1:16 , where the word translated 'principalities' is arche, the prefix in Archangel. ]'>[1] In 1 Thessalonians 4:16 the meaning seems to be that the voice of the Lord Jesus will be of the character of an "archangelic" shout
Devotion, Days of - In Great Britain they are: ...
Easter Monday
Easter Tuesday
Whit Monday
Whit Tuesday
Purification of Blessed Virgin Mary (February 2,)
Saint Matthias (February 24,)
Saint Gregory the Great (March 12,)
Saint Joseph (March 19,)
Annunciation (March 25,)
Saint George (April 26,)
Saints Philip and James (May 1,)
Finding of the Cross (May 3,)
Saint Augustine (May 27,)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24,)
Saint James, Apostle (July 25,)
Saint Anne (July 26,)
Saint Lawrence (August 10,)
Saint Bartholomew (August 24,)
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary (September 8,)
Saint Matthew (September 21,)
Saint Michael, Archangel (September 29,)
Saints Simon and Jude (October 28,)
Saint Andrew, Apostle (November 30,)
Immaculate Conception (December 8,)
Saint Thomas, Apostle (December 21,)
Saint Stephen (December 26,)
Saint John the Apostle (December 27,)
Holy Innocents (December 28,)
Saint Thomas of Canterbury (December 29,)
Saint Silvester (December 31,)
They are the same in Ireland, excepting that the Immaculate Conception is a holyday of obligation
Days of Devotion - In Great Britain they are: ...
Easter Monday
Easter Tuesday
Whit Monday
Whit Tuesday
Purification of Blessed Virgin Mary (February 2,)
Saint Matthias (February 24,)
Saint Gregory the Great (March 12,)
Saint Joseph (March 19,)
Annunciation (March 25,)
Saint George (April 26,)
Saints Philip and James (May 1,)
Finding of the Cross (May 3,)
Saint Augustine (May 27,)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24,)
Saint James, Apostle (July 25,)
Saint Anne (July 26,)
Saint Lawrence (August 10,)
Saint Bartholomew (August 24,)
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary (September 8,)
Saint Matthew (September 21,)
Saint Michael, Archangel (September 29,)
Saints Simon and Jude (October 28,)
Saint Andrew, Apostle (November 30,)
Immaculate Conception (December 8,)
Saint Thomas, Apostle (December 21,)
Saint Stephen (December 26,)
Saint John the Apostle (December 27,)
Holy Innocents (December 28,)
Saint Thomas of Canterbury (December 29,)
Saint Silvester (December 31,)
They are the same in Ireland, excepting that the Immaculate Conception is a holyday of obligation
Mass, Saints of the - Outside the Canon, the Blessed Virgin, Saint John the Baptist, Saint Peter the Apostle and Saint Paul the Apostle are mentioned in the Confiteor and in the prayer before the Orate Fratres, Saint Michael the Archangel, in the Confiteor
Saints of the Mass - Outside the Canon, the Blessed Virgin, Saint John the Baptist, Saint Peter the Apostle and Saint Paul the Apostle are mentioned in the Confiteor and in the prayer before the Orate Fratres, Saint Michael the Archangel, in the Confiteor
Michael - The Archangel (Daniel 10:13; Daniel 10:21; Daniel 12:1; 2 Peter 2:11; Revelation 12:7). " This language suits an Archangel rather than the divine Son
Lilies - In Christian art it is an emblem of ...
the Annunciation, to indicate the purity of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Saint Agnes of Montepulciano
Saint Angelus of Jerusalem, as a symbol of his pure speech
Saint Anthony of Padua
Saint Antonius of Florence
Saint Casimir of Poland
Saint Catherine of Siena
Saint Catherine of Sweden
Saint Clydog
Saint Columba of Rieti
Saint Daria
Saint Didacus
Saint Dominic de Guzman
Saint Emerentiana, as a symbol of a pure death
Saint Francis Xavier
Gabriel the Archangel due to his connection to the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Annunciation
Saint Gertrude the Great
Saint Joseph, whose staff (according to an ancient legend) bloomed into lilies in the presence of Mary as a symbol of his chastity
Saint Justina of Padua
Saint Kenelm
Saint Lydwina of Schiedam
Saint Martina
Saint Margaret of Hungary
Saint Mary Anne de Paredes, in reference the lily that grew from her spilled blood
Saint Nicholas of Tolentino
Blessed Osanna Andreasi
Saint Pulcheria
Saint Ursicinus of Saint-Ursanne
and others
Lily - In Christian art it is an emblem of ...
the Annunciation, to indicate the purity of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Saint Agnes of Montepulciano
Saint Angelus of Jerusalem, as a symbol of his pure speech
Saint Anthony of Padua
Saint Antonius of Florence
Saint Casimir of Poland
Saint Catherine of Siena
Saint Catherine of Sweden
Saint Clydog
Saint Columba of Rieti
Saint Daria
Saint Didacus
Saint Dominic de Guzman
Saint Emerentiana, as a symbol of a pure death
Saint Francis Xavier
Gabriel the Archangel due to his connection to the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Annunciation
Saint Gertrude the Great
Saint Joseph, whose staff (according to an ancient legend) bloomed into lilies in the presence of Mary as a symbol of his chastity
Saint Justina of Padua
Saint Kenelm
Saint Lydwina of Schiedam
Saint Martina
Saint Margaret of Hungary
Saint Mary Anne de Paredes, in reference the lily that grew from her spilled blood
Saint Nicholas of Tolentino
Blessed Osanna Andreasi
Saint Pulcheria
Saint Ursicinus of Saint-Ursanne
and others
Michael - Archangel who served as the guardian of the national of Israel (Daniel 10:13 ,Daniel 10:13,10:21 ; Daniel 12:1 )
Ancient of Days - In fact, Ibn Ezra singled out the Archangel Michael as the Ancient of days
Michael - In all the biblical references to him, Michael the Archangel is in conflict with the enemies of God’s people
Book of Life - ...
In the Apocalyptic writings of Judaism the Final Judgment was to be based upon the records contained in the books supposedly kept by the Archangel Michael
Trumpets - ...
When the Lord Jesus comes to fetch His saints it will be with the voice of the Archangel and with the trump of God
Dominion - Others believe that the reference is to angels, either good or evil, as representing some form of supernatural power and dominion, and the reference in the context to Michael, the Archangel, not bringing a railing judgment even against the devil, may be thought to favour this view
Archangel - The English term Archangel is based on a Greek term Archangelos which means “chief, or first angel. Hierarchies emerge in the literature that stressed particular groupings headed by Archangels [1] who were counted among number designations such as seven (Tobit 12:15 ; 4 Ezra 5:20 ), four (Enoch 4; 87:2-3; 88:1), three (Enoch 90:31). The Archangels Michael (Daniel 10:13 ; Daniel 12:1 ; Enoch 9:1; 10:11), Gabriel (Daniel 8:16 ; Enoch 9:1; 20:7; 40:9), Raphael (Tobit 3:17 ; Tobit 12:15 ; Enoch 10:4; 40:9) and Uriel (Enoch 9:1; 19:1; 20:2) gain particular hero status. These special Archangels function as mediators between God and humans, and frequently there is a perceptible character that stands in contrast (but not necessarily in opposition) to the messenger function. The Archangels are interpreters of the message. Although angels generally represented a “guardian role,” common to the ancient near eastern world, Archangels seem to be of a superior category. The Archangel, Gabriel, is the messenger who speaks of the birth of John in Luke 1:11 , Luke 1:19 , and tells Mary of the birth of Jesus (Luke 1:26 ). The Book of Revelation appears to reflect tradition of Archangels found in Enoch (although the term Archangelos is found only in 1 Thessalonians 4:16 and Jude 1:9 ) that have holy creatures waiting on the throne of God, presiding over the corners of the earth, and are part of the cosmic reordering at the end of time (Revelation 1:4 ; Revelation 4:5 ; Revelation 7:1 ; Revelation 12:7 ; Enoch 9:1; 10:1; 40:2; 90:21)
Trumpet - Paul seems to reflect, in 1 Thessalonians 4:16, the tradition which connected it with the Archangel Michael, but Mt
Scapular - The rules concerning scapulars are: ...
the investing must be done by an authorized person
the scapular may be given in any place, to any Catholic, even to an infant
it must be worn as described above
if replaced, no blessing is required
if it is laid aside for a considerable time, the benefits are forfeited during that time
The Church has approved 18 kinds of scapulars: ...
Scapular of Mount Carmel
Scapular of Our Lady of Ransom
Scapular of Saint Benedict
Scapular of Saint Dominic
Scapular of Saint Joseph
Scapular of Saint Michael the Archangel
Scapular of the Hearts of Jesus and Mary
Scapular of the Help of the Sick
Scapular of the Holy Face
Scapular of the Immaculate Conception
Scapular of the Immaculate Heart of Mary
Scapular of the Most Blessed Trinity
Scapular of the Mother of Good Counsel
Scapular of the Passion (black)
Scapular of the Passion (red)
Scapular of the Precious Blood
Scapular of the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Scapular of the Seven Dolors
Jude, Epistle of - Then the railers are put to shame by the conduct of Michael the Archangel, who when rightly contending with Satan about the body of Moses did not rail against him, but said, "The Lord rebuke thee
Minnesota - Here the first little chapel of Minnesota was built and named in honor of Saint Michael the Archangel
Groaning - Philo’s Logos, identified with the Archangel, etc
Jude, the Epistle of - The doubts about it arose probably from the reference to the mysterious conflict of Michael the Archangel with Satan concerning Moses' body, nowhere else mentioned in Scripture, but found in the apocryphal Book of Enoch. )...
So Jude also stamps as true the tradition as to the Archangel Michael's dispute with Satan concerning Moses' body (Judges 1:9; compare Deuteronomy 34:6)
Fair - Among the most celebrated fairs in Europe are those of Frankfort and Leipsic in Germany of Novi in the Milanese of Riga and Archangel in Russia of Lyons and St
Angels - Twice we meet with 'archangel:' an Archangel's voice will accompany the rapture of the church, 1 Thessalonians 4:16 ; and 'Michael the Archangel' contended with Satan about the body of Moses
Prince - It came later to be applied to the guardian angels of the nations ( Daniel 10:13 ; 1618451436_15 ), to Michael the Archangel ( Daniel 12:1 )
Mary - In verses 7-12 we read of the Archangel Michael and the dragon who move from heaven to earth, and then in verses 13-17 of the dragon, the woman, and her child, all of whom are on earth
Colosse - ...
A legend connected with an inundation was the ground of erecting a church to the Archangel Michael near a chasm, probably the one noticed by Herodotus
sa'Tan - We conclude therefore that he was of angelic nature, a rational and spiritual creature, superhuman in power, wisdom and energy; and not only so, but an Archangel, one of the "princes" of heaven
Parousia - The order of events awaited is the descent of Jesus with His angels from the upper heavens to the lower; the sounding of the trumpet and the voice of the Archangel which will summon the dead from Sheol; the giving to the saints of the body of the resurrection; the catching up of the living saints, who have been changed in the twinkling of an eye, to meet Jesus and the risen saints in the air; the general judgment of both living and dead; the establishment of the Messianic Kingdom, which, after a period of struggle, is to be victorious over the kingdom of Satan; and finally the fixing of the eternal supremacy of God
Moses - it is said respecting the body of Moses that Michael, the Archangel, contended with the devil about it, the object of Satan probably being to make his tomb to be regarded as a holy place, to which the people would go for blessing, as people do still to the tombs of saints
Devil - All we know of his original state as an Archangel of light is that he lost it through pride and restless ambition, and that he had some special connection, possibly as God's vicegerent over this earth and the animal kingdom; thereby we can understand his connection and that of his subordinate fallen angels with this earth throughout Scripture, commencing with his temptation of man to his characteristic sin, ambition to be "as gods knowing good and evil;" only his ambition seems to have been that of power, man's that of knowledge
Voice (2) - John 10:16; John 10:27, John 18:37); in an eschatological connexion, Revelation 3:20 (‘Behold, I stand at the door and knock: if any man hear my voice and open the door, I will come in to him and sup with him, and he with me’); of the resurrection cry, 1 Thessalonians 4:16 (the voice of the Archangel awakening the dead; cf
Jude, Epistle of - Yet even Michael the Archangel, when contending with Satan for the body of Moses, did not venture to dispute his function as Accuser, but left him and his blasphemies to a higher tribunal
Satan - ’ In the earlier literature his great opponent is the Archangel Michael
Fall, the - Satan, having been a powerful and influential administrative Archangel, had rebelled against God
Assumption of Moses - -We read in Judges 1:9 : ‘But Michael the Archangel, when, contending with the devil, he disputed about the body of Moses, durst not bring against him a railing judgment, but said, “The Lord rebuke thee. 7:7)-‘Yet Michael the Archangel,’ etc
Angel - Others have distributed angels into nine orders, according to the names by which they are called in Scripture, and reduced these orders into three hierarchies; to the first of which belong seraphim, cherubim, and thrones; to the second, dominions, virtues, and powers; and to the third, principalities, Archangels, and angels. The Jews reckon four orders or companies of angels, each headed by an Archangel; the first order being that of Michael; the second, of Gabriel; the third, of Uriel; and the fourth, of Raphael
Second Coming of Christ - He goes on to say that the Lord will "come down from heaven, with a loud command, with the voice of the Archangel and with the trumpet call of God" (4:16). So is the fact that all this will be public and open, for the Lord will come "with a loud command, with the voice of the Archangel and with the trumpet call of God" (1 Thessalonians 4:16 )
Angel - The angel Michael was deemed to be Judaism's patron, and the apocryphal writings named three other Archangels as leaders of the angelic hierarchy. Gabriel was not referred to here as an Archangel, the Greek term Archangelos [ Luke 1:26-33 )
Angels - 7); in the Secrets of Enoch (20) we read of Archangels, incorporeal powers, lordships, principalities, powers, cherubim, seraphim, ‘ten troops. In Judges 1:9 the Archangel (Michael) is mentioned; so in 1 Thessalonians 4:16, where Michael is doubtless meant. 500), who divided the heavenly host into three divisions, with three subdivisions in each: (1) thrones, cherubim, seraphim; (2) powers (ἐξουσίαι), lordships (κυριότητες), mights (δυνάμεις); (3) angels, Archangels, principalities (ἀρχαί)
Heresy - The Archangels are not generally recognized in this theory; this class is said to have been of a later origin, and to have been first introduced by Porphyry. ( See Archangel
Hannah - He had that profound inquietude which attests a moral nature of a high order, and a mental nature stamped with the seal of the Archangel! Pascal is of this leading and glorious race: he has more than one sign of it in his heart and on his brow: he is one of the noblest of mortal men, but he is sick, and he would be cured
Dead Sea Scrolls - The Sons of Light are under the dominion of the Prince of Light, apparently identified as the Archangel Michael (cf
Philo - With Philo, besides the one transcendental God, who rules over all without mixing in it, there stands a second Divine Being, the Logos, sometimes viewed as God’s plan of the world, but more frequently as a personal creative being: he calls it a second God, God’s firstborn son, or Archangel, begotten, produced, created by God
Colossians, Epistle to the - Theodoret says that the Archangel Michael was worshipped in the district, and this worship continued for several centuries (see Zahn, op
Millenarians - Beside, that Christ should come from heaven, and appear and reign in his human nature and presence before the day of judgment, seems to be contrary to the following scriptures: "For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the Archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first
Moses - From an obscure passage in the New Testament, in which Michael the Archangel is said to have contended with the devil about the body of Moses, Judges 1:9 , some have thought that he was buried by the ministry of angels, near the scene of the idolatry of the Israelites; but that the spot was purposely concealed, lest his tomb might also be converted into an object of idolatrous worship among the Israelites, like the brazen serpent
Enoch Book of - Judgment is mediated now by angels of punishment, now by the Archangels, or the sword of the righteous or internecine strife, or by the Son of Man, or exercised immediately by God Himself. 3, 10) heard by the four Archangels, who bring their cause before God (ix. -The seven Archangels-Uriel, Raphael, Raguel, Michael, Saraqael, Gabriel, Remiel-and their functions (xx. 3-14); an innumerable multitude, and four presences (=archangels)-Michael, Raphael, Gabriel, and Phanuel-and their functions (xl. 1, 2), and iron chains made for Azazel’s hosts, whom four Archangels will cast into the burning furnace on that great day (liv. -‘After this’ he is translated in spirit; he sees the sons of God, the secrets of heaven, the crystal house, and countless angels and the four Archangels, the Head of Days, the Son of Man, who brings in endless peace for the righteous. ‘Lord of Spirits’ as a Divine title; Phanuel replaces Uriel as the fourth Archangel