What does Apollos mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἀπολλῶς a learned Jew from Alexandria and mighty in the scriptures who became a Christian and a teacher of Christianity. 4
ἀπολλῶ a learned Jew from Alexandria and mighty in the scriptures who became a Christian and a teacher of Christianity. 4
ἀπολλῶν a learned Jew from Alexandria and mighty in the scriptures who became a Christian and a teacher of Christianity. 2

Definitions Related to Apollos

G625


   1 a learned Jew from Alexandria and mighty in the scriptures who became a Christian and a teacher of Christianity.
   Additional Information: Apollos = “given by Apollo”.
   

Frequency of Apollos (original languages)

Frequency of Apollos (English)

Dictionary

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Apollos
A Jew of Alexandria, a learned and eloquent man, who through the Scriptures and the ministry of John the Baptist became a Christian. He visited Ephesus about A. D. 54, and publicly proclaimed his faith in Christ; whereupon he was further instructed in gospel truth. Passing thence into Achia, he preached with great power and success, especially among the Jews, Acts 19:1 1 Corinthians 3:6 . His character was not unlike that of Paul; they were equally grieved at the dissension of the Corinthians, and at those personal partialities which led many away from Christ, 1 Corinthians 3:4-22 16:12 ; and they cooperated to the end in serving him, Titus 3:13 . Jerome is of opinion that Apollos afterwards returned to Corinth from Crete.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Apollos
(Apollonius or Apollodorus). An Alexandrine Jew, "eloquent (or learned) and mighty in the Scriptures" (which had been translated into the famous Greek version, the Septuagint, at his birthplace) (Acts 18:24-25). "Instructed in the way of the Lord,"so far as John the Baptist could instruct hint; for this had been the main subject of John's ministry, "prepare ye the way of the Lord" (Matthew 3:3). Apollos was "fervent in spirit;" and so when he came to Ephesus, "he spoke and taught diligently the things of Jesus" (so the three oldest manuscripts read), as John had pointed to Jesus as the Messiah. But Apollos knew only the water baptism of John; he did not yet know that what John had foretold ("I indeed baptize you with water unto repentance, but He Messiah shall baptize you with the Holy Spirit and with fire") had actually come to pass, in the church's baptism with the Spirit on Pentecost, and that graces and gifts were now being bestowed on the several living stones composing "the temple of the Holy Spirit." (Compare Acts 19:1-6.)
But Aquila and Priscilla, on hearing him, "took him unto them and expounded unto him the way of God more perfectly." Thus having received new light he went forth to Achaia, watering the seed there that Paul had already planted (1 Corinthians 3:4-6), and "helped them much which had believed through grace." His deep knowledge of the Old Testament gave him especial power with the Jews, "for he mightily convinced them publicly, showing by the Scriptures that Jesus is the Christ." Some at Corinth abused his name. into a party watchword, saying, "I am of Apollos," so popular was he. But Paul, while condemning their party spirit, commends Apollos, and writes that he had "greatly desired our brother Apollos to come" unto the Corinthians (1 Corinthians 16:12). But Apollos was disinclined to come at that time; probably to give no handle for party zeal, until the danger of it should have passed away.
Those who made his name their party cry were attracted by his rhetorical style acquired in Alexandria, as contrasted with the absence of "excellency of speech and enticing words of man's wisdom" (1 Corinthians 2:1-4), and even in their estimation "the contemptible speech" (2 Corinthians 10:10), of Paul. The last Bible notice of him is in Titus 3:13, where Paul charges Titus, then in Crete, "bring Zenas the lawyer and Apollos on their way diligently, that nothing may be wanting to them." Jerome states that Apollos remained at Crete until he heard that the divisions at Corinth had been healed by Paul's epistle; then he went and became bishop there.
Apollos's main excellency was as builder up,' rather than founder, of churches. His humility and teachableness in submitting, with all his learning, to the teaching of Aquila and even of Priscilla (a woman), his fervency and his power in Scripture, and his determinably staying away from where his well deserved popularity might be made a handle for party zeal, are all lovely traits in his Christian character.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Apollos
A Jew "born at Alexandria," a man well versed in the Scriptures and eloquent (Acts 18:24 ; RSV, "learned"). He came to Ephesus (about A.D. 49), where he spake "boldly" in the synagogue (18:26), although he did not know as yet that Jesus of Nazareth was the Messiah. Aquila and Priscilla instructed him more perfectly in "the way of God", i.e., in the knowledge of Christ. He then proceeded to Corinth, where he met Paul (Acts 18:27 ; 19:1 ). He was there very useful in watering the good seed Paul had sown (1 Corinthians 1:12 ), and in gaining many to Christ. His disciples were much attached to him (1 Corinthians 3:4-7,22 ). He was with Paul at Ephesus when he wrote the First Epistle to the Corinthians; and Paul makes kindly reference to him in his letter to (Titus 3:13 ). Some have supposed, although without sufficient ground, that he was the author of the Epistle to the Hebrews.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Apollos
One who destroys; destroyer
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Apollos
APOLLOS (a pet name, abbreviated from Apollonius , which appears in D [1] text of Acts 18:24 ). Apart from a doubtful reference in Titus 3:13 , we derive our knowledge of Apollos from 1 Cor. and Acts 18:24-28 . In Acts he is described as an Alexandrian Jew, an eloquent man, with an effective knowledge of the OT. He came to Ephesus before St. Paul sojourned there, and, having been instructed in the way of the Lord, he zealously proclaimed his views in the synagogue, where Priscilla and Aquila heard him. What exactly his views were, it is not easy to decide. Acts 18:25 suggests that he was a Christian in some sense, that he knew the story of Jesus, believed in Him as Messiah, but did not know of the coming of the Holy Ghost. The disciples mentioned in Acts 19:1 ff., who are clearly in a parallel position, do not seem to know even so much as this; and ‘instructed in the way of the Lord’ need not mean Christianity, while even the phrase ‘the things concerning Jesus’ may refer simply to the Messianic prophecies (cf. Luke 24:27 , and see art. ‘Apollos’ by J. H. A. Hart in JThS , Oct. 1905). In Ephesus, Apollos may have preached only John’s baptism of repentance. But Priscilla and Aquila made him a full Christian.
Later on Apollos worked in Corinth, with great success. His eloquence and Philonic culture won him a name for wisdom, and made his preaching attractive, so that many declared themselves his special followers (1 Corinthians 1:12 ). Apollos’ teaching in Corinth may have been marked by allegorical interpretation, insistence on Divine knowledge, and on the need of living according to nature (see St. Paul’s sarcastic reference to ‘nature’ in 1 Corinthians 11:14 ). But the party-strife at Corinth was not of his intending. Apollos and Paul were agreed in their gospel ( 1 Corinthians 3:8 ) a fact the Corinthians overlooked. Apollos refused the request of the Corinthians for a speedy second visit ( 1 Corinthians 16:12 ). St. Paul apparently speaks of Apollos as an Apostle ( 1 Corinthians 4:9 ). We have no certain records of Apollos’ teaching, but it has been suggested that he wrote the Wisdom of Solomon before, and the letter to the Hebrews after, his conversion.
H. G. Wood.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Apollos
In Acts 18:24-25 Apollos is described as ‘a Jew, an Alexandrian by race, a learned man, mighty in the Scriptures, instructed in the way of the Lord, fervent in spirit,’ who came to Ephesus when Aquila and Priscilla had been left there by St. Paul to do pioneering work pending the Apostle’s return. Apollos ‘spake and taught carefully the things concerning Jesus’; but his knowledge of Jesus was limited, for he knew ‘only the baptism of John.’
It is not easy to elucidate the meaning of the rather obscure phrases in Acts 18:25-26. Schmiedel cuts the knot by making Acts 18:25 c, Acts 18:26 bc later accretions. Wendt throws out the whole of Acts 18:25, regarding Apollos as a Jew having no connexion with John or with Jesus, McGiffert is of opinion that the description of Apollos as ‘instructed in the way of the Lord’ and as teaching ‘the things concerning Jesus’ is erroneous; Acts 18:25 a must have been added by St. Luke. ‘We are to think of Apollos as a disciple of John who was carrying on the work of his master and preaching to his countrymen repentance in view of the approaching kingdom of God’ (Apostolic Age, 219f.). Harnack says: ‘Apollos would appear to have been originally a regular missionary of John the Baptist’s movement; but the whole narrative of Acts at this point is singularly coloured and obscure’ (Expansion of Christianity, i. 331 n. [1] ).
Without falling back on any of these somewhat contradictory explanations, we gather that Apollos had an imperfect hearsay acquaintance with the story of Jesus, though enough to convince him of His Messiahship. If the twelve men found in Ephesus by St. Paul (Acts 19:1-2) may be treated as disciples of Apollos, he had not heard ‘whether the Holy Ghost was given.’ His bold eloquence in the synagogue attracted Aquila and Priscilla (q.v. [2] ), who ‘took him unto them and expounded the way of God more carefully.’ This indefinite expression does not carry us very far. It seems unlikely that Apollos was baptized at Ephesus, for the twelve disciples are still ignorant of baptism, nor was there a Christian Church in Ephesus until after St. Paul’s return later. In this connexion, the Western reading is interesting: that ‘the brethren’ who encouraged Apollos to go to Achaia were Corinthian Christians. Perhaps they recognized the need of fuller instruction than could be given in Ephesus for such a promising disciple, who was likely to become a powerful Christian teacher.
The work of Apollos in Corinth is described as ‘helping them much which had believed through grace’ (Acts 18:27). St. Paul’s mission must have left a number of uninstructed Christians in Corinth. These converts had been persuaded to ‘believe through grace.’ But the Christian life of some was undeveloped; and the powerful preaching of Apollos did much to help them.
This conception of the work of Apollos in Corinth is in accord with St. Paul’s words in 1 Corinthians 3:6, ‘I planted; Apollos watered.’ It is justifiable also to recognize Apollos in St. Paul’s reference to men who ‘build on the foundation’ he had laid (1 Corinthians 3:11-12), and to ‘tutors in Christ’ (1 Corinthians 4:15) in contrast to himself as their ‘father,’ Evidently Apollos’ work was not so much preaching the gospel to the unconverted as buttressing the faith of Christians, partly by an eloquent exposition of the OT, and partly by a powerful apologetic which silenced opponents and strengthened believers.
But this confirming work done by Apollos in Corinth had other effects which were less useful. It appears to have been influential in determining the subsequent character of the Church. Preaching to recent converts whose intellectual equipment was slender and whose Christian knowledge must have been elementary, Apollos, whose own instruction had been imperfect, would inevitably put the impress of his own mode of thinking upon them. Thus there arose a party in the Corinthian Church with the watch-word ‘I am of Apollos.’ Although some of these had been converted by St. Paul’s preaching, they had been ‘much helped’ by Apollos. Under the influence of their ‘tutor in Christ,’ their interpretation of Christian truth and duty took on the hue of Apollos rather than of St. Paul.
The distinctive elements in the preaching of Apollos may be gauged from two considerations. (1) He was ‘a Jewish Christian versed in the Alexandrian philosophy,’ whose ‘method of teaching differed from that of Paul, in the first place in being presented in a strikingly rhetorical form, and also by the use of Alexandrian speculation and allegorical interpretation of Scripture.… Apollos sought to reinforce the Gospel which was common to both [3], by means of the Alexandrian philosophy and methods of exegesis’ (Pfleiderer, i. 145f.). It is questionable, however, whether the gospel he preached was in all respects ‘common to both Paul and himself.’ It cannot be without significance that St. Paul has to emphasize the work of the Holy Spirit so definitely as he does in 1 Cor. (cf. 1 Corinthians 2:10-16; 1 Corinthians 3:16; 1 Corinthians 12:1-4). Apollos when he arrived in Ephesus did not know of the giving of the Holy Spirit. Even in Corinth his efforts were to show by the Scriptures that Jesus was the Christ (Acts 18:28). It seems likely that his preaching had this Jewish tone all through, and lacked the spiritual note so dominant in St. Paul’s preaching. It was not Judaistic; it was ‘a middle term between Paulinism and Judaism’ (Pfleiderer, i. 148).
The last NT reference to Apollos (Titus 3:13) connects him with ‘Zenas the lawyer,’ probably a convert from the Jewish scribes. This confirms the idea that Apollos maintained a Hebraistic type of preaching, though his Alexandrian training differentiated him from the ‘Judaizers’ who pursued St. Paul so relentlessly, Apollos did not recognize that he was anti-Pauline. But the inevitable result of his preaching was to produce a different type of Christian from the type St. Paul desired.
(2) Despite Weizsäcker’s disclaimer, some of the results of the teaching of Apollos can he recognized in those irregularities in the Corinthian Church to which St. Paul refers in 1 Corinthians. Would not his eloquence, his philosophical bent, and his reiterated emphasis on Jesus as the Christ, lead to imperfect conversions? And may not the preference for the gift of tongues, or the difficulties about marriage, be traced naturally to this eloquent ascetic? In Corinth, St. Paul resolved ‘not to know anything save Christ, and him crucified’ (1 Corinthians 2:2). Apollos was less conscious of the dangers of another mode of preaching; and his convincing eloquence might win converts who had not ‘believed through grace.’ This judgment is in harmony with St. Paul’s references to Apollos. They scarcely justify the remark of Pfleiderer that St. Paul and Apollos were ‘on the best of terms’ (i. 146). The relations were correct, but hardly cordial. The two men were friendly; but they occupied different standpoints, and could not always agree. St. Paul was very anxious to avoid friction in Corinth. Therefore he wrote about ‘the parties’ in a conciliatory spirit, acknowledging generously the work of Apollos. In the same spirit, Apollos did not accept the invitation of the Corinthians (1 Corinthians 16:12). But there are hints that St. Paul did not reckon Apollos among the great Christian teachers. He is not mentioned among the founders of the Church in 2 Corinthians 1:19. In 1 Corinthians 16:12 he is referred to only as ‘the brother,’ whore other people’s work is described with enthusiasm. St. Paul’s references to his own preaching ‘not in wisdom of words’; to ‘wood, hay, stubble’ as possibly built on the foundation he has laid; to ‘ten thousand tutors in Christ’ who may conceivably mislead: these are compatible at least with St. Paul’s fear lest the work of Apollos might be somewhat subversive of his own. Then in Titus 3:13 St. Paul links Apollos with Zenas in a kindly spirit, but not as if he were an outstanding leader. Probably, whilst sincerely respecting each other, they recognized frankly the differences between them; and in a very creditable manner each man went on his own way. Like St. Paul, Apollos tried to avoid fomenting the party spirit in Corinth; and the NT leaves him in Crete, as a travelling preacher.
Several scholars favour the theory, suggested by Luther, that Apollos was the author of ‘Hebrews.’ Probably we must accept Bruce’s summing up: ‘Apollos is the kind of man wanted. With this we must be content’ (Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) ii. 338a).
Literature.-articles in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) and Encyclopaedia Biblica on ‘Apollos,’ ‘Corinth,’ ‘Corinthians’; W. M. Ramsay, St. Paul the Traveller and the Roman Citizen, London, 1895, pp. 252, 267ff.; O. Pfleiderer, Prim. Christianity, do. 1906, i. 145-160; C. v. Weizsäcker, Apostolic Age, i. 2 [4] 319-322, ii. [4]4 97; A. Harnack, Expansion of Christianity2, do. 1908, i. 79; A. C. McGiffert, Apostolic Age, Edinburgh, 1897, p. 290ff.; A. Wright, Some NT Problems, London, 1898, p. 309; A. Deane, Friends and Fellow-Labourers of St. Paul, do. 1907, p. 20; F. J. A. Hort, Journal of Theological Studies , Oct. 1905; and Schaff-Herzog [4]1 , article ‘Apollos.’ For authorship of ‘Hebrews,’ see Comm. on Heb. by M. Dods (Expositor’s Greek Testament ), 229, and article in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) on ‘Hebrews, Epistle to.”
J. E. Roberts.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Apollos
(ay pahl' lahss), meaning “destroyer,” names an Alexandrian Jew who came to Ephesus following Paul's first visit and was taught Christian doctrine by Priscilla and Aquila. An educated man, Apollos handled the Old Testament Scriptures with forcefulness. However, he was lacking in a full understanding of the way of God, so Priscilla and Aquila took him aside and instructed him (Acts 18:26 ). Apollos became even more successful in his ministry. He went from Ephesus to Greece with the encouragement of the Asian believers and a letter of introduction (Acts 18:27 ). He greatly strengthened the believers by using the Scriptures to demonstrate that Jesus was the Christ (Acts 18:28 ).
Apollos is last mentioned in the Book of Acts as being in Corinth (Acts 19:1 ). Paul referred to Apollos frequently, particularly in 1Corinthians. Here the majority of the references (1 Corinthians 1:12 ; 1Corinthians 3:4-6,1 Corinthians 3:22 ) have to do with the schisms in the Corinthian church centering on personalities. Paul noted that some believers championed Paul; some, Apollos; and some, Cephas. What is important is that believers belong to Christ, not to individual leaders. Such references show that Apollos must have been a dynamic figure to be compared with Paul or Peter. In 1 Corinthians 4:6 Paul placed Apollos on the same level as himself. They both sought to defeat the arrogance and superiority which comes from being self-centered rather than Christ-centered.
Paul referred to Apollos in 1 Corinthians 16:12 as “our brother,” showing how much Paul considered him as one of the team. This is also demonstrated in Titus 3:13 where Paul asked Titus to help Apollos on his way. A learned and gifted preacher, Apollos was willing to receive more instruction and be part of the team.
Because of Apollos' knowledge of the Old Testament, Luther suggested that Apollos might well be the writer of the Book of Hebrews. See Aquila and Priscilla ; Ephesus ; Corinth ; 1Corinthians ; 2Corinthians .
William Vermillian
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Apollos
A convert from Alexandria, an eloquent man and mighty in thescriptures, who, when only knowing the baptism of John, taught diligently the things of Jesus. At Ephesus he was taught more perfectly by Priscilla and Aquila. He laboured at Corinth, following the apostle Paul, who could hence say 'I have planted, Apollos watered,' and subsequently he greatly desired Apollos to revisit Corinth. His name is associated with that of Paul in connection with the party spirit at Corinth, which the apostle strongly rebuked; but from his saying he had 'transferred these things to himself and to Apollos,' it would appear that the Corinthians had local leaders, under whom they ranged themselves, whom he does not name; and that he taught them the needed lesson, and established the general principle by the use of his own name and that of Apollos rather than the names of their leaders. Acts 18:24 ; Acts 19:1 ; 1 Corinthians 1:12 ; 1 Corinthians 3:4-22 ; 1 Corinthians 4:6 ; 1 Corinthians 16:12 ; Titus 3:13 .
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Apollos
was a Jew of Alexandria, who came to Ephesus in the year of our Lord 54, during the absence of St. Paul, who had gone to Jerusalem, Acts 18:24 . He was an eloquent man, and mighty in the Scriptures; but he knew only the baptism of John, and was not fully informed of the higher branches of Gospel doctrine. However, he acknowledged that Jesus Christ was the Messiah, and declared himself openly as his disciple. At Ephesus, therefore, he began to speak boldly in the synagogue, and demonstrated by the Scriptures that Jesus was the Christ. Aquila and Priscilla, having heard him there, took him with them, and instructed him more fully in the ways of God. Some time after, he was inclined to go into Achaia, and the brethren wrote to the disciples there, desiring them to receive him. He was very useful at Corinth, where he watered what St. Paul had planted, 1 Corinthians 3:6 . It has been supposed, that the great admiration of his disciples for him tended to produce a schism. Some said, "I am of Paul;" some, "I am of Apollos;" and others, "I am of Cephas." But this division, which St. Paul mentions and reproves in his First Epistle to the Corinthians, did not prevent Paul and Apollos, personally, from being closely united in the bonds of Christian charity and affection. Apollos, hearing that the Apostle was at Ephesus, went to meet him, and was there when St. Paul wrote the first Epistle to the Corinthians; in which he observes, that he had earnestly entreated Apollos to return to Corinth: but though he had not prevailed with him, Apollos gave him room to hope that he would visit that city at a favourable opportunity. Some have supposed, that the Apostle names Apollos and Cephas, not as the real persons in whose name parties had been formed in Corinth, but that, in order to avoid provoking a temper which he wished to subside, he transfers "by a figure" to Apollos and himself what was really meant of other parties, whom from prudence he declines to mention. However this might be, the reluctance of Apollos to return to Corinth seems to countenance the general opinion. St. Jerom says that Apollos was so dissatisfied with the division which had happened on his account at Corinth, that he retired into Crete with Zeno, a doctor of the law; but that the evil having been corrected by the letter of St. Paul to the Corinthians, Apollos returned to that city, of which he afterward became bishop. The Greeks say that he was bishop of Duras; some, that he was bishop of Iconium, in Phrygia; and others of Caesarea.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Apollos
Over the last two or three hundred years of the pre-Christian era, a strong community of Jewish biblical scholars had grown up in Alexandria in Egypt. Apollos came from this background. He had a detailed knowledge of Old Testament Scriptures concerning the Messiah and became a believer in Jesus.
When Apollos visited the newly established Christian community in Ephesus, it became clear that he lacked an understanding of some important Christian teachings. But he learnt from the fuller instruction that Priscilla and Aquila gave him, and was of considerable help in teaching the Ephesian church. When he decided to move across to Corinth, the Ephesian Christians wrote to the Christians in Corinth to recommend him to them as a worthy teacher (Acts 18:24-28).
Foolishly, the immature Corinthian Christians made favourites of different teachers who had helped them, and soon there was tension between various groups in the church. Among these groups was a pro-Apollos faction and a pro-Paul faction (1 Corinthians 1:11-12). Paul condemned this formation of factions. He pointed out that he and Apollos were not in competition, but worked in cooperation. They were fellow servants of God (1 Corinthians 3:4-9). No doubt Apollos likewise was opposed to the Corinthians’ creation of factions. This was probably the reason why, after leaving Corinth, he thought it best not to return for a while, in spite of Paul’s enthusiastic urging (1 Corinthians 16:12).
Apollos must have continued as a travelling Christian preacher for many years. Towards the end of Paul’s life, when Apollos visited Titus in Crete, Paul urged Titus to welcome him and to give him all possible help in his service for God. Apollos may even have been the person who carried Paul’s letter to Titus (Titus 3:13; cf. Titus 1:5).

Sentence search

Apollos - An educated man, Apollos handled the Old Testament Scriptures with forcefulness. Apollos became even more successful in his ministry. ...
Apollos is last mentioned in the Book of Acts as being in Corinth (Acts 19:1 ). Paul referred to Apollos frequently, particularly in 1Corinthians. Paul noted that some believers championed Paul; some, Apollos; and some, Cephas. Such references show that Apollos must have been a dynamic figure to be compared with Paul or Peter. In 1 Corinthians 4:6 Paul placed Apollos on the same level as himself. ...
Paul referred to Apollos in 1 Corinthians 16:12 as “our brother,” showing how much Paul considered him as one of the team. This is also demonstrated in Titus 3:13 where Paul asked Titus to help Apollos on his way. A learned and gifted preacher, Apollos was willing to receive more instruction and be part of the team. ...
Because of Apollos' knowledge of the Old Testament, Luther suggested that Apollos might well be the writer of the Book of Hebrews
Zenas - In Titus 3:13 Titus is urged to ‘set forward (πρόπεμψον) Zenas the lawyer and Apollos on their journey diligently (σπουδαίως), that nothing be wanting unto them. ’ We gather that Zenas and Apollos were fellow-travellers who had come to Crete and were contemplating going elsewhere. Perhaps they were travelling preachers; or Zenas may have been the travelling companion of the eloquent Apollos. It is significant that he is found in the company of Apollos, whose preaching had a Jewish tinge (cf. article Apollos). Though a convert to Christianity, and evidently a valued worker, he did not shake off his legalism completely; he favoured the Apollos type of preaching rather than the Pauline. It has been suggested that Zenas and Apollos were the bearers of the Epistle. Roberts, article ‘Apollos’ in Dict
Apollos - In Acts 18:24-25 Apollos is described as ‘a Jew, an Alexandrian by race, a learned man, mighty in the Scriptures, instructed in the way of the Lord, fervent in spirit,’ who came to Ephesus when Aquila and Priscilla had been left there by St. Apollos ‘spake and taught carefully the things concerning Jesus’; but his knowledge of Jesus was limited, for he knew ‘only the baptism of John. Wendt throws out the whole of Acts 18:25, regarding Apollos as a Jew having no connexion with John or with Jesus, McGiffert is of opinion that the description of Apollos as ‘instructed in the way of the Lord’ and as teaching ‘the things concerning Jesus’ is erroneous; Acts 18:25 a must have been added by St. ‘We are to think of Apollos as a disciple of John who was carrying on the work of his master and preaching to his countrymen repentance in view of the approaching kingdom of God’ (Apostolic Age, 219f. Harnack says: ‘Apollos would appear to have been originally a regular missionary of John the Baptist’s movement; but the whole narrative of Acts at this point is singularly coloured and obscure’ (Expansion of Christianity, i. ...
Without falling back on any of these somewhat contradictory explanations, we gather that Apollos had an imperfect hearsay acquaintance with the story of Jesus, though enough to convince him of His Messiahship. Paul (Acts 19:1-2) may be treated as disciples of Apollos, he had not heard ‘whether the Holy Ghost was given. It seems unlikely that Apollos was baptized at Ephesus, for the twelve disciples are still ignorant of baptism, nor was there a Christian Church in Ephesus until after St. In this connexion, the Western reading is interesting: that ‘the brethren’ who encouraged Apollos to go to Achaia were Corinthian Christians. ...
The work of Apollos in Corinth is described as ‘helping them much which had believed through grace’ (Acts 18:27). ’ But the Christian life of some was undeveloped; and the powerful preaching of Apollos did much to help them. ...
This conception of the work of Apollos in Corinth is in accord with St. Paul’s words in 1 Corinthians 3:6, ‘I planted; Apollos watered. ’ It is justifiable also to recognize Apollos in St. Paul’s reference to men who ‘build on the foundation’ he had laid (1 Corinthians 3:11-12), and to ‘tutors in Christ’ (1 Corinthians 4:15) in contrast to himself as their ‘father,’ Evidently Apollos’ work was not so much preaching the gospel to the unconverted as buttressing the faith of Christians, partly by an eloquent exposition of the OT, and partly by a powerful apologetic which silenced opponents and strengthened believers. ...
But this confirming work done by Apollos in Corinth had other effects which were less useful. Preaching to recent converts whose intellectual equipment was slender and whose Christian knowledge must have been elementary, Apollos, whose own instruction had been imperfect, would inevitably put the impress of his own mode of thinking upon them. Thus there arose a party in the Corinthian Church with the watch-word ‘I am of Apollos. Paul’s preaching, they had been ‘much helped’ by Apollos. Under the influence of their ‘tutor in Christ,’ their interpretation of Christian truth and duty took on the hue of Apollos rather than of St. ...
The distinctive elements in the preaching of Apollos may be gauged from two considerations. … Apollos sought to reinforce the Gospel which was common to both [3], by means of the Alexandrian philosophy and methods of exegesis’ (Pfleiderer, i. Apollos when he arrived in Ephesus did not know of the giving of the Holy Spirit. ...
The last NT reference to Apollos (Titus 3:13) connects him with ‘Zenas the lawyer,’ probably a convert from the Jewish scribes. This confirms the idea that Apollos maintained a Hebraistic type of preaching, though his Alexandrian training differentiated him from the ‘Judaizers’ who pursued St. Paul so relentlessly, Apollos did not recognize that he was anti-Pauline. ...
(2) Despite Weizsäcker’s disclaimer, some of the results of the teaching of Apollos can he recognized in those irregularities in the Corinthian Church to which St. Apollos was less conscious of the dangers of another mode of preaching; and his convincing eloquence might win converts who had not ‘believed through grace. Paul’s references to Apollos. Paul and Apollos were ‘on the best of terms’ (i. Therefore he wrote about ‘the parties’ in a conciliatory spirit, acknowledging generously the work of Apollos. In the same spirit, Apollos did not accept the invitation of the Corinthians (1 Corinthians 16:12). Paul did not reckon Apollos among the great Christian teachers. Paul’s fear lest the work of Apollos might be somewhat subversive of his own. Paul links Apollos with Zenas in a kindly spirit, but not as if he were an outstanding leader. Paul, Apollos tried to avoid fomenting the party spirit in Corinth; and the NT leaves him in Crete, as a travelling preacher. ...
Several scholars favour the theory, suggested by Luther, that Apollos was the author of ‘Hebrews. ’ Probably we must accept Bruce’s summing up: ‘Apollos is the kind of man wanted. -articles in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) and Encyclopaedia Biblica on ‘Apollos,’ ‘Corinth,’ ‘Corinthians’; W. ]'>[6] , article ‘Apollos
Apollos - Apollos came from this background. ...
When Apollos visited the newly established Christian community in Ephesus, it became clear that he lacked an understanding of some important Christian teachings. Among these groups was a pro-Apollos faction and a pro-Paul faction (1 Corinthians 1:11-12). He pointed out that he and Apollos were not in competition, but worked in cooperation. No doubt Apollos likewise was opposed to the Corinthians’ creation of factions. ...
Apollos must have continued as a travelling Christian preacher for many years. Towards the end of Paul’s life, when Apollos visited Titus in Crete, Paul urged Titus to welcome him and to give him all possible help in his service for God. Apollos may even have been the person who carried Paul’s letter to Titus (Titus 3:13; cf
Apollos - Apollos (a pet name, abbreviated from Apollonius , which appears in D
Later on Apollos worked in Corinth, with great success. Apollos’ teaching in Corinth may have been marked by allegorical interpretation, insistence on Divine knowledge, and on the need of living according to nature (see St. Apollos and Paul were agreed in their gospel ( 1 Corinthians 3:8 ) a fact the Corinthians overlooked. Apollos refused the request of the Corinthians for a speedy second visit ( 1 Corinthians 16:12 ). Paul apparently speaks of Apollos as an Apostle ( 1 Corinthians 4:9 ). We have no certain records of Apollos’ teaching, but it has been suggested that he wrote the Wisdom of Solomon before, and the letter to the Hebrews after, his conversion
Zenas - ” Christian lawyer whom Paul asked Titus to send, together with Apollos, on his way, lacking nothing (Titus 3:13 ). Zenas and Apollos perhaps delivered Paul's letter to Titus
Apollos - Some said, "I am of Paul;" some, "I am of Apollos;" and others, "I am of Cephas. Paul mentions and reproves in his First Epistle to the Corinthians, did not prevent Paul and Apollos, personally, from being closely united in the bonds of Christian charity and affection. Apollos, hearing that the Apostle was at Ephesus, went to meet him, and was there when St. Paul wrote the first Epistle to the Corinthians; in which he observes, that he had earnestly entreated Apollos to return to Corinth: but though he had not prevailed with him, Apollos gave him room to hope that he would visit that city at a favourable opportunity. Some have supposed, that the Apostle names Apollos and Cephas, not as the real persons in whose name parties had been formed in Corinth, but that, in order to avoid provoking a temper which he wished to subside, he transfers "by a figure" to Apollos and himself what was really meant of other parties, whom from prudence he declines to mention. However this might be, the reluctance of Apollos to return to Corinth seems to countenance the general opinion. Jerom says that Apollos was so dissatisfied with the division which had happened on his account at Corinth, that he retired into Crete with Zeno, a doctor of the law; but that the evil having been corrected by the letter of St. Paul to the Corinthians, Apollos returned to that city, of which he afterward became bishop
Apollos - He laboured at Corinth, following the apostle Paul, who could hence say 'I have planted, Apollos watered,' and subsequently he greatly desired Apollos to revisit Corinth. His name is associated with that of Paul in connection with the party spirit at Corinth, which the apostle strongly rebuked; but from his saying he had 'transferred these things to himself and to Apollos,' it would appear that the Corinthians had local leaders, under whom they ranged themselves, whom he does not name; and that he taught them the needed lesson, and established the general principle by the use of his own name and that of Apollos rather than the names of their leaders
Persis - A Christian woman, saluted and praised by Paul (Romans 16:12) as having "laboured much in the Lord"; compare Priscilla' s ministrations as to Apollos (Acts 18:26)
Apelles - " A common Jewish name, probably not, as Origen thought, Apollos
Apollos - Apollos was "fervent in spirit;" and so when he came to Ephesus, "he spoke and taught diligently the things of Jesus" (so the three oldest manuscripts read), as John had pointed to Jesus as the Messiah. But Apollos knew only the water baptism of John; he did not yet know that what John had foretold ("I indeed baptize you with water unto repentance, but He Messiah shall baptize you with the Holy Spirit and with fire") had actually come to pass, in the church's baptism with the Spirit on Pentecost, and that graces and gifts were now being bestowed on the several living stones composing "the temple of the Holy Spirit. into a party watchword, saying, "I am of Apollos," so popular was he. But Paul, while condemning their party spirit, commends Apollos, and writes that he had "greatly desired our brother Apollos to come" unto the Corinthians (1 Corinthians 16:12). But Apollos was disinclined to come at that time; probably to give no handle for party zeal, until the danger of it should have passed away. The last Bible notice of him is in Titus 3:13, where Paul charges Titus, then in Crete, "bring Zenas the lawyer and Apollos on their way diligently, that nothing may be wanting to them. " Jerome states that Apollos remained at Crete until he heard that the divisions at Corinth had been healed by Paul's epistle; then he went and became bishop there. ...
Apollos's main excellency was as builder up,' rather than founder, of churches
Priscilla - ) in insturcting Apollos (Acts 18:26 )
Zenas - Paul commends him to Titus, that he should bring Zenas and Apollos on their journey diligently, so that nothing might be wanting to them of necessaries
ze'Nas, - a believer, and, as may be inferred from the context, a preacher of the gospel, who is mentioned in (Titus 3:13 ) in connection with Apollos
Zenas - A pious lawyer, and a friend of Paul, who, writing from Nicopolis during the last year of his life, commends him and Apollos, then at Crete on a journey, to the kind offices of Titus, Titus 3:13
Prisca, Priscilla - " Paul met them at Corinth, and they travelled with him to Ephesus, where they were enabled to expound unto Apollos the way of God more perfectly
Eloquent - " In the AV of Acts 18:24 , it is translated "eloquent," said of Apollos; the RV is almost certainly right in translating it "learned
Hebrews - Its authorship is disputed, many ascribing it to the apostle Paul, others to Apollos, Luke, or Barnabas
Aquila And Priscilla - There they remained and taught Apollos the way of the Lord more perfectly (Acts 18:18-28). (See Apollos. She and he together, as true yokefellows in the Lord, to all within their reach; to Apollos, who became the mighty champion of Christianity, convincing the Jews from the Scriptures at Corinth; setting up "a church in their house" wherever they were: in Ephesus; then at Rome, risking their lives for Paul, and earning thanks of "all the churches of the Gentiles
Powerful, Powerfully - ...
B — 1: εὐτόνως (Strong's #2159 — Adverb — eutonos — yoo-ton'-oce ) signifies "vigorously, vehemently" (eu, "well," teino, "to stretch"), Luke 23:10 , "vehemently," of the accusation of the chief priests and scribes against Christ; Acts 18:28 , RV, "powerfully" (AV, "mightily"), of Apollos in confuting Jews
Ephesus - Paul visited Ephesus on his second tour, Acts 18:19-21; Apollos was instructed there by Aquila and Priscilla, Acts 18:24-26; Paul dwelt there three years, Acts 19:1-41; charged the elders of the church
aq'Uila - There they remained and there they taught Apollos
Corinth'Ians, First Epistle to the, - (Acts 18:11 ) A short time after the apostle had left the city the eloquent Jew of Alexandria, Apollos, went to Corinth, (Acts 19:1 ) and gained many followers, dividing the church into two parties, the followers of Paul and the followers of Apollos
Alexandria - In the New Testament there is a record of one of them, Apollos, whose knowledge of Old Testament references to the Messiah was extraordinary. He soon became a powerful Christian preacher (Acts 18:24-28; see Apollos)
Apollos - Jerome is of opinion that Apollos afterwards returned to Corinth from Crete
Exhort, Exhortation - , "to turn forward, propel" (pro, "before," trepo, "to turn"); hence, "to impel morally, to urge forward, encourage," is used in Acts 18:27 , RV, "encouraged him" (Apollos), with reference to his going into Achaia; AV, "exhorting the disciples;" while the encouragement was given to Apollos, a letter was written to the disciples in Achaia to receive him
Aquila - They travelled with Paul to Ephesus, where they were able to help Apollos spiritually
Aquila - There they remained, and there they taught Apollos
Apol'Los - (Acts 18:27 ; 19:1 ) When the apostle wrote his First Epistle to the Corinthians, Apollos was with or near him, (1 Corinthians 16:12 ) probably at Ephesus in A
Aquila - In particular they helped Apollos, a newly converted Jewish teacher who had come to Ephesus from Egypt (Acts 18:24-26; see Apollos)
Stephanas - The partisans of Apollos, Cephas, and Christ, might possibly receive them coldly as having been baptized by Paul, hence he "beseeches" the Corinthians in their behalf
Achaia - Paul began amongst them and was carried on by Apollos (1 and 2 Cor
Encourage, Encouragement - A — 1: προτρέπω (Strong's #4389 — Verb — protrepo — prot-rep'-om-ahee ) "to urge forward, persuade," is used in Acts 18:27 in the Middle Voice, RV, "encouraged," indicating their particular interest in giving Apollos the "encouragement" mentioned; the AV, "exhorting," wrongly connects the verb
Alexandria - as being the birthplace of Apollos, who became companion of Paul, Acts 18:24 ; and as the city to which certain ships belonged or from whence they sailed
Accurately - It is used in Matthew 2:8 , of Herod's command to the wise men as to searching for the young Child (RV, "carefully;" AV, "diligently"); in Acts 18:25 , of Apollos' teaching of "the things concerning Jesus" (RV, "carefully;" AV, "diligently"); in Ephesians 5:15 , of the way in which believers are to walk (RV, "carefully;" AV, "circumspectly"); in 1 Thessalonians 5:2 , of the knowledge gained by the saints through the Apostle's teaching concerning the Day of the Lord (RV and AV, "perfectly")
Oracle - The adjective λόγιος (Revised Version ‘learned’) is applied to Apollos (Acts 18:24)
Alexandria - Apollos, eloquent and mighty in the Scriptures, was a native of this city (Acts 18:24 )
Aquila And Priscilla - There they instructed Apollos in the Christian faith (Acts 18:25 )
Baptism - The distinction between John's baptism and Christian baptism appears in the case of Apollos, (Acts 18:26,27 ) and of the disciples at Ephesus mentioned (Acts 19:1-6 ) We cannot but draw from this history the inference that in Christian baptism there was a deeper spiritual significance
Corinthians - Factions had risen in the church, some using Paul's name and some those of Peter, Apollos, and of Christ, in bitter contentions
Divisions - The Corinthian Church, though outwardly united, was divided in its allegiance to different teachers-‘I am of Paul, and I of Apollos, and I of Cephas, and I of Christ. Apollos was a Jew of Alexandria (Acts 18:24-28), a disciple of the Baptist, who, being more fully instructed by Aquila and Priscilla, was baptized into the Christian Church
Corinth - Here he first became aquainted with Aquila and Priscilla, and soon after his departure Apollos came to it from Ephesus
Aquila And Priscilla - 176 B, C) that it was Priscilla’s careful expositions of ‘the way of God’ ( Acts 18:26 ) that proved so helpful to Apollos. Paul visited Jerusalem; there Apollos, the eloquent Alexandrian, profited greatly from their ripe Christian experience, and learnt, from one or both of them, the secret of power in ministering the gospel of grace ( Acts 18:26 ff
Ephesus - )...
Early developments...
An important visitor during the early days of the Ephesian church was Apollos, a Jewish teacher from Alexandria in Egypt. Though eloquent, Apollos was lacking in the knowledge of certain Christian teachings, till Priscilla and Aquila taught him more accurately (Acts 18:24-28)
Alexandria - Apollos, the great Christian orator, came from Alexandria (Acts 18:24 ), and Paul rode the ships of that port (Acts 27:6 ; Acts 28:11 )
he'Brews, Epistle to the - For many years Paul was considered the author; others think it may have been Luke, Barnabas, or Apollos
Titus, Epistle to - Zenas, the lawyer, and Apollos probably delivered the letter to Titus (1 Timothy 3:13 ). See Apollos ; Circumcision ; Holy Spirit ; Paul ; Salvation
Faction - Paul, Apollos, and Cephas, differing only in personal idiosyncrasies, preached essentially the same gospel, their names quickly became the party-cries of wrangling sects in the Corinthian Church
Accompany - While personal "accompaniment" is not excluded, practical assistance seems to be generally in view, as indicated by Paul's word to Titus to set forward Zenas and Apollos on their journey and to see "that nothing be wanting unto them
Corinth - Apollos followed him in his labors at Corinth, and Aquila and Sosthenes were also among its early minister, Acts 18:1 1 Corinthians 1:1 16:19
Growth Increase - In writing to the Corinthian Church, he compares the work done by himself and Apollos, and declares, ‘I planted, Apollos watered, God increased’ (1 Corinthians 3:6). Paul’s preaching had kindled and Apollos had nourished; but the work of both would have been ineffective but for God’s working, His making the seed to grow and increase (1 Corinthians 3:7)
Figure - , from Paul and Apollos to circumstances in Corinth, see FASHION
Oration, Orator - Acts also portrays Apollos as an eloquent speaker (Acts 18:24 )
Hebrews, Epistle to - Others have attributed it to Clement of Rome, or Luke, or Barnabas, or some unknown Alexandrian Christian, or Apollos; but the conclusion which we think is best supported, both from internal and external evidence, is that Paul was its author
Corinthians - Certain factions had arisen in the church, using his name and those of Peter, Apollos, and of Christ himself, in bitter partisan contentions
Dispersion - So we find Aquila from Pontus, Barnabas of Cyprus, Apollos of Alexandria, Clement probably of Rome
Alexandria - ...
Hence Apollos, born at Alexandia, eloquent and mighty in the Scriptures, being instructed in the way of the Lord and fervent in the spirit, taught diligently (Greek accurately) the things of the Lord, though he knew only the baptism of John (Acts 18:25); i
Commendation - The Ephesian Christians wrote such a letter for Apollos to the Church at Corinth (Acts 18:27)
Quartus - Elsewhere in the Pauline Epistles, Apollos (1 Corinthians 16:12), Epaphroditus (Philippians 2:25), Onesimus (Colossians 4:9), Sosthenes (1 Corinthians 1:1), Timothy (2 Corinthians 1:1, etc
Water - Therefore, Apollos came ministering the Spirit of GOD to those who had heard the Word of GOD
Might, Mighty, Mightily, Mightier - 1); (2) of Christ, regarded as a prophet, Luke 24:19 ("in deed and word"); (3) of men: Moses, Acts 7:22 ("in his words and works"); Apollos, Acts 18:24 , "in the Scriptures;" of those possessed of natural power, 1 Corinthians 1:26 ; of those possessed of spiritual power, 2 Corinthians 10:4 . ...
D — 1: εὐτόνως (Strong's #2159 — Adverb — eutonos — yoo-ton'-oce ) "vigorously, vehemently" (eu, "well," teino, "to stetch"), is translated "mightily" in Acts 18:28 , AV, of the power of Apollos in "confuting" the Jews (RV, "powerfully"); in Luke 23:10 it is rendered "vehemently
Corinthians, First Epistle to the - He had heard of the abuses and contentions that had arisen among them, first from Apollos (Acts 19:1 ), and then from a letter they had written him on the subject, and also from some of the "household of Chloe," and from Stephanas and his two friends who had visited him (1 Corinthians 1:11 ; 16:17 )
Alexandria - Alexandria was the birthplace of Apollos, Acts 18:24, and in the apostle Paul's time it carried on an extensive commerce with the countries on the Mediterranean
Corinthians - While, then, some called themselves disciples of Paul, Cephas, or Apollos, others assumed the splendid appellation of Christ's party. The question itself divided all these various parties into two principal factions: the partisans of Cephas and James were for the law; the friends of Paul adopted his opinion, as well as Apollos, who, with his adherents, was always in heart in favour of Paul, and never wished to take a part in a separation from him, 1 Corinthians 16:12
Strife - Paul, Apollos, and Cephas desired was that they should be constituted leaders of rival sects and acclaimed by eager partisans
Heresy - Again, the parties in the Corinthian Church which called themselves after the names of Paul, Cephas, Apollos, and Christ were divisions in the Church, not separated from it
Aquila And Priscilla - During this time Apollos (q. As nothing is said about the baptism of Apollos, and as the twelve men ‘had not heard whether the Holy Spirit was given,’ it seems unlikely that there had been any Christian baptism in Ephesus before St
ti'Tus - Zenas and Apollos are in Crete, or expected there; for Titus is to send them on their journey, and to supply them with whatever they need for it
Romans, Epistle to the - (Acts 8:4 ; 11:10 ) At first we may suppose that the gospel had preached there in a confused and imperfect form, scarcely more than a phase of Judaism, as in the case of Apollos at Corinth, (Acts 18:25 ) or the disciples at Ephesus
Corinth - Here, after his departure, Apollos came from Ephesus. The immoralities abounding outside at Corinth, and the craving even within the church for Greek philosophy and rhetoric which Apollos' eloquent style gratified, rather than for the simple preaching of Christ crucified (1 Corinthians 2:1, etc. Apollos' followers also rested too much on his Alexandrian rhetoric, to the disparagement of Paul, who studied simplicity lest aught should interpose between the Corinthians and the Spirit's demonstration of the Savior (1 Corinthians 2)
Boldness - Paul and Barnabas at Antioch of Pisidia (Acts 13:46), of Apollos at Ephesus (Acts 18:26), of St
Alexandrians - Even before becoming a Christian, the Alexandrian Apollos had doubtless a breadth of sympathy, as well as a richness of culture, which could not have been attained among the Rabbis of Jerusalem
Titus, Epistle to - ...
The Epistle was probably brought to Titus by the hands of Zenas and Apollos (Titus 3:13 )
Corinth - Apollos had crossed from Ephesus to Corinth (Acts 18:27 , 2 Corinthians 3:1 ) and done valuable work there ( Acts 18:27-28 , 1 Corinthians 1:12 )
Alexandria - Apollos was ‘an Alexandrian by race, a learned man (ἀνὴρ λόγιος; Authorized Version and Revised Version margin, ‘eloquent’), mighty in the scriptures’ (Acts 18:24). Apollos (q
Ephesus - Apollos preached in Ephesus soon thereafter and met Priscilla and Aquila who “expounded unto him the way of God more perfectly” (Acts 18:26 )
Spirit - Apollos was characterized as speaking with "great fervor" (Acts 18:25 ) and Paul "had no peace of mind" when Titus did not meet him at Troas (2 Corinthians 2:13 )
Corinth - Paul was at liberty to remain some time longer at Corinth; and after his departure, Apollos, a zealous and eloquent Jewish convert of Alexandria, was made a powerful instrument in confirming the church, and in silencing the opposition of the Jews, Acts 18
Corinthians, First Epistle to the - Paul’s time there was a Paul-party, and also an Apollos-party, a Cephas-party, and a Christ-party ( 1 Corinthians 1:12 ), though the words ‘but I [1] of Christ’ are interpreted by Estius ( Com . Paul’s own observation: ‘You make parties, taking Paul, Apollos, Cephas as leaders, but I, Paul, am no party man, I am Christ’s’ (cf. The Apollos-party would probably consist of those who disparaged St. 47), who speaks of the parties of Paul, Cephas, and Apollos, but omits the Christ-party (see above § 3 ); we cannot infer from his phrase ‘the Epistle of the blessed Paul’ that he knew only one Epistle to the Corinthians, as early usage shows (Lightfoot, Clement , ii
Seventy (2) - ) as follows:—James (brother of the Lord), Timothy, Titus, Barnabas, Ananias, Stephen, Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Simon, Nicolas, Parmenas, Cleopas, Silas, Silvanus, Crescens, Epenetus, Andronicus, Amplias, Urbanus, Stachys, Apelles, Aristobulus, Narcissus, Herodion, Rufus, Asyncritus, Phlegon, Hermes, Hermas, Patrobas, Rhodion, Jason, Agabus, Linus, Gaius, Philologus, Olympas, Sosipater, Lucius, Tertius, Erastus, Phygellus, Hermogenes, Dermas, Quartus, Apollos, Cephas, Sosthenes, Epaphroditus, Caesar, Marcus, Joseph Barsabbas, Artemas, Clemens, Onesiphorus, Tychicus, Carpus, Euodius, Philemon, Zenas, Aquila, Priscas, Junias, Marcus (2), Aristarchus, Pudens, Trophimus, Lucas the Eunuch, Lazarus. But many others, including such Gentile Christians as Titus, Tychicus, Trophimus, and brethren like Timothy and Apollos, who became converts long after our Lord’s Ascension, are obviously the outcome of indiscriminating conjecture
Ephesians, Epistle to - The work he began on this occasion was carried forward by Apollos (24-26) and Aquila and Priscilla
Corinth - Prominent Christian leaders associated with Corinth include Aquila, Priscilla, Silas, Timothy, Apollos, and Titus
Titus - " Paul tells Titus to hospitably help forward Zenas the converted Jewish lawyer or scribe and Apollos, with the latter of whom Titus had been already associated in connection with Corinth (1 Corinthians 15:12; 2 Corinthians 7:6; 2 Corinthians 7:9; 2 Corinthians 8:6; 2 Corinthians 12:18; Acts 19:1)
Isaacus, Egyptian Solitary - Apollos, probably lived at Cellia
Hebrews, the Epistle to the - The Alexandrian phraseology does not prove Apollos' authorship (Alford's theory). The Alexandrian church would not have so undoubtingly asserted Paul's authorship if Apollos their own countryman had really been the author
Library - It is possible that the learned Apollos (Acts 18:24 ) may have made use of this famous library
Phoebe - In some such way as this Phoebe devoted herself and her means to the service of the Church, and earned thereby the title of διάκονος, which no more means ‘deaconess’ in the later sense than it means ‘deacon’ when used to describe Apollos, Tychicus, Epaphras, Timothy, or the Apostle himself
Minister - ...
A — 3: ὑπηρέτης (Strong's #5257 — Noun Masculine — huperetes — hoop-ay-ret'-ace ) properly "an under rower" (hupo, "under," eretes, "a rower"), as distinguished from nautes, "a seaman" (a meaning which lapsed from the word), hence came to denote "any subordinate acting under another's direction;" in Luke 4:20 , RV, "attendant," AV, "minister" it signifies the attendant at the synagogue service; in Acts 13:5 , it is said of John Mark, RV, "attendant," AV, "minister," in Acts 26:16 , "a minister," it is said of Paul as a servant of Christ in the Gospel; so in 1 Corinthians 4:1 , where the Apostle associates others with himself, as Apollos and Cephas, as "ministers of Christ
John the Baptist - Apollos was from Alexandria in North Africa and at one point knew only of the baptism of John (Acts 18:24-25 )
Ephesians, Epistle to the - Paul first visited Ephesus on his way from Corinth to Syria: he did not stay then, but left Priscilla and Aquila there, who were afterwards joined by Apollos
Alexandria - Alexandria was also the native place of Apollos
Church Government - ), and Apollos by the evidence of Clement of Rome, who most likely knew the truth of the matter
Interpretation - Apollos, whom certain Corinthians set up as St
John the Baptist - Of this number was Apollos, a learned and zealous man, who was of Alexandria, and came to Ephesus twenty years after the resurrection of our Saviour, Acts 18:25 . Paul came after Apollos to the same city, there were still many Ephesians who had received no other baptism, and were not yet informed that the Holy Ghost was received by baptism in the name of Jesus Christ, Acts 19:1
Scribes - Christ's minister must be a cf6 "scribe instructed which is unto the kingdom of heaven" (Matthew 13:52); such were "Zenas the lawyer" and "Apollos mighty in the Scriptures" (Titus 3:13)
Corinthians, Epistles to the - He placed the ministry of himself and Apollos in its true light: they were fellow-labourers in God's husbandry
Alexandria - Apollos of Alexandria ( Acts 18:24-28 ) needed to be ‘more accurately instructed’ in Christian doctrine, though we have no direct evidence that he was a disciple of Philo
Adoption - "All things are yours, " says the apostle, "whether Paul, or Apollos, or Cephas, or the world, or life, or death, or things present, or things to come, all are yours, " 1 Corinthians 3:22 ...
3
Name - -A number of these occur in the apostolic writings; thus Apollonius is shortened into Apollos (Acts 18:24); Ampliatus into Amplias (Romans 16:8); Demetrius into Demas (Acts 19:24, 3 John 1:12, 2 Timothy 4:10, etc
Hebrews - Luke, Clement of Rome, Priscilla, Barnabas, Apollos, or a Hellenist like Stephen have all been suggested
John - Years later, a group of John's followers were found around Ephesus, among them the eloquent Apollos (Acts 18:24-19:7 ); and for centuries John's influence survived among the Mandeans, who claimed to perpetuate his teachings
Ephesus - ...
With the religious history of Ephesus are also associated the names of Priscilla and Aquila (Acts 18:18), Apollos (Acts 18:24, 1 Corinthians 16:12), Tychicus (Ephesians 6:21), Timothy (1 Timothy 1:3, 2 Timothy 4:9), and especially John the Apostle and John the Presbyter
Calling - Thus it is said, "Paul may plant, and Apollos water, but God giveth the increase," 1 Corinthians 3:6-7
Disciples - We may presume that Barnabas (Acts 14:4 ,Acts 14:4,14:14 ), Apollos (1 Corinthians 4:6-13 ), and also Andronicus and Junias (Romans 16:7 ) were likewise witnesses of the resurrected Lord
Marriage - In the Bible the leaders in home and in society were generally men; but there were exceptions: Deborah was a judge (Judges 4-5 ); Lydia was a merchant (Acts 16:14 ); Priscilla and Aquila seemed to have acted as a team in teaching Apollos (1618418494_26 ) and in providing a meeting place for the church (Romans 16:3-5 ; 1 Corinthians 16:19 )
Baptism - Apollos' and John's disciples at Ephesus knew not of the Holy Spirit's baptism, which is the distinctive feature of Christ's (Acts 18:25; Acts 19:2-6; compare Acts 1:5; Acts 11:16)
Hebrews, Epistle to - Luther, with his usual boldness and independence, hazarded the unsupported guess that its author was Apollos (cf
Minister, Ministration - He and Apollos and Cephas are ὑπηρέται Χριστοῦ (1 Corinthians 4:1)
Baptism - Apollos had been instructed (ἦν κατηχημένος) in the way of the Lord, but only imperfectly, and Priscilla and Aquila taught him more carefully (ἀκριβέστερον, Acts 18:26)
Dispersion - This brief account must be qualified, however, by the statement in Acts (18:28), that it was a gifted Alexandrian Jew, Apollos, who, after ‘the way of God had been expounded to him more carefully,’ demonstrated the Messiahship of Jesus publicly, before the Jews in Corinth, with energy and success (cf
Dispersion - This brief account must be qualified, however, by the statement in Acts (18:28), that it was a gifted Alexandrian Jew, Apollos, who, after ‘the way of God had been expounded to him more carefully,’ demonstrated the Messiahship of Jesus publicly, before the Jews in Corinth, with energy and success (cf
Peter, the Epistles of - In Lydia was the Philadelphian church favorably noticed Revelation 3:7; that of Sardis the capital; Thyatira; and Ephesus, founded by Paul, laboured in by Aquila, Priscilla, Apollos, and Paul for three years, censured for leaving its first love (Revelation 2:4)
Unity (2) - There is no suggestion that those who called themselves ‘of Paul’ had ceased to communicate with those who called themselves ‘of Apollos’ (1 Corinthians 1:12)
Philo - Apollos, a certain Jew born at Alexandria, an eloquent man, mighty in the Scriptures (Acts 18:24), was not necessarily a pupil of Philo; there were other interpreters of the Scriptures at Alexandria besides him, as Philo himself mentions occasionally
Woman - Acts also describes a significant Christian woman teacher, Priscilla, who with her husband Aquila enabled Apollos to learn and disseminate correct doctrine (18:26)
Wisdom - There is no ground for connecting Apollos with the special method favoured by the Corinthians, which departed from St
Prophecy - Paul, and the means with which Apollos 'mightily convinced the Jews
Education - Apollos having been thus instructed in the way or the Lord (Acts 18:25) taught with accuracy the facts concerning Jesus
Christianity - Among the proselytes to Christianity we find Nicodemus, and Joseph of Arimathea, members of the senate of Israel; Jairus, a ruler of the synagogue; Zaccheus, the chief of the publicans at Jericho; Apollos, distinguished for eloquence; Paul, learned in the Jewish law; Sergius Paulus, governor of the island of Cyprus; Cornelius, a Roman captain; Dionysius, a judge and senator of the Athenian areopagus; Erastus, treasurer of Corinth; Tyrannus, a teacher of grammar and rhetoric at Corinth; Publius, governor of Malta; Philemon, a person of considerable rank at Colosse; Simon, a noted sophist in Samaria; Zenas, a lawyer; and even the domestics of the emperor himself
John, Gospel of (ii. Contents) - There can be little doubt that Apollos, the learned Jew of Alexandria, made this identification in his preaching, which was so mightily convincing