What does Anger mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
אַף־ nostril 20
אַפּ֔וֹ nostril 12
אַ֥ף nostril 10
אַ֤ף nostril 8
אַפּ֑וֹ nostril 6
אַפּֽוֹ nostril 5
אַ֣ף nostril 5
אַפְּךָ֖ nostril 4
אָ֑ף nostril 4
אַפַּ֙יִם֙ nostril 4
אַפּ֖וֹ nostril 4
אַפִּ֔י nostril 4
לְהַכְעִיסֽוֹ to be angry 4
בְּאַפִּ֔י nostril 3
אַ֝פְּךָ֗ nostril 3
אַפִּ֖י nostril 3
אַפִּי֙ nostril 3
אַ֝פַּ֗יִם nostril 3
אָֽף nostril 3
הַכְעִסֵֽנִי to be angry 2
לְהַכְעִסֵ֔נִי to be angry 2
θυμοῦ passion 2
בְּאַפּֽוֹ nostril 2
לְהַכְעִ֗יס to be angry 2
אַפֶּ֔ךָ nostril 2
הַכְעִיסֵ֔נִי to be angry 2
בָאַף֙ nostril 2
בְּאַפִּ֣י nostril 2
הָאַף֙ nostril 2
θυμοί passion 2
לְהַכְעִיסֵ֔נִי to be angry 2
בְּ֝אַ֗ף nostril 2
ὀργήν anger 2
ὀργῆς anger 2
ὀργὴ anger 2
אַפּ֗וֹ nostril 2
מַכְעִסִ֖ים to be angry 2
בְאַפִּ֖י nostril 2
אַפִּ֣י nostril 2
לְהַכְעִיס֙ to be angry 1
וַיַּכְעֵ֕ס to be angry 1
לְהַכְעִֽיס to be angry 1
לְהַכְעִ֖יס to be angry 1
לְאַ֫פּ֥וֹ nostril 1
לְהַכְעִיסֵ֖נִי to be angry 1
הִכְעִ֔יס to be angry 1
מַכְעִיסִ֖ים to be angry 1
אַפֶּֽךָ nostril 1
בְאַפֶּ֑ךָ nostril 1
וַיַּכְעֵ֗ס to be angry 1
לְהַכְעִיסוֹ֙ to be angry 1
זַעְמֶ֑ךָ anger 1
הִכְעַ֔סְתָּ to be angry 1
וַחֲמָת֖וֹ heat 1
؟ אַפֶּ֑ךָ nostril 1
הִכְעִ֥יס to be angry 1
לְהַכְעִ֔יס to be angry 1
וַ֭יַּכְעִיסוּ to be angry 1
וָקָֽצֶף wrath 1
פָּ֫נֶ֥יךָ face. 1
פָּנַ֖י face. 1
עֶבְרָת֣וֹ outpouring 1
מִ֝תְעַבְּר֗וֹ to pass over or by or through 1
יִטּֽוֹר to keep 1
נִֽאֲצ֛וּ to spurn 1
לְבָבוֹ֒ inner man 1
כַּֽעַסְךָ֣ anger 1
כַ֔עַס anger 1
וַיַּכְעִיס֥וּהוּ to be angry 1
הִכְעִ֖יסוּ to be angry 1
לְהַכְעִיס֖וֹ to be angry 1
וַיַּכְעִ֖סוּ to be angry 1
הִכְעִס֛וּנִי to be angry 1
מַכְעִסִ֥ים to be angry 1
(הַכְעִיסֵ֛נִי) to be angry 1
תַכְעִ֤יסוּ to be angry 1
לְהַכְעִסֵ֖נִי to be angry 1
הַמַּכְעִיסִ֥ים to be angry 1
לְהַכְעִיסֵֽנִי to be angry 1
אַכְעִיסֵֽם to be angry 1
כִּעֲס֖וּנִי to be angry 1
יַכְעִיסֻֽהוּ to be angry 1
אַ֝֗ף nostril 1
! אַפּֽוֹ nostril 1
בְּאַפֶּ֗ךָ nostril 1
אַ֖ף nostril 1
אַפָּם֙ nostril 1
בְאַפָּם֙ nostril 1
בְּאַ֤ף nostril 1
אַפִּ֗י nostril 1
בְּאַפִּֽי nostril 1
כְּאַפְּךָ֙ nostril 1
כְּאַפִּ֖י nostril 1
אַפִּ֛י nostril 1
אַ֨ף nostril 1
אַפַּ֖יִם nostril 1
בְאַפִּ֔י nostril 1
אַפִּ֑י nostril 1
בְּאַ֥ף nostril 1
؟ הָאַ֥ף nostril 1
בְּאַפּ֖וֹ nostril 1
אַפְּךָ֙ nostril 1
בְאַפַּ֖יִם nostril 1
אַפָּ֤ם nostril 1
אַף֩ nostril 1
παροργισμῷ indignation 1
παροργιῶ to rouse to wrath 1
θυμὸν passion 1
θυμός passion 1
בְּאַ֖ף nostril 1
וְאַפִּ֖י nostril 1
בְּאַפְּךָ֥ nostril 1
אַ֗ף nostril 1
מֵ֭אַף nostril 1
בְּאַפּוֹ֮ nostril 1
בְּאַ֗ף nostril 1
אַפַּ֣יִם nostril 1
אַ֭פַּיִם nostril 1
אַ֧ף nostril 1
אַפַּ֥יִם nostril 1
؟ אַפּ֑וֹ nostril 1
בְּאַ֧ף nostril 1
בְּאַף֙ nostril 1
בְּאַפּ֤וֹ ׀ nostril 1
לְאַפִּ֔י nostril 1
אַפּ֣וֹ nostril 1
בְּאַ֫פּ֥וֹ nostril 1
אַפִּ֤י nostril 1
וְאַפִּ֔י nostril 1
אַפִּ֜י nostril 1
בְּאַפִּ֥י nostril 1
וּבְאַ֥ף nostril 1
בְּאַפִּ֖י nostril 1
בְּאַפְּךָ֖ nostril 1
אַ֛ף nostril 1
אַ֔ף nostril 1
רוּחָם֙ wind 1

Definitions Related to Anger

H639


   1 nostril, nose, face.
   2 Anger.
   

H3707


   1 to be angry, be vexed, be indignant, be wroth, be grieved, provoke to Anger and wrath.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to be vexed, be indignant.
         1a2 to be angry.
      1b (Piel) to provoke to Anger.
      1c (Hiphil).
         1c1 to vex.
         1c2 to vex, provoke to Anger.
         

G2372


   1 passion, angry, heat, Anger forthwith boiling up and soon subsiding again.
   2 glow, ardour, the wine of passion, inflaming wine (which either drives the drinker mad or kills him with its strength).
   

G3709


   1 Anger, the natural disposition, temper, character.
   2 movement or agitation of the soul, impulse, desire, any violent emotion, but esp.
   Anger.
   3 Anger, wrath, indignation.
   4 Anger exhibited in punishment, hence used for punishment itself.
      4a of punishments inflicted by magistrates.
      

H5678


   1 outpouring, overflow, excess, fury, wrath, arrogance.
      1a overflow, excess, outburst.
      1b arrogance.
      1c overflowing rage or fury.
      

H5674


   1 to pass over or by or through, alienate, bring, carry, do away, take, take away, transgress.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to pass over, cross, cross over, pass over, march over, overflow, go over.
         1a2 to pass beyond.
         1a3 to pass through, traverse.
            1a3a passers-through (participle).
            1a3b to pass through (the parts of victim in covenant).
         1a4 to pass along, pass by, overtake and pass, sweep by.
            1a4a passer-by (participle).
            1a4b to be past, be over.
         1a5 to pass on, go on, pass on before, go in advance of, pass along, travel, advance.
         1a6 to pass away.
            1a6a to emigrate, leave (one’s territory).
            1a6b to vanish.
            1a6c to perish, cease to exist.
            1a6d to become invalid, become obsolete (of law, decree).
            1a6e to be alienated, pass into other hands.
      1b (Niphal) to be crossed.
      1c (Piel) to impregnate, cause to cross.
      1d (Hiphil).
         1d1 to cause to pass over, cause to bring over, cause to cross over, make over to, dedicate, devote.
         1d2 to cause to pass through.
         1d3 to cause to pass by or beyond or under, let pass by.
         1d4 to cause to pass away, cause to take away.
      1e (Hithpael) to pass over.
      

H5201


   1 to keep, keep guard, reserve, maintain.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to keep, maintain.
         1a2 to keep, guard.
         

G3950


   1 indignation, wrath, exasperation.
   

H7307


   1 wind, breath, mind, spirit.
      1a breath.
      1b wind.
         1b1 of heaven.
         1b2 quarter (of wind), side.
         1b3 breath of air.
         1b4 air, gas.
         1b5 vain, empty thing.
      1c spirit (as that which breathes quickly in animation or agitation).
         1c1 spirit, animation, vivacity, vigour.
         1c2 courage.
         1c3 temper, Anger.
         1c4 impatience, patience.
         1c5 spirit, disposition (as troubled, bitter, discontented).
         1c6 disposition (of various kinds), unaccountable or uncontrollable impulse.
         1c7 prophetic spirit.
      1d spirit (of the living, breathing being in man and animals).
         1d1 as gift, preserved by God, God’s spirit, departing at death, disembodied being.
      1e spirit (as seat of emotion). 1e1 desire. 1e2 sorrow, trouble.
      1f spirit.
         1f1 as seat or organ of mental acts.
         1f2 rarely of the will.
         1f3 as seat especially of moral character.
      1g spirit of God.
         1g1 as inspiring ecstatic state of prophecy.
         1g2 as impelling prophet to utter instruction or warning.
         1g3 imparting warlike energy and executive and administrative power.
         1g4 as endowing men with various gifts.
         1g5 as energy of life.
         1g6 ancient angel and later Shekinah.
         

G3949


   1 to rouse to wrath, to provoke, exasperate, Anger.
   

H3708


   1 Anger, vexation, provocation, grief.
      1a vexation.
         1a1 of men.
         1a2 of God.
      1b vexation, grief, frustration.
      

H6440


   1 face.
      1a face, faces.
      1b presence, person.
      1c face (of seraphim or cherubim).
      1d face (of animals).
      1e face, surface (of ground).
      1f as adv of loc/temp.
         1f1 before and behind, toward, in front of, forward, formerly, from beforetime, before.
      1g with prep.
         1g1 in front of, before, to the front of, in the presence of, in the face of, at the face or front of, from the presence of, from before, from before the face of.
         

H2195


   1 Anger, indignation.
   

H3824


   1 inner man, mind, will, heart, soul, understanding.
      1a inner part, midst.
         1a1 midst (of things).
         1a2 heart (of man).
         1a3 soul, heart (of man).
         1a4 mind, knowledge, thinking, reflection, memory.
         1a5 inclination, resolution, determination (of will).
         1a6 conscience.
         1a7 heart (of moral character).
         1a8 as seat of appetites.
         1a9 as seat of emotions and passions.
            1a10 as seat of courage.
            

H2534


   1 heat, rage, hot displeasure, indignation, Anger, wrath, poison, bottles.
      1a heat.
         1a1 fever.
         1a2 venom, poison (fig.
         ).
      1b burning Anger, rage.
      

H7110


   1 wrath, Anger.
      1a of God.
      1b of man.
   2 splinter, twig, broken twig.
      2a meaning dubious.
      

H5006


   1 to spurn, contemn, despise, abhor.
      1a (Qal) to spurn, contemn.
      1b (Piel).
         1b1 to spurn.
         1b2 to cause to contemn.
      1c (Hiphil) to spurn.
      1d (Hithpolel) to be contemned.
      

Frequency of Anger (original languages)

Frequency of Anger (English)

Dictionary

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Anger
A violent emotion of a painful nature, sometimes arising spontaneously upon just occasion, but usually characterized in the Bible as a great sin, Matthew 5:22 Ephesians 4:31 Colossians 3:8 . Even when just, our anger should be mitigated by a due consideration of the circumstances of the offence and the state of mind of the offender; of the folly and ill-results of this passion; of the claims of the gospel, and of our own need of forgiveness from others, but especially from God, Matthew 6:15 . Anger is in Scripture frequently attributed to God, Matthew 7:11 28:20 ; not that he is liable to those violent emotions which this passion produces, but figuratively speaking, that is, after the manner of men; and because he punishes the wicked with severity of a superior provoked to anger.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Anger
The emotion of instant displeasure on account of something evil that presents itself to our view. In itself it is an original susceptibility of our nature, just as love is, and is not necessarily sinful. It may, however, become sinful when causeless, or excessive, or protracted (Matthew 5:22 ; Ephesians 4:26 ; Colossians 3:8 ). As ascribed to God, it merely denotes his displeasure with sin and with sinners (Psalm 7:11 ).
Webster's Dictionary - Anger
(1):
(v. t.) To make painful; to cause to smart; to inflame.
(2):
(n.) Trouble; vexation; also, physical pain or smart of a sore, etc.
(3):
(n.) A strong passion or emotion of displeasure or antagonism, excited by a real or supposed injury or insult to one's self or others, or by the intent to do such injury.
(4):
(v. t.) To excite to anger; to enrage; to provoke.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Anger
Strong emotional reaction of displeasure, often leading to plans for revenge or punishment. There are many words for anger in Hebrew; in Greek orge [1] and thumos [2] are used more or less interchangeably.
The Anger of God Unlike pagan gods, whose tirades reflect the fickleness of their human creators, Yahweh "expresses his wrath every day" because he is a righteous judge ( Psalm 7:11 ). At the same time, God is merciful and not easily provoked to anger (Exodus 34:6 ; Psalm 103:8-9 ).
God may choose to display his wrath within historical events, as in Israel's wilderness wanderings (Psalm 95:10-11 ) or the Babylonian exile (Lamentations 2:21-22 ). But his wrath will be fully expressed on the dies irae, the day of wrath at the end of the age, when all wrongs will be punished (Zephaniah 1:14-18 ).
John the Baptist warns of God's fiery judgment (Matthew 3:7 ). Jesus will execute God's wrath at his second coming (Revelation 6:15-17 ). While the wicked already stand under God's condemnation (John 3:36 ; Ephesians 2:3 ), by sinning, they continue to store up wrath (Romans 2:5 ; 9:22 ). But God in his mercy sent Jesus to turn away his anger by a sacrifice of propitiation (Romans 3:25 ; 5:9 ; 1 John 2:2 ; 4:10 ).
Some have doubted whether a God of love can experience anger toward his creatures. The Jewish philosopher Philo championed the Stoic idea that a perfect being by definition could not become angry. In the twentieth century, C. H. Dodd held that "wrath of God" is merely symbolic of the fact that sin has consequences. But such viewpoints reveal more about the writers' theological assumptions than the consistent teaching of the Bible.
Human Anger The Bible usually portrays human anger as sinful. Cain's ire would have been turned to good if he had repented and offered an acceptable sacrifice. But by nursing his wrath against a holy God and the righteous Abel, he ends up committing murder ( Genesis 4:3-8 ).
"Refrain from anger and turn from wrath"—so warns Psalm 37:8 . In contrast with our modern emphasis on the constructive uses of anger, Proverbs urges us to think carefully before expressing anger (12:16; 14:29; 19:11), to be patient (16:32), and to show restraint (29:11). Angry people cause conflicts (29:22; 30:33) and continually get themselves into trouble (19:19); they should be avoided (22:24-25). In biblical history, Saul stands out as the embodiment of sinful rage (see 1 Samuel 19:9-10 ; 20:30-34 ). On the other hand, Job and many psalmists display anger and frustration with their situationand at times even with God himself. In the end Job is rebuked because he has doubted God's justice (chaps. 35-36), but the psalmists' prayers are acceptable apparently because they are viewing the world from God's perspective; since God knows the heart, it is better for them to voice their anger than it is to deny it.
Jesus warns that angry people will face God's judgment (Matthew 5:22 ; cf. Galatians 5:20 ; Colossians 3:6-8 ). James reflects the wisdom of the Old Testament when he tells his readers to "be quick to listen, slow to speak and slow to become angry" (1:9). According to Ephesians 4:25-27 , people should speak truthfully, but their anger should be restrained, short-lived, and used for righteous ends. Provoking another person to anger without reason is in itself a sin (Ephesians 6:4 ). Anger can divide a church (2 Corinthians 12:20 ) and frustrate prayer (1 Timothy 2:8 ); an elder must not be "quick-tempered" (Titus 1:7 ).
People may, however, react to sin in the way that God doesin holiness and without desire for personal vengeance (Romans 12:19-21 ). Moses was therefore justly angry with Pharaoh (Exodus 11:8 ). But Jesus the God-Man gives us the best example of how to express righteous anger (Matthew 23:1-36 ; Mark 3:5 ; 11:15-17 ; John 2:13-17 ).
At the same time, people may believe that their anger is warranted when it is not; such anger is usually rooted in a desire to justify oneself. Simeon and Levi's slaughter of the Shechemites goes well beyond righteous anger (Genesis 34:1-31 ; 49:5-7 ). Jonah believes that he is right to be angry when God spares the wicked (chap. 4). Those who angrily oppose Jesus think that God is on their side (Matthew 21:15-16 ). Even the disciples are self-righteously angry with James and John (Matthew 20:24 ) and with the woman who anointed Jesus with costly ointment (Mark 14:4-5 ).
Gary Steven Shogren
See also Wrath of God
Bibliography . G. C. Berkhouwer, Studies in Dogmatics: Sin ; F. Büchsel, TDNT, 3:167-68; H. C. Hahn, NIDNTT, 1:105-13; H. Kleinknecht et al., TDNT, 5:382-447.
King James Dictionary - Anger
AN'GER, n. ang'ger. L. ango, to choke strangle, vex whence angor, vexation, anguish, the quinsy, angina. Gr. to strangle, to strain or draw together to vex. The primary sense is to press, squeeze, make narrow Heb. to strangle.
1. A violent passion of the mind excited by a real or supposed injury usually accompanied with a propensity to take vengeance, or to obtain satisfaction from the offending party. This passion however varies in degrees of violence, and in ingenuous minds, may be attended only with a desire to reprove or chide the offender. Anger is also excited by an injury offered to a relation, friend or party to which one is attached and some degrees of it may be excited by cruelty, injustice or oppression offered to those with whom one has no immediate connection, or even to the community of which one is a member. Nor is it unusual to see something of this passion roused by gross absurdities in others, especially in controversy or discussion. Anger may be inflamed till it rises to rage and a temporary delirium.
2. Paint smart of a sore or swelling the literal sense of the word, but little used. AN'GER, ang'ger.
1. To excite anger to provoke to rouse resentment. 2. To make painful to cause to smart to inflame as, to anger an ulcer.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Anger, Burning
A. Verb.
Chârâh (חָרָה, Strong's #2734), “to get angry, be angry.” This verb appears in the Bible 92 times. In the basic stem, the word refers to the “burning of anger” as in Jonah 4:1. In the causative stem, chârâh means “to become heated with work” or “with zeal for work” (Neh. 3:20).
B. Noun.
Chârôn (חָרֹן, Strong's #2740), “burning anger.” The 41 occurrences of this word cover every period of the Bible. This word refers exclusively to divine anger as that which is “burning.” ) chârôn first appears in Exod. 32:12: “Turn from thy fierce wrath [1], and repent of this evil against thy people.”
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Anger
(Latin: ango, distress)
A strongly exciting emotion aroused by an evil that is present but not acquiesced in. Though commonly a self-regarding emotion, it may be aroused in behalf of others. Anger is not purely painful as it includes the agreeable consciousness of energetic reaction against evil, and is not of itself morally evil, but may be at times a high moral force in the form of virtuous indignation, called "just" anger. It needs restraint as it can easily become inordinate and lead to a purpose of revenge or pass into hatred and it is then a vice.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Anger
ANGER . In OT ‘anger’ represents about a dozen Heb. roots, which occur as nouns, vbs. (once ‘angered’ is used transitively, Psalms 106:32 ), and adjs. By far the most frequent words are anaph (lit. ‘to snort’) and its deriv. noun aph , which is used of the anger both of men ( Genesis 27:45 ; Genesis 30:2 , Exodus 11:8 ; Exodus 32:19 ; etc.) and God ( Exodus 4:14 ; Exodus 32:22 , Psalms 6:1 ; Psalms 7:6 etc.). In NT ‘anger’ is of much less frequent occurrence, and represents only 2 roots: (1) the noun orgç (wh., however, is usually tr. [1] ‘wrath’), the vb. orgizomai , the adj. orgÄ­los (only in Titus 1:7 ), and the trans. vb. parorgizô ( Romans 10:19 , the only case of a trans, use of ‘anger’ in NT); (2) the vb. cholaô (lit. ‘to be full of bile,’ fr. cholç , ‘bile’), used only in John 7:23 to express the bitter anger of ‘the Jews’ against Jesus. With regard to the distinction between orgç and the synon. thumos , it is to be noted that while orgç is very often tr. [1] ‘wrath,’ thumos is never tr. [1] ‘anger,’ and when the two words occur together, thumos in each case is ‘wrath’ ( Romans 2:8 , Ephesians 4:31 , Colossians 3:8 ) and orgç ‘anger’ ( Ephesians 4:31 , Colossians 3:8 ) or ‘indignation’ ( Romans 2:8 ). Thumos is the more violent word, denoting anger as a strong passion or emotion, while orgç points rather to a settled moral indignation. Thus orgç is used of the sorrowful anger of Jesus ( Mark 3:5 ); thumos of the rage of His enemies ( Luke 4:28 ; cf. Acts 19:28 ). And, outside of the Apocalypse, thumos is applied almost exclusively to the wrath of men (the only exception being Romans 2:8 ), while orgç in the great majority of cases ( Matthew 3:7 , John 3:36 , Romans 1:18 etc.) denotes the righteous indignation of God.
J. C. Lambert.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Anger (Wrath) of God
ANGER (WRATH) OF GOD . It might seem that the idea of the Divine anger, manifesting itself in judgments of destruction, belongs to an early and anthropomorphic stage of religion. Yet, on the whole, the Biblical conception will be found consistent and profoundly ethical. God is holy a term which seems to unite all the unapproachable perfections of Deity, especially His majesty and awful purity. He is the ‘Holy One of Israel,’ in covenant relation with a nation to whom He has revealed Himself as holy, and whom He will fashion with slow redemptive purpose into ‘an holy people.’ Moreover, God is righteous , a moral governor and lawgiver, demanding obedience and punishing transgression of His commands. The Divine holiness is not an element in an abstract conception of Deity: it is not a passive perfection, but an active attribute of a self-revealing and redeeming God. It follows that one side of this activity is necessarily a reaction against, a repudiation of, what is unholy and unrighteous in His creatures. This disposition towards sin is the anger or wrath of God. In the history of Israel it appears as a terrible factor in the discipline of the nation to righteousness: the ungrateful, the rebellious, and especially the idolatrous, are destroyed by fire and sword, pestilence and famine ( Psalms 78:1-72 , Deuteronomy 32:15-43 ). So ‘jealous’ is God for His holiness, that even accidental profanation of its symbol, the Ark, is visited by extreme penalty ( 1 Samuel 6:18 ; 1 Samuel 6:20 , 2 Samuel 6:7 ). But the anger of the Lord, though fierce, is also just: it is ‘provoked’ by moral causes and for moral ends, and is averted by penitence and moral acquiescence in the righteousness of His judgments ( Exodus 32:1-35 , Leviticus 10:8 , Numbers 25:11 , Deuteronomy 13:17 ). Psalmist and Prophet dwell upon the subordination of the Divine anger to the Divine mercy. God is ‘slow to anger’ ( Psalms 103:8 ; Psalms 145:8 , Joel 2:13 , Jonah 4:2 , Nahum 1:3 ), and His anger passes away ( Psalms 30:6 , Isaiah 12:1 , Jeremiah 3:12 , Micah 7:18 ).
Yet the wrath of God remains an essential element of His revelation through the prophets, a real Divine attribute, conplementary, not antithetic to the Divine mercy (Isaiah 1:18-20 ; Isaiah 5:25 ; Isaiah 42:25 ; Isaiah 54:8 ). In the NT, although the stress has shifted to the love of God revealed to the world in Jesus Christ, the anger of God still holds place. The teaching of Jesus, while refusing to see in all physical ills the Divine displeasure against sin ( Luke 13:1-5 , John 9:3 ), contains impressive warning of the terrible reality of God’s judgments ( Luke 13:3-6 , Matthew 25:30 ; Matthew 25:41 , Luke 12:5 ). In St. Paul’s writings this conception of judgment, held in reserve against unrepentant sin, is expressed in the phrase ‘the wrath of God,’ or, more simply, ‘the wrath’ ( Romans 1:18 , Ephesians 5:6 , Colossians 3:6 , Romans 2:8 ; Romans 5:8 ). There is a coming ‘day of wrath’ ( Romans 2:5 , cf. Matthew 3:7 ); sinful man unredeemed by Christ is necessarily a ‘vessel of wrath,’ a ‘child of wrath’ ( Romans 9:22 , Ephesians 2:3 ).
It is true that the NT references to God’s anger are mainly eschatological and contain figurative elements (see esp. Revelation 6:16 ‘the wrath of the Lamb,’ Revelation 11:18 , Revelation 14:10 , Revelation 16:19 , Revelation 19:15 ). But for the significance of the Divine wrath as an ethical necessity in God, though His fundamental attribute is love, it may he noted that (1) the writer through whom the revelation of the Divine love attains its culminating expression (‘God is love,’ 1 John 4:8 ) declares also of him that obeys not the Son, ‘the wrath of God ahideth on him’ ( John 3:36 ). (2) The Epistle which shows how in Christ the aloofness and terror of Israel’s worship are done away in favour of full and free access to a ‘throne of grace,’ has, as the climax to its glowing description of Christian privilege, the solemn warning ‘our God is a consuming fire’ ( Hebrews 12:18-28 ).
S. W. Green.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Anger
A violent passion of the mind, arising from the receipt, or supposed receipt, of any injury, with a present purpose of revenge. All anger is by no means sinful; it was designed by the Author of our nature for self-defense; nor is it altogether a selfish passion, since it is excited by injuries offered to others as well as ourselves, and sometimes prompts us to reclaim offenders from sin and danger, Ephesians 4:26 ; but it becomes sinful when conceived upon trivial occasions or inadequate provocations; when it breaks forth into outrageous actions; vents itself in reviling language, or is concealed in our thoughts to the degree of hatred. To suppress this passion the following reflections of arch-deacon Paley, may not be unsuitable: "We should consider the possibility of mistaking the motives from which the conduct that offends us proceeded; how often our offences have been the effect of inadvertency, when they were construed into indications of malice; the inducement which prompted our adversary to act as he did, and how powerfully the same inducement has, at one time or other, operated upon ourselves; that he is suffering, perhaps, under a contrition, which he is ashamed or wants opportunity to confess; and how ungenerous it is to triumph by coldness or insult over a spirit already humbled in secret; that the returns of kindness are sweet, and that there is neither honor, nor virtue, nor use, in resisting them; for some persons think themselves bound to cherish and keep alive their indignation, when they find it dying away of itself.
We may remember that others have their passions, their prejudices, their favorite aims, their fears, their caution, their interests , their sudden impulses, their varieties of apprehension, as well as we: we may recollect what hath sometimes passed in our own minds when we have got on the wrong side of a quarrel, and imagine the same to be passing in our adversary's mind now: when we became sensible of our misbehavior, what palliations we perceived in it, and expected others to perceive; how we were affected by the kindness, and felt the superiority of a generous reception, and ready forgiveness; how persecution revived our spirits with our enmity, and seemed to justify the conduct in ourselves, which we before blamed. Add to this the indecency of extravagant anger; how it renders us while it lasts, the scorn and sport of all about us, of which it leaves us, when it ceases, sensible and ashamed; the inconveniences and irretrievable misconduct into which our irascibility has sometimes betrayed us; the friendships it has lost us; the distresses and embarrassments in which we have been involved by it; and the repentance which, on one account or other, it always costs us.
But the reflection calculated above all others to allay that haughtiness of temper which is ever finding out provocations, and which renders anger so impetuous, is, that which the Gospel proposes; namely, that we ourselves are, or shortly shall be, suppliants for mercy and pardon at the judgment seat of God. Imagine our secret sins all disclosed and brought to light; imagine us thus humbled and exposed; trembling under the hand of God; casting ourselves on his compassion; crying out for mercy; imagine such a creature to talk of satisfaction and revenge; refusing to be entreated, disdaining to forgive; extreme to mark and to resent what is done amiss; imagine, I say, this, and you can hardly feign to yourself an instance of more impious and unnatural arrogance." Paley's Mor. Phil. ch.7. vol 1:; Fawcett's excellent Treatise on Anger;
Seed's Posth. Ser. ser.11.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Anger of God
See WRATH.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Anger
See Wrath.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Anger
1. Human anger.-Except by the stoical mind which finds no place for strong emotion in a moral scheme, anger has been recognized as a quality which, under certain conditions and within certain limits, may not only be permissible but commendable. Its ready abuse has, however, led to its being commonly placed among the evils of human nature. The teaching of the early Christian Church recognizes both aspects. Condemnation of the abuse of anger is not wanting in the apostolic writings. Among the manifest works of the flesh are enmities, strife, jealousies, wraths (θυμοί), factions (Galatians 5:20). St. Paul fears lest he shall find these evils in the Church when he comes to Corinth (2 Corinthians 12:20). One of the marks of the greatest of Christian virtues is that it ‘does not blaze forth in passionate anger’ (οὐ παροζύνεται [1]). In Christian circles, all bitterness and wrath and anger must be put away (Ephesians 4:13; cf. Colossians 3:8). The holy hands lifted up in prayer must be unstained with anger and strife (1 Timothy 2:8). The ‘bishop’ must be blameless, as God’s steward, not self-willed, not soon angry (Titus 1:7). St. James bids his readers be swift to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath, for the wrath of man worketh not the righteousness of God (James 1:19-20). ‘Be not prone to anger,’ says the Didache (iii. 2), ‘for anger leadeth to murder: nor a zealot, nor contentious, nor quick-tempered, for murder also is the outcome of those.’
On the other hand, Christian morality recognizes a righteous anger. The section of the Sermon on the Mount which teaches that whosoever is angry with his brother is in danger of the judgment (Matthew 5:21 f.) is primarily aimed at something other than passion-it is an emphatic condemnation of the spirit which despises and seeks to injure a brother. The violation of the law of brotherly love, manifest in the anger of Matthew 5:22, might, indeed, provoke a legitimate wrath, e.g. in the series of woes, terrible in intensity of language, pronounced by Jesus against the scribes and Pharisees (Matthew 23:13 ff.). We should hesitate to acknowledge a man as morally and spiritually great who could remain unmoved in the presence of the world’s wrongs. The early preachers would have been poor souls had they been able to hide their indignation at the murderers of Jesus (Acts 3:13-14; Acts 5:30; Acts 7:51 f.). Could Peter well have been calm with Ananias and Sapphira (Acts 5:1), and later, with the commercially-minded, religious adventurer, Simon Magus (Acts 8:20 f.)? A certain principle of discrimination seems, however, to have been observed. Anger at personal insult or persecution was discouraged. Anger provoked by personal injury may have a protective value in a lower stage of the world’s life, but the attitude of Christian ethics to this type is governed by the law of non-resistance laid down by the Sermon on the Mount. Man must return good for evil, show kindness to his enemy, leave retribution to God (Romans 12:19-20). St. Paul claims that, ‘when reviled, we bless; when persecuted, we bear it patiently; when slandered, we try to conciliate’ (1 Corinthians 4:12), thus following the example of Jesus (1 Peter 2:23). One is tempted to regard the apology which followed the momentary outburst of St. Paul’s passion against the high priest (Acts 23:3) as an expression of the Apostle’s principles of non-resistance rather than as an acknowledgment of priestly rights. But there is an altogether different attitude when that which is to be defended is a righteous principle, a weaker brother, or the faith or ethical standard of the Church. Elymas, the sorcerer, seeking to hinder a work of grace, provokes a vigorous anger (Acts 13:10-11). On behalf of the purity of faith St. Paul resists St. Peter to the face (Galatians 2:11). The Epistle to the Galatians is a piece of passionate writing, and a note of indignation runs through, the later chapters of 2 Cor. (cf. 1 Corinthians 1:14; 1 Corinthians 5:5, etc.). The man who does not love the Lord Jesus, or the one who preaches a false gospel, let him be accursed-ἀνάθεμα (1 Corinthians 16:22). The indignation (ἀγανάκτησις) of the Corinthian Church against the guilty person in the case of immorality, to which St. Paul has drawn attention, is commended by him (2 Corinthians 7:11). Similarly, the Church at Ephesus is congratulated on its hatred of the Nicolaitans (Revelation 2:6). St. Paul ‘burns’ if another is ‘made to stumble’ (2 Corinthians 11:29). In these instances, anger seems to have been regarded as compatible with, and indeed expressive of, Christian character. The obvious danger of mistaken zeal for a cause or creed must, however, be kept in mind. The case of St. Paul’s early life provides an illustration (Galatians 1:13, Philippians 3:6). There may be a zeal for God, not according to knowledge (Romans 10:2).
But even legitimate anger may readily pass into a sin. Passions beyond the control of the rational self can hardly be justified, whatever the cause. Self-control is a cardinal Christian virtue. Hence the apostolic caution of Ephesians 4:26, ‘Be ye angry and sin not,’ i.e. if angry, as one may rightly be, do not allow the passion to become an evil by its excess. The wrath against which the warning is given seems indicated by the following clause-‘let not the sun go down on your παροργισμός’ (‘a noun which differs from ὀργή in denoting, not the disposition of anger, or anger in a lasting mood, but exasperation, sudden violent anger’ [2]). There is no reference to deliberate indignation on a matter of principle, such as the resentment which, the author of Ecce Homo claims, was felt by Jesus towards the Pharisees to the end of His life.
2. Divine anger.-Most minds must have felt the objection expressed by Origen, Augustine, and the Neo-Platonist theologians generally, that we cannot treat the Supreme as a magnified man and attribute to Him such perturbation of mind as is suggested to us by the term ‘anger.’ But we may allow-and must do so unless we are prepared to deny personality in God-that the quality, which we find expressed under human conditions as the righteous anger of a good man, must exist in God, although in a form which we cannot adequately conceive, owing to our inability to realize absolute conditions. We may be helped to some extent by recognizing that behind the human agitations of personality in love, pity, indignation, etc., there are certain principles and attitudes which no more depend for their quality on the element of agitation than the existence of steam depends upon the appearance of white vapour which we ordinarily associate with it. This underlying quality we may attribute to the Deity, in whom life and personality, here expressed only in finite and conditioned forms, have their perfect and unconditioned being (Lotze).
The objection that anger, unlike love, is unworthy of the highest moral personality (Marcion) may be met by the answer that Divine love and anger are not two opposing principles, but expressions of the one attitude towards contrary sets of human circumstances. The Divine anger is actually involved in the Divine love (Tertullian, Martensen, etc.). The one Lord whose name is Truth and Love is, because of this, a consuming flame to Wrong (Hebrews 10:31; Hebrews 12:29).
The idea of the ‘Divine anger’-this attitude of Deity towards certain courses of human life-is a justifiable inference from the intuitions of conscience, but another and an unsound argument played a part in the historical formation of the doctrine. In the early stages of religious thought the conception of the wrath of God would naturally come to men’s minds from contemplation of the ills of human life. The chieftain punished those with whom he was angry, either by direct action or by withholding his protection. Did not, then, physical calamities, pestilences, reverses of fortune, defeat in battle, indicate the displeasure of Deity (Joshua 7, 2 Samuel 21:1; 2 Samuel 24, etc.)? Such misfortune, when no ethical cause could be recognized, would encourage the doctrine of unwitting and non-ethical offences (e.g. the violation of tabu) and of non-ethical propitiation. The ills of life-especially death-suggested later a world lying under a curse, due to Adam’s sin. Against the popular doctrine that misfortune indicated Divine displeasure, the Book of Job is a protest. Human suffering has educative values, and does not necessarily indicate the disapproval of God (Hebrews 12:5 f.).
Yet even in early times the idea of the Divine anger did not rest wholly on the facts of human suffering. Men realized that the world, as they found it, was not in harmony with their conceptions of the Highest, and thus in times of prosperity, which, according to this theory, would indicate God’s contentment with His people, prophets such as Amos argued for coming doom. From the consciousness of the holiness of God it was inferred that there must be Divine displeasure.
The turning away of the Divine anger.-Two attitudes in regard to this problem appear among the Hebrews, even as early as the 8th cent. b.c. The prophets of that period ‘do not recognize the need of any means of reconciliation with God after estrangement by sin other than repentance’ (Hosea 14:2, Amos 5:22-24, Isaiah 1:13; Isaiah 1:17, Micah 6:6-8). On the other hand, while repentance was always insisted upon by Israel’s religious teachers, there was a tendency to assert the need of supplementary means in order to bring about the reconciliation of God and man. The conception may have originated in the practice of offering a propitiatory gift or legal compensation to an outraged person (Genesis 20:16; Genesis 32:13; cf. 1 Samuel 26:19, 2 Samuel 24:18 f.), or in the primitive view of sin as having a material existence of its own which called for an appropriate ritual treatment beyond the mental change of repentance, or in the customs of Levitical ‘sin-offerings,’ which, although originally made in view of ceremonial faults, for which ethical repentance was strictly impossible, must have come to suggest that, in addition to repentance, a sacrificial operation was needful even in cases of moral transgression.
From the period of the Exile, prayer, fasting, almsgiving, and especially the sufferings of the righteous, were regarded as substitutes for material sacrifices (see article ‘Atonement’ in Jewish Encyclopedia ). Isa 53 is the ‘earliest expression of a conception [3] which attained wide development in later times and constantly meets us in the teaching of the Jewish synagogues’ (O. Whitehouse). One of the seven brothers, during the persecutions of Antiochus Epiphanes, prays that ‘in me and my brothers, the wrath of the Almighty may be appeased’ (2 Maccabees 7:38). 4 Maccabees 6:29 gives a prayer, ‘Let my blood serve for purification, and as an equivalent for their life (ἀντίψυχον) take my own’ (cf. 4 Maccabees 1:11; 4 Maccabees 9:24; 4 Maccabees 17:20-22; 4 Maccabees 18:4). These passages supply an interesting link between the old Leviticism and the NT doctrine of the sacrificial death of Jesus.
The doctrine of propitiation receives no support from the teaching of Jesus as given in the Synoptics. Repentance and new life are the conditions of the restoration of the Divine favour. Jesus does not appear to have ever taught that reconciliation depended upon His own death as a propitiation (see Dict. of Christ and the Gospels , article ‘Sacrifice’), although He did teach that the spiritual ministration involved suffering and sacrifice, so that the death of Jesus might be figuratively regarded as a ‘ransom for many’ (Mark 10:35-45). Moreover, the teaching of Jesus is not favourable to the view that legal right claims a compensation beyond repentance, before the Father will forgive. The moral of the parables of the Prodigal and the Labourers (cf. Luke 23:43) is that forensic conceptions are altogether inappropriate in the religions sphere. Harmony with God is a matter of altitude, not of purchase or compensation.
The teaching of the Acts of the Apostles agrees with that of the Synoptics. There is no hint in the early preaching of the Church, as recorded in this work, of a propitiatory value in the death of Jesus. Jesus is, indeed, described as a ‘Saviour,’ but in the sense that He gives ‘repentance to Israel and remission of sins’ (Acts 5:31), i.e. He is able to bring about a change in the hearts of men, and, in accordance with prophetic teaching, pardon follows repentance (cf. the description of the preaching of the Baptist, as that of ‘repentance unto remission of sins,’ Mark 1:4).
But, with the exception of the authors of the Synoptics, the Acts, and the Epistle of James, the writers of the NT are strongly influenced by the propitiatory theory of the death of Jesus. The passage of the ‘Suffering Servant’ (Isaiah 53:4 f., Isaiah 53:10 f.) suggested a doctrine which seemed to throw light upon the ignominious death of Jesus upon the Cross. The ‘stumbling-block’ to the Jewish mind became the Christian’s boast. How the sacrifice was regarded as operating is not clear-the analogy of Levitical blood sacrifices was evidently sometimes in the mind of the writers (Romans 3:25, 1 Peter 1:19, John 1:29, etc.). St. Paul also holds the idea that the death of Jesus is a sign of His human submission to the elemental world-powers of darkness, who, since Adam, have held the world under their grievous rule (Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) , article ‘Elements’; also Wrede, Paul, Eng. translation , 1907, p. 95). But, being more than man, He rises from the dead. The Resurrection is a sign that Death-one of the elemental principalities and powers, and representative of the rest-has no longer dominion over Him (Romans 6:9), or over those in ‘faith’ union with Him. But these ‘world-powers of darkness,’ whose dues the death of Jesus was conceived as satisfying, are but a thinly disguised form of God’s retribution for Adam’s sin. Ultimately the propitiation is still made to God, although the emphasis is drawn from the wrath of God to the love which inspired the propitiatory action (cf. John 3:16, Romans 3:25; Romans 5:8, etc.). From this point, St. Paul follows the anti-legal teaching of Jesus in asserting that ‘justification’-right relations with God-depends on the new attitude of ‘faith,’ not on ‘works’; but legalism with St. Paul must be satisfied by the prior transaction of Jesus on the Cross.
The difficulty in the doctrine of propitiation does not lie in the fact that no ultimate distinction can be made between the Power to whom propitiation is offered and the God of love who offers it. Independently of the interests of this particular doctrine, we must accept the paradox that the same God who works under the limitation of law ordains the law which limits Him. But we cannot accept the interpretation of the death of Jesus as an exalted Levitical blood sacrifice, or as a transaction with the ‘world-powers of darkness,’ nor can we be satisfied with a presentation of an angry God, who needs compensation or some mollifying gift before He will turn away the fierceness of His wrath. The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit; a broken and contrite heart He will not despise (Psalms 51:17). It would seem more satisfactory to follow the suggestions of the Synoptics and the Acts, and find the reconciling work of Jesus, as directed not towards God, but towards men, bringing about in them a repentance which makes possible their harmonious relations with the Father.
The death of Jesus may be regarded partly as a vicarious sacrifice of the order recognized in the Synoptic-suffering and self-denial for the sake of the Kingdom of God, for conscience, and men’s uplifting. The justification of this law of sacrifice (‘Ever by losses the right must gain, Every good have its birth of pain’ [4]) is that it makes possible the expression of moral qualities. In order that love may have significance, it must pay a price-must be written upon a hard resisting world, as labour and self-denial. This demand of law is obviously not indicative of Divine displeasure or opposition.
The death of Jesus may also be regarded as part of the penalty of human sin. If men had not been selfish, hypocritical, apathetic to goodness and justice, there would not have been the tragedy on Calvary. In virtue of race solidarity, the sins of an evil and adulterous generation fell upon Him. This dark law-that the innocent must suffer the results of transgression along with the guilty-has an educative value in demonstrating the evil and disastrous nature of sin, which is doubly terrible since the suffering which it creates falls upon the just as well as upon the unjust, sometimes even more upon the former than upon the latter. The penalty of sin indicates the Divine displeasure towards sin, but not necessarily towards those who pay the penalty, for obviously God cannot be conceived as being angry with innocent sufferers, involved in the results of others’ sins. Neither must we regard God as angry with a repentant sinner because he continues to reap what he has sown. The forgiveness of sin is distinct from the cancelling of its results, which, in accordance with educative moral law, must run their course.
One’s trust in the forgiveness of God rests upon the sense of the divinity of human forgiveness-‘By all that He requires of me, I know what God Himself most be’ (Whittier, Revelation). If we must judge the anger of God from the righteous indignation of a good man, we cannot think of His cherishing any vindictiveness, or needing any propitiation to induce Him to forgive, when the sinner seeks His face. Nor can a view of reconciliation held by the most sternly ethical of the OT prophets, and by the purest soul of the NT, be considered as weakening the sense of sin, and minimizing the grace of pardon.
The Day of Wrath.-From the time of Amos, OT prophetism had conceived a darker side to Israel’s still more ancient conception of the Day of the Lord. It would be a time when human wrongdoing, much of which was apparently overlooked in this age, would receive its sure reward, although genuine repentance would apparently avert the coming anger (Joel 2, Amos 5:4 ff., Jeremiah 18:8). That ‘great and notable Day’ (Acts 2:20), with its darker aspects, entered largely into NT thought (Matthew 3:7; Matthew 7:22, Luke 10:12, 2 Thessalonians 1:8 f., etc.). It is to this coming Dies Irae that the actual term ‘wrath of God’ (ὀργὴ τοῦ θεοῦ) is almost uniformly applied by NT writers. Some of the Divine indignation may be manifested in the present operation of moral law-the penalties experienced by the ungodly heathen seem to be part of the Divine wrath which ‘is being revealed’ (ἀποκαλύπτεται) from heaven (Romans 1:18 f.); and, according to Romans 13:4, the temporal ruler punishing evil-doers is ‘a minister of God, an avenger for (Divine) wrath,’ i.e. a human instrument carrying out in this age the Divine retribution. But the emphasis is upon ‘the wrath to come.’ In the present age, moral law only imperfectly operates. The sinner is treasuring up for himself ‘wrath in the day of wrath’ (Romans 2:5), when upon every soul that worketh evil shall be wrath and indignation, tribulation and anguish (Romans 2:9; cf. Revelation 11:18; Revelation 6:16-17, where the Divine anger is spoken of as ‘the wrath of the Lamb’). Repentance before the Day of Wrath will save one from the coming doom (Acts 2:21; Acts 2:38; Acts 2:40, Ephesians 2:3), and the provision of these days of grace modifies the conception of the Divine sternness (Romans 9:22). The ‘Law,’ in making transgression possible, ‘worketh wrath’ (Romans 4:15), but Christ, by His reconciliation of man and God, delivers the believer from the ‘wrath to come’ (1 Thessalonians 1:10; 1 Thessalonians 5:9). The NT significance of ὀργὴ θεοῦ is illustrated in Romans 5:9, where St. Paul argues from the fact of present reconciliation with God that the saints will be delivered from the ‘wrath of God.’ Even where the Divine anger is described as having already had its manifestation, the reference may really be eschatological (Ritschl). The aorist of 1 Thessalonians 2:16 (ἔφθασεν δὲ ἐπʼ αὐτοὺς ἡ ὀργὴ εἰς τέλος) seems to indicate that, in the Apostle’s judgment, some historical manifestation or God’s wrath upon the Jews has already taken place, but St. Paul may regard such an indication of the Divine anger as the preliminary movements of the Day of Wrath. The clouds were already gathering for that consummation which the Apostle was expecting in his own lifetime (1 Thessalonians 4:15).
Literature.-A. Ritschl, de Ira Dei, Bonn, 1859, Justification and Atonement, Eng. translation , Edinburgh, 1900; R. W. Dale, The Atonement7, London, 1878; D. W. Simon, Redemption of Prayer of Manasseh 1:2, do. 1906; O. Lodge, Man and the Universe, do. 1908. chs. 7 and 8; P. Gardner, Exploratio Evangelica, do. 1899, chs. 29, 31. For human anger: J. Butler’s Sermons, 8 and 9; J. R. Seeley, Ecce Homo, 1866, pp. 21-23; Tolstoi, Essays and Letters, ch. 12.
H. Bulcock.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Anger (2)
ANGER.—Anger is the instinctive resentment or reaction of the soul against anything which it regards as wrong or injurious. It is part of its equipment for self-preservation, and the promptitude and energy with which it comes into play are a fair measure of the soul’s power to protect itself from the evil which is in the world. If there is not an instant and indignant repulsion of evil, it creeps into the apathetic soul, and soon makes it not only its victim but its instrument. The child’s anger with the fire which burns him is in a sense irrational; but one true meaning and purpose of anger in the moral world is illustrated by it. It is the vehement repulsion of that which hurts, and there is no spiritual, as there is no natural, life without it.
An instinct, however, when we come into the world of freedom and responsibility, always needs education; and the radical character of the education required by the instinct of anger is apparent from the fact that the first thought of almost all men is that anger is a vice. Taking human nature as it is, and looking at the actual manifestations of anger, this is only too true. There is, as a rule, something vicious in them. They are self-regarding in a selfish way. Men are angry, as Aristotle puts it (Ethics, iv. 5, 7), on wrong grounds, or with the wrong people, or in a wrong way, or for too long a time. Their anger is natural, not spiritual; selfish, not guided by consideration of principle; the indulgence of a temper, not the staking of one’s being for a cause. In the NT itself there are far more warnings against anger than indications of its true place and function. Yet when we read the Gospels with the idea of anger in our minds, we can easily see that justice is done to it both as a virtue and a vice. There is a certain arbitrariness in trying to systematize the teaching of Jesus on this or on any other subject, but most of the matter can be introduced if we examine (1) the occasions on which Jesus Himself is represented as being angry; (2) those in which He expresses His judgment on moral questions with a vehemence which is undoubtedly inspired by indignation; and (3) those in which He gives express teaching about anger.
1. Occasions on which Jesus Himself is represented as being angry.—(a) The most explicit is Mark 3:5 ‘He looked round on them with anger (μετʼ ὀργῆς), being grieved (συνλυπούμενος) over the hardening of their heart.’ The objects of Christ’s anger here are the people in the synagogue, who maintained an obstinate and prejudiced silence when He asked them, ‘Is it lawful on the Sabbath day to do good or to do evil, to save life or to kill?’ What roused His anger was partly their inhumanity, which eared nothing for the disablement of the man with the withered hand, but even more, perhaps, the misrepresentation of God of which they were guilty, when in His honour (as they would have it) they justified inhumanity on the Sabbath day. To be inhuman themselves was bad enough, but to impute the same inhumanity to the Heavenly Father was far worse, and the indignation of Jesus was visible as He looked round on them. He passionately resented their temper, and repelled it from Him with vehemence, as injurious at once to God and to man. Yet His indignation was expressed in one indignant glance (περιβλεψάμενος, aorist), while it was accompanied by a deep pain, which did not pass away (συνλυπούμενος, present), over the hardening of their heart. This combination, in which resentment of wrong is accompanied with a grief which makes the offender’s case one’s own, and seeks to win him by reaching the inner witness to God in his soul before insensibility has gone too far, is characteristic of Jesus, and is the test whether anger is Christian.
(b) The next occasion on which we see our Lord display an emotion akin to anger is found in Mark 10:13 ff. He was ‘moved with indignation’ ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ἠγανάκτησεν) when the disciples forbade the children to be brought to Him. The other instances in which the same word is used (Mark 10:41; Mark 14:4, Matthew 21:15, Luke 13:14) show that a natural feeling of being hurt or annoyed is what the word specifically means. The disciples should have known Him better than to do what they did: they wronged Him in forbidding the approach of the children. Hence doctrines and practices which refuse to children, and to the intellectually and morally immature in general, their place and interest in the kingdom of God, are proper subjects of resentment. In one aspect of it, the kingdom of God is a protest against nature, and to enter into it we must be born again; but in another, there is a real analogy between them; the order of nature is constituted with a view to the order of grace; man is made in God’s image and for God, and it is his true nature to welcome God; if the children are ‘suffered,’ and not forbidden, they will go to Jesus. They wrong God who deny this, and therefore the denial is to be resented.
(c) There is a striking passage in Luke (Luke 14:25 ff.), where, although anger is not mentioned, it is impossible not to feel that Jesus is speaking with a profound and even passionate resentment. ‘Great multitudes followed with him, and he turned, and said to them, If any man cometh to me, and hateth not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brothers, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple.’ Jesus was on His way to die; and it moved Him as an indignity, which He was entitled to resent, that on the very path to the cross He should be attended by a shallow throng who did not have it in them to do the slightest violence to themselves for the sake of the kingdom of God. The whole passage, in which the moral demands of discipleship are set at the highest, vibrates with indignation. To follow Christ is a great enterprise, like building a tower, or going to war; it requires the painful sacrifice of the tenderest natural affections, the renunciation of the most valued possessions; and when it is affected by people who have no moral salt in them—who could not win it from themselves to give up anything for God and His cause—the resentment of Jesus rises into scorn (Luke 14:34 f.). With all His love for men, there was a kind of man whom He did not shrink from describing as ‘good for nothing.’
(d) The last passage is that in which Jesus cleanses the Temple: Mark 11:15 and parallels. What stirred His indignation here was in part the profanity to which sacred places and their proper associations had lost all sacredness; in part, the covetousness which on the pretext of accommodating the pilgrims had turned the house of prayer into a den of thieves; in part, again, the inhumanity which, by instituting a market so noisy in the Court of the Gentiles, must have made worship for these less privileged seekers after God difficult, if not impossible. The text quoted in John 2:17 (Psalms 69:9), as remembered by the disciples in connexion with this event—‘the zeal of thy house shall eat me up’—sums up as well as anything could do the one characteristic which is never wanting in the anger of Jesus, and which alone renders anger just. It is jealousy for God—the identification of oneself with His cause and interest on earth, especially as it is represented in human beings, and resentment of everything which does it wrong.* [1]
2. The occasions on which Jesus expresses His judgment on moral questions with a vehemence which is undoubtedly inspired by indignation.—Every moral judgment, of course, contains feeling it is not merely the expression of assent or dissent but of consent or resentment. We are all within the moral world, not outside of it; we cannot be spectators merely, but in every thought we are actors as well; to deny this is to deny that then is a moral world at all. Hence all dissent is condemnation, and all condemnation, if real, is resentment; but there are circumstances in which tin condemnation is so emphatic that the resentment becomes vivid and contagions, and it is illustrations of this that we wish to find in the life of Jesus.
(a) The most conspicuous is perhaps that which we find in the passage on σκάνδαλα (Matthew 18:6 f.). Jesus has taken a little child to rebuke the ambitious strife of the Twelve; but ‘these little ones who believe in me’ are not children, but the disciples generally (cf. Matthew 10:42). ‘To make one of them stumble’ (σκανδαλίζειν) is to perplex him, to put him out about Christ, to create misunderstanding and estrangement, such as we hear of for a time in the case of the Baptist (Matthew 11:2 ff.) and the Nazarenes (Matthew 13:57), and so to make his discipleship void. In a more general sense it means to mislead, or to be the cause that another falls into sin which his better conscience condemns. If we are to judge from His language, nothing ever moved Jesus to such passionate indignation as this. The sin of sins was that of leading others into sin, especially ‘the little ones’—the weak, the untaught, the easily perplexed and easily misled—whose hearts were otherwise naturally right with Him. Every word in Jesus’ sentence is laden with indignation: ‘Better for him that a great millstone were hanged about his neck, and that he were drowned in the depth of the sea.’ This anger of Jesus is exactly what is meant in the OT by ‘the jealousy of God,’ i.e. His love pledged to His own, and resenting with all the intensity of the Divine nature any wrong inflicted on them (cf. Zechariah 8:2 f.). Though anger is often sinful, the absence of anger may be due to the absence of love: and the man who can see the ‘little ones’ being made to stumble and who takes it quite coolly is very far from the kingdom of God.
(b) It is possibly an instance of this same indignation that we find in Matthew 16:23. Peter tempts Jesus to decline the cross—in other words, tries to make Him stumble at the will of the Father; and the indignant vehemence with which he is repelled—‘Get thee behind me, Satan’—shows how real the temptation was, and how a prompt and decisive resentment is the natural security in such trials. We have a right and a duty to be angry with the tempter.
(c) In the answer of Jesus to the Sadducees in Matthew 5:21-27 ff. we have another light on what moved Him to indignation. In the scornful πολὺ πλανᾶσθε with which the discussion closes, resuming the πλανᾶσθε of Mark 12:24, Jesus’ resentment shines out. The question at issue, that of man’s immortality was a great and solemn question. It involved the whole character of God—what He was, and what in His power, His goodness, and His faithfulness He could and would do for the souls He had made in His own image. The Sadducees had tried to degrade it and make it ridiculous, and the indignation of Jesus is unmistakable. It is an example which justifies indignation with those who by unworthy controversial methods profane or render ridiculous subjects in which the dearest concernments of humanity are involved.
(d) To these passages may be added Jesus’ denunciation of the Pharisees in Matthew 23:13 ff. The long series of woes is not merely a revelation of things which in the mind of Jesus are illegitimate, it is a revelation of the passionate resentment which these things evoke in Him. They are the things with which God is angry every day, and it is a sin in men if they can look at them without indignation. To keep people ignorant of religious truth, neither living by it ourselves, nor letting them do so (Matthew 23:13); to make piety or the pretence of it a cloak for avarice (Matthew 23:14, only introduced here from || Mark); to raise recruits for our own faction on the pretext of enlisting men for the kingdom of God (Matthew 23:15); to debauch the simple conscience by casuistical sophistries (Matthew 23:16-22); to destroy the sense of proportion in morals by making morality a matter of law in which all things stand on the same level (Matthew 23:23 f.); to put appearance above reality, and reduce life to a play, at once tragedy and farce (Matthew 23:25-28); to revive the spirit and renew the sins of the past, while we affect a pious horror of them, crucifying the living prophets while we build monuments to the martyred (Matthew 23:29 ff.): these are the things which made a storm of anger sweep over the soul of Jesus, and burst in this tremendous denunciation of His enemies. Yet it is entirely in keeping with the combination of ideas in Mark 3:5 (μετʼ ὀργῆς … συνλυπούμενος) when the Evangelist attaches to this our Lord’s lament over Jerusalem (Matthew 23:37 ff., cf. Luke 13:34 f.). His anger does not extinguish His compassion, and if the city could be moved to repentance He would still gather her children together as a hen gathers her chickens under her wings.
Putting the whole of the passages together, and generalizing from them, we may infer that the two things in human conduct which moved Jesus most quickly and deeply to anger, were (1) inhumanity, wrong done to the needs or rights of men; and (2) misrepresentation of God by professedly religious people, and especially by religious teachers. He stood in the world for the rights and interests, or, we may say, for the truth of God and of human nature; and His whole being reacted immediately and vehemently against all that did wrong to either.
3. Something may further be learned from the passages in which Jesus gives express teaching about anger.—(a) The chief of these is Mark 12:24. Here our Lord interprets the sixth commandment for the citizens of the kingdom of God. It is not only the act of murder which is condemned, but the first movement of the passions which leads in that direction. ‘He who murders shall be liable to the judgment? I tell you, every one who is angry with his brother shall be liable to the judgment.’ The reading εἰκῆ (‘without cause,’ temere) is no doubt erroneous here; but the introduction of it is rather a rhetorical than an exegetical blunder. As Tholuck observed, to bring in the idea that there is such a thing as lawful anger would only weaken the condemnation passed here upon such anger as men are familiar with in themselves and others; but after what has been said under (1) and (2), it does not need to be proved that there is a place for anger in the Christian in the world in which we live. What Jesus condemns here is not any kind of anger, but anger with a brother, which forgets that he is a brother, and that we have a brother’s duty to him; the anger which leads straight to contemptuous and insulting words (the ῥακά and μωρέ of Matthew 5:22), and ends in irreconcilable bitterness (Matthew 5:25 f.). Anger like this on the part of one Christian toward another is sin, and sin so deadly that no words could exaggerate the urgency of escape from it. No religions duty, not even the most sacred, can take precedence of the duty of reconciliation. If a man should be offering his gift at the altar—if he should actually be seated at the communion table with the communion cup in his hand, let him put it down, and go first, and get out of these angry relations with his brother, and then come and have fellowship with God (Matthew 5:23 f.). How can an angry man, with the temper of a quarrel in him, have communion with the God of peace? It is possible to raise casuistical questions in all such situations as are here supposed, but as these questions present themselves only to the spectators, not to the responsible actors, it is not worth while to raise them. The one duty insisted on here, as in the partly parallel passage in Matthew 18:15-18, is the duty of placability. The person who has suffered the wrong—that is, who is in the right, who is entitled to be angry—is for that very reason to take the initiative in reconciliation, and to bear the expense of it. That is how God deals with us, who have offended Him, and that is how we are to deal with those who offend us. There is to be no anger in the sense of a selfish resentment into which the bad passions of unregenerate human nature can pour themselves; and the lawful anger of the soul, whose wrong is a wrong done to the kingdom of God, will pass away at once when he who has done the wrong is brought to repentance. The penitence and the resentment are the guilty and the innocent index of the reality of the wrong; and each is as inevitable as the other if the Christian life is to be morally sincere.
(b) It is natural to take account here of the passage on retaliation and non-resistance in Matthew 5:38 ff. Anger seems to be unconditionally precluded by such a saying as, ‘Whosoever smiteth thee on the right cheek, turn to him the other also.’ It is difficult to believe that any one was ever struck on the face unjustly (as is assumed in the connexion) without resenting it, and just as difficult to believe that it would be for the good of humanity or of the kingdom of God that it should he so. But Jesus, who came to abolish one literalism, did not come to institute another. His words are never to be read as statutes, but as appeals to conscience. What He teaches in this place is that there is no limit to be laid down beforehand beyond which love is no longer to regulate the conduct of His disciples. No provocation can be so insulting, no demand can be so unjust, so irrational, so exasperating, as that His disciples shall be entitled to cast love overboard, and meet the world with weapons like its own. Love must to all extremities be the supreme and determining principle in their conduct, the same love, with the same interests in view, as that of their Father in heaven (Matthew 5:45); but no more in them than in Him does it exclude all manifestation of anger. What it does exclude is the selfish anger which is an alternative to love, not the Divine resentment which is a mode of love, and expresses its sense of the reality of wrong. If this died out of the world, society would swiftly rot to extinction; but the gospel, in the sense of the words, the example, and the spirit of Jesus, is so far from proscribing this that it is the greatest of all powers for keeping it alive. For those who have learned that where the spirit of the Lord is there is liberty, the literal interpretation of words like Matthew 5:39-42 is a combination of pedantry and fanaticism which no genius will ever make anything else than absurd.
Echoes of the teaching of Jesus on anger are probably to be traced at various points in the teaching of the Apostles. e.g. in Romans 12, a chapter which often recalls the Sermon on the Mount, Romans 12:18-21 are entirely in the key of Matthew 5:38 ff. ‘The wrath’ of Romans 12:19, to which Christians are to leave room, is the wrath of God which will be revealed at the last day. God has reserved for Himself (ἐμοὶ ἐκδίκησις, ἐγὼ ἀνταποδώσω) the vindication of the wronged, and they are not to forestall Him or take His work out of His hands; in the day of wrath, when His righteous judgment is revealed, all wrongs will be rectified; meanwhile, as Christ teaches, love is to rule all our conduct, and we must overcome evil with good. It is perhaps with a vague recollection of Matthew 5:23 f. that men are directed in 1 Timothy 2:8 to pray χωρἰς ὀργῆς: an angry man cannot pray. Accordingly a bishop must not be ὀργίλος, given to anger, or of an uncontrollable temper (Titus 1:7). Exhortations like those in Ephesians 4:31, Colossians 3:8, James 1:19, show that anger was known to the Church mainly in forms which the Christian conscience condemned. James 1:19 is particularly interesting, because it reminds us of the danger (in anger) of enlisting self in the service of God, calling on the old man to do what can be done only by the new: ‘The wrath of man worketh not the righteousness of God.’ But though it is difficult, it need not be impossible that the wrath which a man feels, and under the impulse of which he expresses himself, should be, not ‘the wrath of man,’ but a Divine resentment of evil. The words of Matthew 18:6 or Matthew 23:13 ff. fell from human lips, but they are the expression and the instrument of the jealousy of God. To be angry without sin is difficult for men, but it is a difficult duty (Ephesians 4:26).
Apart from anything yet alluded to is the use of the verb ἐμβριμᾶσθαι to describe some kind of emotion in Jesus (Mark 1:43, Matthew 9:30, John 11:33; John 11:38). Ordinarily the word conveys the idea of indignation which cannot be repressed; but this, though found elsewhere in the Gospels (e.g. Mark 14:5), is not obviously appropriate in the passages quoted. In the first two it may be due to our Lord’s consciousness of the fact that the persons on whom He had conferred a great blessing were immediately going to disregard His command to keep silent about it; the sense of this put something severe and peremptory into His tones. In the last two it has been explained as expressing Jesus’ sense of the indignity of death; He resented, as something not properly belonging to the Divine idea of the world, such experiences as He was confronted with on the way to the grave of Lazarus. But this is precarious, and on the whole there is little stress to be laid on any inference we can draw from the use of ἐμβριμᾶσθαι in the Gospels.
Literature.—Butler, Sermons, viii., ix.; Law, Serious Call, ch. xxi.; Seeley, Ecce Homo, chs. xxi.–xxiii.; Dale, Atonement7 [2] , p. 338 ff.; Expos. Times, iv. [3], pp. 256 ff., 492 ff.; Expositor, 1st ser. i. [4], 133 ff.
James Denney.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Anger
a resentful emotion of the mind, arising upon the receipt, or supposed receipt, of an affront or injury; and also simple feeling of strong displacency at that which is in itself evil, or base, or injurious to others. In the latter sense it is not only innocent but commendable. Strong displeasure against evil doers, provided it be free from hatred and malice, and interferes not with a just placableness, is also blameless, Ephesians 4:26 . When it is vindictive against the person of our neighbour, or against the innocent creatures of God, it is wicked, Matthew 5:22 . When anger, hatred, wrath, and fury, are ascribed to God, they denote no tumultuous passion, but merely his holy and just displeasure with sin and sinners and the evidence of it in his terrible threatenings, or righteous judgments, Psalms 6:1 ; Psalms 7:11 . We must, however, take care that we refine not too much. These are Scriptural terms, and are often used of God; and though they express not a tumultuous, much less an unjust, passion, there is something in God which answers to them. In him they are principles arising out of his holy and just nature; and for this reason they are more steady and uniform, and more terrible, than if they were emotions, or as we say, passions. Nor can we rightly regard the seventy of the judgments which God has so often executed upon sin without standing in awe of him, "as a consuming fire" to the ungodly.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Anger, Angry
A — 1: ὀργή (Strong's #3709 — Noun Feminine — orge — or-gay' ) originally any "natural impulse, or desire, or disposition," came to signify "anger," as the strongest of all passions. It is used of the wrath of man, Ephesians 4:31 ; Colossians 3:8 ; 1 Timothy 2:8 ; James 1:19,20 ; the displeasure of human governments, Romans 13:4,5 ; the sufferings of the Jews at the hands of the Gentiles, Luke 21:23 ; the terrors of the Law, Romans 4:15 ; "the anger" of the Lord Jesus, Mark 3:5 ; God's "anger" with Israel in the wilderness, in a quotation from the OT, Hebrews 3:11 ; 4:3 ; God's present "anger" with the Jews nationally, Romans 9:22 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:16 ; His present "anger" with those who disobey the Lord Jesus in His Gospel, John 3:36 ; God's purposes in judgment, Matthew 3:7 ; Luke 3:7 ; Romans 1:18 ; 2:5,8 ; 3:5 ; 5:9 ; 12:19 ; Ephesians 2:3 ; 5:6 ; Colossians 3:6 ; 1 Thessalonians 1:10 ; 5:9 . See INDIGNATION , VENGEANCE , WRATH.
Notes: (1) Thumos, "wrath" (not translated "anger"), is to be distinguished from orge, in this respect, that thumos indicates a more agitated condition of the feelings, an outburst of wrath from inward indignation, while orge suggests a more settled or abiding condition of mind, frequently with a view to taking revenge. Orge is less sudden in its rise than thumos, but more lasting in its nature. Thumos expresses more the inward feeling, orge the more active emotion. Thumos may issue in revenge, though it does not necessarily include it. It is characteristic that it quickly blazes up and quickly subsides, though that is not necessarily implied in each case.
(2) Parorgismos, a strengthened form of orge, and used in Ephesians 4:26 , RV margin, "provocation," points especially to that which provokes the wrath, and suggests a less continued state than No. (1). "The first keenness of the sense of provocation must not be cherished, though righteous resentment may remain" (Westcott). The preceding verb, orgizo, in this verse implies a just occasion for the feeling. This is confirmed by the fact that it is a quotation from Psalm 4:4 (Sept.), where the Hebrew word signifies to quiver with strong emotion.
Thumos is found eighteen times in the NT, ten of which are in the Apocalypse, in seven of which the reference is to the wrath of God; so in Romans 2:8 , RV, "wrath (thumos) and indignation" (orge); the order in the AV is inaccurate. Everywhere else the word thumos is used in a bad sense. In Galatians 5:20 , it follows the word "jealousies," which when smoldering in the heart break out in wrath. Thumos and orge are coupled in two places in the Apocalypse, Revelation 16:19 , "the fierceness (thumos) of His wrath" (orge); and Revelation 19:15 , "the fierceness of the wrath of Almighty God." See WROTH (be).
(3) Aganaktesis originally signified "physical pain or irritation" (probably from agan, "very much," and achomai, "to grieve"), hence. "annoyance, vexation," and is used in 2 Corinthians 7:11 , "indignation."
B — 1: ὀργίζω (Strong's #3710 — Verb — orgizo — or-gid'-zo ) "to provoke, to arouse to anger," is used in the Middle Voice in the eight places where it is found, and signifies "to be angry, wroth." It is said of individuals, in Matthew 5:22 ; 18:34 ; 22:7 ; Luke 14:21 ; 15:28 , and Ephesians 4:26 (where a possible meaning is "be ye angry with yourselves"); of nations, Revelation 11:18 ; of Satan as the Dragon, Revelation 12:17 . See WRATH.
B — 2: παροργίζω (Strong's #3949 — Verb — parorgizo — par-org-id'-zo ) is "to arouse to wrath, provoke" (para, used intensively, and No. 1); Romans 10:19 , "will I anger;" Ephesians 6:4 , "provoke to wrath." See PROVOKE.
B — 3: χολάω (Strong's #5520 — Verb — cholao — khol-ah'-o ) connected with chole, "gall, bile," which became used metaphorically to signify bitter anger, means "to be enraged," John 7:23 , "wroth," RV, in the Lord's remonstrance with the Jews on account of their indignation at His having made a man whole on the Sabbath Day.
Notes: (1) Thumomacheo (from thumos, "wrath," machomai, "to fight") originally denoted to fight with great animosity, and hence came to mean "to be very angry, to be exasperated," Acts 12:20 , of the anger of Herod, "was highly displeased."
(2) Thumoo, the corresponding verb, signifies "to provoke to anger," but in the Passive Voice "to be wroth," as in Matthew 2:16 , of the wrath of Herod, "was exceeding wroth."
(3) Aganakteo, see A, Note (3), is rendered in various ways in the seven places where it is used; "moved with indignation," Matthew 20:24 ; 21:15 , RV (AV, "sore displeased"); "had indignation," Matthew 26:8 ; Mark 14:4 . In Mark 10:14 the RV has "was moved with indignation" (AV, "was much displeased"), said of the Lord Jesus. The same renderings are given in Mark 10:41 . In Luke 13:14 (AV, "with indignation"), the RV rightly puts "being moved with indignation." These words more particularly point to the cause of the vexation. See DISPLEASE, INDIGNATION.
(4) In Colossians 3:21 , erethizo signifies "to provoke." The RV correctly omits "to anger."
C — 1: ὀργίλος (Strong's #3711 — Adjective — orgilos — org-ee'-los ) "angry, prone to anger, irascible" (see B, Nos. 1,2), is rendered "soon angry" in Titus 1:7 .
Webster's Dictionary - Anger
(1):
(v. t.) To make painful; to cause to smart; to inflame.
(2):
(n.) Trouble; vexation; also, physical pain or smart of a sore, etc.
(3):
(n.) A strong passion or emotion of displeasure or antagonism, excited by a real or supposed injury or insult to one's self or others, or by the intent to do such injury.
(4):
(v. t.) To excite to anger; to enrage; to provoke.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Anger
Sudden outbursts of temper are one fruit of sinful human nature. The Bible therefore repeatedly pictures the evils of such behaviour and warns God’s people to avoid it (Genesis 49:6-7; Matthew 18:32-34; Galatians 5:19-20; Ephesians 4:31-32; Colossians 3:8). Uncontrolled anger can have far-reaching consequences, producing violence and even murder (Matthew 5:21-22; Luke 4:28-29; Acts 7:54; Acts 7:57-58; Acts 21:27-36). It is important that a person in a position of responsibility in the church not be quick tempered (Titus 1:7).
Yet there may be cases where it is right to be angry. Those who are faithful to God should be angry at all forms of sin, whether that sin be rebellion against God or wrongdoing against other people (Exodus 16:20; Exodus 32:19; 2 Samuel 12:5; Nehemiah 5:6-7; Psalms 37:8). But because human nature is affected by sin, people find it difficult to be angry and at the same time not go beyond the limits that God allows (Psalms 4:4; Psalms 106:32-33; Ephesians 4:26).
Certainly it is wrong for people to be so angry that they try to take personal revenge. God’s people must be forgiving, and leave God to deal with those who do them wrong (Leviticus 19:18; Romans 12:19-21; see HATRED; REVENGE). If, in resisting wrongdoing, they are guilty of bad temper, they should not try to excuse their behaviour by claiming they are carrying out God’s righteous purposes (James 1:19-20). God’s anger is always pure, always just, always righteous (Exodus 34:6-7; Romans 2:4-6; see WRATH).

Sentence search

Angry - ) Showing Anger; proceeding from Anger; acting as if moved by Anger; wearing the marks of Anger; as, angry words or tones; an angry sky; angry waves. ) Touched with Anger; under the emotion of Anger; feeling resentment; enraged; - followed generally by with before a person, and at before a thing
Choleric - ) Angry; indicating Anger; excited by Anger. ) Easily irritated; irascible; inclined to Anger
Wrath - ) Violent Anger; vehement exasperation; indignation; rage; fury; ire. ) The effects of Anger or indignation; the just punishment of an offense or a crime. ) To Anger; to enrage; - also used impersonally
Emboil - ) To boil with Anger; to effervesce. ) To cause to boil with Anger; to irritate; to chafe
Angry - See Anger. Showing Anger wearing the marks of Anger caused by Anger as, an angry countenance angry words
Choler - By the superabundance of this fluid, Anger was formerly supposed to be produced or perhaps the opinion was that the bile caused the inflamed appearance of the face in Anger. Anger wrath irritation of the passions
Anger - Anger . In OT ‘anger’ represents about a dozen Heb. (once ‘angered’ is used transitively, Psalms 106:32 ), and adjs. noun aph , which is used of the Anger both of men ( Genesis 27:45 ; Genesis 30:2 , Exodus 11:8 ; Exodus 32:19 ; etc. In NT ‘anger’ is of much less frequent occurrence, and represents only 2 roots: (1) the noun orgç (wh. parorgizô ( Romans 10:19 , the only case of a trans, use of ‘anger’ in NT); (2) the vb. cholç , ‘bile’), used only in John 7:23 to express the bitter Anger of ‘the Jews’ against Jesus. ]'>[1] ‘anger,’ and when the two words occur together, thumos in each case is ‘wrath’ ( Romans 2:8 , Ephesians 4:31 , Colossians 3:8 ) and orgç ‘anger’ ( Ephesians 4:31 , Colossians 3:8 ) or ‘indignation’ ( Romans 2:8 ). Thumos is the more violent word, denoting Anger as a strong passion or emotion, while orgç points rather to a settled moral indignation. Thus orgç is used of the sorrowful Anger of Jesus ( Mark 3:5 ); thumos of the rage of His enemies ( Luke 4:28 ; cf
Cheran - Anger
Wrath - See Anger
Hirah - Liberty; Anger
Revenge - By some it is considered as a perversion of Anger. Anger, it is said, is a passion given to man for wise and proper purposes, but revenge is the corruption of Anger; is unnatural, and therefore ought to be suppressed. It is observable that the proper object of Anger is vice; but the object in general of revenge is man. ...
See Anger
Tahrea - Anger; wicked contention
Horonites - Men of Anger
Harhas - Anger; heat of confidence
Hamath - Anger; heat; a wall
Heber - One that passes; Anger
Naharai - My nostrils; hot; Anger
Eber - One that passes; Anger
Angered - ) of Anger...
Indignation - —See Anger, and Fierceness
Woodness - ) Anger; madness; insanity; rage
Wrawness - ) Peevishness; ill temper; Anger
Wrath - See Anger, p
Angering - ) of Anger...
Wrathless - ) Free from Anger or wrath
Groaning (2) - —See Sighing; and Anger, p
Incensed - Inflamed to violent Anger exasperated
Disgruntle - ) To dissatisfy; to disaffect; to Anger
Anger - There are many words for Anger in Hebrew; in Greek orge [1] and thumos [2] are used more or less interchangeably. ...
The Anger of God Unlike pagan gods, whose tirades reflect the fickleness of their human creators, Yahweh "expresses his wrath every day" because he is a righteous judge ( Psalm 7:11 ). At the same time, God is merciful and not easily provoked to Anger (Exodus 34:6 ; Psalm 103:8-9 ). But God in his mercy sent Jesus to turn away his Anger by a sacrifice of propitiation (Romans 3:25 ; 5:9 ; 1 John 2:2 ; 4:10 ). ...
Some have doubted whether a God of love can experience Anger toward his creatures. ...
Human Anger The Bible usually portrays human Anger as sinful. ...
"Refrain from Anger and turn from wrath"—so warns Psalm 37:8 . In contrast with our modern emphasis on the constructive uses of Anger, Proverbs urges us to think carefully before expressing Anger (12:16; 14:29; 19:11), to be patient (16:32), and to show restraint (29:11). On the other hand, Job and many psalmists display Anger and frustration with their situationand at times even with God himself. 35-36), but the psalmists' prayers are acceptable apparently because they are viewing the world from God's perspective; since God knows the heart, it is better for them to voice their Anger than it is to deny it. According to Ephesians 4:25-27 , people should speak truthfully, but their Anger should be restrained, short-lived, and used for righteous ends. Provoking another person to Anger without reason is in itself a sin (Ephesians 6:4 ). Anger can divide a church (2 Corinthians 12:20 ) and frustrate prayer (1 Timothy 2:8 ); an elder must not be "quick-tempered" (Titus 1:7 ). But Jesus the God-Man gives us the best example of how to express righteous Anger (Matthew 23:1-36 ; Mark 3:5 ; 11:15-17 ; John 2:13-17 ). ...
At the same time, people may believe that their Anger is warranted when it is not; such Anger is usually rooted in a desire to justify oneself. Simeon and Levi's slaughter of the Shechemites goes well beyond righteous Anger (Genesis 34:1-31 ; 49:5-7 )
Resentful - ) Inclined to resent; easily provoked to Anger; irritable
Angrily - ) In an angry manner; under the influence of Anger
Exasperater - ) One who exasperates or inflames Anger, enmity, or violence
Tift - ) A fit of pettishness, or slight Anger; a tiff
Rame - ) Anger; wrath; scorn
Anger, Burning - In the basic stem, the word refers to the “burning of Anger” as in Jonah 4:1. ...
Chârôn (חָרֹן, Strong's #2740), “burning Anger. This word refers exclusively to divine Anger as that which is “burning
Angriness - ) The quality of being angry, or of being inclined to Anger
Passionless - ) Void of passion; without Anger or emotion; not easily excited; calm
Wrath - Violent Anger vehement exasperation indignation as the wrath of Achilles. The effects of Anger
Altercate - ) To contend in words; to dispute with zeal, heat, or Anger; to wrangle
Capital Sins - In Catholicism, the seven causes of all sin: pride, covetousness, lust, Anger, gluttony, envy, sloth...
Zounds - ) An exclamation formerly used as an oath, and an expression of Anger or wonder
Altercation - ) Warm contention in words; dispute carried on with heat or Anger; controversy; wrangle; wordy contest
Excandescence - ) Violent Anger; a growing angry
Indignation - See Anger , A, Note (3). ...
Notes: (1) Orge, "wrath," is translated "indignation" in Revelation 14:10 , AV; RV, "anger. " See Anger , A, No. (2) For thumos, see Anger , A, Notes (1) and (2). " See Anger , B, Note (3)
Provocation - ) The act of provoking, or causing vexation or, Anger. ) That which provokes, or excites Anger; the cause of resentment; as, to give provocation
Flare-up - ) A sudden burst of Anger or passion; an angry dispute
Choler - ) Irritation of the passions; Anger; wrath
Provokement - ) The act that which, provokes; one who excites Anger or other passion, or incites to action; as, a provoker of sedition
Anger - Even when just, our Anger should be mitigated by a due consideration of the circumstances of the offence and the state of mind of the offender; of the folly and ill-results of this passion; of the claims of the gospel, and of our own need of forgiveness from others, but especially from God, Matthew 6:15 . Anger is in Scripture frequently attributed to God, Matthew 7:11 28:20 ; not that he is liable to those violent emotions which this passion produces, but figuratively speaking, that is, after the manner of men; and because he punishes the wicked with severity of a superior provoked to Anger
Rage - ) Especially, Anger accompanied with raving; overmastering wrath; violent Anger; fury. ) To be furious with Anger; to be exasperated to fury; to be violently agitated with passion
Exasperation - ) The act of exasperating or the state of being exasperated; irritation; keen or bitter Anger
Hammuel - (ham' myoo ehl) Personal name meaning, “El is my father-in-law” or “God is hot with Anger
Anger - Anger is also excited by an injury offered to a relation, friend or party to which one is attached and some degrees of it may be excited by cruelty, injustice or oppression offered to those with whom one has no immediate connection, or even to the community of which one is a member. Anger may be inflamed till it rises to rage and a temporary delirium. To excite Anger to provoke to rouse resentment. To make painful to cause to smart to inflame as, to Anger an ulcer
Pathetic - ) Expressing or showing Anger; passionate
Odfend - ) To cause dislike, Anger, or vexation; to displease
Anger - Anger is not purely painful as it includes the agreeable consciousness of energetic reaction against evil, and is not of itself morally evil, but may be at times a high moral force in the form of virtuous indignation, called "just" Anger
Chide - To scold at to reprove to utter words in Anger, or by way of disapprobation to rebuke as, to chide one for his faults. To scold to clamor to find fault to contend in words of Anger sometimes followed by with
Anger, Angry - A — 1: ὀργή (Strong's #3709 — Noun Feminine — orge — or-gay' ) originally any "natural impulse, or desire, or disposition," came to signify "anger," as the strongest of all passions. It is used of the wrath of man, Ephesians 4:31 ; Colossians 3:8 ; 1 Timothy 2:8 ; James 1:19,20 ; the displeasure of human governments, Romans 13:4,5 ; the sufferings of the Jews at the hands of the Gentiles, Luke 21:23 ; the terrors of the Law, Romans 4:15 ; "the Anger" of the Lord Jesus, Mark 3:5 ; God's "anger" with Israel in the wilderness, in a quotation from the OT, Hebrews 3:11 ; 4:3 ; God's present "anger" with the Jews nationally, Romans 9:22 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:16 ; His present "anger" with those who disobey the Lord Jesus in His Gospel, John 3:36 ; God's purposes in judgment, Matthew 3:7 ; Luke 3:7 ; Romans 1:18 ; 2:5,8 ; 3:5 ; 5:9 ; 12:19 ; Ephesians 2:3 ; 5:6 ; Colossians 3:6 ; 1 Thessalonians 1:10 ; 5:9 . ...
Notes: (1) Thumos, "wrath" (not translated "anger"), is to be distinguished from orge, in this respect, that thumos indicates a more agitated condition of the feelings, an outburst of wrath from inward indignation, while orge suggests a more settled or abiding condition of mind, frequently with a view to taking revenge. " ...
B — 1: ὀργίζω (Strong's #3710 — Verb — orgizo — or-gid'-zo ) "to provoke, to arouse to Anger," is used in the Middle Voice in the eight places where it is found, and signifies "to be angry, wroth. 1); Romans 10:19 , "will I Anger;" Ephesians 6:4 , "provoke to wrath. ...
B — 3: χολάω (Strong's #5520 — Verb — cholao — khol-ah'-o ) connected with chole, "gall, bile," which became used metaphorically to signify bitter Anger, means "to be enraged," John 7:23 , "wroth," RV, in the Lord's remonstrance with the Jews on account of their indignation at His having made a man whole on the Sabbath Day. ...
Notes: (1) Thumomacheo (from thumos, "wrath," machomai, "to fight") originally denoted to fight with great animosity, and hence came to mean "to be very angry, to be exasperated," Acts 12:20 , of the Anger of Herod, "was highly displeased. " ...
(2) Thumoo, the corresponding verb, signifies "to provoke to Anger," but in the Passive Voice "to be wroth," as in Matthew 2:16 , of the wrath of Herod, "was exceeding wroth. " The RV correctly omits "to Anger. " ...
C — 1: ὀργίλος (Strong's #3711 — Adjective — orgilos — org-ee'-los ) "angry, prone to Anger, irascible" (see B, Nos
Vehemence - ) Violent ardor; great heat; animated fervor; as, the vehemence of love, Anger, or other passions
Forsake - ...
Cease from Anger, and forsake wrath. In Anger, the color forsakes the cheeks
Wroth - " See Anger , B, No. ...
2: θυμόω (Strong's #2373 — Verb — thumoo — thoo-mo'-o ) signifies "to be very angry" (from thumos, "wrath, hot Anger"), "to be stirred into passion," Matthew 2:16 , of Herod (Passive Voice)
Gnashing - Striking the teeth together, as in Anger, rage or pain
Shoot - The words come quickly in hatred and Anger, and deeply wound the person spoken against
Sirrah - ) A term of address implying inferiority and used in Anger, contempt, reproach, or disrespectful familiarity, addressed to a man or boy, but sometimes to a woman
Fierce - ) Vehement in Anger or cruelty; ready or eager to kill or injure; of a nature to inspire terror; ferocious
Massah - Trial, temptation, a name given to the place where the Israelites, by their murmuring for want of water, provoked Jehovah to Anger against them
Appease - ) To make quiet; to calm; to reduce to a state of peace; to still; to pacify; to dispel (anger or hatred); as, to appease the tumult of the ocean, or of the passions; to appease hunger or thirst
Tiff - ) A fit of Anger or peevishness; a slight altercation or contention
Provocation - In Hebrews 3:8 ,Hebrews 3:8,3:15 that which aroused God's Anger
Dudgeon - ) Resentment; ill will; Anger; displeasure
Manslaughter - ) The unlawful killing of a man, either in negligenc/ or incidentally to the commission of some unlawful act, but without specific malice, or upon a sudden excitement of Anger
Anger (Wrath) of God - Anger (WRATH) OF GOD . It might seem that the idea of the Divine Anger, manifesting itself in judgments of destruction, belongs to an early and anthropomorphic stage of religion. This disposition towards sin is the Anger or wrath of God. But the Anger of the Lord, though fierce, is also just: it is ‘provoked’ by moral causes and for moral ends, and is averted by penitence and moral acquiescence in the righteousness of His judgments ( Exodus 32:1-35 , Leviticus 10:8 , Numbers 25:11 , Deuteronomy 13:17 ). Psalmist and Prophet dwell upon the subordination of the Divine Anger to the Divine mercy. God is ‘slow to Anger’ ( Psalms 103:8 ; Psalms 145:8 , Joel 2:13 , Jonah 4:2 , Nahum 1:3 ), and His Anger passes away ( Psalms 30:6 , Isaiah 12:1 , Jeremiah 3:12 , Micah 7:18 ). In the NT, although the stress has shifted to the love of God revealed to the world in Jesus Christ, the Anger of God still holds place. ...
It is true that the NT references to God’s Anger are mainly eschatological and contain figurative elements (see esp
Capital Sins - They are: ...
pride,
avarice,
lust,
anger,
envy,
sloth,
gluttony
Capital Vices - They are: ...
pride,
avarice,
lust,
anger,
envy,
sloth,
gluttony
Perezuzzah, or Perezuzza - Place signifying 'Breach of Uzzah,' thus named by David, in his Anger, because God there smote Uzzah for putting his hand to the ark, which by the law should not have been touched except by the priests
Sins, Capital - They are: ...
pride,
avarice,
lust,
anger,
envy,
sloth,
gluttony
Sins, Seven Deadly - They are: ...
pride,
avarice,
lust,
anger,
envy,
sloth,
gluttony
Seven Deadly Sins - They are: ...
pride,
avarice,
lust,
anger,
envy,
sloth,
gluttony
Vices, Capital - They are: ...
pride,
avarice,
lust,
anger,
envy,
sloth,
gluttony
Hamstring - The hamstringing of oxen (Genesis 49:6 modern translations) is an example of rash Anger
Offence - ) The state of being offended or displeased; Anger; displeasure
Inflame - To excite or increase, as passion or appetite to enkindle into violent action as, to inflame love, lust or thirst to inflame desire or Anger. To provoke to irritate to Anger
Taberah - The name commemorates God's “burning Anger” which broke out in fire against the ever-complaining Israelites (Numbers 11:3 ; Deuteronomy 9:22 )
Despite - ) Malice; malignity; spite; malicious Anger; contemptuous hate
Gall - Anger bitterness of mind
Implacable - Not to be appeased or subdued as implacable Anger implacable enmity, malice or revenge
Rage - Violent Anger accompanied with furious words, gestures or agitation Anger excited to fury. To be furious with Anger to be exasperated to fury to be violently agitated with passion
Meekness - The virtue which moderates Anger, checking its disorderly effects
Prester - ) One of the veins of the neck when swollen with Anger or other excitement
Exasperate - ) To irritate in a high degree; to provoke; to enrage; to exscite or to inflame the Anger of; as, to exasperate a person or his feelings
Predisposition - ) The act of predisposing, or the state of being predisposed; previous inclination, tendency, or propensity; predilection; - applied to the mind; as, a predisposition to Anger
Raca - ” He placed it in the context of Anger and strongly condemned one who would use it of another person
Displeasure - Displeasure is Anger, but it may be slight Anger
Bile - ) Bitterness of feeling; choler; Anger; ill humor; as, to stir one's bile
Nettle - ...
NETTLE, To fret or sting to irritate or vex to excite sensations of displeasure or uneasiness, not amounting to wrath or violent Anger
Extravagance - ) The state of being extravagant, wild, or prodigal beyond bounds of propriety or duty; want of moderation; excess; especially, undue expenditure of money; vaid and superfluous expense; prodigality; as, extravagance of Anger, love, expression, imagination, demands
Displease - It usually expresses less than to Anger, vex, irritate, or provoke
Winepress - Revelation 19:15 (a) This is typical of the acts of the Lord JESUS CHRIST wherein He will tread down all His enemies, crush His opponents, and in His Anger would tread upon all those who live in rebellion against Him
Gnash - To strike the teeth together, as in Anger or pain as, to gnash the teeth in rage
Wrath, Wrath of God - The emotional response to perceived wrong and injustice, often translated “anger,” “indignation,” “vexation,” and “irritation. When the Israelites complained to God at Taberah, “the Anger of the Lord blazed hotly” (Numbers 11:10 RSV) Later, God reminded the people of various such experiences and warned, “Remember and do not forget how you provoked the Lord your God to wrath in the wilderness. ( Deuteronomy 1:26-46 ; Joshua 7:1 ; Psalm 2:1-6 ) Historical calamity and disaster were to be expected when God was stirred to Anger. Isaiah spoke of “the day of the Lord” as “cruel, with wrath and fierce Anger” ( Isaiah 13:9 NRSV) This day referred to the present day of judgment in history, as when the Assyrians conquered Israel; but it also calls to mind a future day of final judgment at the end time when all will be called to give account to God. We are instructed by Paul not to take revenge (Romans 12:19 ), nor to “let the sun go down on your Anger” (Ephesians 4:26 NRSV). We must rid ourselves of “all such things—anger, wrath, malice” (Colossians 3:8 NRSV). The Old Testament psalms of lament such as Psalm 53:1 ; Psalm 137:1 show how humans can freely express their Anger to God. ...
To realize this freedom from the domination of wrath, the gracious work of the Holy Spirit is needed to sanctify and cleanse the heart of the attitudes and feelings of wrath and Anger. Such a spirit is no longer a slave of Anger and wrath but is yielded “to righteousness for sanctification” ( Romans 6:19 NRSV)
Anger (2) - ANGER. —Anger is the instinctive resentment or reaction of the soul against anything which it regards as wrong or injurious. The child’s Anger with the fire which burns him is in a sense irrational; but one true meaning and purpose of Anger in the moral world is illustrated by it. ...
An instinct, however, when we come into the world of freedom and responsibility, always needs education; and the radical character of the education required by the instinct of Anger is apparent from the fact that the first thought of almost all men is that Anger is a vice. Taking human nature as it is, and looking at the actual manifestations of Anger, this is only too true. Their Anger is natural, not spiritual; selfish, not guided by consideration of principle; the indulgence of a temper, not the staking of one’s being for a cause. In the NT itself there are far more warnings against Anger than indications of its true place and function. Yet when we read the Gospels with the idea of Anger in our minds, we can easily see that justice is done to it both as a virtue and a vice. There is a certain arbitrariness in trying to systematize the teaching of Jesus on this or on any other subject, but most of the matter can be introduced if we examine (1) the occasions on which Jesus Himself is represented as being angry; (2) those in which He expresses His judgment on moral questions with a vehemence which is undoubtedly inspired by indignation; and (3) those in which He gives express teaching about Anger. —(a) The most explicit is Mark 3:5 ‘He looked round on them with Anger (μετʼ ὀργῆς), being grieved (συνλυπούμενος) over the hardening of their heart. ’ The objects of Christ’s Anger here are the people in the synagogue, who maintained an obstinate and prejudiced silence when He asked them, ‘Is it lawful on the Sabbath day to do good or to do evil, to save life or to kill?’ What roused His Anger was partly their inhumanity, which eared nothing for the disablement of the man with the withered hand, but even more, perhaps, the misrepresentation of God of which they were guilty, when in His honour (as they would have it) they justified inhumanity on the Sabbath day. This combination, in which resentment of wrong is accompanied with a grief which makes the offender’s case one’s own, and seeks to win him by reaching the inner witness to God in his soul before insensibility has gone too far, is characteristic of Jesus, and is the test whether Anger is Christian. ...
(b) The next occasion on which we see our Lord display an emotion akin to Anger is found in Mark 10:13 ff. ), where, although Anger is not mentioned, it is impossible not to feel that Jesus is speaking with a profound and even passionate resentment. The text quoted in John 2:17 (Psalms 69:9), as remembered by the disciples in connexion with this event—‘the zeal of thy house shall eat me up’—sums up as well as anything could do the one characteristic which is never wanting in the Anger of Jesus, and which alone renders Anger just. ’ This Anger of Jesus is exactly what is meant in the OT by ‘the jealousy of God,’ i. Though Anger is often sinful, the absence of Anger may be due to the absence of love: and the man who can see the ‘little ones’ being made to stumble and who takes it quite coolly is very far from the kingdom of God. ): these are the things which made a storm of Anger sweep over the soul of Jesus, and burst in this tremendous denunciation of His enemies. His Anger does not extinguish His compassion, and if the city could be moved to repentance He would still gather her children together as a hen gathers her chickens under her wings. ...
Putting the whole of the passages together, and generalizing from them, we may infer that the two things in human conduct which moved Jesus most quickly and deeply to Anger, were (1) inhumanity, wrong done to the needs or rights of men; and (2) misrepresentation of God by professedly religious people, and especially by religious teachers. Something may further be learned from the passages in which Jesus gives express teaching about Anger. As Tholuck observed, to bring in the idea that there is such a thing as lawful Anger would only weaken the condemnation passed here upon such Anger as men are familiar with in themselves and others; but after what has been said under (1) and (2), it does not need to be proved that there is a place for Anger in the Christian in the world in which we live. What Jesus condemns here is not any kind of Anger, but Anger with a brother, which forgets that he is a brother, and that we have a brother’s duty to him; the Anger which leads straight to contemptuous and insulting words (the ῥακά and μωρέ of Matthew 5:22), and ends in irreconcilable bitterness (Matthew 5:25 f. Anger like this on the part of one Christian toward another is sin, and sin so deadly that no words could exaggerate the urgency of escape from it. There is to be no Anger in the sense of a selfish resentment into which the bad passions of unregenerate human nature can pour themselves; and the lawful Anger of the soul, whose wrong is a wrong done to the kingdom of God, will pass away at once when he who has done the wrong is brought to repentance. Anger seems to be unconditionally precluded by such a saying as, ‘Whosoever smiteth thee on the right cheek, turn to him the other also. Love must to all extremities be the supreme and determining principle in their conduct, the same love, with the same interests in view, as that of their Father in heaven (Matthew 5:45); but no more in them than in Him does it exclude all manifestation of Anger. What it does exclude is the selfish Anger which is an alternative to love, not the Divine resentment which is a mode of love, and expresses its sense of the reality of wrong. ...
Echoes of the teaching of Jesus on Anger are probably to be traced at various points in the teaching of the Apostles. Accordingly a bishop must not be ὀργίλος, given to Anger, or of an uncontrollable temper (Titus 1:7). Exhortations like those in Ephesians 4:31, Colossians 3:8, James 1:19, show that Anger was known to the Church mainly in forms which the Christian conscience condemned. James 1:19 is particularly interesting, because it reminds us of the danger (in Anger) of enlisting self in the service of God, calling on the old man to do what can be done only by the new: ‘The wrath of man worketh not the righteousness of God
Choler - ]'>[1] ‘colic’); and in Daniel 8:7 ; Daniel 11:11 in the sense of bitter Anger
Recollect - ) Reflexively, to compose one's self; to recover self-command; as, to recollect one's self after a burst of Anger; - sometimes, formerly, in the perfect participle
Resentment - ) In a bad sense, strong displeasure; Anger; hostility provoked by a wrong or injury experienced
Sea of Glass - According to the interpretation of some, "this calm, glass-like sea, which is never in storm, but only interfused with flame, represents the counsels of God, those purposes of righteousness and love which are often fathomless but never obscure, always the same, though sometimes glowing with holy Anger
Pulsation - ) Any touching of another's body willfully or in Anger
Passionate - ) Capable or susceptible of passion, or of different passions; easily moved, excited or agitated; specifically, easily moved to Anger; irascible; quick-tempered; as, a passionate nature
Roaring - ) A loud, deep, prolonged sound, as of a large beast, or of a person in distress, Anger, mirth, etc
ah! - ...
2: ἔα (Strong's #1436 — Interjection — ea — eh'-ah ) an interjection of surprise, fear and Anger, was the ejaculation of the man with the spirit of an unclean demon, Luke 4:34 , RV; the AV renders it "Let us alone" (see RV , marg
Anger - ) To excite to Anger; to enrage; to provoke
Provoke - ) To cause provocation or Anger
Abana - In his Anger Naaman wanted to wash here rather than in the dirty Jordan (2 Kings 5:12 )
Anger - ) To excite to Anger; to enrage; to provoke
Perez-Uzzah - ” Site of the threshing floor of Nacon (or Chidon) west of Jerusalem on the Kiriath-jearim road where the Anger of the Lord “broke out” against Uzzah, who touched the ark to steady it (2 Samuel 6:8 ; 1 Chronicles 13:11 )
Holy Communion, Effects of - Holy Communion, partaking of the Body and Blood of Christ, unites us with Him, increases our love of Him, obtains forgiveness for venial sin, remission of punishment incurred by sin, preservation from future sin, quieting of the violent passions of Anger and lust; it acts as healing remedy of body and soul and pledges us a happy immortality
Distaste - ) Alienation of affection; displeasure; Anger
Ebullition - ) A sudden burst or violent display; an outburst; as, an ebullition of Anger or ill temper
Fury - ) Violent Anger; extreme wrath; rage; - sometimes applied to inanimate things, as the wind or storms; impetuosity; violence
Effects of Holy Communion - Holy Communion, partaking of the Body and Blood of Christ, unites us with Him, increases our love of Him, obtains forgiveness for venial sin, remission of punishment incurred by sin, preservation from future sin, quieting of the violent passions of Anger and lust; it acts as healing remedy of body and soul and pledges us a happy immortality
Admah - Jehovah, when speaking of His fierce Anger against Ephraim said, "How shall I make thee as Admah?" Hosea 11:8
Nose - ...
'Aph (אַף, Strong's #639), “nose; nostrils; face; wrath; Anger. ...
The words “length of face or nostrils” constitute an idiom meaning “longsuffering” or “slow to Anger. The contrasting idiom, meaning “quick to Anger,” might literally mean “short of face/nostrils. ...
The singular form often means “anger” or “wrath. 30:2: “And Jacob’s Anger was kindled against Rachel. Since God is infinite, eternal, and unchangeable and since Anger is an emotion representing a change in one’s reaction (cf. The Spirit of God can seize a man and move him to a holy “anger”( Cain - Cain's Anger was kindled because of the acceptance of Abel and his offering, and he slew his brother, notwithstanding that God had reasoned with him respecting his Anger
Roar - ) The cry of one in pain, distress, Anger, or the like. ) To cry loudly, as in pain, distress, or Anger
Cain - Cain's Anger was kindled because of the acceptance of Abel and his offering, and he slew his brother, notwithstanding that God had reasoned with him respecting his Anger
Anger - Human Anger. -Except by the stoical mind which finds no place for strong emotion in a moral scheme, Anger has been recognized as a quality which, under certain conditions and within certain limits, may not only be permissible but commendable. Condemnation of the abuse of Anger is not wanting in the apostolic writings. One of the marks of the greatest of Christian virtues is that it ‘does not blaze forth in passionate Anger’ (οὐ παροζύνεται [1]). In Christian circles, all bitterness and wrath and Anger must be put away (Ephesians 4:13; cf. The holy hands lifted up in prayer must be unstained with Anger and strife (1 Timothy 2:8). ‘Be not prone to Anger,’ says the Didache (iii. 2), ‘for Anger leadeth to murder: nor a zealot, nor contentious, nor quick-tempered, for murder also is the outcome of those. ’...
On the other hand, Christian morality recognizes a righteous Anger. The section of the Sermon on the Mount which teaches that whosoever is angry with his brother is in danger of the judgment (Matthew 5:21 f. The violation of the law of brotherly love, manifest in the Anger of Matthew 5:22, might, indeed, provoke a legitimate wrath, e. Anger at personal insult or persecution was discouraged. Anger provoked by personal injury may have a protective value in a lower stage of the world’s life, but the attitude of Christian ethics to this type is governed by the law of non-resistance laid down by the Sermon on the Mount. Elymas, the sorcerer, seeking to hinder a work of grace, provokes a vigorous Anger (Acts 13:10-11). In these instances, Anger seems to have been regarded as compatible with, and indeed expressive of, Christian character. The obvious danger of mistaken zeal for a cause or creed must, however, be kept in mind. ...
But even legitimate Anger may readily pass into a sin. The wrath against which the warning is given seems indicated by the following clause-‘let not the sun go down on your παροργισμός’ (‘a noun which differs from ὀργή in denoting, not the disposition of Anger, or Anger in a lasting mood, but exasperation, sudden violent Anger[2]). Divine Anger. -Most minds must have felt the objection expressed by Origen, Augustine, and the Neo-Platonist theologians generally, that we cannot treat the Supreme as a magnified man and attribute to Him such perturbation of mind as is suggested to us by the term ‘anger. ’ But we may allow-and must do so unless we are prepared to deny personality in God-that the quality, which we find expressed under human conditions as the righteous Anger of a good man, must exist in God, although in a form which we cannot adequately conceive, owing to our inability to realize absolute conditions. ...
The objection that Anger, unlike love, is unworthy of the highest moral personality (Marcion) may be met by the answer that Divine love and Anger are not two opposing principles, but expressions of the one attitude towards contrary sets of human circumstances. The Divine Anger is actually involved in the Divine love (Tertullian, Martensen, etc. ...
The idea of the ‘Divine Anger’-this attitude of Deity towards certain courses of human life-is a justifiable inference from the intuitions of conscience, but another and an unsound argument played a part in the historical formation of the doctrine. ...
Yet even in early times the idea of the Divine Anger did not rest wholly on the facts of human suffering. ...
The turning away of the Divine Anger. If we must judge the Anger of God from the righteous indignation of a good man, we cannot think of His cherishing any vindictiveness, or needing any propitiation to induce Him to forgive, when the sinner seeks His face. It would be a time when human wrongdoing, much of which was apparently overlooked in this age, would receive its sure reward, although genuine repentance would apparently avert the coming Anger (Joel 2, Amos 5:4 ff. Revelation 11:18; Revelation 6:16-17, where the Divine Anger is spoken of as ‘the wrath of the Lamb’). ’ Even where the Divine Anger is described as having already had its manifestation, the reference may really be eschatological (Ritschl). Paul may regard such an indication of the Divine Anger as the preliminary movements of the Day of Wrath. For human Anger: J
Fierceness - Quickness to attack keenness in Anger and resentment
Exclamation - ) A loud calling or crying out; outcry; loud or emphatic utterance; vehement vociferation; clamor; that which is cried out, as an expression of feeling; sudden expression of sound or words indicative of emotion, as in surprise, pain, grief, joy, Anger, etc
Flames - ...
Isaiah 66:15 (a) By this we are told that GOD's burning Anger will be poured out upon all the enemies of His people
Bright - ...
Revelation 9:17 (b) Here is a picture of the fierce Anger and destructive power of GOD's army as they attack their fellowmen who are enemies of GOD
Bildad - God's Anger was kindled against Bildad: but he, with his two companions, brought a sacrifice, and when Job prayed for them God accepted him
Fierce, Fierceness - " ...
B — 1: θυμός (Strong's #2372 — Noun Masculine — thumos — thoo-mos' ) "hot Anger, wrath," is rendered "fierceness" in Revelation 16:19 ; 19:15 , of the wrath of God. See Anger (A, Notes), INDIGNATION , WRATH
Raca - Our blessed Lord hath defined three several degrees of guilt in the use of improper Anger and names. (Matthew 5:22) "I say unto you (saith Jesus) that whosoever is angry with his brother without a cause, shall be in danger of the judgment; and whosoever shall say to his brother, Raca, shall be in danger of the council; but whosoever shall say, Thou fool, shall be in danger of hell fire. " It was a law of the Sanhedrim, founded upon the law of God, that no one should cherish Anger against another, much less bring a railing accusation. He that did so was justly exposed to the judgment of God; but if he went farther than mental Anger, and called his brother Raca, should be brought before the council, that judgment might be speedily obtained. But, if still prosecuting his malignity, and said, Thou fool, that is, thou child of hell, and this to a brother who is a child of God, Such an one was in danger of hell fire. To say to another Raca, subjects the offender to the curse and condemnation of the council; but to say thou fool, makes the offender in danger of hell-fire. In the case to which Jesus refers, the utmost Anger and malice is supposed; so that when the offender calls his brother, fool, he means one that is a child of hell, and under the curse of God
Arms - ) Anything which a man takes in his hand in Anger, to strike or assault another with; an aggressive weapon
Hailstones - By this poetic language the Psalmist is describing the power and fierce Anger of GOD in judgment
Indignation - which we cannot contemplate without being provoked to Anger, and feeling a generous resentment
Uzzah - The Lord's Anger “burst forth” (NRSV) against Uzzah, who was struck dead ( 2 Samuel 6:6-8 )
Fierce - Cursed be their Anger, for it was fierce
Uzzah - The Lord's Anger “burst forth” (NRSV) against Uzzah, who was struck dead ( 2 Samuel 6:6-8 )
Ahim'a-az - (brother of Anger )
Uzzah - The Lord's Anger “burst forth” (NRSV) against Uzzah, who was struck dead ( 2 Samuel 6:6-8 )
Propitiation - In simple terms, to propitiate means to turn away a person’s Anger by giving that person an offering. The Bible describes this opposition to evil as the wrath or Anger of God (Deuteronomy 11:16-17; John 3:36; Ephesians 5:6). It is not an Anger such as the bad temper that sinful people often display, but an Anger that contains no trace of sin. to pacify, appease, calm the Anger of or win the favour of God). God is a God of love, and he reacts in holy and just Anger against all that is wrong in his rebellious creatures. God’s Anger was turned away (i
Druzes - Their name is derived from their leader, Dorazy, a Persian at the Egyptian court of El Hakim, whom he proclaimed to be an incarnation of the deity, and fleeing the Anger of the crowd, c
Ahimaaz - Brother of Anger = irascible
Anguish - See Anger
Flame - ) Burning zeal or passion; elevated and noble enthusiasm; glowing imagination; passionate excitement or Anger
Behave - He did behave his Anger e'er 'twas spent
Incontinency - Want of restraint of the passions or appetites free or uncontrolled indulgence of the passions or appetites, as of Anger
Heron - The root, אנפ , signifies to breathe short through the nostrils, to snuff, as in Anger; hence to be angry; and it is supposed that the word is sufficiently descriptive of the heron, from its very irritable disposition
Kick - To thrust out the foot or feet with violence, either in wantonness, resistance, Anger or contempt to manifest opposition
Nose - Several expressions in Scripture grew out of the fact that Anger often shows itself by distended nostrils, hard breathing, and in animals by snorting, 2 Samuel 22:9 Job 39:20 Psalm 18:8
Gnashing of Teeth - In the Old Testament, gnashing of teeth was an expression of Anger reserved for the wicked and for one's enemies (Job 16:9 ; Psalm 35:16 ; Psalm 37:12 ; Lamentations 2:16 )
Maccabees, the - When Antiochus (Epiphanes) was expelled from Egypt by the Romans, he vented his Anger on the Jews, and sought to abolish their worship at Jerusalem, putting multitudes to death (B
Zipporah - With reluctance and Anger she circumcised him, exclaiming, "A bloody husband art thou to me because of the circumcision," which binds thee to me afresh
Disdain - ) To be filled with scorn; to feel contemptuous Anger; to be haughty
Chafe - ) To excite passion or Anger in; to fret; to irritate
Devil Worshippers - Among many barbarous peoples, offerings were made to evil and malignant gods, in order to placate them and avert their Anger
Eclipse - Eclipses were regarded as tokens of God's Anger (Joel 3:15 ; Job 9:7 )
Mesha - Jehoram determined to punish him; but Mesha made the horrible sacrifice of his eldest son to some idol god, openly upon the wall, in sight of the Israelites, who fearing that they might incur the Anger of God by having given occasion to a human sacrifice, retreated to their own country
Nahash - His son Hanun provoked David's Anger (2 Samuel 10:3-5 )
Oven - Psalm 21:9 (a) In this way GOD describes His fierce Anger which will bring great suffering upon His enemies
Disguise - ) To hide by a counterfeit appearance; to cloak by a false show; to mask; as, to disguise Anger; to disguise one's sentiments, character, or intentions
Heat - ...
Ezekiel 3:14 (a) Here we find a type of Anger, bitterness and hatred
Bitterness - In a figurative sense, extreme enmity, grudge, hatred or rather an excessive degree or implacableness of passions and emotions as the bitterness of Anger. Acts 8 ...
Root of bitterness, a dangerous error, or schism, tending to draw persons to apostasy
Spark - ...
Job 41:19 (c) Probably this is just poetical language to describe the terrible hatred and Anger that exists in this case
ab'Igail - ) When David's messengers were slighted by Nabal, Abigail supplies David and his followers with provisions, and succeeded in appeasing his Anger
Vengeance - (2) In Romans 3:5 , AV, orge, "wrath" (RV), is rendered "vengeance;" see Anger , WRATH
Kindle - : To inflame, as the passions; to rouse; to provoke; to excite to action; to heat; to fire; to animate; to incite; as, to kindle Anger or wrath; to kindle the flame of love, or love into a flame
Abigail - When David's messengers were slighted by Nabal, Abigail supplied David and his followers with provisions, and succeeded in appeasing his Anger
Worshippers, Devil - Among many barbarous peoples, offerings were made to evil and malignant gods, in order to placate them and avert their Anger
Fire - ...
Because of fire's heat and destructive capacity, it frequently appears in the Bible as a symbol of God's Anger and of the judgment and destruction that sometimes are extensions of that Anger. Ezekiel uses the term "fiery Anger" to speak of God's outpoured judgment, especially when speaking of the impending Babylonian conquest (21:31; 22:31). ...
In other passages, the Anger of God is not only metaphorically represented by fire, but fire becomes a literal vehicle of his wrath. At Taberah in the Sinai desert Yahweh's "anger was aroused" and "fire from the Lord burned among" the people (Numbers 11:1 ). And the rebellion of Korah and his followers also resulted in many of them perishing by fire, a manifestation of God's hot Anger (Numbers 16:35 ; 26:10 ; Leviticus 10:2 ). ...
The same imagery of fire as a sign of God's Anger and judgment continues in the New Testament
Arpad - Isaiah mimicked such statements, saying Assyria was only a rod of Yahweh's Anger and would soon face punishment for its pride (Isaiah 10:5-19 )
Transport - ) To carry away with vehement emotion, as joy, sorrow, complacency, Anger, etc
Breath - Third, this word signifies an “idol,” which is unsubstantial, worthless, and vain: “They have moved me to jealousy with that which is not God; they have provoked me to Anger with their vanities …” ( Esau - We have an account of his ill-advised marriages, Genesis 26:34 ; of his loss of his father's chief blessing, and his consequent Anger against Jacob, Genesis 27:1-46 ; of their subsequent reconciliation, Genesis 32:1-33:20 ; and of his posterity, Genesis 36:1-43
Abel - ...
In envy and Anger, Cain killed Abel (Genesis 4:8)
Anger - Uncontrolled Anger can have far-reaching consequences, producing violence and even murder (Matthew 5:21-22; Luke 4:28-29; Acts 7:54; Acts 7:57-58; Acts 21:27-36). God’s Anger is always pure, always just, always righteous (Exodus 34:6-7; Romans 2:4-6; see WRATH)
Anger - All Anger is by no means sinful; it was designed by the Author of our nature for self-defense; nor is it altogether a selfish passion, since it is excited by injuries offered to others as well as ourselves, and sometimes prompts us to reclaim offenders from sin and danger, Ephesians 4:26 ; but it becomes sinful when conceived upon trivial occasions or inadequate provocations; when it breaks forth into outrageous actions; vents itself in reviling language, or is concealed in our thoughts to the degree of hatred. Add to this the indecency of extravagant Anger; how it renders us while it lasts, the scorn and sport of all about us, of which it leaves us, when it ceases, sensible and ashamed; the inconveniences and irretrievable misconduct into which our irascibility has sometimes betrayed us; the friendships it has lost us; the distresses and embarrassments in which we have been involved by it; and the repentance which, on one account or other, it always costs us. ...
But the reflection calculated above all others to allay that haughtiness of temper which is ever finding out provocations, and which renders Anger so impetuous, is, that which the Gospel proposes; namely, that we ourselves are, or shortly shall be, suppliants for mercy and pardon at the judgment seat of God. vol 1:; Fawcett's excellent Treatise on Anger; ...
Seed's Posth
Kindle - ...
Jeremiah 17:4 (b) This is a type of the initiation and growth of wicked devices which arouse GOD's Anger
Baptist, Peter, Saint - The indiscreet boast of a Spanish sea captain that the missionaries had been sent to prepare for the conquest of Japan by Spain, aroused the Anger of the emperor, and he ordered the missionaries to be imprisoned
Kindle - To inflame, as the passions to exasperate to rouse to provoke to excite to action to heat to fire to animate as, to kindle Anger or wrath to kindle resentment to kindle the flame of love, or love into a flame
Countenance - So the rebuke of his countenance indicates his Anger and frowns. ...
This application of face or countenance, which seems to be of high antiquity, proceeded probably from the practice of turning away the face to express Anger, displeasure and refusal a practice still common, but probably universal among rude nations. To keep the countenance, is to preserve a calm, composed or natural look, unruffled by passion to refrain from expressing laughter, joy, Anger or other passion, by an unchanged countenance
Weapon - Isaiah 13:5 (a) GOD describes His Anger and His power as being weapons of destruction against His enemies
Cease - To abstain as, cease from Anger
Patience - The quality of bearing offenses and injuries without Anger or revenge
Rebek'ah - She directed and aided him in carrying it out, foresaw the probable consequence of Esau's Anger, and prevented it by moving Isaac to send Jacob away to Padan-aram, (Genesis 27:1 ) . (Genesis 29:12 ) Rebekah's beauty became at one time a source of danger to her husband
Provocation, Provoke - 2), is used metaphorically, signifying "to rouse to Anger, to provoke," in the Passive Voice, in Acts 17:16 , RV, "was provoked" (AV, "was stirred"); in 1 Corinthians 13:5 , RV, "is not provoked" (the word "easily" in AV, represents no word in the original). ...
B — 4: παροργίζω (Strong's #3949 — Verb — parorgizo — par-org-id'-zo ) "to provoke to wrath:" see Anger , B, No
Meekness - Aristotle described meekness as the middle position between excessive Anger and an excessive lack of Anger
John Colombini, Blessed - He belonged to an old patrician family and his wealth enabled him to hold a position of great prominence and influence, but his married life was marred by his avarice, ambition, and proneness to Anger
Nose, Nostrils - for Anger ( Genesis 27:45 , and very often), Ezekiel 8:17 refers to the custom of putting a twig to the nose, apparently in idolatrous worship, the significance of which is now obscure
Uzza - Uzza’s death was attributed by the popular mind to Anger on the part of Jahweh at his having presumed to handle the sacred emhlem too familiarly
Pique - ) To wound the pride of; to sting; to nettle; to irritate; to fret; to offend; to excite to Anger
Bear - ...
Revelation 13:2 (b) This bear is a type of the anti-Christ who will work quickly, slyly, smoothly, quietly and apparently with no Anger or hatred even as a bear which seems to be docile upon first observance
Longsuffering - The Hebrew אַפַּיִם specifically means ‘anger,’ ‘wrath,’ and accordingly the אָרֶךְ אַ׳ is one who is ‘long,’ in the sense of ‘long-delaying’ his Anger; hence in many cases the word is rendered by ‘slow to Anger’ in the English Bible. On the other hand, θυμός in μακρόθυμος does not specifically denote ‘anger,’ but has the general meaning of ‘temper,’ although it can also have the former specialized sense. A μακρόθυμος is therefore he who keeps his temper long, and this can be understood with reference to wilful provocation by man, in which case it will mean the exercise of restraint from Anger; or with reference to trying circumstances and persons, in which case it will mean the exercise of patience. In all other cases the word when used of God denotes specifically the restraint of His Anger and the deferring of the execution thereof (= ὀργή); thus Romans 2:4; Romans 9:22, 1 Timothy 1:16, 1 Peter 3:20
Rizpah - Rizpah spread sackcloth on the rock, a sign that the land repented, and watched the dead till the Anger of Jehovah relented and the rain came
Atonement - It is used in the Old Testament to translate a Hebrew word which means a covering; implying that by a Divine propitiation the sinner is covered from the just Anger of God
Face - "Face" signifies also Anger, justice, severity (Genesis 16:6,8 ; Exodus 2:15 ; Psalm 68:1 ; Revelation 6:16 )
Famine - Famines were sent as an effect of God's Anger against a guilty people (2 Kings 8:1,2 ; Amos 8:11 ; Deuteronomy 28:22-42 ; 2 Samuel 21:1 ; 2 Kings 6:25-28 ; 25:3 ; Jeremiah 14:15 ; 19:9 ; 42:17 , etc
Ahimaaz - (uh hihm' uh az) Personal name with uncertain meaning, “brother of Anger” and “my brother is counselor,” being suggestions
Excess - In morals, any indulgence of appetite, passion or exertion, beyond the rules of God's word, or beyond any rule of propriety intemperance in gratifications as excess in eating or drinking excess of joy excess of grief excess of love, or of Anger excess of labor
Low - ) To feel the heat of passion; to be animated, as by intense love, zeal, Anger, etc
Low - ) To feel the heat of passion; to be animated, as by intense love, zeal, Anger, etc
Urge - Urge not my father's Anger
Commination - Our reformers wisely rejected this ceremony as mere shadow and show; and substituted this office in its room, which is A denunciation of God's Anger and judgment against sinners; that the people, being apprised of God's wrath and indignation against their sins, might not, through want of discipline to the church, be encouraged to pursue them
Disguise - Men sometimes disguise themselves fro the purpose of committing crimes without danger of detection. To hide by a counterfeit appearance to cloke by a false show, by false language, or an artificial manner as, to disguise Anger, sentiments or intentions
Arm - Sometimes He manifests His Anger, His mighty power, and His ability to destroy
Reed - Thus it is threatened, "The Lord shall smite Israel as a reed is shaken in the water, and he shall root up Israel out of the good land which he gave to their fathers, and shall scatter them beyond the river, because they have made their idol groves, provoking him to Anger," 1 Kings 14:15
Drunk - ...
Isaiah 51:17 (a) Here we find a type of the experience of Israel, the inhabitants of Jerusalem, in being forced to absorb the Anger of GOD and the pouring of His wrath upon them. ...
Isaiah 63:6 (b) This is a picture of the terrible condition of the people when GOD's Anger is once released against them
Meekness - It teaches us to govern our own Anger whenever we are at any time provoked, and patiently to bear the Anger of others, that it may not be a provocation to us
Abel - God had respect to Abel's sacrifice, and not to Cain's; hence Cain in Anger killed Abel, Genesis 4:1-26
Displeased - "Grieved" does not adequately express the righteous Anger of God intimated in the passage
Sighing - On the ‘groaning’ of John 11:33; John 11:38 see Anger in vol
Thigh - ...
Ezekiel 21:12 (c) We may use this type to illustrate the rather common practice of striking one's self upon the thigh, or the hip, or the leg, when in Anger, or when insisting on some course of action
Fume - ) To be in a rage; to be hot with Anger
Rebuke - O Lord, rebuke me not in thine Anger
Peace - Freedom from agitation or disturbance by the passions, as from fear, terror, Anger, anxiety or the like quietness of mind tranquillity calmness quiet of conscience
e'Sau - Mention of his unhappy marriages may be found in (Genesis 26:34 ) The next episode in the life of Esau is the loss of his father's covenant blessing, which Jacob secured through the craft of his mother, and the Anger of Esau, who vows vengeance
Simeon - in their Anger they slew a man, and in their selfwill they digged down a wall. Cursed be their Anger, for it was fierce; and their wrath, for it was cruel: I will divide them in Jacob, and scatter them in Israel
Breath - More important is the impact of God's breath on national life, for He can breathe Anger and judgment on threatening enemies bringing festive joy to God's people (Isaiah 30:33 ; compare Job 41:21 ). As a rule, God's judgment was breathed through the experience of natural calamities (Psalm 18:15 ), expressing His Anger (Isaiah 11:4 ; Job 4:9 ). Acts 9:1 uses breath to express Saul's Anger as a breathing of threats against the early Christians
Burn - Genesis 44:18 (a) Judah did not want Joseph's Anger to be aroused and inflicted upon him. ...
Psalm 89:46 (b) The Psalmist did not want GOD's Anger to be increased and poured out upon the people. ...
Lamentations 2:3 (b) GOD is informing us that He was filled with just Anger against the evil doings of His people
Mad - Inflamed with Anger very angry
Sore - With vexation or Anger (1 Samuel 1:6 )
Breath - In Anger the breath comes strong and vigorous
Ahimaaz - Ahimaaz (a-hĭm'a-ăz), brother of Anger
Passion - Violent agitation or excitement of mind, particularly such as is occasioned by an offense, injury or insult hence, violent Anger
Lamentations, Theology of - Given the evil of his people, however, more is said in Lamentations about God's Anger than about his righteousness. Each acrostic, but especially the second, includes mention of his Anger (1:12; 2:1,2, 3,4, 21,22; 3:43; 4:11). God's Anger, speaking metaphorically, is poured out like fire (2:4; Anger should it be unleashed (30:23-24; Amos 1:3-5,6 , 10,11 ). ...
No attempt is made to reconcile God's Anger and God's compassion, but compassion is no less characteristic of God than is Anger
Hormah - After the manifestation of God's Anger against the Israelites, on account of their rebellion and their murmurings when the spies returned to the camp at Kadesh, in the wilderness of Paran, with an evil report of the land, they quickly repented of their conduct, and presumed to go up "to the head of the mountain," seeking to enter the Promised Land, but without the presence of the Lord, without the ark of the convenant, and without Moses
Eliab - Eliab betrayed Anger without a cause toward David, when seeking his brethren's welfare ("Why camest thou down hither, and with whom hast thou left those few sheep in the wilderness?"); also "pride and naughtiness of heart," the very sins he charged David with ("I know thy pride," etc
Passion - ) The state of the mind when it is powerfully acted upon and influenced by something external to itself; the state of any particular faculty which, under such conditions, becomes extremely sensitive or uncontrollably excited; any emotion or sentiment (specifically, love or Anger) in a state of abnormal or controlling activity; an extreme or inordinate desire; also, the capacity or susceptibility of being so affected; as, to be in a passion; the passions of love, hate, jealously, wrath, ambition, avarice, fear, etc
Apparel - He will tread the winepress and shed the blood of the enemies in His Anger and wrath
Cool - To moderate excitement of temper to allay, as passion of any kind to calm, as Anger to abate, as love to moderate, as desire, zeal or ardor to render indifferent
Sodom - Throughout Scripture the ruin of Sodom and Gomorrah is represented as a most signal effect of God's Anger, and as a mirror in which those living at ease in sin and lust may see their own doom
ba'Laam - He yielded to the temptations of riches and honor which Balak set before him; but God's Anger was kindled at this manifestation of determined self-will, and the angel of the Lord stood in the way for an adversary against him
Kibroth-Hattaavah - Then punishment fell on them: they loathed the food which they had desired; it bred disease in them; the divine Anger aggravated the disease into a plague, and a heavy mortality was the consequence
Beard - ) To take by the beard; to seize, pluck, or pull the beard of (a man), in Anger or contempt
Arms - In law, arms are any thing which a man takes in his hand in Anger, to strike or assault another
Ark - It is the baptism of the Lord JESUS under GOD's Anger and wrath, as described in1Pe 3:20-21, by which we are saved
Oven - Psalms 21:9; "Thou shalt make them as a fiery oven in the time of Thine Anger
Boil - ) To be moved or excited with passion; to be hot or fervid; as, his blood boils with Anger
Fool - Our Lord seems to have used the term in a sense somewhat peculiar in Matthew 5:22 : "Whosoever shall say to his brother, Thou fool, shall be in danger of hell fire. " But the whole verse shows the meaning to be, that when any one of his professed disciples indulges a temper and disposition of mind contrary to charity, or that peculiar love which the brethren of Christ are bound by his law to have toward each other, John 13:34 , not only showing Anger against another without a cause, but also treating him with contemptuous language, and that with malicious intent, he shall be in danger of eternal destruction
Longsuffering - ...
Note: "Longsuffering is that quality of self-restraint in the face of provocation which does not hastily retaliate or promptly punish; it is the opposite of Anger, and is associated with mercy, and is used of God, Exodus 34:6 (Sept
Little - I view with Anger and disdain
Dull - civ), "Bradus differs from the words with which it is here brought into comparison, in that no moral fault or blame is necessarily involved in it; so far indeed is it from this, that of the three occasions on which it is used in the NT two are in honor; for to be 'slow' to evil things, to rash speaking, or to Anger ( James 1:19 , twice), is a grace, and not the contrary
Nabal - One of the shepherds that stood by and saw the reception David's messengers had met with, informed Abigail, Nabal's wife, who at once realized the danger that threatened her household. She so courteously and persuasively pled her cause that David's Anger was appeased, and he said to her, "Blessed be the Lord God of Israel which sent thee this day to meet me. He was stunned by a sense of the danger to which his conduct had exposed him
Bosom - Anger resteth in the bosom of fools
Flame - ...
Jeremiah 48:45 (a) By this type is represented the fierce, burning Anger and power of the enemies of Moab
Ananias - Peter, was the signal proof of God’s Anger on this Judas-like hypocrisy
Beard - To take by the beard to seize, pluck, or pull the beard, in contempt or Anger
Smoking - They are fierce in their Anger and destructive in their ways
Anger - When Anger, hatred, wrath, and fury, are ascribed to God, they denote no tumultuous passion, but merely his holy and just displeasure with sin and sinners and the evidence of it in his terrible threatenings, or righteous judgments, Psalms 6:1 ; Psalms 7:11
Brimstone - The Prophet Isaiah, Isaiah 34:9 , writes that the Anger of the Lord shall be shown by the streams of the land being turned into pitch, and the dust thereof into brimstone
ha'Gar - 4, and Sarah, with the Anger, we may suppose, of a free woman rather than of a wife, reproached Abraham for the results of her own act
Body of Christ - Christian unity in the body of Christ is damaged by mistrust, Anger, unwholesome talk, bitterness, wrath, Anger, and clamor
Drunkenness - It betrays most constitutions either to extravagance of Anger, or sins of lewdness
Beth-Horon - Suggestions include, “house of caves,” “house of Anger,” “house of the hollow,” “house of (the god) Hauron
Money Changers - To help visitors change money into that acceptable in Jerusalem, money changers set up tables in the Temple court of the Gentiles. ...
Three words are translated “moneychangers”: kollubiston ( Matthew 21:12 ; Mark 11:15 ; John 2:15 ) of Semitic origin referred to the exchange rate or commission; kermatistas ( John 2:14 ) referred to a dealer in small change; and trapetzitais ( Matthew 25:27 ) which Luke used in a slightly different form (trapetzan , Matthew 19:23 , or shulhanim in Hebrew) referred to a money agent who sat at a table. ...
Money changers were in the area with vendors who sold animals, birds, and other items used in Temple worship and sacrifices. Some exchangers profited greatly and loaned their money along with that others invested with them. ...
In Anger at this corruption of the purpose of the Temple, Jesus turned over the tables of the money changers and drove them and the sellers of animals out of the Temple court (Matthew 21:12 )
Boil - To be hot or fervid to swell by native heat, vigor or irritation as the boiling blood of youth his blood boils with Anger
Wedding Garment - Therefore for the king on coming in to see his guests, to find there a man without the wedding garment, implied such a contempt to his person, and to his son's marriage, as might well justify the Anger shewn
Sodom - At its summit and base are blocks of stone, of which the Arabs say: "a people once dwelt there, to whom travelers came seeking hospitality; but the people did to them a horrible deed, wherefore the Almighty in Anger rained down stones, and destroyed them from off the face of the earth
Digest - ) To quiet or abate, as Anger or grief
Haman - Perpetual warfare had been pronounced against them by Jehovah and this accounts for Mordecai's refusal to pay Haman reverence, which so wounded his pride and aroused his Anger that he plotted to destroy not only Mordecai but all the Jews that were in the king's dominions
Rings - When God threatened Jeconiah with the utmost effects of his Anger, he tells him, that though he were the signet or ring on his finger, yet he should be torn off, Jeremiah 22:24
Gallio - To him his brother Seneca dedicated his books, "Of Anger
Ahab - Ahab erected in Samaria a house of Baal, and set up images of Baal and Ashtoreth; idolatry and wickedness became fearfully prevalent, and the king "did more to provoke the Lord to Anger than all the kings that were before him
Ahab - His Anger was on this account kindled against the prophet, and he sought to kill him
Repentance of God - The repentance of God became Israel's creed alongside other attributes of God like “gracious,” “merciful,” “slow to Anger,” and “great in covenant-love” (Joel 2:13 ; Jonah 4:2 )
Murder - Spitting in the face of another, looking with contempt upon another, or unleashing one's Anger are signs that a murderous spirit is present
Longsuffering - ]'>[1] uses this word only in Jeremiah 15:15 , where it is the translation of a phrase usually rendered ‘slow to Anger’ (cf
Valentinians - But, besides these eight principal AEons there were twenty-two more; the last of which, called Sophia, being desirous to arrive at the knowledge of Bythos, gave herself a great deal of uneasiness, which created in her Anger and Fear, of which was born Matter
Fire - ) To inflame; to irritate, as the passions; as, to fire the soul with Anger, pride, or revenge
Abigail - Taking on herself the blame of Nabal's insult to David's messengers, she promptly, and with a discreet woman's tact, averted David's just Anger by liberally supplying the wants of his forces, and by deprecating in person at his feet the shedding of blood in vengeance
Seraiah - Calvin translated "when he went in behalf of Zedekiah," being sent to appease Nebuchadnezzar's Anger at his revolt
Abigail - In Anger, David determined to kill all of Nabal's household
Tents - We learn from this that the home life, the domestic affairs were destroyed by the Anger of the Lord
Temper - ) Heat of mind or passion; irritation; proneness to Anger; - in a reproachful sense
Jealousy - Jealousy is regarded as worse than wrath or Anger (Proverbs 27:4 )
Patience - He is slow to Anger in relation to the Hebrews (Exodus 34:6 ; Numbers 14:18 , Nehemiah 9:17 ; Psalm 86:15 ; Isaiah 48:9 ; Hosea 11:8-9 )
Hell - The misery of hell will consist in the privation of the vision and love of God, exclusion from every source of happiness, perpetual sin, remorse of conscience in view of the past, malevolent passions, the sense of the just Anger of God, and all other sufferings of body and soul which in the nature of things are the natural results of sin, or which the law of God requires as penal inflictions
Reserve - Will he reserve his Anger for ever? Jeremiah 3
Vary - While fear and Anger, with alternate grace, pant in her breast, and vary in her face
Sisinnius, Bishop of Novatianists - Sisinnius jocosely told him he would be much obliged to him for sparing him so much trouble, and thus disarmed his Anger ( ib
Tongue - The association in Isaiah of God’s appearance in judgment with smoke and fire gave rise to a fine literary description of the Lord’s Anger: “Behold, the name of the Lord cometh from far, burning with his Anger, and the burden thereof is heavy: his lips are full of indignation, and his tongue as a devouring fire” ( Expiation, Propitiation - ”...
In Greek writings hilasmos refers to soothing the Anger of the gods. Other scholars see God as the object receiving the offering for sin which then in some sense pacifies His Anger and meets His holy need for justice. In the New Testament setting, this would mean that on the cross Jesus either dealt with the evil nature of human sin and covered it so that God forgives it, or it means that Jesus satisfied God's holy Anger and justice so that forgiven sinners could freely enter the presence of the holy God. Some scholars would see both ideas present in the word hilasmos , so that God in grace initiated the sacrifice of Jesus to provide covering and forgiveness for human sin but that He also received the sacrifice which satisfied His Anger and justice
Rainbow - When the dread storm, in which the lightnings were Jahweh’s arrows and the thunder His voice, was passing, His bow appeared in the clouds as a sign that His Anger was appeased
Jealousy - ...
The Hebrew word qana [ Numbers 5:14-30 ) and God's passionate Anger against sin (1 Kings 14:22 ; Psalm 78:58 ). This is followed by the question, "Are we stronger than he?" meaning "Can we afford to defy his power?" Therefore, to arouse the jealousy of God is a very dangerous action on our part
Face - ...
Ezekiel 38:18 (a) This is the picture of a man whose Anger is seen in his countenance as the face reddens and the mouth tightens
Music - Yea, Saul himself felt the contagion, and for the moment his passion of Anger subsided
Balaam - This he did a second and a third time, to the extreme mortification of Balak, who dismissed him in great Anger
Esau - Overcome with misery and Anger, Esau tried to kill Jacob, but Jacob found out and escaped (Genesis 27:30-38; Genesis 27:41-45; Hebrews 12:17)
Murder (2) - In the doctrine of Jesus, the crimes of the Mosaic codes are traced to their source in the heart (Matthew 15:19, Mark 7:21), and murder to the passion of Anger
Valentinianus Iii - 451) heartily abuses Valentinian for this law, and considers Attila's invasion a direct and immediate expression of Heaven's Anger
Reconciliation - In 1 Samuel 29:4 (yithratseh zeh 'el 'adonaayw ), "wherewith should this man (David) reconcile himself to his master (Saul)?" the Anger to be laid aside was not David's to Saul, but Saul's to David; "reconcile himself to Saul" therefore means to induce Saul to be reconciled to him and take him back to his favor. ...
So Matthew 5:24, "be reconciled to thy brother," means, "propitiate him to lay aside his Anger and be reconciled to thee
Evil Spirits - Ezekiel propounds a similar view ( Isaiah 14:9 ), that a prophet may be deceived by God, and so made the means of his own destruction and of that of his dupes, much as David was moved to number Israel through the Anger of the Lord against the people ( 2 Samuel 24:1 ). They speak out of their own heart, and are so far from executing God’s justice or Anger upon the wicked that He interposes to check them, and to protect men from being misled
Jonathan - At length, "in fierce Anger," he left his father's presence and cast in his lot with the cause of David (1 Samuel 20:34 )
Mind - memory, mention, to remember, mind, ardor of mind, vehemence Anger
Omri - Determined and unscrupulous he "walked in Jeroboam's sin of the calf worship, provoking Jehovah God of Israel to Anger with vanities
Wine - It is the product of the holy Anger of the righteous Judge
Face - The face of God denotes sometimes his Anger: "The face of the Lord is against them that do evil
Emerods - Among other objections, it may also be observed, that the mice, which are mentioned, not only in the Hebrew text, 1 Samuel 6:5 ; 1 Samuel 6:12 ; 1 Samuel 16:18 , but also in the Alexandrine and Vulgate versions, 1 Samuel 5:6 ; 1 Samuel 6:5 ; 1 Samuel 6:11 ; 1 Samuel 6:18 , are an objection to understanding the hemorrhoids by the word under consideration, since if that were in fact the disease, we see no reason why mice should have been presented as an offering to avert the Anger of the God of Israel
Offend - To cause dislike or Anger
Reconciliation - Gratius observes, that, in heathen authors, men's being reconciled to their gods is always understood to signify appeasing the Anger of their gods. ...
And when our Lord ordered the offending to go and be reconciled to his offended brother, Matthew 5:1-48 , the plain meaning is, that he should go and try to appease his Anger, obtain his forgiveness, and regain his favour and friendship, by humbling himself to him, asking his pardon, or satisfying him for any injury that he might have done him
Baptism - ...
Luke 12:50 (a) This is the baptism of our Lord JESUS which He endured on the Cross when GOD poured out His wrath upon Him and engulfed Him as it were in the burning billows of His Anger. He is the ark of safety into which we enter for protection from the deluge of GOD's Anger against sin
Jeremiah, Theology of - ...
Because of the people's sin, however, and the departure from the "ancient paths" (6:16), God is about to act with Anger and fury (7:20). These scenes of judgment are driven by God's Anger, which "burns like a fire" (4:4,8). One of several terms for Anger, ‘ap , is found twenty-four times in Jeremiah—more often than in any other biblical book. Forty-two different passages in Jeremiah speak of God's Anger. The tradition of God's Anger against evil reaches far back (cf. This Anger is not wrath on a rampage but a holy Anger, for the nexus between sin and punishment is unambiguous (4:18; 51:6). Echoes of the judgment, even allusion to God's Anger, have not disappeared (30:23-24; 31:2; 32:28-29), but the promised salvation lies beyond the exile
the Children of Capernaum Playing at Marriages And Funerals in the Market-Place - Shamelessness strengthens the shameless man, faithlessness the faithless man, abusive words the abusive man, angry words and angry acts make the man more and more a man of Anger, and avaricious acts end in making a man a miser. When you have been again angry today, you have not only been again angry today, but you are all that the more open to Anger tomorrow. Till today's Anger, and tomorrow's Anger, and the next day's Anger, will all unite to make you an absolute savage to all who live near you. But if you have intermitted thirty days without an explosion of Anger, make a thanksgiving sacrifice to God
Spitting - " (Isaiah 50:6)...
In order to have the better apprehension of the subject, we must look as far back as the Levitical law, where we find that even the spittle of an unclean person, though not accompanied with any Anger, get if falling by accident upon another, was considered a defilement; and the person so spit upon was unclean until the even. (See Leviticus 15:8) But when this was done by design, and accompanied with Anger, the uncleanness and the disgrace were considered more flagrant. When it was done in Anger, it was looked upon as the greatest of all outrages: and even when done unintentionally no affront in common life was equal to it
Matthew (Apostle) - ), which roused the Anger of the ‘scribes of the Pharisees
Ahimaaz - ("brother of Anger", i
Army - Israel recognized God's Anger when God did not go out with their armies (Psalm 44:9 )
Face - In scripture, face is used for Anger or favor
Zeal - " Sometimes it is taken for Anger and indignation; sometimes, for vehement desire
Reconciliation - " When the Philistines suspected that David would appease the Anger of Saul, by becoming their adversary, they said, "Wherewith should he reconcile himself to his master? Should it not be with the heads of these men?" not, surely, How shall he remove his own Anger against his master? but, how shall he remove his master's Anger against him? How shall he restore himself to his master's favour? "If thou bring thy gift to the altar, and there rememberest that thy brother hath aught against thee," not, that thou hast aught against thy brother, "first be reconciled to thy brother; that is, appease and conciliate him; so that the words, in fact, import, "See that thy brother be reconciled to thee," since that which goes before is, not that he hath done thee an injury, but thou him. Thus, then, for us to be reconciled to God is to avail ourselves of the means by which the Anger of God toward us is to be appeased, which the New Testament expressly declares to be meritoriously "the sin-offering" of Him "who knew no sin," and instrumentally, as to each individual personally, "faith in his blood
Immutability of God - God expresses wrath, though He is “slow to Anger” (Nehemiah 9:17 )
Esau - As Jacob neared Palestine, he made plans for confronting his wronged brother and allaying his Anger
Fire (Kindle) - ...
Psalm 78:21 (a) This is a type of GOD's Anger and wrath against His own people of Judah and Israel because of their sins
Justinus - The third, or female principle, identified with the earth, is called Eden and Israel, destitute of knowledge and subject to Anger, of a double form, a woman above the middle, a snake below
Much - Deuteronomy 28 ...
Manasseh wrought much wickedness in the sight of the Lord to provoke him to Anger
Uri'ah - " In a moment David's Anger is appeased
Ancient - The pronunciation of the first vowel ought to accord with that is antiquity, Anger, anchor, &c
Hedge - ...
Jeremiah 49:3 (c) We may learn from this that the enemies of GOD will seek hiding places from GOD and from His Anger poured out
Arm - In Isaiah 30:30, the word seems to represent lightning bolts: "And the Lord shall cause his glorious voice to be heard, and shall show the lighting down of his arm, with the indignation of his Anger, and with the flame of a devouring fire, with scattering, and tempest, and hailstones" (cf
Gestures - ), Anger ( Mark 3:5 ), or reproach ( Luke 22:61 ). One who narrowly escapes danger, describing his experience, will crack his thumb nail off the edge of his front teeth, suggesting Job’s ‘with the skin of my teeth’ (Job 19:20 )
Continually - In contrast, Israel is “a people that provoketh me to Anger continually to my face” ( Burn - To be inflamed with passion or desire as, to burn with Anger or love
Sacrifice - Sacrifices have, in all ages, and by almost every nation, been regarded as necessary to placate the divine Anger, and render the Deity propitious. Though the Gentiles had lost the knowledge of the true God, they still retained such a dread of him, that they sometimes sacrificed their own offspring for the purpose of averting his Anger
Propitiation - As the justice of God is punitive, (and if it is not punitive, his laws are a dead letter,) then is there wrath in God; then is God angry with the wicked; then is man, as a sinner, obnoxious to this Anger; and so a propitiation becomes necessary to turn it away from him. They first suppose that Anger in God is to be considered as a passion, and that passion a desire of revenge; and then tell us, that if we do not prove that this desire of revenge can be satisfied by the sufferings of Christ, then we can never prove the doctrine of satisfaction to be true; whereas, we do not mean by God's Anger, any such passion, but the just declaration of God's will to punish, upon our provocation of him by our sins; we do not make the design of the satisfaction to be that God may please himself in revenging the sins of the guilty upon the most innocent person, because we make the design of punishment not to be the satisfaction of Anger as a desire of revenge, but to be the vindication of the honour and rights of the offended person by such a way as he himself shall judge satisfactory to the ends of his government
Balaam - Balak's actions brought God's Anger upon Moab (Deuteronomy 23:3-6 )
Kindness - Slow to Anger and abounding in love became a characteristic description of Israel's Lord, distinguishing His kindness from His wrath (Exodus 34:6 ; Numbers 14:18 ; Nehemiah 9:17 ; Psalm 103:8 ; Psalm 145:8 ; Jonah 4:2 ; Joel 2:13 )
Gallio - Seneca dedicated to him his treatises On Anger and On a Happy Life
Jephthah, Jephthae - ' Jephthah suffered severely through his rash vow, and he had not wisdom and humility to appease the Anger of Ephraim
Jehoram - He sank into gross idolatry, and brought upon himself and his kingdom the Anger of Jehovah
Valens, Emperor - His Anger was excited at this period against magical practices by a conspiracy at Antioch (Socr
Drive - Anger and lust often drive men into gross crimes
Meekness - Typical human responses in such circumstances include frustration, bitterness, or Anger, but the one who is guided by God's spirit accepts God's ability to direct events (Galatians 5:23 ; Ephesians 4:2 ; Colossians 3:12 ; 1 Timothy 6:11 ; Titus 3:2 ; James 1:21 ; 3:13 )
Anthropomorphitae - Anthropomorphism is always connected with anthropopathism (from ἄνθρωπος and πάθος passion) which ascribes to God human passions and affections such as wrath Anger envy jealousy pity repentance
Esau - It may be God had warned Esau, as He did Laban, not to hurt Jacob; or possibly his Anger may have abated: forwhen they approached, "Esau ran to meet him, and embracedhim, and fell on his neck and kissed him, and they wept
Fool (2) - He said, ‘Ye have heard that it was said to them of old time, Thou shalt not kill, and Whosoever shall kill shall be in danger of the judgment. But I say unto you that whosoever is angry [1] with his brother, is in danger of the judgment; and whosoever shall say to his brother, Raca [2], shall be liable to a more solemn judgment; but whosoever shall say, Thou fool [3], shall be worthy of a more dreadful doom
Antiochus - He was thus 'a raiser of taxes,' and was 'destroyed neither...
in Anger, nor in battle. 'At the appointed time he shall return and come toward the South,' ...
Daniel 11:29 ; but he was stopped by Rome; 'ships of Chittim,' ships from Macedonia,...
came against him; and in great Anger he returned and vented his wrath on Jerusalem
Fire - To inflame to irritate the passions as, to fire with Anger or revenge
Josiah - Nevertheless, "the Lord turned not from the fierceness of his great wrath wherewith his Anger was kindled against Judah" (2 Kings 22:3-20 ; 23:21-27 ; 2 Chronicles 35:1-19 )
Compassion - While his compassion can be thwarted by disobedience (Deuteronomy 13:17 ; 30:3 ; 2 Chronicles 30:9 ), there are times when his disobedient people's only hope is that his compassion overcomes his Anger (Hosea 11:8 )
Salvation - It referred to deliverance or preservation from disease, dangers, sufferings, death and the consequences of wrongdoing (Exodus 14:30; Judges 2:11-16; Psalms 34:6; Psalms 37:40; 1 Peter 1:18-19; Jeremiah 17:14). The picture of a sacrificial offering expresses further aspects of salvation; for example, the death of a sacrificial victim in the place of the sinner (Hebrews 9:26; see SACRIFICE), and the presentation of an offering to turn away God’s Anger against sin (Romans 3:25; see PROPITIATION)
Demon Possession - Demons were blamed for toothaches, headaches, broken bones, and outbursts of jealousy and Anger
Anthropomorphism - The expression, "the Lord's Anger burned" (Exodus 4:14 ) is interesting
Castle - Israel prayed for peace in her fortress, but no fortress gave security from God's Anger (Isaiah 25:2 ; Isaiah 34:13 ; Hosea 8:14 )
Lion - The king is frightening in his Anger (Proverbs 19:12 ; 20:2 ), the soldier courageous (2 Samuel 17:10 ), national leaders vicious (Ezekiel 22:25 ; Zephaniah 3:3 ), enemy nations destructive (Isaiah 5:29 ; Jeremiah 2:15 ) and protective of their conquests (Isaiah 5:29 ), and personal enemies stealthy in their pursuit to harm (Psalm 10:9 ; 17:12 )
Orphan - My Anger will be aroused, and I will kill you with the sword; your wives will become widows and your children fatherless" (22:22)
Hand - To smite the hands together was a sign of Anger ( Numbers 24:10 )
Reproach - The destruction of Jerusalem and the Exile brought Judah to the state of “reproach”: “O Lord, according to all thy righteousness, I beseech thee, let thine Anger and thy fury be turned away from thy city Jerusalem, thy holy mountain: because for our sins, and for the iniquities of our fathers, Jerusalem and thy people are become a reproach to all that are about us” ( Return - 14:4: “I will heal their backsliding, I will love them freely: for mine Anger is turned away from him
Jeremiah - The princes, in their Anger at such a message by Jeremiah, cast him into prison ((37:15-38:13)
Aaron - ...
Moses and Aaron were guilty of disobedience to God when, in Anger at the people’s constant complaining, they struck the rock at Meribah
Meekness (2) - True meekness, which is worthy of all honour, is seen only in those who, with an acute sense of wrong, control the natural impulse to show Anger and to retaliate, not from fear, or pride, or policy, or scorn of others, but because in obedience to the will of God they accept the provocation or wrong as discipline, and as an opportunity for showing the Divine spirit of patience and love. ‘Meekness is the power of love to quell the ebullition of Anger, to restrain the violent and hasty temper’ (Martensen). It is the meekness of Jesus that makes His Anger so terrible. So far from Anger being inconsistent with meekness, it is only when meekness is associated with it that Anger has a pure moral worth
Jonah - By general acclamation they proclaimed a fast, which the king confirmed, enjoining all to "cry mightily unto God, turning from every evil way" in hope that "God would turn from His fierce Anger. " Jonah's Anger and its correction. Moreover, Jonah in apologizing for his vexation does not mention, as its cause, the failure of his prediction, but solely God's slowness to Anger. ...
"Grief," not selfish Anger, was Jonah's feeling (Jonah 4:6)
Jealousy (2) - Anger, 2 (a). Sometimes ζῆλος is Anger (Acts 5:17), the Heb
Compassion - Often it expresses God's Anger and decision no longer to show mercy and pity (Zechariah 11:6 ). An Old Testament or human minister realizes personal weaknesses and thus moderates personal Anger at another's weaknesses ( Hebrews 5:2 )
Day of the Lord - Lamentations 2:2 can speak of the “day of the Lord's Anger” in past tense, describing the fall of Jerusalem. The Old Testament language of the day of the Lord is thus aimed at warning sinners among God's people of the danger of trust in traditional religion without commitment to God and to His way of life
Murmur, Murmuring - For its use in a friendly sense see John 7:31-32, where the murmuring was that of persons who believed on Jesus, and who said, ‘When the Christ shall come, will he do more signs than those which this man hath done?’—a dangerous omen to the Pharisees. Compare also Luke 19:7, where all, apparently even the Twelve, shared in it with a sense of outrage done to propriety; Edersheim calls it a murmur of disappointment and Anger; but perhaps Bengel is more correct, ‘ex haesitatione potius quod ad majoreni partem attinet quam cum indignatione
Sin (2) - " abar , "transgression through Anger"; "sin is the transgression of the law," i
Dinah - Jacob in reproving them lays stress only on the dangerous consequences of their crime, "ye have troubled me to make me to stink among the inhabitants of the land . they shall gather themselves and slay me," because it was the only argument that would weigh with his sons; but, his dying words show his abhorrence of their" cruelty" and "cursed Anger" (Genesis 49:5-7)
Face - ) Presence; sight; front; as in the phrases, before the face of, in the immediate presence of; in the face of, before, in, or against the front of; as, to fly in the face of danger; to the face of, directly to; from the face of, from the presence of. ) Mode of regard, whether favorable or unfavorable; favor or Anger; mostly in Scriptural phrases
Ahab - From the secular point of view he was an able and energetic prince; from the religious point of view he was a dangerous innovator, and a patron of foreign gods. This prophet, by his bold challenge to the priests of Baal, roused the Anger of Jezebel, and was obliged to flee the country (1 Kings 17:1-24 ; 1 Kings 18:1-46 ; 1 Kings 19:1-21 )
Ahab - The seventh king of Israel's Northern Kingdom, married a foreigner, Jezebel, and incited God's Anger more than any of Israel's previous kings
Isaacus, Donatist Martyr - Maximianus suffered first, but Isaac provoked the Anger of the judges by his taunting exclamations and was forthwith compelled to undergo a treatment no less brutal
Mordecai - ...
The faithfulness of Mordecai exposed him to the Anger and resentment of Haman the Hagagite
Patience - ...
We are very susceptive of irritation; Anger is eloquent; revenge is sweet: but to stand calm and collected; to suspend the blow which passion was urgent to strike; to drive the reasons of clemency as far as they will go; to bring forward fairly in view the circumstances of mitigation: to distinguish between surprise and deliberation, infirmity and crime; or if infliction be deemed necessary, to leave God to be both the judge and the executioner; this a Christian should labour after: his peace requires it. '...
He that is slow to Anger is of great understanding; but he that is hasty of spirit, exalteth folly
Gather - In times of peace they were farmers and tradesmen; but when danger threatened, a leader would “assemble” them or “summon” them to a common location and organize them into an army (cf. The verb is used in this sense to refer to “divine judgment”: “As they gathered silver, and brass … into the midst of the furnace, to blow the fire upon it, to melt it; so will I gather you in mine Anger and in my fury ( Anger “disappears”: “Thou hast taken away all thy wrath
Talmud - His stature was from one end of the world to the other; and it was for his transgression that the Creator, laying his hand in Anger on him, lessened him; 'for before, ' says R
Fire - God Himself is compared to fire not only to illustrate His holiness, but also to illustrate His Anger against sin (Isaiah 10:17 ; Hebrews 12:29 )
Discipline - Discipline was not to evoke Anger from the children ( Ephesians 6:4 )
Lamentations, Book of - Lamentations 2:1 continues the lament over the ruin wrought by divine Anger and calls the people to prayer. The book warns modern readers that an immoral nation stands in danger of God's awesome judgment and that the only hope for survival is submission to God
Achan - By Achan's stoning the Anger of the Lord was turned away from Israel, and the door of entrance to the promised inheritance thrown open
Nahum - He is slow to Anger, but He is jealous, and His revenge is furious
Fierceness - ...
Of recorded deeds the incident of the driving out of the vendors and money-changers from the temple precincts (Matthew 21:12, Mark 11:15, John 2:15) is the most notable: but it is in the vigour of His language that the possibilities of fierceness in Him are most revealed. Anger
Foolishness - When He likened His critics to children in the market-place who would play at neither a sad nor a merry game (Matthew 11:16-19), was He not saying in His heart, ‘Ye fools’? But Anger and contempt are the sources of the former; wonder and pity, mingled with indignation, shape the latter
Evil-Speaking - For seeming to revile the high priest Ananias in a moment of just Anger, St
Apostasy - In freedom God could choose to turn away His Anger and heal their “backsliding” (Hosea 14:4 )
Cedron - " (2 Corinthians 5:21) Here it was, that all the waves and billows of JEHOVAH'S just Anger, for his broken law, went over the head of Christ, as the Surety and Representative of his people; and which brought forth those cries of the Glory-man, Christ Jesus, which, by the Spirit of prophecy, was recorded of him
Camel - Meanwhile it is wont to utter loud cries or growls of Anger and impatience
Oven - The heat is considerably greater than what is needed for the more gradual firing of our larger European loaf, and the Oriental oven thus became the emblem of vehement desire (Hosea 7:6-7) and the indignant Anger of God (Psalms 21:9)
Jonah, Theology of - He has pity on the teeming masses of people and animals who may be in danger of destruction because he is both their Creator and Sustainer (4:10-11). ...
God is "gracious and compassionate, … slow to Anger and abounding in love, a God who relents from sending calamity" (4:2). ...
Jonah's Anger and displeasure at the sparing of the great city (4:1-2) are described with the same vocabulary used to portray Cain's murderous wrath (Genesis 4:5-6 )
Simeon - Till in Anger he threw down his pen and went home to his own house. For one thing, the very devil himself sometimes fills me with such a harsh and cruel temper-such a wicked spirit of Anger and hostility at some people-that I could eat them up and annihilate them
Moses - ...
Moses needed such faith, for the murmurings and rebellion of the people were great, and they charged him with causing their trials: why had he brought them out to perish in the wilderness? When God's Anger was kindled against them, he pleaded for them. When God spake of consuming all the people, and making a great nation of Moses, he besought God to turn from His Anger, urging what a reproach it would be forthe Egyptians to say that He had led them out only to slay them; and he reminded God of what He had sworn to His servants Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
Zechariah, Book of - God's Anger with His sinful people is justified (Zechariah 1:1-2 ). Vision One: God's election mercy for His people replaces His Anger (Zechariah 1:7-17 )
Lion - Its cry of Anger is much louder and shorter. Who provoketh him to Anger sinneth against his own soul," Proverbs 19:12 ; Proverbs 20:2 ; that is, he seeketh his own death
Levi - Jacob's moral weakness, in reproaching his sons not with the treacherous murder but with exposing him to danger ("ye have troubled me to make me to stink among the inhabitants of the land"), is faithfully delineated (Genesis 34). O my soul, come not thou into their secret" (deliberative council), renounce all fellowship with their act; "mine honour" (glory, my spirit, which is man's glory, the center of his personality framed in God's image);" for in their Anger they slew a man and in their wantonness (Hebrew) houghed an ox
Lord's Name Taken in Vain - His sacred name is used indiscriminately to express Anger, joy, grief, surprise, impatience; and, what is almost still more unpardonable than all, it is wantonly used as a mere unmeaning expletive, which, being excited by no temptation, can have nothing to extenuate it; which, causing no emotion, can have nothing to recommend it, unless it be the pleasure of the sin
Hebrew Language - Mental qualities are represented by physical members: strength by the "hand" or "arm"; Anger by the "nostril" (aph ); favor by the "shining face"; displeasure by the "falling of the countenance
Wicked (2) - —God’s attitude towards the wicked man is not one of implacable Anger, but of winning kindness (Luke 6:35)
Nahum - Who can endure the heat of God's Anger? (Nahum 1:6 )
Lion - ...
...
Psalm 22:13 (a) The maddening throng around the Cross resembled lions in their hatred, their vociferous shouts and their Anger against the Son of GOD
Smoke - Deuteronomy 29:20 (a) The Anger of the living GOD is described in this graphic way
Repent - 18:10); “And rend your heart, and not your garments, and turn unto the Lord your God: for he is gracious and merciful, slow to Anger … and repenteth him of evil” (Joel 2:13)
Salvation - imports, in general, some great deliverance from any evil or danger. It is to dwell for ever in a place, where no objects of pity or compassion, of Anger or envy, of hatred or distrust, are to be found; but where all will increase the happiness of each other, by mutual love and kindness
Macedonius, Bishop of Constantinople. - The sepulchre containing the relics of Constantine the Great was in danger of falling to pieces, and Macedonius determined to remove them. Constantius's Anger was great against Macedonius because of the slaughter, but even more because he had removed the body without consulting him
Fire - ...
Fire when used as a type usually indicates wrath, judgment, punishment or other expressions of Anger. ...
Judges 9:15 (b) The Anger of Abimelech was to be poured out on Israel. ...
Ezekiel 1:4 (b) This may be a picture of the mighty power, the destroying force of GOD in His righteous Anger and judgment. GOD's fierce Anger is displayed in all its justice, righteousness and purity
the Mother of Zebedee's Children - And it was the sight of all this that made our Lord's rising Anger turn to an infinite pity, till He said to her two sons: 'Are ye able to drink of My cup, and to be baptized with My baptism?' And what do you think the two insane men said? They actually said: "We are able!" In such sin had their mother Salome conceived them. Where had Salome lived all her days? What kind of a mother had she herself had? In what synagogue in all Israel had she worshipped God? Who had been her teachers in the things of God? What had she been thinking about all the time our Lord had been teaching and preaching in her hearing, as He did every day, about seeing with other people's eyes, and feeling with other people's hearts, and doing to other mothers and to their sons as she would have them do to her and to her sons? How could she have lived in this world, and especially in the day and in the discipleship of Christ, and how could she have borne and brought up her sons to be His disciples, and still be capable of this disgraceful scheme? Had she possessed one atom of experience of the world, not to say of truth and wisdom and love, she could never have petitioned for a place of such offence and such danger for her two sons. Even if Christ had asked it of her, she would have shrunk from exposing her two sons to the envy and the Anger and the detraction of all the ten, and of many more besides. But instead of that, this cruel woman to her own flesh and blood was for exposing her two sons to every possible shaft and spear of envy, and Anger, and ill-will, and injury
Naaman - Leprosy was so loathsome, and so utterly incurable and deadly, that it was not looked on as an ordinary disease at all: but, rather, as a special creation in His Anger, and a direct curse of God, both to punish sin, and, at the same time, to teach His people something of what an accursed thing sin really is; till the whole nature of leprosy and all the laws laid down for its treatment, and the miraculous nature of its so seldom cure, all combined to work into the imagination, and into the conscience, and into the heart, and into the ritual, and into the literature of Israel, some of her deepest lessons about the terrible nature and the only proper treatment of sin. What do you say just to give a trial to the things that hitherto have most Angered you to hear them spoken about? The real spiritual nature of salvation has always been an unwelcome subject to you. Leprosy is not cured on your prescription; its true and only cure has laws, and rules, and obediences, and submissions, and sacrifices of its own that may all Anger you to be told them, but it can be had in no other way. And her firstborn is your pride, and your Anger, and your envy, and your ill-will, and your hatred of so many men around you
Devil - In the parallel passage, God in His Anger told David to number Israel (2 Samuel 24:1 ). Believers, on the other hand, are warned even in their Anger not to give Satan a foothold to tempt them (Ephesians 4:27 ). Knowledge about Satan and evil angels alerts Christians to the danger and sublety of satanic temptation
Samuel, Books of - Anger on one side does not require Anger from the other as David's reactions to Saul continually show, summarized in 1 Samuel 24:17 : “Thou art more righteous than I: for thou has rewarded me good, whereas I have rewarded thee evil
Regeneration - Because of this experience Paul urged each believer to practice truth, control Anger, demonstrate kindness, and submit to the control of the Holy Spirit
Locusts - "Therefore also now saith the Lord, Turn ye even to me with all your heart, and with fasting, and with weeping, and with mourning: and rend your heart, and not your garments, and turn unto the Lord your God: for he is gracious and merciful; slow to Anger, and of great kindness, and repenteth him of the evil
Fig Tree - For surely, the Lord did not expect fruit out of season; neither did he mean, as some have supposed, to shew Anger, to a fig tree
Inherit - 47:6), and permitted a remnant of the “possession” to return: “Who is a God like unto thee, that pardoneth iniquity, and passeth by the transgression of the remnant of his heritage? he retaineth not his Anger for ever, because he delighteth in mercy” ( Hezekiah - ...
Hezekiah began his reforms by assembling the priests and Levites and telling them plainly that neglect of the temple and its services was the reason for God’s Anger with Judah (2 Chronicles 29:1-11)
Vengeance (2) - But these are echoes of the Divine wrath; they are not in any single instance the expression of personal Anger, of retaliation, of hatred. ‘Anger (Wrath) of God,’ ‘Avenge,’ ‘Ethics,’ ‘Forgiveness,’ ‘Goel’; JE Eusebius, Bishop of Vercellae - Eusebius was so peremptory in refusing as to excite the Anger of the Arianizing emperor, who banished him, together with some priests and deacons, to Scythopolis in Syria
Rachel - " Jacob with just Anger replied, "am I in God's stead, who hath withheld from thee the fruit of the womb?" God took her at her word; she had Joseph, and in giving birth to Benjamin "died
Passion - Anger; ...
18
Mercy, Merciful - ]'>[3] ‘lovingkindness (mercy) and truth’ being the regnant qualities of His dealings with Israel and with ‘covenant’ ( Deuteronomy 7:9 , 1 Kings 8:23 , Nehemiah 1:6 ; Nehemiah 9:32 , Psalms 89:28 , Isaiah 55:8 , Daniel 9:4 ), as well as with ‘goodness’ and ‘compassion’ (above); while it is contrasted with ‘anger,’ ‘judgment,’ and ‘sacrifice’ ( Micah 7:18 , Psalms 101:1 , Hosea 6:6 )
Responsibility - The Lord revealed to Ezekiel what he expected of his people and the dangers of disobedience. The prophet is a watchman who is accountable to warn the people when danger comes (3:18,20; 33:6,8). Likewise, in the wilderness, Moses affirmed that although the Lord is slow to Anger, "he does not leave the guilty unpunished; he punishes the children for the sin of the fathers to the third and fourth generation" (Numbers 14:18 )
Legs - —The breaking of the legs with a heavy club or bar (σκελοκοπία, crurifragium) was inflicted as a capital punishment on slaves and others who incurred the Anger of irresponsible masters (for reff. ‘One of the malefactors reproached them, saying, We have suffered this for the evils that we have done, but this man having become the Saviour of men, what wrong hath He done to you? And they, being Angered at him, commanded that his legs should not be broken, that he might die in torment’ (see Robinson and James, Gospel and Revelation of Peter; also the edd
Levi - (See Exodus 17:1-7) Here Moses and Aaron stemmed the torrent of the people's Anger; and it should seem to have been in allusion to this, that the man of God, speaking of Levi, said, "whom thou didst prove, and didst find faithful," who did not acknowledge the feelings of nature when those calls of grace demanded faithfulness
Lord - It signifies His position as the one who has authority (like a master) over His people to reward the obedient and punish the disobedient: “Ephraim provoked him to Anger most bitterly: therefore shall he leave his blood upon him, and his reproach shall his Lord return unto him” ( Eudoxius, Bishop of Constantinople - ...
The years during which Eudoxius and Valens acted together were troubled by portents, which many attributed to the Anger of Heaven at the cruelty of Valens in banishing bishops who would not admit Eudoxius to their communion
Satan - When the prophet persisted, God disciplined him: “And God’s Anger was kindled because he went: and the angel of the Lord stood in the way for an adversary against him” ( ju'Das Iscar'Iot - The rules to which the twelve were subject in their first journey, (Matthew 10:9,10 ) sheltered him from the temptation that would have been most dangerous to him. What was Judas' motive in betraying Christ? -- (1) Anger at the public rebuke given him by Christ at the supper in the house of Simon the leper. " (3) The money was used to buy a burial-field for poor strangers
Jehoahaz - His persevering in his father's sin, namely, the worship of Jeroboam's calves, and his leaving the Asherah still standing in Samaria from the time of Ahab (1 Kings 16:33), brought on Israel Jehovah's Anger more than in Jehu's time; for the longer sin is persevered in, the heavier the final reckoning, an accumulated entail of guilt descends (Exodus 20:5)
Levi - ...
Cursed be their Anger, for it was fierce;...
And their wrath, for it was cruel;...
I will divide them in Jacob,...
And scatter them in Israel
Son of David - It was so understood, and the Anger of the priests and scribes was aroused in consequence
Arment - ...
Isaiah 59:17 (a) This figure represents the Anger of GOD against a disobedient people
Beam And Mote - , quotes Augustine as comparing ‘settled hatred’ (the beam) with a passing burst of Anger (the mote)
Nineveh - It was the power used by God to carry out His indignation against Israel: it is thus called "the rod of mine Anger," and the indignation of Jehovah against His land and people ceases in the destruction of the Assyrian — a reference to some power in the last days which will morally succeed to the character of the Assyrian, and be destroyed subsequent to Babylon
Atonement - He is not touched with Anger, resentment, etc
Moses - Though naturally liable to Anger and impatience, he so far subdued himself as to be termed the meekest of men, Numbers 12:3 ; and his piety, humility, and forbearance, the wisdom and vigor of his administration, his unfailing zeal and faith in God, and his disinterested patriotism are worthy of all imitation
Atonement - God reconciles the world unto Himself, in the first instance, by satisfying His own just enmity against sin (Psalms 7:11; Isaiah 12:1, compare 1 Samuel 29:4; "reconcile himself unto his master," not remove his own Anger against his master, but his master's Anger against him)
Amos - The people revelled in it, giving no thought to any further danger. He saw that the Assyrian would eventually push past Damascus down into Palestine, and bring in the day of account; and although he nowhere names Assyria as the agent of God’s Anger, the references are unmistakable ( Amos 5:27 , Amos 6:7 ; Amos 6:14 , Amos 7:17 ). With this broad view of history, a view from which the idea of special privilege is excluded, he sees in the northern power the instrument of Jehovah’s Anger ( Amos 5:27 , Amos 6:14 ); a power that even in its self-aggrandisement is working out Jehovah’s purpose
Jephthah - Meantime, through Jehovah's Anger at Israel's apostasy to Baalim, Ashtaroth, the gods of Ammon, etc, he sold them (compare Romans 7:14, gave them up to the wages that their sin had earned) into the hands of those very people whose gods they chose (Judges 10:7; Judges 10:17-18), the instrument of their sin being made the instrument of their punishment (Proverbs 1:31; Jeremiah 2:19). Herein Gideon was superior, for "he that is slow to Anger is better than the mighty, and he that ruleth his spirit than he that taketh a city" (Proverbs 16:32)
Decrees - Hence, despite the "decree" of the destruction, Zephaniah can call the people to seek God "before the decree takes effect Perhaps you will be hidden in the day of the Lord's Anger" (2:1-3 NASB)
Spirit - Eliphaz accuses Job of venting his Anger on God (Job 15:13 )
Samuel, Second Book of - This is followed by a psalm of thanksgiving by David in which he celebrates what God had been for him in his necessities and dangers. It is sad that the last public act of David should be one of sin, but it must be observed that the Anger of Jehovah was kindled against Israel, and God punished their rebellion by allowing Satan to act upon the pride of David's heart to number Israel
Charge, Chargeable - ...
C — 4: ἐμβριμάομαι (Strong's #1690 — Verb — embrimaomai — em-brim-ah'-om-ahee ) from en, "in," intensive, and brime, "strength," primarily signifies "to snort with Anger, as of horses
Nazareth - The accusers of Stephen refer with contemptuous Anger to ‘this Jesus the Nazarene’ (Acts 6:14), whom the heretic would fain set above Moses
Nazareth - The accusers of Stephen refer with contemptuous Anger to ‘this Jesus the Nazarene’ (Acts 6:14), whom the heretic would fain set above Moses
Balaam - Certainly, "God's Anger was kindled because he went"; for his going was in spite of the former plain prohibition; and the second voice was a permission giving him up in judicial Anger to his own perversity (compare 1 Kings 22:15), a permission too resting on the condition, which Balaam did not wait for, "if the men come to call thee
Micah, Theology of - Their half-truth distorted the covenant by emphasizing only Exodus 34:6 ("The Lord the compassionate and gracious God, slow to Anger, abounding in love and faithfulness") and omitting Exodus 34:7 ("yet he does not leave the guilty unpunished"). Having purged his imperium within, thereby protecting it from the divine Anger against unholiness, the Lord promises to guard it from enemies without (v
Eternal Fire (2) - According to Deuteronomy 32:22 the fire of Jehovah’s Anger reaches down to Sheol. , where God’s Anger or jealousy and man’s wickedness are said to burn like fire
Matthew - And then, with that never-to-be-forgotten look and accent of mingled Anger and mercy, our Lord went immediately into the publican's office and said to him: 'Matthew, thou must leave all this life of thine and come and follow Me. Then their loud and angry voices; and then His voice with more pity in it than Anger, calling sinners to repentance
Elijah - A passion of scorn and contempt; a passion of Anger and revenge; a passion of sadness and dejection and despair; a passion of preaching; a passion of prayer. That man among ourselves who has the most human nature in him and the most heart; the most heart and the most passion in his heart; the most love and the most hate; the most Anger and the most meekness; the most scorn and the most sympathy; the most sunshine and the most melancholy; the most agony in prayer, and the most victorious assurance that, all the time, his prayer is already answered-that man is the likest of us all to the prophet Elijah; that man has Elijah's own mantle fallen upon him
Reconcile, Reconciliation - Anger, where there is no personal element, is a sign of moral health if, and if only, it is accompanied by grief
Hosea - She must be dealt with in judgement, but the valley of Achor (where God's Anger was turned away, Joshua 7:26 ) should be a door of hope. The people encouraged the king and princes in their wickedness: their weakness was manifest, for strangers had devoured them
Honesty - Here it is not common dishonesty that rouses our Lord’s Anger so much as the desecration of the house of God
Look - As a last instance, though expressing a very different emotion, we may adduce Mark 3:5 ‘He looked round about on them (περιβλεψάμενος αὐτούς) with Anger, being grieved for the hardness of their hearts
Colours - ’ ‘Light and fire, when regarded ethically in Holy Scripture, are contrasts: light, the image of beneficent love; and fire, of destroying Anger’ (Delitzsch, Iris, Eng
Aurelius, Marcus, Roman Emperor - The gods were wroth, and what had roused their Anger but the presence of those who denied them? "Christianos ad leones " seemed the remedy for every disaster. 208) and appended to Justin's first Apology, which purports to be addressed to the Senate, informing them how, when he and his army were in danger of perishing for want of water in the country of the Marcomanni, the Christians in his army had prayed to their God, and refreshing rain had fallen for them, and a destroying hail on their enemies, and bidding them therefore to refrain from all accusations against Christians as such, and ordering all who so accused them to be burnt alive
Plagues of Egypt - We read that Moses, though the meekest of men, went out from Pharaoh in great Anger
Fuel - The words of the prophet are: "Take heed and be quiet; fear not, neither be faint-hearted, for the two tails of these smoking firebrands, for the fierce Anger of Rezin with Syria, and of the son of Remaliah," Isaiah 7:4
Balaam - So far there had been no indication of God’s displeasure; but now follows ( Numbers 22:22-34 ) the story of the ass, through which God’s Anger at the refusal of the seer to accept His answer, given once and for all, is manifested
jo'Seph - Sold into Egypt to Potiphar, Joseph prospered and was soon set over Potiphar's house, and "all he had he gave into his hand;" but incurring the Anger of Potiphar's wife ch
Jacob - )...
To escape his brother’s Anger, Jacob fled north
God (2) - The Law declared that a man should not kill, but Jesus taught that Anger exposed one to the same danger of judgment (Matthew 5:21 f. Now this profounder conception of sin, this attaching of the gravest penalties to the secret feeling of Anger and to the unclean desire, implies a clearer and more ethical conception of the holiness of God
Alexander the Coppersmith - Did Paul feel in his heart, and did he entertain and express to Timothy, all the Anger and resentment that is expressed in the text? Did Paul actually say, "The Lord reward Alexander the coppersmith according to his evil works?" Whether he did or no, that makes no difference to us. Of men, that is, who would not be tempted by any less spiritual trial than Anger and resentment at the enemies, not of themselves, but of the Church of Christ
Spirit - ...
Spirit is used extensively with human emotions including sorrow ( Proverbs 15:4 ,Proverbs 15:4,15:13 ), anguish (Exodus 6:9 ; John 13:21 ), Anger (Proverbs 14:29 ; Proverbs 16:32 ), vexation (Ecclesiastes 1:14 ), fear (2 Timothy 1:7 ), and joy (Luke 1:47 )
Satan - ...
Believers need to exercise care about Anger, so as "not to give the devil a foothold" (Ephesians 4:26 )
Corinthians - This letter produced in the Corinthians great grief, vigilance against the vices reproved, and a very beneficial dread of God's Anger
Waldenses - Thus a pontifical inquisitor, quoted by Usher, says, "These heretics are known by their manners and conversation; for they are orderly and modest in their behaviour and deportment; they avoid all appearance of pride in their dress; they are chaste, temperate, and sober; they seek not to amass riches; they abstain from Anger; and, even while at work, are either learning or teaching
James - Such, indeed, was his general reputation for piety and virtue, that, as we learn from Origen, Eusebius, and Jerom, Josephus thought, and declared it to be the common opinion, that the sufferings of the Jews, and the destruction of their city and temple, were owing to the Anger of God, excited by the murder of James
Poetry of the Hebrews - ...
A soft answer turneth away wrath; but frievous words stir up Anger
Jacob - ...
Soon after his acquisition of his father's blessing (Genesis 27 ), Jacob became conscious of his guilt; and afraid of the Anger of Esau, at the suggestion of Rebekah Isaac sent him away to Haran, 400 miles or more, to find a wife among his cousins, the family of Laban, the Syrian (28)
Judgment - His love for all that is right is so strong that he reacts against all that is wrong in righteous Anger and holy wrath (Romans 1:18; Romans 2:5; Ephesians 5:6; Revelation 6:17; see HELL; PUNISHMENT)
Nicodemus - There was a sufficient sense of truth and justice, and of personal interest in Jesus, to enable him to risk the Anger of the majority by a protest, but enough of caution or timidity to put the protest into an indirect and tentative form rather than into a bold defence of the Master
Rabbulas, Bishop of Edessa - Alexander's Anger having been aroused, Andrew wrote to the oeconomi of Hierapolis to justify himself
Severus Sulpicius, an Historian - 169–170), he braved his father's Anger and the flouts of worldly acquaintances ( ib
Sin - 22:8: “He that soweth iniquity shall reap vanity [2]: and the rod of his Anger shall fail. ...
Ra’ may also connote a fierceness or wildness: “He cast upon them the fierceness of his Anger, wrath, and indignation, and trouble, by sending evil [8] angels among them” ( Anger of the Lord was hot against Israel; and he said, Because that this people hath transgressed my covenant which I commanded their fathers, and have not hearkened unto my voice” (cf
Mark, Theology of - "...
The narrative interpretation of what it means to be the Son of God is contained in those stories where the authority of Jesus as a teacher evokes the amazement of the crowd or the Anger and unbelief of the religious authorities. Jesus, the Son of God, is also a person from Nazareth (1:9,24; 10:47; 14:67; 16:6) who reacts with Anger (3:5; 8:33; 10:14; 11:15-16), is disappointed (6:5-6; 9:19; 11:12-14), and not only dies (15:45) but is deeply disturbed at the inevitability of death (14:33-34) and its meaning (15:34)
Gestures - In Mark 3:5 it conveys His righteous Anger (|| Lk. does not mention the Anger)
the Angel of the Church in Sardis - In Anger at him, as also at those who so puffed him up; both in Anger and in love and in pity, his Master sent to His inflated servant this plain-spoken message and most solemn warning. For praise and popularity is the most dangerous of all drugs to a minister. " I did not ask her, but I suppose she meant that the thought of her son in his constant danger made her life of intercessory prayer in his behalf perfect before God, and all Spurgeon's readers will bear her out about his sermons
Nabal - How Abigail behaved herself before the insulted and revengeful soldiers; with what tact and understanding she spake to David; and how she melted David and turned away his hot Anger-all that we read in the matter and the manner of this sacred writer. ' Yes, constant fault-finding; constant correction, and that before strangers; gloomy looks; rough words and manners; all blame and no praise-with these things we are all driving one another to the brink of the pond every day. It cures churlishness in Nabal; and impatience, and weariness, and despair of life in Abigail; and Anger and revenge in David
Cross, Crucifixion - In any case, the wrath is not to be seen as the capricious Anger of a malevolent God, but rather as the careful, considered fury of the Holy One of Israel against the evil that keeps man from his rightful place as God's highest and most prized possession
Cloud, Cloud of the Lord - ...
The pillar of cloud motif-set forth in the exodus account and expanded in the prophetic announcements of a new exodus after the Babylonian exile-encompasses a rich complex of theological meanings and functions: guidance/leading (of Israel out of Egypt and through the wilderness to Canaan, Exodus 13:21 ; Numbers 14:14 ; Nehemiah 9:12 ; Psalm 78:14 ); a signal for movement (breaking and setting up camp, Exodus 40:36-37 ; Numbers 9:17-23 ); protection from danger (as a barrier of darkness between Israel and the Egyptians, Exodus 14:19-20 ); the sustained, immediate, personal presence of Yahweh/the angel of the Lord (Exodus 13:22 ; 14:19,24 ; 40:38 ; Numbers 9:15-16 ); an agency of summons (to battle, Numbers 10:34-35 ; and to worship, Exodus 33:10 ); both a concealment and manifestation of divine glory (Exodus 16:10 ; 19:9,16 ; 20:21 ; 24:15-18 ; 34:5 ; Deuteronomy 4:11 ; 5:22 ); the place of propositional revelation (as an oracular cloud, Exodus 33:9 ; Psalm 99:7 ); the dwelling place/throne of divinity (over the tabernacle, Numbers 9:18,22 ; 10:11 ; and in particular, over the mercy seat, Leviticus 16:2 ); the locus of cultic theophany (for the investiture of the seventy elders and Joshua, Numbers 11:25 ; Deuteronomy 31:15 ; for the inauguration of the tabernacle, 1619167463_57 ); shade/protection from the sun or storm (Numbers 10:34 ; Psalm 105:39 ; Isaiah 4:5 ); illumination (as a pillar of fire by night, Exodus 14:20 ; Numbers 9:15 ); and an agency of legal investigation and/or executive judgment (against Israel's enemies, Exodus 14:24 ; and against rebels within Israel, Numbers 12:5,10 ; 16:42 ). On that day the Anger of Yahweh will burn with "a thick rising (smoke-) cloud" (Isaiah 30:27 )
Revelation, Book of - ...
The third series of judgments then follows, with seven angels pouring out seven bowls of God’s Anger upon a rebellious world (15:1-16:21)
Gestures - One's eyes can show Anger (Mark 3:5 )
Perseverance - ...
According to the Epistle to the Hebrews, Moses persevered in the face of the Egyptian king's Anger "because he saw him who is invisible" (Hebrews 11:27 )
Motives - Jesus notes that it is the "pure in heart" who will be rewarded (Matthew 5:8 ; 22:37-38 ; Mark 7:20-21 ), even as he equates Anger with murder and lust with adultery (Matthew 5:21-22,28 )
Head, Headship - Blushing, tears, paleness, and flushing may show fear, Anger, or mourning
Repentance - An especially vivid illustration of this reversal is found in 1619167463_7 : "How can I give you up, Ephraim? My heart is changed within me I will not carry out my fierce Anger
Fire - "A fire is kindled in mine Anger, and shall burn unto the lowest hell; and shall consume the earth with her increase, and set on fire the foundations of the nations
Pharisees - Hence they accounted causeless Anger and impure desires as trifles of no moment, Matthew 5:21-22 ; Matthew 5:27-30 ; they compassed sea and land to make proselytes to the Jewish religion from among the Gentiles, that they might rule over their consciences and wealth; and these proselytes, through the influence of their own scandalous examples and characters, they soon rendered more profligate and abandoned than ever they were before their conversion, Matthew 23:15
Gardens - Thus Jehovah calls the apostate Jews, "a people that provoketh me continually to Anger to my face, that sacrificeth in gardens,"...
Isaiah 65:3 . They resembled those thorny plants which are twisted together, whose spines point in every direction, and are so sharp and strong that they cannot be touched without danger, and so entangling that when the traveller has with much pain and exertion freed himself from one, he is instantly seized by another
Stumbling - In England, where the roads are so excellent, we do not readily perceive the force and just application of the Scriptural figures, derived from a ‘stone of stumbling, and a rock of offence,' Isaiah 8:14 , and similar passages; but in the east, where the roads are, for the most part, nothing more than an accustomed track, the constant danger and impediment arising to travellers from stones and rocks fully explain the allusion. As soon as this was conveyed to him, he seemed strongly agitated by Anger, yet endeavoured to conceal his emotions under affected contempt and derision, which produced from him one of the most singular grins that ever yet marred the human physiognomy. Meantime I considered myself as being in some danger; and yet such was the power which he had over the cattle, that I found it impossible to stop him. This country therefore, for some distance round us, is very dangerous to travellers, whose only safety lies in flight
Judgement - He is represented as coming from Edom, with dyed garments from Bozrah, when He will tread the people in His Anger, and trample them in His fury, and their blood will stain all His raiment
Perfection (Human) - This law of the highest and purest possible motive will preclude not only the external act of murder, but the cherishing of Anger against a brother (Matthew 5:21-26). This law of the inner life in harmony with the Father’s will is in no danger of coming into conflict with any righteous system of legal regulations, and least of all with the Law of God as revealed in the OT
Exodus, Theology of - Each plague becomes more dangerous. Almost every plague account notes the obstinate attitude of Pharaoh, an attitude that outwardly may give in to the danger of the moment, but resurfaces when the plague abates. Yahweh is compassionate, gracious, slow to Anger, abounding in steadfast love, abounding in faithfulness, and forgiving (34:6-7). God's Anger may be averted by intercession (8:8; 32:30-34) and repentance holds the possibility of aversion of God's wrath, although Pharaoh does not do so in a meaningful way
Samson - He would raise pity and Anger wherewith to purge our hearts as we saw Samson striving to do only what was right, with men of Belial all about him waiting for his halting, and dwelling on all his past wrong-doing. Who is a God like unto Thee, that pardoneth iniquity, and passeth by the transgression of the remnant of His heritage? He retaineth not His Anger for ever, because He delighteth in mercy
David - The last act the Books of Samuel report about David is his census of the people, bringing God's Anger but also preparing a place for the Temple to be built (2 Samuel 24:1 )
King - God in retribution "gave them a king in His Anger" (Hosea 13:10-11). After the kingdom was set up in Israel the danger was no longer of a literal (but see Jeremiah 42:14) but of a spiritual backsliding return to Egypt (Hosea 11:5; Isaiah 30:1-2; Isaiah 36:9; Ezekiel 17:15)
Nahum, Theology of - Nahum's obvious Anger may be understood against the background of the cruel Assyrian oppression that God's people, as well as other nations, had suffered
Satan - Instead of being a rival power to good and God, as in the Persian belief as to Ormuzd and Ahriman, he is subordinate; his malicious temptation of David was overruled to work out Jehovah's Anger against Israel (2 Samuel 24:1; 1 Chronicles 21:1)
Zedekiah - It was through the Anger of Jehovah against Judah that Zedekiah was given up to his own rebellious devices, "stiffening his neck and hardening his heart from turning unto the Lord God of Israel" who warned him by Jeremiah; like Pharaoh of old (2 Chronicles 36:12-13), he would "not humble himself" (Jeremiah 38:5; Jeremiah 39:1-7; Jeremiah 52:1-11; and Jeremiah 21; 24; 27; 28; 29; 32; 33; 34; 37; 38)
Hand - Exodus 22 ...
To lay hands on in Anger, to assault or seize, or to smite
Josiah - Josiah's reformation had not removed the deep seated evil (as Jeremiah and Zephaniah testify), so that the deceased Manasseh's sin, acting still far and wide though hiddenly now, awaited God's fierce Anger on Jerusalem, as he was warned by God through Huldah (2 Kings 22:16-20)
Ham - At the same time, it is only by laying such sudden and ungovernable outbursts as his was to heart that we shall ever learn how to hold ourselves in when we are mad with Anger at our children. Now, if David's hot Anger against Absalom or Solomon had come upon him when he was in that mind, and had he remembered ancient Noah and his wakening from his wine, what would David have done? With the Holy Spirit not taken away from him, David would have recollected his former falls, and lie would have retreated hack upon his own fifty-first psalm
Self-Control - He had moods of unbounded hope (John 12:32), of depression and shrinking (Matthew 26:38, John 12:27), of indignant Anger (Matthew 23:13-36), of equanimity and comparative insensibility to passing impressions (Luke 13:32, John 19:11); but there was no such long-continued pre-eminence of one good quality over another as would allow the placing of Him, in regard to temperament, in any of the ordinary categories. The Anger of just indignation finds expression and becomes even torrential in Matthew 23:13-36; but there is nowhere any trace of personal rancour. He preserves consistently the wise mean, well removed from the ordinary dangers, on either side, of excess and of defect. In the freedom of His contact with nature and man, His heart never more than momentarily failed, and His self-control in times of confusion and danger helped to make Him the most consummate Leader of sinful men, serene and strong, and always confident in God and in the issue
David - in His Races - '...
But, who is that roaring all the day long on the murderous wheel? Who is that stretched and stretched again on the rack all night till all his bones are out of joint-out of joint and broken in pieces with the hammer and the Anger of God? The voice of whose roaring is that-According to the multitude of Thy tender mercies blot out my transgressions? And that-For I acknowledge my transgressions, and my sin is ever before me? Do you ask who that is? Do you not know? That is the prodigal son of the Old Testament. I do not know that of all the bad blood of which all our hearts are full there is any that lasts longer than Anger, and resentment, and ill-will at our enemies, at our detractors, and at those who despise and deride us
Joseph - " Their Anger was increased when he told them his dreams (37:11)
Exile - Assyria was only the “rod of mine Anger”' (Isaiah 10:5 )
Fall - ...
(2) The consequences of the curse are the penalty of a single sin, by which man incurred the just Anger of God
Assyria - " The Assyrian is the over-flowing scourge of God's Anger because of Israel's connection with idolatry
Diseases - ...
The spots for the most part make their appearance very suddenly, especially if the infected person, at the period when the disease shows itself externally, happens to be in great fear, or to be moved with Anger, Leviticus 13:6-844 ; 2 Chronicles 26:19 . Niebuhr, "is neither infectious nor dangerous. The catalepsy, which is caused by a contraction of the muscles in the whole or a part of the body, for example, in the hands, and is very dangerous
Election - Paul, "were fulfilled the words of Moses, I will provoke you to jealousy by them that are no people, and by a foolish," ignorant and idolatrous, "people I will Anger you
Love - God has such a love for what is right that he reacts in righteous Anger against all that is wrong
Joseph (2) - § [4] In Bethlehem Jesus was born; and there the shepherds, to whom the angel had announced the birth of the Saviour, found Mary and Joseph and ‘the babe lying in a manger’ (Luke 2:16). Pilate, too, neither loved nor was loved by Israel, and his Anger might be kindled at the coming of a Jew, and the member of the Sanhedrin be assailed with insults
Sacrifice - First, that whereas the heathen conceived of their gods as alienated in jealousy or Anger, to be sought after and to be appeased by the unaided action of man, Scripture represents God himself as approaching man, as pointing out and sanctioning the way by which the broken covenant should be restored
Draw - ...
Wilt thou draw out thine Anger to all generations? Psalms 84
God, Name of - God's glory remains an awesome, holy, unapproachable, and dangerous manifestation. Isaiah most clearly takes this step: "See, the Name of the Lord comes from afar, with burning Anger and dense clouds of smoke" (Isaiah 30:27 )
Hymns - ’...
As a specimen of the style Ode 7 may be quoted: ‘As the impulse of Anger against evil, so is the impulse of joy over what is lovely, and brings in of its fruits without restraint
John the Baptist - who holds that the real occasion of John’s imprisonment was Herod’s fear of political trouble, nevertheless allows that there is no real inconsistency between the statement of Josephus and the further assertion of the Evangelists that John had roused the Anger of Herod, and still more of Herodias, by his stern rebuke
Canaan - It was these sins the Jews were to abhor and exterminate; they were to act as agents of God's justice, and not for the gratification of their own avarice, Anger, or lust, the spoil and the captives being all devoted to destruction
Jonathan - Jonathan then only "rose from (his place beside his father at) table in fierce Anger (the only time of his losing self command toward his father) and (did eat no meat," etc
Lactantius - The tract de Irâ Dei , against the Epicureans and Stoics, is intended to prove God as capable of Anger as of compassion and mercy
Punishment (2) - the striking sequence of verses in Luke 2:34; Matthew 21:13-14); for if sin is more than a fiction, the measure of God’s love for the sinner will determine the severity of His Anger against his sin
Adam - For we are consumed by Thine Anger, and by Thy wrath are we troubled. Who knoweth the power of Thine Anger? Even according to Thy fear, so is Thy wrath
Antiochus - "Within a few days (12 years, "few" in comparison with Antiochus's 37 years) he was destroyed, neither in Anger nor in battle," but poisoned by Heliodorus
Pride (2) - ...
(2) The strictures our Lord passed on the racial pride of the Jews drew against Him their fiercest Anger. Many who would loathe the commonly recognized vaingloriousness of the Pharisees are dangerously near sharing in the mental arrogance which prompted the latter to sneer, ‘This multitude which knoweth not the law are accursed’ (John 7:49). Boyd Carpenter on ‘The Dangers of Contempt’)
Lust - This is the usage of Aristotle, who regards ‘lust,’ Anger, fear, etc. Besides this, lust brings one face to face with God’s destructive Anger against sin (cf
Mark, the Gospel According to - ...
Jesus' looks, Mark 3:5, "He looked round about on them in Anger" (Mark 3:34); Mark 8:33; Mark 10:21-23, "Jesus beholding loved him," etc
Mercy, Merciful - Nowhere is their interrelatedness more evident than in the following recurrent Old Testament liturgy which combines all three: “God is merciful ( racham ) and gracious (chana ), slow to Anger, and abounding in steadfast love (chesed ) and faithfulness” (Exodus 34:6 ; Numbers 14:18 ; Nehemiah 9:17 ; Psalm 86:15 ; Psalm 103:8 ; Psalm 145:8 ; Joel 2:13 ; Jonah 4:2 )
Sin - Anger in the heart is the same as murder (Matthew 5:21-22 )
Idol, Idolatry - ...
God's first and foremost reaction to idolatry is Anger
the Woman With the Issue of Blood - And when again your evil heart runs with envy, and Anger, and pride, and ill-will, and unkindness, and all the rest of the bad blood of hell,-all that the more grasp you at Him and at His garment
Fall - To sink into an air of dejection, discontent, Anger, sorrow or shame applied to the countenance or look
Discipline - The Christian must put away Anger, bitterness, clamour, covetousness, envy, evil-speaking, falsehood, fornication, guile, hypocrisy, malice, railing, shameful speaking, uncleanness, wrath (Ephesians 4:17-32, Colossians 3:8-11; cf
Nehemiah, Theology of - The Lord is a God of forgiveness, grace, and compassion, slow to Anger and abounding in lovingkindness (9:17)
God - He opposes evil through personal expressions of His wrath, Anger, judgment, punishment, and jealousy
Jehoram - The great reason was God's Anger" because he had forsaken the Lord God of his fathers
Mark, the Gospel of - Moved by compassion, Anger, frustration, mercy, and sorrow (Mark 1:41 ; Mark 3:5 ; Mark 8:17 ; Mark 14:6 ,Mark 14:6,14:33 ), Jesus ministered among His own kind
Religion - To serve his historical purposes, God calls Assyria "the rod of my Anger , the club of my wrath" (Isaiah 10:5 ), Nebuchadnezzar "my servant" (Jeremiah 25:9 ), and Cyrus "my shepherd" to "accomplish all that I plan" (Isaiah 44:28 )
Person, Personhood - But there is real danger when the consideration of anthropology is pursued in isolation quite apart from theology. The whole spectrum of emotions is attributed to the heartpositive emotions like love, loyalty, joy, comfort and negative ones like grief, envy, Anger
Silence - There is not even the faintest trace of Anger against those who have wreaked their vengeance upon Him
Commandments - ‘Thou shalt not kill’ prohibits Anger, scorn, contention
the Man Who Had Not on a Wedding Arment - But a load of Anger and hatred and wickedness that had lain like a mill-stone on both their hearts was from that moment removed
the Bidden to the Reat Marriage Supper And Some of Their Excuses - ' And, then, what will all these things do for you against the Anger of Almighty God, and against the wrath of the Lamb? Whereas, say Yes! and all things are yours, and you are His, and He is God's. ...
But even that sufficient danger and disaster is not all
Antioch - To avert the Anger of the gods during a season of pestilence, he ordered the sculptor Leios to hew Mt
David - This called forth Psalm 54 , in which David cries earnestly to be saved: strangers had risen up against him; but his faith could say that God had delivered him out of all trouble. ...
David was tempted by Satan to number Israel: it was allowed of God, for his Anger was kindled against Israel, though we are not told what was the occasion of it
Aaron - He also indignantly reproved Aaron, whose sin indeed had kindled against him the Anger of the Lord, so that he would "have destroyed him but that Moses prayed for him
God - God’s attitude to sin is one of wrath, or righteous Anger
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - ...
The Testament of Dan (‘concerning Anger and lying,’ β). Anger blinds a man, and masters him body and soul (i
Ethics (2) - Just as His Anger at the profanation of the Temple moved Him to an involuntary display of a religious feeling superior to, and more delicate than, that of His fellows, so His collision with the leading representatives of Judaism evokes from Him not merely an indignant criticism, but also a manifestation of His own inherent character. The unheeded moments when the animal nature starts up in a fit of Anger or of impure desire are grievously sinful in the eyes of God, as well as the actual misdeeds. First of all He shows that the evasions and periphrases by which those who swear hope to escape the danger of profaning God’s holy name, are of no avail; every oath is and remains an adjuration of God
Flood, the - In contrast to the other ancient Near Eastern stories, in which the gods are arbitrary, acting out of unreasoning Anger, selfishness, and caprice, seeking to deceive the people and not inform them of the impending flood, the biblical picture of the God of the flood is far different
Retribution (2) - Suffering may be a mark of God’s love no less than of His Anger (cf
Paul as Sold Under Sin - You will soon hear His voice speaking in Anger to your jailors at your prison door and saying how displeased He is over all your affliction
the Angel of the Church in Smyrna - " Polycarp was in constant danger of death and in constant fear of death. Still, the devil sometimes fills me with such a harsh and cruel temper; such a spirit of Anger and hostility at some people, that I could eat them up and annihilate them
Numbers, Book of - God gave the people quails, but His Anger was kindled and He smote them with a great slaughter
Elesbaan, a King, Hermit, And Saint of Ethiopia - The Arabic historians record that Elesbaan swore to yet lay hold of the land of the Homeritae, both mountain and plain, pluck the forelock from the rebel's head, and take his blood as the price of Aryates's death; and they tell of the mixed cunning and cowardice by which Abrahah satisfied the Ethiopian's oath, and evaded his Anger, winning at last a recognition of his dignity
Jeroboam - 'Lay down thy plummet,' said Ahijah in hot Anger to Jeroboam one day-'lay down thy measuring line, and come out to the potter's field with me
Mary Magdalene - ...
Pride, envy, Anger, intemperance, lasciviousness, covetousness, spiritual sloth-these were Dante's seven scars on his sanctified forehead
Almighty - " "He removeth the mountains, and they know it not; he overturneth them in his Anger; he shaketh the earth out of her place, and the pillars thereof tremble; he commandeth the sun and it riseth not, and sealeth up the stars
Elijah - " The messengers of Ahaziah returned, and informed the king, that a stranger had told them he should certainly die; and Ahaziah knew that this was the Prophet Elijah. By these fearful miracles he was accredited to this successor of Ahab as a prophet of the true God, and the destruction of these companies of armed men, was a demonstration of God's Anger against the people at large
Lutherans - To conceive that inclination to evil incurs not in itself the disapprobation of Heaven, appeared to them little better than an apology for crime, or at least a dangerous palliation of that which the Christian's duty compels him not only to repress but abhor. The doctrine of the popish divines, explained more at large, was this: When the sinner, conscious of his past transgressions, inquired where he was to seek the expiation of his crime, and deliverance from the dreadful consequences of it, the general answer was, In the merit of penitence; a merit capable of annihilating guilt, and appeasing the Anger of incensed Omnipotence. So deeply rooted in the minds of the papists had become the persuasion of its thus effecting the best of purposes, and that even without the necessity of an actual participation of it by him upon whom the benefit is conferred, that the celebration of the mass was universally regarded as the means of appeasing the Anger of Heaven, and obtaining pardon and peace, of procuring divine assistance for the living, and, for the dead, deliverance from the bitter pains of purgatory
Confession - To own and profess the truths of Christ, and to obey his commandments, in spite of opposition and danger from enemies,...
Matthew 10:32 . He who performs the office of confessor gives the penitent nine-and-thirty blows on the back with a leathern strap, repeating these words, "God, being full of compassion, forgave their iniquity, and destroyed them not; yea, many a time turned he his Anger away, and did not stir up all his wrath. I was then almost sixteen years of age; but I knew not God, and was led into captivity by the Irish, with many thousand men, as we deserved, because we estranged ourselves from God, and did not keep his laws, and were disobedient to our pastors, who admonished us with respect to our salvation: and the Lord brought down upon us the Anger of his Spirit, and dispersed us among many nations, even to the extremity of the earth, where my meanness was conspicuous among foreigners, and where the Lord discovered to me a sense of my unbelief; that late I should remember my transgressions, and that I should be converted with my whole heart to the Lord my God, who had respect to my humiliation, and pitied my youth and ignorance, even before I knew him, and before I was wise, or could distinguish between right and wrong, and strengthened me, and cherished me, as a father would a son. It means not merely a hope of deliverance from danger or from vengeance, but a federal title to positive happiness, purchased by the merits, and declared to mankind by the Gospel of Christ Jesus our Lord
Jesus Christ - But if the Psalm be inquired into more narrowly, and compared with parallel prophecies; if it be duly considered, that not only is the extraordinary person here spoken of called "the Son of God," but that title is so ascribed to him as to imply, that it belongs to him in a manner that is absolutely singular, and peculiar to himself, seeing he is said to be begotten of God, Isaiah 49:7 , and is called, by way of eminence, "the Son," Psalms 102:25-28 ; that the danger of provoking him to Anger is spoken of in so very different a manner from what the Scripture uses in speaking of the Anger of any mere creature, "Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way when his wrath is kindled but a little;" that when the kings and judges of the earth are commanded to serve God with fear, they are at the same time commanded to kiss the Son, which in those times and places was frequently an expression of adoration; and, particularly, that, whereas other Scriptures contain awful and just threatenings against those who trust in any mere man, the Psalmist nevertheless expressly calls them blessed who trust in the Son here spoken of;—all these things taken together make up a character of unequivocal divinity: and, on the other hand, when it is said, that God would set this his Son as his King on his holy hill of Zion, Isaiah 49:6 , this, and various other expressions in this Psalm, contain characters of that subordination which is appropriate to that divine Person who was to be incarnate, and engage in a work assigned to him by the Father
Lois And Eunice - I will not provoke my children to Anger
Judges, Theology of - Although the nature of this evil is rarely spelled out, their sin prompts the Anger of God and results in oppression at the hands of some foreign nation (2:14; 3:8; 4:2; 10:9)
Deuteronomy, the Book of - ...
The later in Deuteronomy refer to the second and additional tithe on the increase of the field only, and for celebrating the sacred feasts each first and second year in the sanctuary, every third year at home with a feast to the Levites, the stranger, fatherless, and widow; like the love-feasts of New Testament (Deuteronomy 11:5. His allusion to the Lord's Anger and exclusion of himself, when speaking of that of the people, accords with the character of the meekest of men (Deuteronomy 1:34-38)
Paul as a Believing Man - I can very well believe that Paul's so original, so powerful, and so cross-concentrated faith, staggers and Angers some of you. It does not stagger and Anger any of you half so much as at one time it both staggered and positively exasperated Paul himself
Ephesians, Book of - Anger and malice must turn to love, compassion, and forgiveness
Woe - ‘As well as meekness there was Anger, and besides tenderness there was strength’ (Hall Caine, Illus
Law of God - He begins with a commandment of the Decalogue, the Sixth, coupled with a corresponding passage from the Mosaic legislation, ‘and whosoever shall kill, shall be in danger of the judgment’ (Matthew 5:21). He says in effect, ‘The spirit of the commandment is this: Anger is murder. I say unto you, That whosoever is angry with his brother … shall be in danger of the Judgment’ (Matthew 5:22)
Aaron - ...
But, the so-called "feast of the Lord" sank into gross paganness; "the people sat down to eat and to drink, and rose up to play," "dancing" before the calf, "naked unto their shame among their enemies"; they aroused Moses' righteous Anger when he descended from the mountain, so that he broke in pieces the tables out of his hand, as a symbol of their violation of the covenant
the Woman Who Took Leaven And Hid it in Three Measures of Meal - A little of the leaven of Anger-think it out, with home-coming illustrations, for yourself
Paul as the Chief of Sinners - And when the enraged crowd were about to fall upon the soothsayer and tear him to pieces for saying such things about their greatest saint, Socrates himself came forward and restrained their Anger and confessed openly and said, "Ye men of Athens, let this truth-speaking man alone, and do him no harm
Enoch - God has not yet in Anger said, Cut that cumberer down! Instead of that, He is still waiting to be gracious to you
Abel - The effect of this upon Cain was not to humble him before God, but to excite Anger against his brother; and, being in the field with him, or, as the old versions have it, having said to him, "Let us go out into the field," "he rose up against Abel his brother, and slew him;" and for that crime, by which the first blood of man was shed by man upon the earth,—a murder aggravated by the relationship and the "righteous" character of the sufferer, and having in it also the nature of religious persecution,—he was pronounced by the Lord "cursed from the earth
Sin - The force of Abimelech’s complaint against Abraham lay in the fact that the former was guiltless of wronging the latter, whereas he was in serious danger of sinning against God in consequence of the patriarch’s duplicity. God is said by the early historian of David’s reign to have been the author of the king’s act, because ‘His Anger was kindled against Israel’ ( 2 Samuel 24:1 )
Unbelief - Man is not struck by the inquiry, "How shall I, unclean as I am, approach the holy God, and stand before him, when he judges me according to the holy law which he has himself engraven on my conscience? What shall I do to become free from the guilt which oppresses me, and again to attain to communion with him?" To make inquiries such as these, this spirit of deism considers as fanaticism; and it casts away from itself all notions of God's Anger, judgments, or punishments, as representations arising only from the limited nature of the human understanding. From the nature of the case, however, it is clear that a fanatical zeal, where the heat of passion concealed from man the hollowness and falsehood of his faith, might be created for a religion, to which man only betook himself as a refuge in his misery, and in his dread of the abyss of unbelief; a religion which no longer served for the development of man's nature, and into which, nevertheless, he felt himself driven back from the want of any other; and that men must use every kind of power and art to uphold that which was in danger of falling from its own internal weakness, and to defend that which was unable to defend itself by its own power
Lot - Every new acre of pasture land, and every new well of water for his cattle, and every new time of stocktaking, only made Abraham confess himself more and more a stranger and a pilgrim with God on the earth. Think, fathers; oh, think, mothers; think, young men, also, with so much at stake-think what the temptations and the dangers and the almost sure issues of this and that choice in life must be. Look at its dangers, its temptations, and especially at its companionships. You can all cast your stones of Anger and scorn and astonishment at Lot; I cannot. But, then, to read that only makes us stop and say and ask, Why did a man with a beginning like Lot, and with past experiences like Lot, why did he not rise up and leave a life, and a neighbourhood, and an occupation, and a companionship out of all which so much danger and so much vexation of soul continually sprang? The reason was that he had invested in Sodom, as our merchants would say. Just what God will have to do to deliver your soul and mine from the things that so endanger our souls and so vex them His time will tell
Exodus, the Book of - Then the Lord's visitation on him (probably sudden and dangerous sickness) for neglecting to circumcise his son (Exodus 4:24-26). To Pharaoh it was the longsuffering appeal of God, who is slow to Anger, and who tries the milder chastisements to bring the sinner if possible to repentance before resorting to the more severe
Incarnation - He felt even strong emotions: wonder ( Mark 6:6 , Luke 7:9 ), compassion ( Mark 8:2 , Luke 7:13 ), joy ( Luke 10:21 ), Anger ( Mark 8:12 ; Mark 10:14 ); He was deeply moved ( John 11:33 , Mark 14:33 )
Homosexuality - " But deeply ingrained Anger does not justify murder, nor does deeply ingrained greed justify theft or materialism, nor does the deeply ingrained desire of many heterosexuals for multiple partners justify promiscuity
Gregorius (32) Turonensis, Bishop of Tours - Gregory, suspicious of Fredegund's design, warned Leudastes's father-in-law, and besought him to induce Leudastes to keep quiet till Fredegund's Anger was appeased
Saul - giving up to the manifestation of thine own) evil be from Jehovah, through His Anger against thee for sin, let Him smell sacrifice" (Hebrew), i
Paul the Aged - And who can tell, if God will turn and repent, and turn away from His fierce Anger against you, that you perish not
Miriam - Moses the leader and lawgiver of Israel, and Aaron the high priest, and Miriam the prophetess, and all Israel looking after them in terror, and the Anger of the Lord kindling round about them
Heman - ' Much as Heman and Asaph had in common, they were all the time such strangers to one another when their distractions were upon them that they felt, as we say, as far as the poles asunder. Had it been with Heman as it was with David: 'For His Anger endureth but a moment; in His favour is life; weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning
Demoniac - The madness shows itself in these cases, just as it shows itself in the cases which occur among ourselves in the present day: it is now melancholy, and the patient is silent and sullen, and now it vents itself in bursts of Anger and ferocious resentment
Pilate - He used armed force to suppress a fanatical movement in Samaria, which does not appear to have endangered the Roman supremacy in the slightest (Josephus Ant. It is told that Pilate appeared before the Emperor to stand his trial, wearing the tunic of Jesus, and that this tunic acted as a charm to protect him from the Anger of his Imperial master
Priscillianus And Priscillianism, Priscillian - The Priscillianists had, however, friends at court powerful enough to ward off the danger. The persuasion and threats of the emperor failing to move him, he was dismissed the imperial presence in Anger. , asking advice for dealing with these insidious and dangerous adversaries
Pseudo-Chrysostomus - where the writer speaks (19, 93) of "offering the sacrifice of bread and wine," he is made to say "the sacrifice of Christ's body and blood"; and a passage is cut out altogether where he argues that if it be dangerous to transfer to private uses the consecrated vessels "which contain not the Lord's real body, but the mystery of His body," how much more to profane the vessels of our own body which God has prepared for His dwelling-place. Butler in his observations as to the uses of Anger—"Justa ira mater est disciplinae ergo non solum peccant qui cum causa irascuntur sed e contra nisi irati fuerint peccant
Paul - " The Anger of the persecutor was thereby kindled into a fiercer flame. The silversmiths, whose traffic in the little images which they made was in danger (see 2 Corinthians 2:12 ), whence after some time he went to meet Titus in Macedonia. There we can imagine him pacing the ramparts on the edge of the Mediterranean, and gazing wistfully across the blue waters in the direction of Macedonia, Achaia, and Ephesus, where his spiritual children were pining for him, or perhaps encountering dangers in which they sorely needed his presence
Hannah - But when it was too late, Hannah learned that evil in a good man is just as deadly as the same evil in a bad man; as deadly, and far more dangerous. And little do we think-only one here and there has the power and the will, the mind and the heart so to think-how we plunge this man and that woman into a lifetime of deadly sin just by the way we provoke them to Anger at us
Tribes of Israel, the - The radical response of the two brothers, in which they “took their swords and came against the city unawares, and killed all the males” (Genesis 34:25 ), is reflected in Jacob's blessing of the two: “Weapons of violence are their swords cursed be their Anger, for it is fierce, and their wrath, for it is cruel! I will divide them in Jacob, and scatter them in Israel” (Genesis 49:5-7 NRSV)
Ethics - God is seen: there is desire to please Him; there is a shrinking from aught that would arouse His Anger ( Genesis 20:6 ; Genesis 39:9 ). Stress is laid upon kindness to the physically defective ( Leviticus 19:14 ), and to the poor and to strangers ( Deuteronomy 10:18-19 ; Deuteronomy 15:7-11 ; Deuteronomy 24:17 ff
War, Holy War - It will not be because he is overwhelmed by the Anger of the moment
Achan - So the Lord turned from the fierceness of His Anger
Esau - Who is a God like unto Thee, that pardoneth iniquity, and passeth by the transgression of the remnant of His heritage? He retaineth not His Anger for ever, because He delighteth in mercy
Jonath - I will provoke them to Anger with a foolish nation!...
...
John Calvin is certainly correct when he says that Jonah had far more respect to his own reputation as a prophet of the divine judgment to Nineveh than he had either to the good of Nineveh or to the glory of God
Jesus Christ - He showed some of the emotional reactions common to human nature such as astonishment, disappointment, pity and Anger (Mark 3:5; Matthew 5:324; Mark 8:2; Mark 10:14; Luke 7:9)
Psalms of Solomon - Nevertheless, the foreign executant of God’s Anger had outgone his commission: he too is punished; he is slain in Egypt, and his body exposed to dishonour
Christianity - But the law which Jesus gave and which His Apostles enforced is broader and loftier beyond comparison a law for heart and mind as well as for the outward life, forbidding unreasonable Anger equally with murder ( Matthew 5:21 ff
Ezekiel, Theology of - Many Jews also embraced this thinking, and it led to two dangerous conclusions. Its position in the north is significant since that is the direction from which Israel's enemies, as executioners of Yahweh's Anger, generally came
Forgiveness - He is described as "slow to Anger" and "abounding in love/mercy, " "compassionate and gracious" (Exodus 34:6 ; Numbers 14:18 ; Nehemiah 9:17 ; Psalm 86:15 ; 103:8 ; 145:8 ; Joel 2:13 ; John 4:2 )
Sibylline Oracles - These Roman oracles originally were not so much predictions of woes to come, like apocalyptic tracts, as explanations of what was required to avert the Anger of the gods and ward off evil to the State on earth
Christian Life - 44) for Nero’s unreasoning Anger
Aaron - Moses in his Anger had ground the golden calf to ashes, and had sprinkled the ashes on the waters of the brook that ran down out of the Mount of God, till all the people drank of the sin laden water
Balaam - The sight of Israel lying below made the spirit of blessing to come upon Balaam again, till Balak smote his hands together, and in his Anger dismissed Balaam to his home without his wages, since he had not done his work
Plagues of Egypt - And he went out from Pharaoh in great Anger,"...
Exodus 10:28-29 ; Exodus 11:8
Revelation, the Book of - ...
Heaven rejoices because it has been rescued from Satan, but the earth must now mourn, because the devil has been cast down to earth, and his Anger is great
Redemption (2) - As, in the OT, outward calamities are usually connected with Jehovah’s Anger, or with the hiding of His face, so, it is everywhere implied, the first condition of the removal of these evils is return to God and the forsaking of iniquity; if the individual is righteous, this is the ground on which he looks to God for vindication against the ungodly oppressor (Psalms 3, 4, 5 etc
Mark, Gospel According to - ]'>[10] (the word denotes sternness, not necessarily Anger but deep feeling), Mark 3:5 , Mark 6:8 , Mark 10:14 ; note especially Mark 14:33 f
Job, Theology of - Yet the book also teaches that we may ask honest questions of God when we do not understand "why?" (3:11-20; 10:18; 13:24; 24:1-12) or even express strong emotions such as bitterness (7:11; 10:1) or Anger
Lunatic - So far from the idea of semi-sensuous beings representing the truth, it would be far truer to think of possession as akin to the condition seen in intense Anger, or extreme fear
Dates - ...
Thus a great variety of results was reached: Anger (de Temporum … Ratione, 1833, p
Joshua - You will sometimes see stranger young men crowding around a minister in his classes and in his congregational work, and saving their own souls by so doing, while those young men that have been born in the family are never so much as seen or heard of. Are you yourselves to be, and are you to bring up your children after you to be, Amorites, and Hittites, and Hivites, and Canaanites, and Jebusites in the land? Are you to let ambition, and envy, and pride, and Anger, and self-will rule in your hearts and be your household gods? No! Never, never! Not so long as you have still this day in your choice for yourselves and for your households the Lord, the Lord God, merciful and gracious, and abundant in goodness and truth
Nestorian Church - It was very adverse to Papa, who refused in Anger to bow to its decision
Rufinus of Aquileia - This act of treachery, which Jerome subsequently in his Anger at Rufinus's Apology brought himself to defend (Hieron
Noah - ...
No record of the flood appears in the Egyptian monuments, but Plato (Timaeus, 21) testifies that the Egyptians believed that catastrophes from time to time by God's Anger had visited all lands but Egypt; the last was a deluge submerging all lands but Egypt, 8,000 years before Solon's visit to Amosis, no rain falling in Egypt
Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - On the one hand God is presented as a personal being who responds with grace and mercy to the needs and concerns of his people when they seek him and are truly repentant of their sins; but, on the other hand, he is also depicted as one who reacts in righteous Anger and judgment against those who rebel against his commands and show no true repentance
Grace - This statement about the Lord's antipathy toward man is followed by his promise that he will wipe humankind from the face of the earth, that is, completely destroy him, because of his Anger at their condition
Hermas Shepherd of - A great tribulation is at hand, with danger of apostasy by Christians. The fifth Commandment enjoins longsuffering, the opposite of ill-temper (ὀξυχολία), that most evil spirit which causes bitterness, wrath, Anger, and spite. His office is that of a prophet, and his mission is to recall Christians from the danger of too intimate contact with pagan social influence
Jeremiah - Jeremiah denounces him vehemently; the wonder is that he did not fall a victim to the king’s Anger, like his disciple Uriah ( Jeremiah 26:20-24 ; Jeremiah 36:26-30 ; Jeremiah 22:13-19 ). A popular Jehovist party existed; but this was the most dangerous factor in the situation. But as the danger from the northern hordes passed and Josiah’s rule brought new prosperity, the prophet’s vaticinations were discounted; his pessimism became an object of ridicule
Romans, Epistle to the - Paul warns the Romans against false teachers, as against a possible rather than an actual danger ( Acts 16:17-20 ). If they are at present under a cloud, it is God’s mercy and not His Anger that has willed it so
Covenant - This breaking of the covenant aroused Yahweh's Anger; he spoke of carrying out the curse of the covenant on them (32:9-10)
Prayer - It is one of the principal excellencies of this kind of prayer, that it can be practised at all times, and in all places; in the public ordinances of religion; in all our ordinary and extraordinary undertakings; in times of affliction, temptation, and danger; in seasons of social intercourse, in worldly business, in travelling, in sickness, and pain. For this purpose, as well as upon many other accounts, it will be of great advantage to keep by us in writing some of the most remarkable providences of God, and instances of his mercy or Anger towards us, and some of our most remarkable carriages towards him, whether sins, or duties, or the exercises of grace. We are in danger of tiring those that join with us
Babel - Smith reads an Assyrian fragment of writing in columns to the effect that "wickedness of men caused the gods to overthrow Babel; what they built in the day the god overthrew in the night; in his Anger he scattered them abroad; their counsel was confused
Science (2) - This, however, was pursued, not in a modern spirit of desire for knowledge, but because the disasters which the nation had experienced drove its religious leaders to a more careful analysis and preservation of the Law, in order that, by obeying it, the Anger of God might be appeased and the prosperity of the people might return
Vicarious Sacrifice - Westcott says: ‘It contains the notion not of appeasing one often in Anger, but of altering the character of that which interposes an inevitable obstacle to fellowship
Gospels, Apocryphal - Jesus is represented as saying, ‘I come to put an end to sacrifices, and unless ye cease from sacrificing, Anger will not cease from you. According to Epiphanius, the work contained the saying of Jesus, ‘Be approved money-changers
Psalms, Theology of - The first is cathartic in that it allows complainants to verbalize honestly to God the Anger they feel toward those who have proven themselves to be foes. The time of transition from the reign of one king to that of his successor was often a dangerous time politically when rivals vied for the throne and subject peoples attempted revolt
Mental Characteristics - He was passionate: ‘He looked round with Anger’ (Mark 3:5); ‘Jesus wept’ (John 11:35, cf
Socialism - Hughes deliberately adopted the word ‘Socialist’ for the movement which they founded, and incurred, as Hughes has testified, much ‘anger and bitterness’ as a result; but, since then, the Socialist idea has had a secure place in the speculations and activities of modern Christianity. James as to the danger of riches (e. ’ Membership in the Church meant the admission into a fellowship in which the rich man became poorer and the poor man richer; in which the stranger, the outcast, and the slave were welcomed and loved as brothers
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - ‘Arrogance and conceit and folly and Anger’ must be laid aside. ‘But if certain persons should be disobedient unto the words spoken by Him through us … they will entangle themselves in no slight transgression and danger; but we shall be guiltless of this sin’ (lix
Koran - The slave fell on his knees, rehearsing these words of the Alcoran; "Paradise is for those who restrain their Anger
Augustine - Unwilling to unman himself, as he accounted it, before Alipius, he left him; and throwing himself down under the branches of a large fig tree he poured out a torrent of tears which he was unable any longer to restrain, and exclaimed in bitterness of soul, "When, O Lord, when will thy Anger cease? Why tomorrow? Why not at this time?" He instantly heard what he considered to be the voice of a child, saving Tolle, lege, "Take and read. ...
Augustine had hitherto directed his theological artillery principally against the predestinarian errors of the Manichees; but he was soon called upon to change his weapons and his mode of warfare, in attacking a new and not less dangerous class of heretics
Moses - And when Moses drew nigh, and saw their proceedings, his Anger waxed hot, and he cast away the tables of the covenant, or stone tablets on which were engraven the ten commandments by the finger of God himself, and brake them beneath the mount, in the presence of the people; in token that the covenant between God and them was now rescinded on his part, in consequence of their transgression
Paul - He was deterred by no difficulty or danger, and endured a great variety of persecutions with patience and cheerfulness. We see him in the prosecution of his purpose, travelling from country to country, enduring every species of hardship, encountering every extremity of danger, assaulted by the populace, punished by the magistrates, scourged, beaten, stoned, left for dead; expecting, wherever he came, a renewal of the same treatment, and the same dangers; yet, when driven from one city, preaching in the next; spending his whole time in the employment; sacrificing to it his pleasures, his ease, his safety; persisting in this course to old age, unaltered by the experience of perverseness, ingratitude, prejudice, desertion; unsubdued by anxiety, want, labour, persecutions; unwearied by long confinement; undismayed by the prospect of death. His religion was a destructive zeal, his Anger was fierceness, his fury required victims
Paul - The narrative in the Acts tells us simply that he was occupied in this work, with increasing vigor, for "many days," up to the time when imminent danger drove him from Damascus. After these signs of danger the brethren immediately sent away Paul and Silas by night. The Corinthian spectators, either favoring Paul or actuated only by Anger against the Jews, seized on the principal person of those who had brought the charge, and beat him before the judgment-seat. During this interval the prophet Agabus, (Acts 11:28 ) came down from Jerusalem, and crowned the previous intimations of danger with a prediction expressively delivered
Persecution - It was not the violation of a social law as such that roused the Anger of the prophet, but his defiance of the will of God
Athanasius, Archbishop of Alexandria - 82), resolved, without waiting for the judgment of such an assembly, "to make a bold and dangerous experiment, whether the throne was inaccessible to the voice of truth. Constantius wrote to him in Anger, assuming the truth of the former charge; but Athanasius was successful in disproving both
Donatus And Donatism - But before the deputation reached the emperor, his Anger was kindled by accounts from his own officers
Babylon - Behold, the day of the Lord cometh, cruel both with wrath and fierce Anger, to lay the land desolate: and he shall destroy the sinners thereof out of it
Synods - Whether he had taken umbrage at the reputation of his new colleague, or the enemies of Arminius had found means to provoke the Anger of Gomarus by some artful insinuation or other; he violently set his face against a man whom, some time before, he looked upon as orthodox
Person of Christ - Joy, sorrow, distress, peace, love, Anger every wholesome human emotion is felt by Him
Justinianus i, Emperor - How far this ingratitude was in the most notable case, that of Belisarius, excused by apprehensions of danger, is a problem not wholly solved or soluble. Vigilius, not venturing openly to oppose the emperor, and fearing the Anger of Theodora, had also to reckon with the all but universal loyalty to the council of Chalcedon of the Roman church and of the Western churches generally, and so temporized