What does Ammonites mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
עַמּ֖וֹן a people dwelling in Transjordan descended from Lot through Ben-ammi. 3
עַמּ֑וֹן a people dwelling in Transjordan descended from Lot through Ben-ammi. 3
עַמּ֔וֹן a people dwelling in Transjordan descended from Lot through Ben-ammi. 3
עַמּֽוֹן a people dwelling in Transjordan descended from Lot through Ben-ammi. 3
עַמּוֹן֮ a people dwelling in Transjordan descended from Lot through Ben-ammi. 2
עַמּ֗וֹן a people dwelling in Transjordan descended from Lot through Ben-ammi. 2
עַמּ֨וֹן a people dwelling in Transjordan descended from Lot through Ben-ammi. 1
עַמּ֜וֹן a people dwelling in Transjordan descended from Lot through Ben-ammi. 1
עַמֹּנִֽים descendants of Ammon and inhabitants of Ammon. 1
מֵֽהָעַמּוֹנִ֛ים descendants of Ammon and inhabitants of Ammon. 1
הָֽעַמּוֹנִ֛ים descendants of Ammon and inhabitants of Ammon. 1
וְהָֽעַמֹּנִ֔ים descendants of Ammon and inhabitants of Ammon. 1
וְהָעַמֹּנִ֜ים descendants of Ammon and inhabitants of Ammon. 1

Definitions Related to Ammonites

H5983


   1 a people dwelling in Transjordan descended from Lot through Ben-ammi.
   Additional Information: Ammon = “tribal”.
   

H5984


   1 descendants of Ammon and inhabitants of Ammon.
   Additional Information: Ammonite = see Ammon “tribal”.
   

Frequency of Ammonites (original languages)

Frequency of Ammonites (English)

Dictionary

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ammonites
The descendants of Ammon, or Ben-Ammi, a son of Lot. They destroyed an ancient race of giants called Zamzummim, and seized their country, which lay east of Judea, Deuteronomy 2:19-21 . Their territory extended from the Arnon to the Jabbok, and from the Jordan a considerable distance into Arabia. Their capital city was Rabbah, (also called Rabbath Ammon, and afterwards Philadelphia,) which stood on the Jabbok. Yet in the time of Moses they had been driven out of this region, towards the east, by the Amorites, Numbers 21:21-35 32:33 . Moses was forbidden to assail them, Deuteronomy 2:19 . They were gross idolaters; their chief idol being Moloch, supposed to be the same with Saturn, 1 Kings 11:5-7 2 Kings 23:13 . They oppressed Israel in the time of Jephthah, and were defeated by him with great slaughter, Judges 11:1-40 . The children of Ammon afterwards, at various times, troubled the Israelites, for which the prophets threatened them with divine judgments, Jeremiah 46:1-6 Ezekiel 25:2-10 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ammonites
A tribe racially allied to the Hebrews, settled east of the Jordan. They practised the idolatries and abominations common to Semitic races, and their god was called Milcom, another form of Moloch. They were held in special loathing by the Hebrews, and, when converted to Hebraism, were barred from the Tabernacle together with their children, even after the tenth generation. In the time of Judas Machabeus, they were still a strong people, whom he subdued with difficulty.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ammon, Ammonites
AMMON, AMMONITES . A people inhabiting the territory between the tribe of Gad and the Arabian desert, from the Israelitish conquest of Palestine to the 4th cent. b.c., and perhaps till the 1st cent. a.d.
In Genesis 19:38 the Ammonites are said to have descended from a certain Ben-Ammi, but in the Assyrian inscriptions Shalmaneser II., Tiglath-pileser III., and Sennacherib call them Beth-Ammon, placing the determinative for ‘man’ before Ammon. Except in Psalms 83:7 , which is late, the people are never called ‘Ammon’ in the Hebrew OT, but the ‘children of Ammon,’ or ‘Ammonites.’
The really important feature of the story of Genesis 19:1-38 is that it reveals a consciousness that the Israelites regarded the Ammonites as their kindred. The proper names of individual Ammonites, so far as they are known to us, confirm this view. Probably, therefore, the Ammonites formed a part of that wave of Aramæan migration which brought the Hebrews into Palestine. Perhaps, like the Hebrews, they adopted the language of the people in whose land they settled, thus later speaking a Canaanite dialect. The genealogy which traces their descent from Lot probably signifies that they settled in the land of Lot, or Lotan, called by the Egyptians Ruten, which lay to the east of the Dead Sea and the Jordan.
In Deuteronomy 2:20 the Ammonites are said to have displaced the Zamzummim, a semi-mythical people, of whom we know nothing. Judges 11:12-29 represents Ammon as having conquered all the land between the Jabbok and the Arnon, and a king of Ammon is said to have reproved Israel for taking it from them. The statement is late, and of doubtful authority. Israel found the Amorites in this territory at the time of the conquest, and we have no good reason to suppose that the Ammonites ever possessed it. Their habitat was in the north-eastern portion of this region, around the sources of the Jabbok. Rabbah (modern ‘Amman ) was its capital and centre.
At the time of the conquest the Gadite Israelites did not disturb the Ammonites (Numbers 21:24 , Deuteronomy 2:37 ), or attempt to conquer their territory. During the period of the Judges the Ammonites assisted Eglon of Moab in his invasion of Israel ( Judges 3:13 ), and attempted to conquer Gilead, but were driven back by Jephthah the judge ( Judges 11:4-9 ; Judges 11:30-36 , Judges 12:1-3 ). Later, Nahash, their king, oppressed the town of Jabesh in Gilead, and it was the victory which delivered this city from the Ammonites that made Saul Israel’s king ( 1 Samuel 11:1-15 ). Saul and Nahash thus became enemies. Consequently, later, Nahash befriended David, apparently to weaken the growing power of Israel. When David succeeded Saul in power, Hanun, the son of Nahash, provoked him to war, with the result that Rabbah, the Ammonite capital, was stormed and taken, the Ammonites were reduced to vassalage, and terrible vengeance was wreaked upon them ( 2 Samuel 10:1-19 ; 2 Samuel 11:1-27 ; 2 Samuel 12:1-31 ). Afterwards, during Absalom’s rebellion, a son of Nahash rendered David assistance at Mahanaim ( 2 Samuel 17:27 ). Zelek, an Ammonite, was among David’s heroes ( 2 Samuel 23:37 ). These friendly relations continued through the reign of Solomon, who took as one of his wives the Ammonite princess Naamah, who became the mother of Rehoboam, the next king ( 1 Kings 11:1 ; 1 Kings 14:21 ; 1 Kings 14:31 ). After the reign of Solomon the Ammonites appear to have gained their independence.
In the reign of Ahab, Ba’sa, son of Rehob, the Ammonite, was a member of the confederacy which opposed the progress of Shalmaneser into the West (cf. KAT [1] 3 42). According to 2 Chronicles 20:1 , the Ammonites joined with Moab and Edom in invading Judah in the reign of Jehoshaphat. Before the reign of Jeroboam II. the Ammonites had made another attempt to get possession of Gilead, and their barbarities in warfare excited the indignation of the prophet Amos ( Amos 1:13-15 ), Chronicles represents them as beaten a little later by Jotham of Judah, and as paying tribute to Uzziah ( 2 Chronicles 26:8 ; Zephaniah 2:8-9 ). When next we hear of the Ammonites, Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon is employing them to harass the refractory Judæan king Jehoiakim ( 2 Kings 24:2 ). Perhaps it was at this period that the Ammonites occupied the territory of Gad ( Jeremiah 49:1 ff.). Later, the domination of the Babylonian compelled Ammon and Israel to become friends, for Ammon conspired with King Zedekiah against Nebuchadnezzar ( Jeremiah 27:3 ), and during the sieges of Jerusalem many Judæans had migrated to Ammon ( Jeremiah 40:11 ). The Babylonian king regarded both Ammon and Judah as rebels, for Ezekiel represents him as casting lots to see whether he should first attack Rabbah or Jerusalem ( Ezekiel 21:20 ff., cf. 2 Chronicles 27:5 ).
Perhaps there was a settlement of Ammonites in Israelitish territory, for Deuteronomy 23:3 ff. recognizes the danger of mixture with Ammonites, while Joshua 18:24 seems to indicate that there was in post-exilic times a village in Benjamin called ‘the village of the Ammonites.’
After the destruction of Jerusalem, Baalis, king of Ammon, sent a man to assassinate Gedaliah, whom Nebuchadnezzar had made governor of Judah (Jeremiah 40:14 ). Again, 140 years later, the Ammonites did everything in their power to prevent the rebuilding of the walls of Jerusalem by Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 2:10 ; Nehemiah 2:19 ; Nehemiah 4:3 ; Nehemiah 4:7 ). Nehemiah and Ezra fomented this enmity by making illegal the marriages of Ammonitish women with Israelitish peasantry who had remained in Judah ( Nehemiah 13:23 ).
Between the time of Nehemiah and Alexander the Great the country east of the Jordan was overrun by the Nabatæans. Perhaps the Ammonites lost their identity at this time: for, though their name appears later, many scholars think it is used of these Arabs. Thus in 1Ma 5:6 ff. Judas Maccabæus is said to have defeated the Ammonites; Psalms 83:7 reckons them among Israel’s enemies; while Justin Martyr ( Dial. Tryph . 19) says the Ammonites were numerous in his day. As Josephus ( Ant . I. xi. 5) uses the same language of the Moabites and Ammonites, though elsewhere (XIV. i. 4) he seems to call them Arabians, it is possible that the Ammonites had lost their identity at the time of the Nabatæan invasion. Their capital, Rabbah, was rebuilt in the Greek style by Ptolemy Philadelphus of Egypt in the 3rd cent. b.c. and named Philadelphia. Its ruins amid the modern town of ‘Amman are impressive. The god of the Ammonites is called in the OT Milcom , a variation of Melek , ‘king.’ When the Jews, just before the Exile, to avert national disaster, performed child-sacrifice to Jawheh as Melek or ‘king,’ the prophets stamped this ritual as of foreign or Ammonite origin on account of the similarity of the name, though perhaps it was introduced from Phœnicia (cf. G. F. Judgesin Encyc. Bibl . iii. 3188 ff.). The Ammonites appear to have been a ruthless, semi-savage people. Such a rite may have been practised by them too; if so, it is all that we know of their civilization.
George A. Barton.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Ammonites
Semitic people living northeast of the Dead Sea in the area surrounding Rabbah who often battled with the Israelites for possession of the fertile Gilead. See Deuteronomy 2:20 ; Deuteronomy 23:3 ; 1 Samuel 11:1 ; 2 Samuel 23:37 ; 1 Kings 11:1 ; 1 Chronicles 11:39 ; 2 Chronicles 12:13 ; 2 Chronicles 20:1 ; 2 Chronicles 24:26 ; 2 Chronicles 26:8 ; 2 Chronicles 27:5 ; Ezra 9:1 ; Nehemiah 2:10 ,Nehemiah 2:10,2:19 ; Nehemiah 4:3 ,Nehemiah 4:3,4:7 ; Nehemiah 13:1 ; Jeremiah 40:11 ,Judges 10:6-11:14 ; Jeremiah 41:10 ,Jeremiah 41:10,41:15 ; Jeremiah 49:1-2 ; Ezekiel 25:1 . Ammon, the kingdom of the Ammonites, was hardly more than a city-state, consisting of the capital city itself, Rabbah or Rabbath-Ammon (“chief city,” or “chief city of the Ammonites”) and its immediately surrounding territory. Rabbath was located at the headwaters of the Jabbok river, where the southeastern corner of Gilead gives way to the desert. The agricultural productivity of Gilead, the waters of the Jabbok itself and of associated springs, as well as Rabbah's naturally defendable position, destined Rabbah to be a city of medium importance in ancient times. The proximity of the Ammonites to Gilead likewise destined them to be constant enemies of the Israelites, who made claims to Gilead and actually controlled it during the reigns of certain strong kings such as David, Omri, Ahab, and Jeroboam II.
Most of our information about the Ammonites comes from the Old Testament, although Ammonite kings are mentioned occasionally in the Assyrian records. We know from the latter, for example, that an Ammonite king named Ba'sha, along with Ahab of Israel and other kings of the region, defended Syria-Palestine against Shalmaneser III in 853 B.C. An Ammonite inscription, the so-called Siran Bottle Inscription and several seals/seal impressions have provided additional information about the Ammonites.
Archaeologists have excavated only a small portion of the site of ancient Rabbah (the so-called “Citadel” in the heart of the modern city of Amman). The surrounding area remains largely unexplored. In addition to the inscription and seals mentioned above, the bust of an Ammonite warrior (or god) and the remains of round stone towers thought to be Ammonite are significant archaeological discoveries shedding light on the Ammonites.
Conflict broke out between the Ammonites and Israelites as early as the time of the Judges. The Ammonites made war on the Israelites of Gilead, leading the Israelites to appeal to Jephthah, chief of a local band of renegade raiders, to organize and lead their resistance. Jephthah accepted the challenge, but only after extracting a promise from the elders of Gilead that, if he indeed succeeded in defeating the Ammonites, they would recognize him as ruler of Gilead. At the same time he vowed to Yahweh that “If thou wilt give the Ammonites into my hand, then whoever comes forth from the doors of my house to meet me, when I return victorious from the Ammonites, shall be the LORD's, and I will offer him up for a burnt offering” (Judges 11:30-31 ). Jephthah was victorious, and the Gileadites submitted to his rule; but then his little daughter greeted him upon his return (Jeremiah 40:11,40:40 ).
On another occasion when the Ammonites were attacking the city of Jabesh in Gilead and the Jabeshites attempted to negotiate terms for surrender, the Ammonites demanded nothing less than to put out the right eye of each man in the city. In desperation, the Jabeshites sent messengers to Saul at Gibeah for help. Saul organized an army, hurried to Jabesh, and lifted the siege. Consequently, the Jabeshites were strong supporters of Saul in later years (1 Samuel 11:1 ; 1 Samuel 31:11-13 ). The Ammonite king Saul defeated at Jabesh was Nahash. Presumably this was the same Nahash with whom David had good dealings but whose son, Hanun, renewed hostilities (2 Samuel 10-12 ). The ensuing wars between Israel and Ammon involved warfare between David's troops and those of Hadadezer of Zobah (2 Samuel 10:6-19 ) and provided the occasion of David's affair with Bathsheba. Uriah, Bathsheba's husband, was killed while storming the walls of Rabbah (2 Samuel 11-12 ).
No war with the Ammonites is reported during Solomon's reign. On the contrary, Solomon took one or more Ammonite wives and allowed the worship of Milcom, the Ammonite god, in Jerusalem (1 Kings 11:1-8 ). Presumably the worship of Milcom continued in Jerusalem until it was stamped out by Josiah many years later (2 Kings 23:13 ). We know little of relations between the Ammonites and either Israel or Judah during the first half century of the separate kingdoms, probably because neither of the Hebrew kingdoms attempted to exercise influence in the Transjordan. The coalition of Syro-Palestinian kings, which included Ba'sha of Ammon and Ahab of Israel, halted the Assyrian king, Shalmaneser's march in 853 B.C. But success was only temporary. Later Shalmaneser penetrated the very heart of Syria-Palestine, exacting tribute from the Israelites and, although it is not recorded, probably also from the Ammonites. Eventually, all the petty kingdoms of the region fell to the Assyrians and either were incorporated into the Assyrian province system or controlled as satellites. Ammonite kings paid tribute to Tiglath-pileser III, Sennacherib, and Esarhaddon.
The Israelites recognized the Ammonites as relatives, although somewhat more distant than the Edomites. This relationship was expressed genealogically. Specifically, the Ammonites were said to have descended from an ancestor named Ben Ammi, one of two sons which Lot bore to his two daughters. The Moabites were said to have descended from the other son (Genesis 19:30-38 ). The Ammonites also are mentioned from time to time in Israel's poetical literature. See for example Amos' oracle against the Ammonites in Amos 1:13-15 .
Rabbah apparently had dwindled to an insignificant settlement by the third century B.C. when Ptolemy II Philadelphus (285-246) rebuilt the city and renamed it “Philadelphia” after himself. Philadelphia came to be regarded as one of the Decapolis cities, a federation of ten Greek cities in Palestine (Matthew 4:25 ), and was annexed with the whole Decapolis region to the Roman empire in A.D. 90. The city reached its zenith during the second century A.D., benefiting from the active commerce which moved along the old trade route connecting Damascus and Bostra with the Gulf of Aqabah and western Arabia. The old route was refurbished at that time under the name Via Nova Triana (“Trajan's New Road”), and Philadelphia itself was expanded on a grand scale. Remains of this second century Roman phase of the city are still standing in the heart of the modern city of Amman including the Roman theater, the nymphaum, and temple ruins on the citadel.
Philadelphia, as all of the cities along the Via Nova, began to decline in the third century due to security problems along the Roman frontier and shifts in commercial patterns. Yet it continued as a relatively important city into the Byzantine period. It became the seat of a bishopric and sent representatives to the Council of Nicea (A.D. 325) and the Council of Chalcedon (A.D. 451). Decline continued during the Islamic period until eventually the site of ancient Rabbah/Philadelphia was represented only by a desolate ruin. This was the situation when the place was visited by western travelers at the beginning of the nineteenth century. The history of the modern city, called now Amman, began with resettlement of the site by Circassian refugees in 1878. See Transjordan ; Decapolis .
Maxwell Miller
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ammon, Ammonites, Children of Ammon
Ben-ammi was the son of Lot by his youngest daughter. "The same is the father of the children of Ammon." Genesis 19:38 . His descendants were neighbours to Israel between the Arnon and the Jabbok on the east, and had much to do with Israel. God had bidden Moses not to touch the Ammonites, nor was their land to be possessed by Israel: it had been given to the children of Lot. Their city was Rabbath-ammon, perhaps their only city, as they were a nomadic people. None of the nation were to be allowed to enter the congregation of Israel to the tenth generation, that is, for ever. Deuteronomy 23:3 ; Nehemiah 13:1 . With Amalek they assisted the king of Moab against Israel, and Jericho fell into their hands. Judges 3:13 . Israel served their gods, and God gave them up on both sides of the Jordan to serve the Ammonites. On Israel crying to Jehovah the children of Ammon were defeated under Jephthah. In the early days of Saul's reign they besieged Jabesh-gilead, and would only make peace on the condition that the right eyes of the inhabitants should be thrust out, in order that it might be a reproach on Israel; but Saul hastened to their aid, and routed the Ammonites. 1 Samuel 11:1-11 ; 1 Samuel 12:12 . Their gold and silver taken in battle were dedicated by David to Jehovah. Their king insulted David's servants sent to show kindness to him, as the world refuses the kindness of God's king, and brings judgement upon it. 2 Samuel 10:1-10 ; 2 Samuel 11:1 ; 2 Samuel 12:26-31 .
On the other hand, Shobi, of Rabbah, brought provisions when David fled from Absalom, 2 Samuel 17:27 , and Zelek, an Ammonite, was one of David's thirty valiant men. Solomon loved some of their women, and the mother of his son Rehoboam was Naamah an Ammonitess. 1 Kings 14:21,31 . They molested Israel with varied success until the days of Jehoiakim: 2 Kings 24:2 . Lot being the father of both Moab and Ammon, it is not surprising that the Moabites were often linked with the Ammonites in their attacks upon Israel. Hatred of God's people united them in one common desire to cut them off from being a nation. Psalm 83:4-8 . Tobiah, an Ammonite, was a troublesome adversary to the Jews on their return from captivity. Nehemiah 2:10,19 ; Nehemiah 4:3,7 . Nevertheless the Jews intermarried with this nation, thus mixing 'the holy seed' with the people of the land. Ezra 9:1,2 ; Nehemiah 13:23-25 .
The whole history supplies us with instruction as to the imperative necessity of keeping separate from the contaminations of the world in order to walk with God, and be blessed by Him.
When the king of the north, in a future day, shall enter into 'the glorious land,' Edom, Moab, and Ammon shall escape his hand, Daniel 11:41 ; they are reserved to be subdued by Israel, whom they seduced and persecuted in by-gone ages. Isaiah 11:14 .
Milcom and Molech were the gods of the Ammonites: to the worship of which Solomon had been seduced by his strange wives. 1 Kings 11:5,7 .
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Ammonites
the descendants of Ammon, the son of Lot. They took possession of the country called by their name, after having driven out the Zamzummims, who were its ancient inhabitants. The precise period at which this expulsion took place is not ascertained. The Ammonites had kings, and were uncircumcised, Jeremiah 9:25-26 , and seem to have been principally addicted to husbandry. They, as well as the Moabites, were among the nations whose peace or prosperity the Israelites were forbidden to disturb, Deuteronomy 2:19 , &c. However, neither the one nor the other were to be admitted into the congregation to the tenth generation, because they did not come out to relieve them in the wilderness, and were implicated in hiring Balaam to curse them. Their chief and peculiar deity is, in Scripture, called Moloch. Chemosh was also a god of the Ammonites. Before the Israelites entered Canaan, the Amorites conquered a great part of the country belonging to the Ammonites and Moabites; but it was retaken by Moses, and divided between the tribes of Gad and Reuben. Previous to the time of Jephthah, B.C. 1188, the Ammonites engaged as principals in a war, under a king whose name is not given, against the Israelites. This prince, determining to recover the ancient country of the Ammonites, made a sudden irruption into it, reduced the land, and kept the inhabitants in subjection for eighteen years. He afterwards crossed Jordan with a design of falling upon the tribes of Judah, Benjamin, and Ephraim. The Israelites resisted the invader; and, assembling at Mizpeh, chose Jephthah for their general, and sent an expostulatory message to the king of the Ammonites, Judges 10:11 . The king replied, that those lands belonged to the Ammonites, who had been unjustly dispossessed of them by the Israelites, when they came out of Egypt, and exhorted Jephthah to restore them peaceably to the lawful owners.
Jephthah remonstrated on the injustice of his claim; but finding a war inevitable, he fell upon the Ammonites near Aroer, and defeated them with great slaughter. On this occasion the Ammonites lost twenty cities; and thus an end was put, after eighteen years' bondage, to the tyranny of Ammon over the Israelites beyond Jordan. In the days of Saul, 1 Samuel 11, B.C. 1095, the old claim of the Ammonites was revived by Nahash their king, and they laid siege to the city of Jabesh. The inhabitants were inclined to acknowledge Nahash as their sovereign; but he would accept their submission only on condition that every one of them should consent to lose his right eye, and that thus he might fix a lasting reproach upon Israel: but from this humiliating and severe requisition they were delivered by Saul, who vanquished and dispersed the army of Nahash. Upon the death of Nahash, David sent ambassadors to his son and successor Hanun, to congratulate him on his accession; but these ambassadors were treated as spies, and dismissed in a very reproachful manner, 2 Samuel 10. This indignity was punished by David with rigour. Rabbah, the capital of Hanun, and the other cities of Ammon, which resisted the progress of the conqueror, were destroyed and razed to the ground; and the inhabitants were put to death or reduced to servitude. In the reign of Jehoshaphat the Ammonites united with their brethren, the Moabites, and the inhabitants of Mount Seir, against the king of Judah; but they were completely routed. They were afterward overthrown by Uzziah, king of Judah, and made tributary, 2 Chronicles 26:8 ; and rebelling in the reign of his son Jotham, they were reduced to the necessity of purchasing peace at a very dear rate. After the tribes of Reuben, Gad, and the half tribe of Manasseh, were carried into captivity by Tiglath-Pileser, B.C. 740, the Ammonites and Moabites took possession of the cities belonging to these tribes, and were reproached for it by Jeremiah 49:1 . Their ambassadors were exhorted to submit to Nebuchadnezzar, and threatened, on their refusal, with captivity and slavery, Jeremiah 27:2-4 . The Prophet Ezekiel, Ezekiel 25:4-10 , denounces their entire destruction, and informs them, that God would deliver them up to the people of the east; and that the Ammonites should no more be mentioned among the nations: and this punishment they were to suffer for insulting the Israelites on account of their calamities, and the destruction of their temple by the Chaldeans. This malediction began to be inflicted upon them in the fifth year after the taking of Jerusalem, when Nebuchadnezzar made war against all the people around Judea, A.M. 3420 or 3421, B.C. 583. It is probable that Cyrus granted to the Ammonites and Moabites liberty to return into their own country, whence they had been removed by Nebuchadnezzar; for they were exposed to the revolutions that were common to the people of Syria and Palestine, and were subject sometimes to the kings of Egypt, and sometimes to the kings of Syria. Polybius informs us, that Antiochus the Great took Rabboth, or Philadelphia, the capital of the Ammonites, demolished the walls, and put a garrison into it, A.M. 3806, B.C. 198. During the persecutions of Antiochus Epiphanes, the Ammonites manifested their hatred to the Jews, and exercised great cruelties against such of them as lived in their parts. At length their city Jaser, and the neighbouring town, fell a prey to the Jews, who smote the men, carried their wives and children into captivity, and plundered and burned the city. Thus ended their last conflict with the descendants of Israel. Ammon was, however, a highly productive and populous country when the Romans became masters of all the provinces of Syria; and several of the ten allied cities, which gave name to the celebrated Decapolis, were included within its boundaries. Even when first invaded by the Saracens, this country, including Moab, was enriched by the various benefits of trade, covered with a line of forts, and possessed some strong and populous cities. Volney bears witness, "that in the immense plains of the Hauran, ruins are continually to be met with, and that what is said of its actual fertility perfectly corresponds with the idea given of it in the Hebrew writings." The fact of its natural fertility is corroborated by every traveller who has visited it. And "it is evident," says Burckhardt, "that the whole country must have been extremely well cultivated in order to have afforded subsistence to the inhabitants of so many towns," as are now visible only in their ruins. While the fruitfulness of the land of Ammon, and the high degree of prosperity and power in which it subsisted long prior and long subsequent to the date of the predictions, are thus indisputably established by historical evidence and by existing proofs, the researches of recent travellers (who were actuated by the mere desire of exploring these regions and obtaining geographical information) have made known its present aspect; and testimony the most clear, unexceptionable, and conclusive, has been borne to the state of dire desolation to which it is and has long been reduced.
It was prophesied concerning Ammon, "Son of man, set thy face against the Ammonites, and prophesy against them. I will make Rabbah of the Ammonites a stable for camels and a couching place for flocks. Behold, I will stretch out my hand upon thee, and deliver thee for a spoil to the Heathen; I will cut thee off from the people, and cause thee to perish out of the countries; I will destroy thee. The Ammonites shall not be remembered among the nations. Rabbah" (the chief city) "of the Ammonites shall be a desolate heap. Ammon shall be a perpetual desolation,"
Ezekiel 25:2 ; Ezekiel 25:5 ; Ezekiel 25:7 ; Ezekiel 25:10 ; Ezekiel 21:32 ; Jeremiah 49:2 ; Zephaniah 2:9 .
Ammon was to be delivered to be a spoil to the Heathen—to be destroyed, and to be a perpetual desolation. "All this country, formerly so populous and flourishing, is now changed into a vast desert." ( Seetzens Travels. ) Ruins are seen in every direction. The country is divided between the Turks and the Arabs, but chiefly possessed by the latter. The extortions of the one, and the depredations of the other, keep it in "perpetual desolation," and make it "a spoil to the Heathen." "The far greater part of the country is uninhabited, being abandoned to the wandering Arabs, and the towns and villages are in a state of total ruin." ( Ibid. ) "At every step are to be found the vestiges of ancient cities, the remains of many temples, public edifices, and Greek churches." ( Burckhardt's Travels. ) The cities are left desolate. "Many of the ruins present no objects of any interest. They consist of a few walls of dwelling houses, heaps of stones, the foundations of some public edifices, and a few cisterns filled up; there is nothing entire, though it appears that the mode of building was very solid, all the remains being formed of large stones. In the vicinity of Ammon there is a fertile plain interspersed with low hills, which for the greater part are covered with ruins." ( Burckhardt's Travels in Syria. ) While the country is thus despoiled and desolate, there are valleys and tracts throughout it which "are covered with a fine coat of verdant pasture, and are places of resort to the Bedouins, where they pasture their camels and their sheep."
( Buckingham's Travels in Palestine. ) "The whole way we traversed," says Seetzen, "we saw villages in ruins, and met numbers of Arabs with their camels," &c. Mr. Buckingham describes a building among the ruins of Ammon, "the masonry of which was evidently constructed of materials gathered from the ruins of other and older buildings on the spot. On entering it at the south end," he adds, "we came to an open square court, with arched recesses on each side, the sides nearly facing the cardinal points. The recesses in the northern and southern wall were originally open passages, and had arched door ways facing each other; but the first of these was found wholly closed up, and the last was partially filled up, leaving only a narrow passage, just sufficient for the entrance of one man and of the goats, which the Arab keepers drive in here occasionally for shelter during the night." He relates that he lay down among "flocks of sheep and goats," close beside the ruins of Ammon; and particularly remarks that, during the night, he "was almost entirely prevented from sleeping by the bleating of flocks." So literally true is it, although Seetzen, and Burckhardt, and Buckingham, who relate the facts, make no reference or allusion whatever to any of the prophecies, and travelled for a different object than the elucidation of the Scriptures,—that "the chief city of the Ammonites is a stable for camels, and a couching place for flocks."
"The Ammonites shall not be remembered among the nations." While the Jews, who were long their hereditary enemies, continue as distinct a people as ever, though dispersed among all nations, no trace of the Ammonites remains; none are now designated by their name, nor do any claim descent from them. They did exist, however, long after the time when the eventual annihilation of their race was foretold; for they retained their name, and continued a great multitude until the second century of the Christian aera. ( Justin Martyr. ) "Yet they are cut off from the people. Ammon has perished out of the countries; it is destroyed." No people is attached to its soil; none regard it as their country and adopt its name: "And the Ammonites are not remembered among the nations."
"Rabbah" (Rabbah Ammon, the chief city of Ammon) "shall be a desolate heap." Situated, as it was, on each side of the borders of a plentiful stream, encircled by a fruitful region, strong by nature and fortified by art, nothing could have justified the suspicion, or warranted the conjecture in the mind of an uninspired mortal, that the royal city of Ammon, whatever disasters might possibly befal it in the fate of war or change of masters, would ever undergo so total a transmutation as to become a desolate heap. But although, in addition to such tokens of its continuance as a city, more than a thousand years had given uninterrupted experience of its stability, ere the prophets of Israel denounced its fate; yet a period of equal length has now marked it out, as it exists to this day, a desolate heap, a perpetual or permanent desolation. Its ancient name is still preserved by the Arabs, and its site is now "covered with the ruins of private buildings—nothing of them remaining except the foundations and some of the door posts. The buildings, exposed to the atmosphere, are all in decay," ( Burckhardt's Travels in Syria, ) so that they may be said literally to form a desolate heap. The public edifices, which once strengthened or adorned the city, after a long resistance to decay, are now also desolate; and the remains of the most entire among them, subjected as they are to the abuse and spoliation of the wild Arabs, can be adapted to no better object than "a stable for camels." Yet these broken walls and ruined palaces, says Mr. Keith, which attest the ancient splendour of Ammon, can now be made subservient, by means of a single act of reflection, to a far nobler purpose than the most magnificent edifices on earth can be, when they are contemplated as monuments on which the historic and prophetic truth of Scripture is blended in one bright inscription.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Ammon Ammonites Children of Ammon
Ammon, Ammonites, Children of Ammon (ăm'mon,ăm'mon-îtes), strong people, or, perhaps, the same as Ben-ammi, son of my kindred. A people descended from Ben-ammi, the son of Lot by his younger daughter, Genesis 19:38; comp. Psalms 83:7-8, as Moab was by the elder; and dating from the destruction of Sodom. The near relation between the two peoples indicated in the story of their origin continued throughout their existence. Comp. Judges 10:6; 2 Chronicles 20:1; Zephaniah 2:8, etc. Indeed, so close' was their union, and so near their identity, that each would appear to be occasionally spoken of under the name of the other. Unlike Moab, the precise position of the territory of the Ammonites is not ascertainable. In the earliest mention of them, Deuteronomy 2:20, they are said to have destroyed the Rephaim, whom they called the Zamzummim, and to have dwelt in their place, Jabbok being their border. Numbers 21:24; Deuteronomy 2:37; Deuteronomy 3:16. "Land," or "country," is, however, but rarely ascribed to them, nor is there any reference to those habits and circumstances of civilization, which so constantly recur in the allusions to Moab. Isaiah 15:1-9; Isaiah 16:1-14; Jeremiah 48:1-47. On the contrary, we find everywhere traces of the fierce habits of marauders in their incursions. 1 Samuel 11:2; Amos 1:13. It appears that Moab was the settled and civilized half of the nation of Lot, and that Ammon formed its predatory and Bedouin section. On the west of Jordan they never obtained a footing. The hatred in which the Ammonites were held by Israel is stated to have arisen partly from their opposition, or, rather, their denial of assistance, Deuteronomy 23:4-5, to the Israelites on their approach to Canaan. But whatever its origin the animosity continued in force to the latest date. The tribe was governed by a king, Judges 11:12, etc.; 1 Samuel 12:12; 2 Samuel 10:1; Jeremiah 40:14; and by "princes," 2 Samuel 10:3; 1 Chronicles 19:3. It has been conjectured that Nahash, 1 Samuel 11:1; 2 Samuel 10:2, was the official title of the king as Pharaoh was of the Egyptian monarchs; but this is without any sure foundation. The divinity of the tribe was Molech, generally named in the Old Testament under the altered form of Milcom—"the abomination of the children of Ammon;" and Malcham. Zephaniah 1:5. In more than one passage under the word rendered "their king" in the A. V. an allusion is intended to this idol.

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Zamzummim - (zam zuhm' mihm) Name the Ammonites gave to the Rephaim. They lived east of the Jordan River until the Ammonites drove them out (Deuteronomy 2:20 )
Zamzummim - A race of giants east of the Jordan, defeated by Chedorlaomer, Genesis 14:5 , and exterminated by the Ammonites, who possessed their territory until themselves subdued by Moses, Deuteronomy 2:20-21 . See Ammonites , and ZUZIM
Ammonitiferous - ) Containing fossil Ammonites
Rab'Bath of the Children of Ammon, - and Rabbath of the Ammonites , [1]
Ammon, Ammonites - AMMON, Ammonites . ...
In Genesis 19:38 the Ammonites are said to have descended from a certain Ben-Ammi, but in the Assyrian inscriptions Shalmaneser II. Except in Psalms 83:7 , which is late, the people are never called ‘Ammon’ in the Hebrew OT, but the ‘children of Ammon,’ or ‘Ammonites. ’...
The really important feature of the story of Genesis 19:1-38 is that it reveals a consciousness that the Israelites regarded the Ammonites as their kindred. The proper names of individual Ammonites, so far as they are known to us, confirm this view. Probably, therefore, the Ammonites formed a part of that wave of Aramæan migration which brought the Hebrews into Palestine. ...
In Deuteronomy 2:20 the Ammonites are said to have displaced the Zamzummim, a semi-mythical people, of whom we know nothing. Israel found the Amorites in this territory at the time of the conquest, and we have no good reason to suppose that the Ammonites ever possessed it. ...
At the time of the conquest the Gadite Israelites did not disturb the Ammonites (Numbers 21:24 , Deuteronomy 2:37 ), or attempt to conquer their territory. During the period of the Judges the Ammonites assisted Eglon of Moab in his invasion of Israel ( Judges 3:13 ), and attempted to conquer Gilead, but were driven back by Jephthah the judge ( Judges 11:4-9 ; Judges 11:30-36 , Judges 12:1-3 ). Later, Nahash, their king, oppressed the town of Jabesh in Gilead, and it was the victory which delivered this city from the Ammonites that made Saul Israel’s king ( 1 Samuel 11:1-15 ). When David succeeded Saul in power, Hanun, the son of Nahash, provoked him to war, with the result that Rabbah, the Ammonite capital, was stormed and taken, the Ammonites were reduced to vassalage, and terrible vengeance was wreaked upon them ( 2 Samuel 10:1-19 ; 2 Samuel 11:1-27 ; 2 Samuel 12:1-31 ). After the reign of Solomon the Ammonites appear to have gained their independence. According to 2 Chronicles 20:1 , the Ammonites joined with Moab and Edom in invading Judah in the reign of Jehoshaphat. the Ammonites had made another attempt to get possession of Gilead, and their barbarities in warfare excited the indignation of the prophet Amos ( Amos 1:13-15 ), Chronicles represents them as beaten a little later by Jotham of Judah, and as paying tribute to Uzziah ( 2 Chronicles 26:8 ; 2 Chronicles 27:5 ). When next we hear of the Ammonites, Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon is employing them to harass the refractory Judæan king Jehoiakim ( 2 Kings 24:2 ). Perhaps it was at this period that the Ammonites occupied the territory of Gad ( Jeremiah 49:1 ff. ...
Perhaps there was a settlement of Ammonites in Israelitish territory, for Deuteronomy 23:3 ff. recognizes the danger of mixture with Ammonites, while Joshua 18:24 seems to indicate that there was in post-exilic times a village in Benjamin called ‘the village of the Ammonites. Again, 140 years later, the Ammonites did everything in their power to prevent the rebuilding of the walls of Jerusalem by Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 2:10 ; Nehemiah 2:19 ; Nehemiah 4:3 ; Nehemiah 4:7 ). Perhaps the Ammonites lost their identity at this time: for, though their name appears later, many scholars think it is used of these Arabs. Judas Maccabæus is said to have defeated the Ammonites; Psalms 83:7 reckons them among Israel’s enemies; while Justin Martyr ( Dial. 19) says the Ammonites were numerous in his day. 5) uses the same language of the Moabites and Ammonites, though elsewhere (XIV. 4) he seems to call them Arabians, it is possible that the Ammonites had lost their identity at the time of the Nabatæan invasion. The god of the Ammonites is called in the OT Milcom , a variation of Melek , ‘king. The Ammonites appear to have been a ruthless, semi-savage people
zu'Zim, the, - (Genesis 14:5 ) The Zuzim perhaps inhabited the country of the Ammonites, who were identical with the Zamzummim, who are known to have ben exterminated and succeeded in their land by the Ammonites [1]
Hanun - A king of the Ammonites, whose father Nahash had befriended David in his early troubles. The shameful treatment received by these ambassadors led to a destructive war upon the Ammonites, 2 Samuel 10:1 - 19 ; 1 Chronicles 19:1-19
Malcham - The chief god of the Ammonites (Zephaniah 1:5 , KJV; Malcam, RSV and NAS margins). The Hebrew malcam is sometimes seen as a deliberate scribal misspelling of Milcom (compare Jeremiah 49:1 ,Jeremiah 49:1,49:3 ; Zephaniah 1:5 ), the common name for the Ammonites' god (1Kings 11:5,1 Kings 11:33 ; Zephaniah 1:5 ), the common name for the Ammonites' god (1Kings 11:5,1 Kings 11:33 ; 2 Kings 23:13 ). At Amos 1:15 the Hebrew malcam is translated simply “their king,” though the word choice suggests that the Ammonites' god will go with them into Exile
Protoconch - ) The embryonic shell, or first chamber, of Ammonites and other cephalopods
Baalis - King of the Ammonites, who sent Ishmael to slay Gedaliah
Chepharhaammonai - This signifies 'hamlet of the Ammonites
Rabbath - or RABBAT-AMMON, the capital city of the Ammonites, situated beyond Jordan
Molech - ) The fire god of the Ammonites, to whom human sacrifices were offered; Moloch
Anaptychus - ) One of a pair of shelly plates found in some cephalopods, as the Ammonites
Che'Phar-Haam'Monai - (hamlet of the Ammonites ), a place mentioned among the town of Benjamin
Milcom - MALCOM, MILCOM...
One of the dunghill gods of the Ammonites
Lituite - ) Any species of Ammonites of the genus Lituites
Zamzummims - They were overcome by the Ammonites, "who called them Zamzummims. " They belonged to the Rephaim, and inhabited the country afterwards occupied by the Ammonites
Prosiphon - ) A minute tube found in the protoconch of Ammonites, and not connected with the true siphon
Achior - A general of the Ammonites ( Jdt 5:5 etc
Abel-Cheramim - , "plain of the vineyards"), a village of the Ammonites, whither Jephthah pursued their forces
ba'Alis, - king of the Ammonites at the time of the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar
Rabbah - The chief city and capital of the Ammonites. It is also called "Rabbath of the Ammonites
Chephar-Ammoni - CHEPHAR-AMMONI (‘village of the Ammonites,’ Joshua 18:24 )
Benammi - Name signifying 'son of my people,' given to the son of Lot's daughter: he was father of the Ammonites
Ben-am'mi - (son of my people ), the son of the younger daughter of Lot, and progenitor of the Ammonites
Hanun - The son of Nahash, king of the Ammonites. The consequence was a war, which proved most disastrous to the Ammonites ( 2 Samuel 10:1 ff
Milcom - The idol of the Ammonites, the worship of which was adopted by Solomon
Ammonites - Ammon, the kingdom of the Ammonites, was hardly more than a city-state, consisting of the capital city itself, Rabbah or Rabbath-Ammon (“chief city,” or “chief city of the Ammonites”) and its immediately surrounding territory. The proximity of the Ammonites to Gilead likewise destined them to be constant enemies of the Israelites, who made claims to Gilead and actually controlled it during the reigns of certain strong kings such as David, Omri, Ahab, and Jeroboam II. ...
Most of our information about the Ammonites comes from the Old Testament, although Ammonite kings are mentioned occasionally in the Assyrian records. An Ammonite inscription, the so-called Siran Bottle Inscription and several seals/seal impressions have provided additional information about the Ammonites. In addition to the inscription and seals mentioned above, the bust of an Ammonite warrior (or god) and the remains of round stone towers thought to be Ammonite are significant archaeological discoveries shedding light on the Ammonites. ...
Conflict broke out between the Ammonites and Israelites as early as the time of the Judges. The Ammonites made war on the Israelites of Gilead, leading the Israelites to appeal to Jephthah, chief of a local band of renegade raiders, to organize and lead their resistance. Jephthah accepted the challenge, but only after extracting a promise from the elders of Gilead that, if he indeed succeeded in defeating the Ammonites, they would recognize him as ruler of Gilead. At the same time he vowed to Yahweh that “If thou wilt give the Ammonites into my hand, then whoever comes forth from the doors of my house to meet me, when I return victorious from the Ammonites, shall be the LORD's, and I will offer him up for a burnt offering” (Judges 11:30-31 ). ...
On another occasion when the Ammonites were attacking the city of Jabesh in Gilead and the Jabeshites attempted to negotiate terms for surrender, the Ammonites demanded nothing less than to put out the right eye of each man in the city. ...
No war with the Ammonites is reported during Solomon's reign. We know little of relations between the Ammonites and either Israel or Judah during the first half century of the separate kingdoms, probably because neither of the Hebrew kingdoms attempted to exercise influence in the Transjordan. Later Shalmaneser penetrated the very heart of Syria-Palestine, exacting tribute from the Israelites and, although it is not recorded, probably also from the Ammonites. ...
The Israelites recognized the Ammonites as relatives, although somewhat more distant than the Edomites. Specifically, the Ammonites were said to have descended from an ancestor named Ben Ammi, one of two sons which Lot bore to his two daughters. The Ammonites also are mentioned from time to time in Israel's poetical literature. See for example Amos' oracle against the Ammonites in Amos 1:13-15
Baalis - King of the Ammonites in the time of the captivity
Oniatite - ) One of an extinct genus of fossil cephalopods, allied to the Ammonites
Chephar-Haammonai - ("hamlet of the Ammonites"
Abelcarmaim - Meadow of vineyards; a village of the Ammonites, six miles from Rabbath-Ammon; in the history of Jephthah it is called "the plain of the vineyards," Judges 11:33
Chephar-Ammoni - (chee' fahr-am' moh ni) Place name meaning, “open village of the Ammonites
Berachah - Blessing, a beautiful valley between Tekoa and Etham, where Jehoshaphat and all Judah held a thanksgiving for their miraculous victory over the Moabites and Ammonites, 2 Chronicles 20:26
Baalis - King of the Ammonites at the time of the Babylonian captivity (Jeremiah 40:14 )
Beth-Rehob - A town or district near Laish ( Judges 18:28 ), whose inhabitants joined the Ammonites against David ( 2 Samuel 10:6 )
Uriah the hitite - As per King David�s orders, he was killed in a battle against the Ammonites
Minnith - A town of the Ammonites in the time of Jephthah, Judges 11:33 , four miles northeast of Heshbon
Tetrabranchiata - Numerous genera and species are found in the fossil state, such as Ammonites, Baculites, Orthoceras, etc
Zoba(h) - At one time, the Ammonites hired mercenaries from Zoba (2 Samuel 10:6 ) to help them fight David. The Ammonites came from the South while the Zobaites came from the North causing David to fight on two fronts
Nahash -
King of the Ammonites in the time of Saul. "And it came to pass that they which remained were scattered, so that two of them [1] were not left together" (1 Samuel 11:1-11 ). ...
...
Another king of the Ammonites of the same name is mentioned, who showed kindness to David during his wanderings (2 Samuel 10:2 ). The grievous insult which was put upon these ambassadors led to a war against the Ammonites, who, with their allies the Syrians, were completely routed in a battle fought at "the entering in of the gate," probably of Medeba (2 Samuel 10:6-14 )
Hamite - ) A fossil cephalopod of the genus Hamites, related to the Ammonites, but having the last whorl bent into a hooklike form
Chemosh - The national god of the Moabites, and of the Ammonites, worshipped also under Solomon at Jerusalem, Numbers 21:29 ; Judges 11:24 ; 1 Kings 11:7 ; 2 Kings 23:13 ; Jeremiah 48:7
Moabites - Their origin and race is that of the Ammonites; their language practically a Hebrew dialect; their religion, polytheistic
Minnith - (mihn' nihth) One of twenty cities involved in Jephthah's conquest of the Ammonites (Judges 11:29-33 )
Ziz, the Cliff of - The pass near Engedi, by which the Moabites and Ammonites ascended from the shore of the Dead Sea, having followed the southern and western coast to this point, 2 Chronicles 20:16
Abel-Cheramim or Abel-Keramim - ” Jephthah, the judge, extended his victory over the Ammonites as far as Abel-cheramim (Judges 11:33 ), whose location east of the Jordan is not known precisely
Jeruel - A wilderness where Jehoshaphat was to find his enemies, the Ammonites, the Moabites, and the inhabitants of Mount Seir, who destroyed one another
Bethrehob - Place in thenorth near Dan, from which perhaps Syrians were hired by the Ammonites against David, Judges 18:28 ; 2 Samuel 10:6
Moloch - ) The fire god of the Ammonites in Canaan, to whom human sacrifices were offered; Molech
Jabesh - Naash, king of the Ammonites, besieged Genesis 2 : 1 Samuel 11:1 , &c
Berachah -
A valley not far from Engedi, where Jehoshaphat overthrew the Moabites and Ammonites (2 Chronicles 20:26 )
Ben-Ammi - Ben-ammi was the original ancestor of the Ammonites
Medeba - Here was fought the great battle in which Joab defeated the Ammonites and their allies (1 Chronicles 19:7-15 ; Compare 2 Samuel 10:6-14 ). In the time of (Isaiah 15:2 ) the Moabites regained possession of it from the Ammonites
na'Hash -
King of the Ammonites who dictated to the inhabitants of Jabesh-gilead that cruel alternative of the loss of their right eyes or slavery which roused the swift wrath of Saul, and caused the destruction of the Ammonite force. ) "Nahaph" would seem to have been the title of the king of the Ammonites rather than the name of an individual
Ammonites - The Ammonites had kings, and were uncircumcised, Jeremiah 9:25-26 , and seem to have been principally addicted to husbandry. Chemosh was also a god of the Ammonites. Before the Israelites entered Canaan, the Amorites conquered a great part of the country belonging to the Ammonites and Moabites; but it was retaken by Moses, and divided between the tribes of Gad and Reuben. 1188, the Ammonites engaged as principals in a war, under a king whose name is not given, against the Israelites. This prince, determining to recover the ancient country of the Ammonites, made a sudden irruption into it, reduced the land, and kept the inhabitants in subjection for eighteen years. The Israelites resisted the invader; and, assembling at Mizpeh, chose Jephthah for their general, and sent an expostulatory message to the king of the Ammonites, Judges 10:11 . The king replied, that those lands belonged to the Ammonites, who had been unjustly dispossessed of them by the Israelites, when they came out of Egypt, and exhorted Jephthah to restore them peaceably to the lawful owners. ...
Jephthah remonstrated on the injustice of his claim; but finding a war inevitable, he fell upon the Ammonites near Aroer, and defeated them with great slaughter. On this occasion the Ammonites lost twenty cities; and thus an end was put, after eighteen years' bondage, to the tyranny of Ammon over the Israelites beyond Jordan. 1095, the old claim of the Ammonites was revived by Nahash their king, and they laid siege to the city of Jabesh. In the reign of Jehoshaphat the Ammonites united with their brethren, the Moabites, and the inhabitants of Mount Seir, against the king of Judah; but they were completely routed. 740, the Ammonites and Moabites took possession of the cities belonging to these tribes, and were reproached for it by Jeremiah 49:1 . The Prophet Ezekiel, Ezekiel 25:4-10 , denounces their entire destruction, and informs them, that God would deliver them up to the people of the east; and that the Ammonites should no more be mentioned among the nations: and this punishment they were to suffer for insulting the Israelites on account of their calamities, and the destruction of their temple by the Chaldeans. It is probable that Cyrus granted to the Ammonites and Moabites liberty to return into their own country, whence they had been removed by Nebuchadnezzar; for they were exposed to the revolutions that were common to the people of Syria and Palestine, and were subject sometimes to the kings of Egypt, and sometimes to the kings of Syria. Polybius informs us, that Antiochus the Great took Rabboth, or Philadelphia, the capital of the Ammonites, demolished the walls, and put a garrison into it, A. During the persecutions of Antiochus Epiphanes, the Ammonites manifested their hatred to the Jews, and exercised great cruelties against such of them as lived in their parts. ...
It was prophesied concerning Ammon, "Son of man, set thy face against the Ammonites, and prophesy against them. I will make Rabbah of the Ammonites a stable for camels and a couching place for flocks. The Ammonites shall not be remembered among the nations. Rabbah" (the chief city) "of the Ammonites shall be a desolate heap. " So literally true is it, although Seetzen, and Burckhardt, and Buckingham, who relate the facts, make no reference or allusion whatever to any of the prophecies, and travelled for a different object than the elucidation of the Scriptures,—that "the chief city of the Ammonites is a stable for camels, and a couching place for flocks. "...
"The Ammonites shall not be remembered among the nations. " While the Jews, who were long their hereditary enemies, continue as distinct a people as ever, though dispersed among all nations, no trace of the Ammonites remains; none are now designated by their name, nor do any claim descent from them. " No people is attached to its soil; none regard it as their country and adopt its name: "And the Ammonites are not remembered among the nations
Abel-Carmaim - An Ammonite village, six miles from Rabbath Ammon, or Philadelphia; the limit of Jephthah's pursuit of the Ammonites
Che'Mosh - ( Numbers 21:29 ; Jeremiah 48:7,13,46 ) In (Judges 11:24 ) he also appears as the god of the Ammonites
Hadadezer - Hanun, the king of the Ammonites, hired among others the army of Hadadezer to assist him in his war against David. In the battle which was fought the Syrians were scattered, and the Ammonites in alarm fled into their capital. Thus the power of the Ammonites and the Syrians was finally broken, and David's empire extended to the Euphrates (2 Samuel 10:15-19 ; 1618388138_6 )
Shobach - see), who commanded the forces of that king when he aided the Ammonites in their war with king David. 1) makes him a giant of the Ammonites equal to Goliath, while the Samaritan Chronicle, sometimes called ‘the book of Joshua
Jephthah - ” When the Ammonites moved against Israel, Jephthah's people asked him to return and lead them. His victory over the Ammonites came about because of a vow he made to offer as a burnt offering the first living thing he saw upon his return from the battle
Bezek - Place where Saul numbered the army before he slew the Ammonites, 1 Samuel 11:8 , apparently near the centre of Palestine
a'i - " (Joshua 7:3-5 ; 8:1 ; Joshua 9:3 ; 10:1,2 ; 12:9 ) ...
A city of the Ammonites, apparently attached to Heshbon
Chemosh - In Judges 11:24 he also appears as the god of the Ammonites
Jahaziel - He encouraged Jehoshaphat against the Moabites and Ammonites
Timotheus - A leader of the Ammonites who was defeated in many battles by Judas Maccabæus ( 1Ma 5:6 ff
Malcam - , RSV, "their king;" Jeremiah 49:1,3 , RSV; Zephaniah 1:5 ), the national idol of the Ammonites
Beracah - ‘The valley of blessing,’ where Jehoshaphat gave thanks for victory over the Ammonites, Moabites, and Edomites, who had marched from Engedi to Tekoa ( 1 Chronicles 12:2 ; 1 Chronicles 12:20 )
Chemosh - One of the chief gods of the Moabites and the Ammonites, the worship of which was introduced at Jerusalem by Solomon, and abolished by Josiah
Jazer - , a city of the Ammonites, near the river Jabbok
Hanun - The son of Nahash, king of the Ammonites
Jason - Three years later Jason was forced to flee, and took refuge with the Ammonites. During the second expedition of Antiochus into Egypt, hearing a rumor that the king had died, Jason at the head of the Ammonites besieged Jerusalem, and slew his countrymen without mercy (2Machabees 5)
Arrow - Ezekiel 21:21 , informs us, that Nebuchadnezzar, putting himself at the head of his armies, to march against Zedekiah, king of the Jews, and against the king of the Ammonites, stood at the parting of two ways, to mingle his arrows together in a quiver, in order to divine from thence which way he should march. Jerom, Theodoret, and the modern commentators after them, believe that this prince took several arrows, and upon each of them wrote the name of the king, town, or province, which he was to attack; for example, upon one, Jerusalem; upon another, Rabbah, the capital of the Ammonites; and upon another, Egypt, &c
Berachah, Valley of - ) Where Jehoshaphat and his people on the fourth day assembled to "bless" Jehovah for overthrowing the invading Ammonites, Moabites, Hagarenes, Edomites, and Amalekites who sought to "cut off Israel from being a nation" (Psalm 83; 2 Chronicles 20:26)
Ziz - The ascent of Ziz is mentioned in 2 Chronicles 20:16 as the way by which the allied Moabites, Ammonites, and Meunim made their way up from En-gedi to attack Jehoshaphat at Jerusalem
Jephthah - (Ἰεφθάε)...
Jephthah, the Gileadite warrior who became the conqueror of the Ammonites, and whose vow compelled him to sacrifice his own daughter (Judges 11-12), is named among the men of the OT who achieved great things by faith (Hebrews 11:32)
Eglon - He formed an alliance with the Ammonites and Amalekites, and took possession of Jericho, where he resided, and where he was afterward assassinated, by Ehud
Ziz - (the projection ), The cliff of, the pass by which the horde of Moabites, Ammonites and Mehunim made their way up from the shores of the Dead Sea to the wilderness of Judah near Tekoa
Min'Nith - (distribution ), a place on the east of the Jordan, named as the point to which Jephthah's slaughter of the Ammonites extended
Rabbath - Or RABBATH-AMMON, afterwards called Philadelphia, the capital of the Ammonites, was situated near the southern source of the jabbok, some twenty-two miles beyond Jordan. When David declared war against the Ammonites, his general, Joab, laid siege to Rabbath-Ammon, where Uriah lost his life by a secret order of his prince; and when the city was reduced to the last extremity, Joab sent for David to hasten and go thither, to enjoy the honor of taking it, 2 Samuel 11:12 . Towards the conclusion of the kingdom of Israel, Tiglathpileser having taken away a great part of the Israelites, the Ammonites were guilty of many cruelties against those who remained; for which the prophets Jeremiah and Ezekiel pronounced very severe prophecies against Rabbath, their captial, and against the rest of the country; which probably had their completion five years after the destruction of Jerusalem, Jeremiah 49:1-3 Ezekiel 21:20
am'Mon - ( Genesis 19:38 ) comp Psal 83:7,8 The Ammonites are frequently mentioned with the Moabites (descendants of Ben-ammi's half-brother), and sometimes under the same name. The precise position of the territory of the Ammonites is not ascertainable. The hatred in which the Ammonites were held by Israel is stated to have arisen partly from their denial of assistance, (23:4) to the Israelites on their approach to Canaan
Chemosh - see]'>[1], who held the same position among the Ammonites)
Brickkiln - Just as the Egyptians used the Israelites to make bricks, so David put the Ammonites to making bricks ( 2 Samuel 12:31 )
Nahash - A king of the Ammonites, defeated by Saul while besieging Ramothgilead, 1 Samuel 11:1-15
Nahash - Some identify him with Jesse, and others with Nahash, king of the Ammonites
League - The Jews were forbidden to enter into an alliance of any kind (1) with the Canaanites (Exodus 23:32,33 ; 34:12-16 ); (2) with the Amalekites (Exodus 17:8,14 ; Deuteronomy 25:17-19 ); (3) with the Moabites and Ammonites (Deuteronomy 2:9,19 )
Emims - The Ammonites called them Zamzummims (2:20)
Medeba - It was afterward taken by the Israelites and allotted to the tribe of Reuben, Joshua 13:16; held by the Ammonites during the reign of David, 1 Chronicles 19:7-15, it later again reverted to Moab
Ammon, Ammonites, Children of Ammon - God had bidden Moses not to touch the Ammonites, nor was their land to be possessed by Israel: it had been given to the children of Lot. Israel served their gods, and God gave them up on both sides of the Jordan to serve the Ammonites. In the early days of Saul's reign they besieged Jabesh-gilead, and would only make peace on the condition that the right eyes of the inhabitants should be thrust out, in order that it might be a reproach on Israel; but Saul hastened to their aid, and routed the Ammonites. Solomon loved some of their women, and the mother of his son Rehoboam was Naamah an Ammonitess. Lot being the father of both Moab and Ammon, it is not surprising that the Moabites were often linked with the Ammonites in their attacks upon Israel. ...
Milcom and Molech were the gods of the Ammonites: to the worship of which Solomon had been seduced by his strange wives
Tob - the men of Tob, supported the Ammonites against David (2 Samuel 10:6; 2 Samuel 10:8)
Aha - GOD noticed that the Ammonites and also other nations used this little word against His people, His land and His temple
ma'Acah - (Joshua 12:5 ) The Ammonite war was the only occasion on which the Maacathites came into contact with Israel when their king assisted the Ammonites against Joab with a force which he led himself
Beth-Rehob - When the Ammonites made David angry by humiliating his officials, Ammon sent to Beth-rehob for Syrian soldiers, evidently indicating that Syria controlled the city
Jazer - Judas Maccabæus took the city, which was then in the hands of the Ammonites ( 1Ma 5:9 ; Jos
Rabbah - To the east of the Jordan River was the land of the Ammonites, whose capital city was Rabbah, or Rabbah-ammon
Zobah - An Aramæan community, the most powerful of the coalition of ‘Syrian’ States which made war upon king David while he was engaged with the Ammonites ( 2 Samuel 8:10 ff
ha'Nun -
Son of Nahash (2 Samuel 10:1,2 ; 1 Chronicles 19:1,2 ) king of Ammon, who dishonored the ambassadors of David, (2 Samuel 10:4 ) and involved the Ammonites in a disastrous war, (2 Samuel 12:31 ; 1 Chronicles 19:6 ) (B
Jephthah, Jephthae - But when the Ammonites attacked Israel, the men of Gilead called in the aid of this 'mighty man of valour. After vainly seeking to divert the Ammonites from their unjust aggression, by maintaining that the Lord God of Israel had given them the land which Ammon now sought to possess, the Spirit of the Lord came upon Jephthah, and he prepared for the war; but before the battle, he vowed that if the Lord would deliver the Ammonites into his hand he would on returning devote to the Lord whatever should first come out of his house to meet him. ...
The Ammonites were smitten with very great slaughter: he conquered twenty cities, for the Lord delivered them into his hand
Zamzummim - A name given by the conquering Ammonites to the Rephaim , the original inhabitants of the land ( Deuteronomy 2:20 )
Rephaim - , "fearful", (Deuteronomy 2:11 ), and to the Ammonites as Zamzummim
Minaeans - It is supposed by recent scholars that they are meant by the Me‘unim or (better) Me‘inim , who are named in 1 Chronicles 4:41 as dwelling in the Negeb, in 2 Chronicles 26:7 along with Arabians, and in 2 Chronicles 20:1 (by correction) along with the Ammonites
Minnith - MINNITH marks the direction in which Jephthah pursued the defeated Ammonites from Aroer ( Judges 11:33 ), i
Jabesh - It was sacked by the Israelites for refusing to aid in chastising the Benjamites, Judges 21:8-10 ...
At a later day, it was besieged by the Ammonites, and relieved by Saul; in gratitude for which service the men of Jabesh-gilead rescued the dead bodies of Saul and his sons from the insults of the Philistines, 1 Samuel 11:1-15 31:11-13 2 Samuel 2:5
eg'Lon - , who, aided by the Ammonites and the Amelekites, crossed the Joran and took "the city of palm trees
Jephte - When he was later appealed to by the elders of Galaad for help against the Ammonites, he consented to lead them and vowed that if he should be given the victory over Ammon he would sacrifice to the Lord whosoever should come forth from his house to meet him on his return
Moloch - Moloch is spoken of in the OT as the god of the Ammonites, and is evidently the national deity, just as Chemosh is the god of Moab, and Jahweh the God of Israel, though the worship of other gods is not precluded
Aram-Naharaim - The Ammonites bought military help from Aram-Naharaim to fight David
Tob - This principality furnished twelve thousand men to the confederacy formed by the Syrians and Ammonites against David, 2 Samuel 10
Ai - A city of the Ammonites, not far from Heshbon
Jahaz - Trodden down (called also Jahaza, Joshua 13:18 ; Jahazah, 21:36; Jahzah, 1 Chronicles 6:78 ), a town where Sihon was defeated, in the borders of Moab and in the land of the Ammonites beyond Jordan, and north of the river Arnon (Numbers 21:23 ; Deuteronomy 2:32 )
Tob - ), in helping the Ammonites in their war against king David ( 2 Samuel 10:6 ff
Salt, Valley of - It is conjectured that while David was leading his army against the Ammonites and Syrians, the Edomites invaded the south of Judah, and that David sent Joab or Abishai against them, who drove them back and finally subdued Edom
Jabbok - This latter branch separated the Ammonites from Israel
Ammon Ammonites Children of Ammon - Ammon, Ammonites, Children of Ammon (ăm'mon,ăm'mon-îtes), strong people, or, perhaps, the same as Ben-ammi, son of my kindred. Unlike Moab, the precise position of the territory of the Ammonites is not ascertainable. The hatred in which the Ammonites were held by Israel is stated to have arisen partly from their opposition, or, rather, their denial of assistance, Deuteronomy 23:4-5, to the Israelites on their approach to Canaan
Rabbah -
"Rabbath of the children of Ammon," the chief city of the Ammonites, among the eastern hills, some 20 miles east of the Jordan, on the southern of the two streams which united with the Jabbok. Here the bedstead of Og was preserved (Deuteronomy 3:11 ), perhaps as a trophy of some victory gained by the Ammonites over the king of Bashan
Aroer - A city of the tribe of Gad (Joshua 13:25 ) near Rabbah, capital of the Ammonites. This may be the Aroer where Jephthah defeated the Ammonites (Judges 11:33 )
Mehunim - ) according to 2 Chronicles 20:1 (NAS, NIV, REB, NRSV following the Greek translation; the Hebrew text reads Ammonites)
Jabesh, Jabeshgilead - The city was afterwards saved from the Ammonites by Saul; and when Saul and his sons were killed in battle, the valiant men of the city took up their bodies and buried them
Abomination - Thus we read, (2 Kings 23:13,) that Ashtoreth was the abomination (that is the idol) of the Zidonians; Chemosh, the abomination of the Moabites; and Milcom, the abomination of the Ammonites
Zephaniah - He denounces the judgments of God against the idolatry and sins of his countrymen, and exhorts them to repentance; he predicts the punishment of the Philistines, Moabites, Ammonites, and Ethiopians, and foretels the destruction of Nineveh; he again inveighs against the corruptions of Jerusalem, and with his threats mixes promises of future favour and prosperity to his people; whose recall from their dispersion shall glorify the name of God throughout the world
Hadare'Zer - ) After the first repulse of the Ammonites and their Syrian allies by Joab, Hadarezer sent his army to the assistance of his kindred the people of Maachah, Rehob and Ishtob
Goli'Ath - ) He was possibly descended from the old Rephaim [1], of whom a scattered remnant took refuge with the Philistines after their dispersion by the Ammonites
Rab'Bah -
A very strong place on the east of the Jordan, and the chief city of the Ammonites. In five passages -- (3:11; 2 Samuel 12:26 ; 17:27 ; Jeremiah 49:2 ; Ezekiel 21:20 ) --it is styled at length Rabbath of the Ammonites, or the children of Ammon; but elsewhere, (Joshua 13:25 ; 2 Samuel 11:1 ; 12:27,29 ; 1 Chronicles 20:1 ; Jeremiah 49:3 ) simply Rabbah
Jephthah - Whom God sets free, or the breaker through, a "mighty man of valour" who delivered Israel from the oppression of the Ammonites (Judges 11:1-33 ), and judged Israel six years (12:7). The defeat of the Ammonites was complete
Abishai - 18,24 , in the war with the Edomites, 1 Chronicles 18:12,13 , and with the Syrians and Ammonites, 2 Samuel 10:10
Moloch - King, the name of the national god of the Ammonites, to whom children were sacrificed by fire
Eglon - Aided by the Amalekites and Ammonites, Eglon dominated Israel for eighteen years
Eglon - King of Moab, under whose leadership the Ammonites and Amalekites joined with the Moabites in fighting and defeating the Israelites
Nebuzar-a'Dan - (Jeremiah 52:30 ) Nebuchadnezzar in his twenty-third year made a descent on the regions east of Jordan, including the Ammonites and Moabites, who escaped when Jerusalem was destroyed
Jephthah - Some time after this, Gilead is threatened with an attack by the Ammonites, and Jephthah is besought to return to his country in order to defend it; he promises to lead his countrymen against the Ammonites on condition of his being made chief (king?) if he returns victorious. ...
The ‘spirit of the Lord’ comes upon Jephthah, and he marches out to attack the Ammonites. He defeats the Ammonites, and, on his return, his daughter, an only child, comes out to meet him. There follows then an episode which recalls Judges 8:1-3 ; the Ephraimites resent not having been called by Jephthah to fight against the Ammonites, just as they resented not being called by Gideon to fight against the Midianites; in the present case, however, the matter is not settled amicably; a battle follows, in which Jephthah is again victorious; the Ephraimites flee, but are intercepted at the fords of Jordan, and, being recognized by their inability to pronounce the ‘sh’ in the word Shibboleth , are slain
Ammon - ...
In the days before Israel’s migration to Canaan, the Ammonites were pushed further east, away from the Jordan, by the Amorites. ...
God approved of the Israelites’ conquest of this territory, for they had taken it not from the Ammonites, who were related to them, but from the Amorites, who were under God’s judgment (Deuteronomy 2:17-19; Deuteronomy 2:37; Deuteronomy 3:1-11; Judges 11:12-23; see AMORITES). Therefore, when the Ammonites tried to repossess the area during the time of the judges, God used Jephthah to drive them out (Judges 10:6-9; Judges 11:32-33). ...
With the changes that accompanied Saul’s appointment as Israel’s first king, the Ammonites seized the opportunity to invade Israel’s eastern territory once more; but they were soon driven out (1 Samuel 11:1-11). But the Ammonites’ violence, cruelty and arrogance were inexcusable, and God’s prophets assured them of a fitting punishment (Jeremiah 49:1-6; Amos 1:13-15; Zephaniah 2:8-11). The Ammonites also joined the attackers to help with the final destruction of Judah, but their treachery only made their own destruction more certain (2 Kings 24:1-2; 1618388138_99; Jeremiah 41:1-3; Jeremiah 41:10; Ezekiel 25:1-7). Individual Ammonites continued to be a source of trouble to the Jews (Nehemiah 2:10; Nehemiah 4:7-9), but eventually the separate racial identity of the Ammonites disappeared
te'Rah - (station ), the father of Abram, Nahor and Haran, and through them the ancestor of the great families of the Israelites, Ishmaelites, Midianites, Moabites and Ammonites
Zamzummim - or ZUZIM, a gigantic race of people, who, together with the Rephaim and Emim, men of like stature, occupied, in the time of Abraham, the country east of Jordan and the Dead Sea, where they were routed by Chedorlaomer, and from which they were afterward expelled by the Ammonites, Deuteronomy 2:20-21
Saul - After his signal defeat of the Ammonites, Saul was confirmed on the throne by the army at Gilgal, 1 Samuel 11:1-15, though the continuance of the theocracy was earnestly insisted on by Samuel. He carried on successful wars against the Ammonites, the Philistines, the Moabites, and the Amalekites
Eighteen - ...
Judges 10:8 (c) The Philistines and the Ammonites "oppressed the children of Israel eighteen years
Shibboleth - The tribes living on the east of Jordan, separated from their brethren on the west by the deep ravines and the rapid river, gradually came to adopt peculiar customs, and from mixing largely with the Moabites, Ishmaelites, and Ammonites to pronounce certain letters in such a manner as to distinguish them from the other tribes
Ehud - After the death of Othniel the people again fell into idolatry, and Eglon, the king of Moab, uniting his bands with those of the Ammonites and the Amalekites, crossed the Jordan and took the city of Jericho, and for eighteen years held that whole district in subjection, exacting from it an annual tribute
Gedaliah - He fled with such of his followers as escaped to the Ammonites (41:15)
en-Gedi - Here the Moabites and Ammonites came against Jehoshaphat ( 2 Chronicles 20:2 )
Citizenship - Under the Mosaic law non-Israelites, with the exception of the Moabites and the Ammonites and others mentioned in Deuteronomy 23:1-3 , were admitted to the general privileges of citizenship among the Jews (Exodus 12:19 ; Leviticus 24:22 ; Numbers 15:15 ; 35:15 ; Deuteronomy 10:18 ; 14:29 ; 16:10,14 )
Captivity - Six captivities are reckoned during the government by judges: the first, under Chushanrishathaim, king of Mesopotamia, which continued about eight years; the second, under Eglon, king of Moab, from which the Jews were delivered by Ehud; the third, under the Philistines, from which they were rescued by Shamgar; the fourth, under Jabin, king of Hazor, from which they were delivered by Deborah and Barak; the fifth, under the Midianites, from which Gideon freed them; and the sixth, under the Ammonites and Philistines, during the judicatures of Jephthah, Ibzan, Elon, Abdon, Eli, Samson, and Samuel
Molech, Moloch, or Milcom - A king, 1 Kings 11:5,7 Acts 7:43 ; supposed also to be intended by Malcham, or "their king," in Jeremiah 49:1 Amos 1:15 Zephaniah 1:5 , the name of a heathen deity, worshipped by the Ammonites
Ham - ...
According to the present text, (Genesis 14:5 ) Chedorlaomer and his allies smote the Zuzim in a place called Ham, probably in the territory of the Ammonites (Gilead), east of the Jordan
Jabbok - It was the boundary between the territory of the Ammonites and that of Og, king of Bashan (Joshua 12:1-5 ; Numbers 21:24 ); also between the tribe of Reuben and the half tribe of Manasseh (21:24; Deuteronomy 3:16 )
Jotham - He conquered the Ammonites, and for three years they paid him tribute
Ammonite - The Ammonites were probably more of a predatory tribe, moving from place to place, while the Moabites were more settled. The prophets predicted fearful judgments against the Ammonites because of their hostility to Israel (Zephaniah 2:8 ; Jeremiah 49:1-6 ; Ezekiel 25:1-5,10 ; Amos 1:13-15 )
Jephthah - When a war broke out between the children of Israel and the Ammonites, he signalized himself for courage and enterprise. This led the Israelites to seek his aid as their commander-in-chief; and though he objected at first on the ground of their ill-usage of him, yet, upon their solemn covenant to regard him as their leader, in case they succeeded against the Ammonites, he took command of their army. After some preliminary negotiations with the Ammonites, in which the question of the right to the country is discussed with great force and ingenuity, and finding every attempt to conciliate them vain, the two armies met; the Ammonites were defeated with great loss of life, and their country scoured by the Israelites. " His next act was one of severity in dealing with the Ephraimites, who were not invited to war against the Ammonites, hence had a battle with the Gileadites, and were defeated; and the latter, seizing the fords of the Jordan, slew every Ephraimite who attempted to escape by crossing the river; and the method employed to ascertain whether they belonged to Ephraim was, to cause them to pronounce the word "shibboleth," which they sounded "sibboleth;" for, it seems that, by this time, a difference in the manner of pronouncing at least one Hebrew letter had arisen between the inhabitants on the different sides of the Jordan
Molech - The name of an idol-god worshipped by the Ammonites with human sacrifices, especially of children
Mesopotamia - Mesopotamia supplied mercenary chariots and cavalry for the Ammonites' war with David (1 Chronicles 19:6 ; superscription of Psalm 60:1 )
Maon, Maonites - 2 Chronicles 20:1 , where ‘Ammonites’ should probably be ‘Meunim’)
Nahash - He sacrificed the oxen sent parts of the sacrifice to his fellow-countrymen with a command to muster, and promptly destroyed the Ammonites
Arnon - The king of the Ammonites tried to retake the Arnon in Jephthah's day, but God's Spirit led Jephthah to victory (Judges 11:12-33 )
Nahash - Saul raised an army and the Ammonites were defeated
ai, Hai - City of the Ammonites, unknown
Abishai - He went with him alone to the tent of Saul, 1 Samuel 26:6-12, and was a leader in the war with Ish-bosheth, 2 Samuel 2:18; 2 Samuel 2:24, in the war with the Edomites, 1 Chronicles 18:12-13, and with the Syrians and Ammonites
Og - ...
Either the Ammonites, like the Bedouin, followed in the wake of Israel's armies as pillagers, and so got possession of it; or Israel sent it to Ammon as a pledge of their having no hostile intentions, the Lord having forbidden them to disturb Ammon, and as a visible token of Israel's power in having overcome such mighty kings as Sihon and Og. His corpse may have been carried, in this view, to the territory of the friendly Ammonites
Rabbah - The capital city of the Ammonites (wh. 750 Rabbah was still the capital of the Ammonites ( Amos 1:14 ), and such it continued to be down to the time of Nebuchadnezzar, who, if we may judge from the prophecies of Jeremiah and Ezekiel ( Jeremiah 49:2 , Ezekiel 21:20 ; Ezekiel 25:5 ), punished Rabbah for a rebellion of the Ammonites by a siege
Hadad-Ezer - Ammonites saw David was too strong for them and hired Syrian troops, including those of Hadad-ezer, to help them, but Joab, David's general, defeated them (2 Samuel 10:6-19 )
Molech - Molech (or Milcom) was the national god of the Ammonites, whose land bordered Israel’s territory east of Jordan
Maacah - Later, this people sided with the Ammonites against David (2 Samuel 10:6-8 )
Races - North Semites : ( a ) Babylonians (Shinar, Accad, Bahel, Erech); ( b ) Assyrians (Asshur, Nineveh, Calah); ( c ) Aramæans (Syrians); ( d ) Canaanitish peoples (1) Ammonites, (2) Amorites, (3) Canaanites, (4) Edomites, (5) Hivites, (6) Israelites, (7) Jebusites, (8) Moabites, (9) Phœnicians (Tyre, Sidon, Arvad, etc
Goliath - He was probably descended from the Rephaim who found refuge among the Philistines after they were dispersed by the Ammonites (Deuteronomy 2:20,21 )
Harrow - ]'>[1] , David is represented as torturing the Ammonites ‘under harrows of iron
Rabbah, Rabbath - The fortified capital of the Ammonites
Jehoshaphat - This seems to have led to his being assailed by a vast host of Moabites, Ammonites, Edomites, and Syrians; but again he was victorious through his faith in God
Maon - In 2 Chronicles 20:1, "with them (other) beside the Ammonites," or as others translated "others who dwelt aside from (i. beyond) the Ammonites," namely, tribes in the Syro-Arabian desert bordering upon Ammon on the N
Moab - Under Nebuchadnezzar the Moabites acted as the auxiliaries of the Chaldeans, 2 Kings 24:2; 1618388138_93; and during the exile they took possession once more of their ancient territory, vacated by the tribes of Reuben and Gad; as did the Ammonites also. ...
Some time after the exile their name was lost under that of the Arabians, as was also the case with the Ammonites and Edomites
Arnon - It is now called Wady Modjeb, and anciently divided the territories of the Moabites in turn from those of the Ammonites, Amorites, and Reubenites, Numbers 21:13 ; Joshua 13:16
Camel - ...
Ezekiel 25:5 (a) This is a type of the destruction and desolation which would come upon the Ammonites under the wrath of GOD
Kabzeel - to Petra; a spot likely to be occupied, though remote, as a stronghold, the key of Palestine toward Moat and Edom, guarding the pass Ez Zuweirah, by which the Moabites under Sanballat, the Ammonites under Tobiah, and the Arabians under Geshem, might attack the Jews (Nehemiah 4:12)
Jehoiakim - Nebuchadnezzar sent against him numerous bands of Chaldeans, with Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites, 2 Kings 24:2, and who cruelly harassed the whole country
Tempest - ...
Amos 1:14 (a) GOD will punish the Ammonites with a terrible destruction when He pours out His wrath upon them because of their wickedness and of their hatred of Israel
Maacah or Maachah - The king of Maachah, with other Syrians, joined the Ammonites in a war with David, and were defeated and made tributary, 2 Samuel 10:6-8,19
Jephthah's Vow - After a crushing defeat of the Ammonites, Jephthah returned to his own house, and the first to welcome him was his own daughter
mo'Lech - Molech was the lord and master of the Ammonites; their country was his possession, ( Jeremiah 49:1 ) as Moab was the heritage of Chemosh; the princes of the land were the princes of Malcham
Rephaim - Despite their reputation for might and height, the Rephaim were defeated by a coalition of eastern kings (Genesis 14:5 ) and were later displaced by the Israelites (Deuteronomy 3:11 ,Deuteronomy 3:11,3:13 ; compare Genesis 15:20 ) and their distant kin, the Moabites (Deuteronomy 2:10-11 ) and the Ammonites (Deuteronomy 2:20-21 )
Abomination - Among the objects so described are heathen deities such as Ashtoreth (Astarte), Chemosh, Milcom, the ‘abominations’ of the Zidonians (Phœnicians), Moabites, and Ammonites respectively ( 2 Kings 23:13 ); images and other paraphernalia of the forbidden cults ( Deuteronomy 7:25 ; Deuteronomy 27:15 , and often in Ezk
Scatter - Thus, when Saul defeated the Ammonites, “they which remained were scattered, so that two of them were not left together” ( Jeho-i'Akim - ( 2 Kings 24:1 ) Nebuchadnezzar sent against him numerous bands of Chaldeans, with Syrians, Moabites and Ammonites, (2 Kings 24:7 ) and who cruelly harassed the whole country
Jabesh-Gilead - This city was afterwards taken by Nahash, king of the Ammonites, but was delivered by Saul, the newly-elected king of Israel
Jephthah - When the people of his tribe decided to overthrow the Ammonites (who had oppressed them for eighteen years; Judges 10:7-8; Judges 10:17-18), Jephthah was the man they asked to be their leader
Joab - ...
Above all, Joab was a skilled general ; this is seen by the number of victories he gained, namely, over the army of Ishbosheth under the leadership of Abner ( 2 Samuel 2:12-32 ); over the Jebusites ( 1 Chronicles 11:6-9 ); over the Syrians and Ammonites ( 2 Samuel 10:1-19 ; 2 Samuel 11:1 ; 2 Samuel 12:26-29 ); over Absalom ( 2 Samuel 18:5-17 ); over Sheba ( 2 Samuel 20:4-22 ). ...
Secondly, his loyalty to the house of David is Illustrated by his whole life of devoted service, and especially by such conspicuous instances as his desire to make his victory over the Ammonites appear to have been gained by David ( 2 Samuel 12:20 ff
Beard - The king of the Ammonites, designing to insult David in the person of his ambassadors, cut away half of their beards, and half of their clothes; that is, he cut off all their beard on one side of their faces, 2 Samuel 10:4-5 ; 1 Chronicles 19:5 . " And hence we may easily learn the magnitude of the offence of the Ammonites in their treatment of David's ambassadors, as above mentioned; and also the force of the emblem used Ezekiel 5:1-5 , where the inhabitants of Jerusalem are compared to the hair of his head and beard
Rephaim - Deuteronomy 2:11 ; Deuteronomy 2:20 calls certain peoples ‘Rephaim’ whom the Moabites and Ammonites called respectively ‘ Emim ’ and ‘ Zamzummin
Engedi - The route of the Moabites and Ammonites invading Jehoshaphat was by Engedi, and still the marauding hordes from Moab pass round the S
Joab - Joab successfully led David's armies against the Ammonites (2 Samuel 10:1 )
Engedi - During the reign of Jehoshaphat, Moabites, Ammonites, and others gathered at Engedi to attack Judah (2 Chronicles 20:1-2 )
Jehoiakim - After three years Jehoiakim revolted and God sent against him bands of the Chaldees, the Syrians, the Moabites, and the Ammonites to destroy Judah on account of their wickedness
Saul - 2909; his prophesying along with the young prophets; his appointment by the lot; his modesty in hiding himself; his first victory over the Ammonites; his rash sacrifice in the absence of Samuel; his equally rash curse; his victories over the Philistines and Amalekites; his sparing of King Agag with the judgment denounced against him for it; his jealousy and persecution of David; his barbarous massacre of the priests and people of Nob; his repeated confessions of his injustice to David, &c, are recorded in 1 Samuel 9-31
Jephthah - In process of time, a war broke out between the Ammonites and the children of Israel who inhabited the country beyond Jordan; and the latter, finding their want of an intrepid and skilful leader, applied to Jephthah to take the command of them. He at first reproached them with the injustice they had done him, in banishing him from his father's house; but he at length yielded to their importunity, on an agreement that, should he be successful in the war against the Ammonites, the Israelites should acknowledge him for their chief, Judges 11:4-11 . ...
As soon as Jephthah was invested with the command of the Israelites he sent a deputation to the Ammonites, demanding to know on what principle the latter had taken up arms against them. Jephthah replied that they had made no conquests in that quarter but from the Amorites; adding, "If you think you have a right to all that Chemosh, your god, hath given you, why should not we possess all that the Lord our God hath conferred on us by right of conquest?" Jephthah's reasoning availed nothing with the Ammonites; and as the latter persisted in waging war, the former collected his troops together and put himself at their head. Jephthah at this time made a vow to the Lord that if he delivered the Ammonites into his hand, whatever came forth out of the doors of his house to meet him when he returned should be the Lord's; it is also added in our English version, "and I will offer it up for a burnt- offering," Judges 11:31 . The battle terminated auspiciously for Jephthah; the Ammonites were defeated, and the Israelites ravaged their country. Hales are of great weight:—When Jephthah went forth to battle against the Ammonites "he vowed a vow unto the Lord, and said, If thou wilt surely give the children of Ammon into my hand, then it shall be, that whatsoever cometh out of the doors of my house to meet me, when I return in peace from the children of Ammon, shall either be the Lord's, or I will offer it up [1] a burnt-offering,"...
Judges 11:30-31
Cedar - "The mighty conquerors of olden days, the despots of Assyria and the Pharaohs of Egypt, the proud and idolatrous monarchs of Judah, the Hebrew commonwealth itself, the war-like Ammonites of patriarchal times, and the moral majesty of the Messianic age, are all compared to the towering cedar, in its royal loftiness and supremacy (Isaiah 2:13 ; Ezekiel 17:3,22,23,31:3-9 ;; Amos 2:9 ; Zechariah 11:1,2 ; Job 40:17 ; Psalm 29:5 ; 80:10 ; 92:12 , etc)
Uzziah - He was successful against the Philistines, the Arabians, and the Mehunims; and the Ammonites were tributary, so that his fame was spread abroad
Shaving - The king of the Ammonites shaved off half the beards of David's ambassadors, which was the greatest insult he could offer
Ishmael - A prince of Judah, who fled to the Ammonites when Jerusalem was destroyed by the Chaldeans
Lot - The son of the youngest daughter was named Ben-ammi and became the father of the Ammonites (Genesis 19:30-38 ). Later in Israel's history, God desired to ensure the place of the Moabites and Ammonites in Palestine (Deuteronomy 2:9 ). The Moabites and Ammonites betrayed their relationship, however, by joining with Assyria at a later period (Psalm 83:5-8 )
Joab - His chief military achievements were, (1) against the allied forces of Syria and Ammon; (2) against Edom (1 Kings 11:15,16 ); and (3) against the Ammonites (2 Samuel 10:7-19 ; 11:1,11 )
Maacah - Its king and army were hired against David by the Ammonites, and shared their overthrow in the battle fought near Medeba ( 2 Samuel 10:1-19 , 1 Chronicles 19:1-19 )
Pools of Solomon - On the fourth day after his victory over the Ammonites, etc
Eglon - With Amalekites and Ammonites crossed the Jordan and took Jericho the city of palmtrees, left unwalled, and therefore an easy prey to the foe, because of Joshua's curse in destroying it 60 years before
Gilead - Jacob fled toward Gilead, Genesis 31:21; it was conquered by Israel, Numbers 21:24; Judges 10:18; Joshua 12:2; Deuteronomy 2:36; was given to Reuben, Gad, and Manasseh, Joshua 17:6; under Jephthah it defeated the Ammonites, Judges 10:18; was a refuge for Saul's son and for David, 2 Samuel 2:9; 2 Kings 15:25-292; 2 Samuel 17:24; the home of Elijah, 1 Kings 17:1; taken in part by Syria, 2 Kings 10:33; by Assyria, Micah 7:14; referred to in the minor prophets, Hosea 6:8; Hosea 12:11; Amos 1:3; Amos 1:13; Obadiah 1:19; 1618388138_47; Zechariah 10:10
Gad - The inheritance of the tribe of Gad lay between Manesseh on the north, Reuben on the south, the Jordan on the west, and the Ammonites on the east
Saul - In his first war with the Ammonites, God was with him; but then follow his presumptuous sacrifice, in the absence of Samuel; his equally rash vow; his victories over the Philistines and the Amalekites; his sparing Agag and the spoil; his spirit of distracted and foreboding melancholy; his jealousy and persecution of David; his barbarous massacre of the priests and people at Nob, and of the Gibeonites; his consulting the witch on Endor; the battle with the Philistines in which his army was defeated and his sons were slain; and lastly, his despairing self-slaughter, his insignia of royalty being conveyed to David by an Amalekite, 1 Samuel 31:1-13 2 Samuel 1:1-27 1 Chronicles 10:13,14
Edom - ...
The Israelites regarded the Edomites as close relatives, even more closely related to them than the Ammonites or Moabites. Specifically, they identified the Ammonites and Moabites as descendants of Lot, Abraham's nephew, but the Edomites as descendants of Esau, Jacob's brother (Genesis 19:30-36 ; Genesis 36:1 ). Edomites seem not to have been barred from worship in the Jerusalem Temple with the same strictness as the Ammonites and Moabites (Deuteronomy 23:3-8 )
Heshbon - Apparently, the Ammonites claimed the region as well, as implied by the exchange of messages between Jephthah and the Ammonite king related in Judges 11:12-28
Gad - 740; and the Ammonites took possession of the territory of Gad
Mesopotamia - ) The Mesopotamians aided the Ammonites with chariots against David (1 Chronicles 19:6; 1 Chronicles 19:16)
Zephaniah, the Book of - Motive to it: God's coming judgments on Israel's foes, the Philistines, Moabites, Ammonites (the land of which three nations the remnant of Jehovah's people shall possess), Ethiopians, and Nineveh, which shall be a desolation;...
"He will famish all the gods of the earth (by destroying the nations worshipping them), and men shall worship Him" each in his own house (Zephaniah 2:4-15)
Ishmael - He fled to the Ammonites
Jehoiakim - Nebuchadnezzar sent bands of Chaldeans, Syrians, and Ammonites (2 Kings 24:2 ) to chastise his rebellious vassal
Jehoshaphat - After this, in the year 3108, the Moabites, Ammonites, and other nations of Arabia Petraea, declared war against Jehoshaphat, 2 Chronicles 20:1-3 , &c. " Abenezra is of opinion, that this valley is the place where King Jehoshaphat obtained a signal victory over the Moabites, Ammonites, and Meonians of Arabia Petraea, 2 Chronicles 20:1 , &c, toward the Dead Sea, beyond the wilderness of Tekoah, which after that event was called the valley of blessing, 2 Chronicles 20:26
Stranger - With the exception of the Moabites and Ammonites, (23:3) all nations were admissible to the rights of citizenship under certain conditions
Gad - It was carried into captivity at the same time as the other tribes of the northern kingdom by Tiglath-pileser (1 Chronicles 5:26 ), and in the time of (Jeremiah 49:1 ) their cities were inhabited by the Ammonites
Ai - A wholly distinct place, mentioned in a prophecy against the Ammonites, Jeremiah 49:3 (perh
Lot - Lot begged to be allowed to go to Zoar, and was permitted; but, fearing to stay there, he left with his two daughters and abode in a cave, where, alas, he became the father of Moab and Ben-ammi, the ancestors of the Moabites and the Ammonites, who are afterwards alluded to as the children of Lot
Jeph'Thah - The Ammonites were routed with great slaughter; but as the conqueror returned to Mizpeh there came out to meet him his daughter, his only child, with timbrels and dancing
Ishmael - He carried off many captives, "and departed to go over to the Ammonites
Mizpah - Here, also, the Israelites assembled to fight against the Ammonites, Judges 10:17; and here Jephthah was met by his daughter
Kohathites - When Jehoshaphat sought deliverance from the Moabites and Ammonites, the Kohathites led the people in prayer and praise (2 Chronicles 20:19 )
Ammon - He was the father of the Ammonites, and dwelt on the east side of the Dead Sea, in the mountains of Gilead
Ezekiel, Book of - ) ...
Prophecies against various surrounding nations: against the Ammonites (Ezekiel 25:1-7 ), the Moabites (8-11), the Edomites (12-14), the Philistines (15-17), Tyre and Sidon (26-28), and against Egypt (29-32)
Adonis - The Syrians, Phoenicians, and Cyprians, called him Adonis; and Calmet is of opinion that the Ammonites and Moabites designated him by the name of Baal- peor
Canaanites - But under Sihon they crossed the Jabbok, and took from the Ammonites and Moabites all the country between the Jabbok and the Arnon; so that this latter stream now became the southern boundary of the Amorites, Numbers 21:13,14,16,26 32:33,39 Deuteronomy 4:46,47 31:4
Samuel, Second Book of - Hanun, king of the Ammonites, by insulting the ambassadors sent to him in kindness by David, drew upon the Ammonites sore punishment, and upon the Syrians who went to their aid: a vivid illustration of the solemn fact that those who refuse grace will be dealt with in judgement...
2 Samuel 11 ; 2 Samuel 12 record the sad story of David's sin respecting Bathsheba, and the way he brought about the death of her husband
Uzzia(h) - To secure the eastern caravan route (the King's Highway), Uzziah rebuilt Elat (Eloth), the strategic port on the gulf of Aqaba (2 Chronicles 26:2 ) and campaigned against the Arabs of Gurbaal (possibly Gur east of Beersheba), the Meunites (a branch of Edomites), and the Ammonites (2 Chronicles 26:7-8 )
People of the Land - In Ezra 9:1-2 ,Ezra 9:1-2,9:11 the plural, the “people of those lands,” is used to designate the groupings with whom intermarriage had occurred, “the Canaanites, the Hittites, the Perizzites, the Jebusites, the Ammonites, the Moabites, the Egyptians, and the Amorites” ( Ezra 9:1 )
King, - The immediate occasion of the substitution of a regal form of government for that of judges seems to have been the siege of Jabesh-gilead by Nahash king of the Ammonites
Idol, Idolatry - When they were in Egypt, many of them worshipped Egyptians deities, Ezekiel 20:8 ; in the wilderness, they worshipped those of the Canaaites, Egyptians, Ammonites, and Moabites; in Judea, those of the Phoenicians, Syrians, and other people around them, Numbers 25:1-18 Judges 10:6 Amos 5:25 Acts 7:42 . Solomon, seduced by complaisance to his strange wives, caused temples to be erected in honor of Ashtoreth goddess of the Phoenicians, Moloch god of the Ammonites, and Chemosh god of the Moabites
Sun - The Hebrews must have been well acquainted with the idolatrous worship of the sun during the captivity in Egypt, both from the contiguity of On, the chief seat of the worship of the sun, as implied in the name itself (On being the equivalent of the Hebrew Bethshemesh, "house of the sun") (Jeremiah 43:13 ) and also from the connection between Joseph and Potipherah("he who belongs to Ela") the priest of On, (Genesis 41:45 ) After their removal to Canaan, the Hebrews came in contact with various forms of idolatry which originated in the worship of the sun; such as the Baal of the Phoenicians, the Molech or Milcom of the Ammonites, and the Hadad of the Syrians
Crown - Gold was the chief material of the king's crown (Psalms 21:3); compare 2 Samuel 12:30, the Ammonites' crown, with its precious stones, was worth (rather than "weighed") a talent of gold
Bed - Og in some expedition of his against Ammon may have left behind him his gigantic bed, to impress his enemy with his super-human greatness, and the Ammonites may have preserved it in Rabbath, their capital; or Israel may have sent it to Ammon as a pledge of their friendly intentions (Jehovah having charged them not to disturb Ammon), and also a visible proof of their power in having conquered so mighty a prince as Og
Ai - Jeremiah used the ruin of Ai as a warning to the Ammonites, who had occupied Israel's territory (Jeremiah 49:3 )
Crown - David took the crown of the king of the Ammonites from off his head; the crown weighed a talent of gold, and was moreover enriched with jewels, 2 Samuel 12:30 ; 1 Chronicles 20:2
Moloch - Moloch, Molech, Milcom, or Melchom, was a god of the Ammonites
Circumcision - Jeremiah depicts Egyptians, Edomites, Ammonites, Moabites, and the desert-dwelling Arabians as circumcised peoples (Jeremiah 9:25-26 ; compare Ezekiel 32:17-32 )
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - Chemosh was the primary national god of the Moabites and Ammonites. Milcom, called the "abomination" of the Ammonites, was apparently the chief deity of the Ammonites or Moabites. Molech or Moloch was another "abomination" of the Ammonites
Rabbah - The Ammonites made unsuccessful sallies (2 Samuel 11:17)
Ammon - Chephar-ha-Ammonai (the hamlet of the Ammonites), in Benjamin, at the head of the passes from the Jordan westward, marks their having temporarily been in that region
Ephraim - Again they complained to Jephthah that he had gone without them to fight the Ammonites, though Jephthah declared that he had called them, and they had not responded
Hell - To denote this latter object, the New Testament writers always make use of the Greek word γεεννα , which is compounded of two Hebrew words, Ge Hinnom, that is, "The Valley of Hinnom," a place near Jerusalem, in which children were cruelly sacrificed by fire to Moloch, the idol of the Ammonites, 2 Chronicles 33:6
Judges - To chastise them, he suffered the people of Mesopotamia and of Moab, the Canaanites, Midianites, Ammonites, and Philistines, in turn to oppress by their exactions apart of the tribes, and sometimes the whole nation
mo'ab - With the tribe of Benjamin they had at least one severe struggle, in union with their kindred the Ammonites
Ephraim - Again they complained to Jephthah that he had gone without them to fight the Ammonites, though Jephthah declared that he had called them, and they had not responded
Moloch - through the place where the Ammonites had burned their children to Moloch
Nebuchadnezzar - 602, and was punished by the irruption of Chaldæans, Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites, incited, perhaps, by Nebuchadnezzar, who, as soon as possible, sent his troops against Jerusalem, and had him taken prisoner, but ultimately released him
Ishmael - He then carried away captive all that were left in Mizpah, and departed to go over to the Ammonites; but Johanan the son of Kareah, and those with him, rescued the captives
Ezekiel - From the beginning of the twenty-fifth to the end of the thirty- second chapter, the prophet foretels the conquest and ruin of many nations and cities, which had insulted the Jews in their affliction; of the Ammonites, the Moabites, the Edomites, and Philistines; of Tyre, of Sidon, and Egypt; all of which were to be punished by the same mighty instrument of God's wrath against the wickedness of man; and in these prophecies he not only predicts events which were soon to take place, but he also describes the condition of these several countries in the remote periods of the world
Nebuchadnezzar the Great - The king of Chaldea sent troops of Chaldeans, Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites, who harassed Judea during three of four years, and at last Jehoiakim was besieged and taken in Jerusalem, put to death, and his body thrown to the birds of the air, according to the predictions of Jeremiah. But during this interval, he made war, also, on the Sidonians, Moabites, Ammonites, and Idumeans; and these he treated in nearly the same manner as the Jews
Giants - The Ammonites who supplanted them called them Zamzummim (Deuteronomy 2:20; Genesis 14:5)
Solomon - Beside Pharaoh's daughter, he married wives from among the Moabites, Ammonites, Idumeans, Sidonians, and Hittites. These women perverted his heart in his declining age, so that he worshipped Ashtoreth, goddess of the Sidonians, Moloch, idol of the Ammonites, and Chemosh, god of the Moabites
War - In many cases, moreover, the issue was distinctly made between the true God and idols; as with the Philistines, 1 Samuel 17:43-47 ; the Syrians, 1 Kings 20:23-30 ; the Assyrians, 2 Kings 19:10-19,35 ; and the Ammonites, 2 Chronicles 20:1-30
War - Far was it from their intention merely to reduce the power of the Philistines, the Ammonites, the Moabites, the Idumeans, the Arabians, the Syrians, and the several princes that were in possession of those countries. Such was that which the Hebrews made against the city of Gibeah, and against the tribe of Benjamin, which would support them in their fault; that which David made against the Ammonites, whose king had affronted his ambassadors; and that of Joshua against the kings of the Canaanites, to protect the Gibeonites. When Saul, at the beginning of his reign, was reformed of the cruel proposal that the Ammonites had made to the men of the city of Jabesh-Gilead, he cut in pieces the oxen belonging to his plough, and sent them through the country, saying, "Whosoever cometh not forth after Saul and Samuel, to the relief of Jabesh-Gilead, so shall it be done unto his oxen," 1 Samuel 11:7
Angel - ), David was quick to dispatch his forces against the Ammonites
Olives - It was upon this mount that Solomon built temples to the gods of the Ammonites, 1 Kings 11:7 , and the Moabites, out of complaisance to his wives of those nations
Jehoshaphat - ) Edom joined with Ammon and other desert tribes enumerated in Psalms 83:3-7 ("other beside the Ammonites," KJV 2 Chronicles 20:1; Hiller proposes to read Maonites from Maan a city near Petra on mount Seir, tribes from all parts of mount Seir: Keil; 26:7, Mehunims), to not only throw off Judah's supremacy but root the Jews out of their divinely given inheritance; but in vain. Seirites, greedy for booty, by God's providence, from an ambush suddenly attacking, caused a panic among the Ammonites and Moabites which eventuated in mutual slaughter
King - Molech , the tribal god of the Ammonites, and the Phœn. The exploits of Saul and his sons against the Ammonites ( 1 Samuel 11:11 ff
Jeremiah, Book of - Gedaliah was murdered by Ishmael, sent by the king of the Ammonites, and the people were carried away. Judgements were to fall upon Egypt, the Philistines, Moab, the Ammonites, Edom, Damascus, Kedar, Elam, and Babylon
da'Vid - (Genesis 15:18-21 ) During the succeeding ten years the nations bordering on his kingdom caused David more or less trouble, but during this time he reduced to a state of permanent subjection the Philistines on the west, (2 Samuel 8:1 ) the Moabites on the east, (2 Samuel 8:2 ) by the exploits of Benaiah, (2 Samuel 23:20 ) the Syrians on the northeast as far as the Euphrates, (2 Samuel 8:3 ) the Edomites, (2 Samuel 8:14 ) on the south; and finally the Ammonites, who had broken their ancient alliance, and made one grand resistance to the advance of his empire. Underneath the splendor of his last glorious campaign against the Ammonites was a dark story, known probably at that time only to a very few --the double crime of adultery with Bath-sheba and the virtual murder of Uriah
Zephaniah, Book of - ...
The second chapter contains a series of threats against the Philistines (Zephaniah 2:4-7 ), the Moabites and Ammonites (Zephaniah 2:8-11 ), the Ethiopians (Zephaniah 2:12 ), and the Assyrians (Zephaniah 2:13-15 )
Remnant - ...
Jeremiah discussed the plight of the Jews who fled to Egypt after Jerusalem’s capture by Nebuchadnezzar: “Likewise when all the Jews that were in Moab, and among the Ammonites, and in Edom, and that were in all the countries, heard that the King of Babylon had left a remnant of Judah
Circumcision - Circumcision was practiced in the ancient Near East by the western Semites, including the Ammonites, Moabites, Hebrews, and Edomites
Moab - They, along with the Ammonites, were descended from Lot through the children that resulted from Lot’s immorality with his two daughters (Genesis 19:36-38; see also AMMON)
Chronology - ...
As to the time of the Judges it appears clear from Judges 10:7,8 that the events recorded did not all follow chronologically: there were oppressions in the west by the Philistines and in the east by the Ammonites in 'the same year;' the periods of some of the Judges also being synchronal
Baal - It is probable that Baal, Belus, or Bel, the great god of the Carthaginians, and also of the Sidonians, Babylonians, and Assyrians, who, from the testimony of Scripture, appears to have been delighted with human sacrifices, was the Moloch of the Ammonites; the Chronus of the Greeks, who was the chief object of adoration in Italy, Crete, Cyprus, and Rhodes, and all other countries where divine honours were paid him; and the Saturn of the Latins
Ban - 11 17), perhaps also by the Ammonites (2 Chronicles 29:23 )
Judges, Book of - }...
Oppression by the | Oppression by the }...
Philistines, during which | Ammonites Judges 10:8 18 }...
Samson was judge, and | Jephthah Judges 12:7 6 }...
Samuel after Eli
Moab And the Moabite Stone - In fact, the Ammonites made claim to all the territory as far south as the Arnon (Judges 11:13 ), while the Book of Joshua makes the same claim for Israel (Joshua 13:15-28 )
Gad - ...
After the conquest, in the time of the Judges, the people of Gilead were overrun by the Ammonites until Jephthah finally wrought their deliverance
Zephaniah, Theology of - ...
The day of the Lord is also shown as international and not just parochial, since judgment will descend on other nations also (Philistines, 2:4-7; Transjordanian Moabites and Ammonites, 2:8-11; Ethiopians or Egyptians, 2:12; or Assyrians, 2:13-15; cf
Coins - The crown that David took from the king of the Ammonites weighed one talent (2 Samuel 12:30 )
Lebanon - Lowest comes a thick layer of hard limestone, named after its most characteristic fossil ( Cidaris glandaria ) Glandaria limestone; above this are strata of Nubian sandstone, yellow and red in colour, and in places 1500 feet thick, overlaid and interlaced with strata of limestone containing fossil echinoderms and Ammonites; and thirdly, above this group, and forming the bulk of the highest peaks, is another layer, many thousand feet thick in places, of a limestone containing countless fossils known as hippurites, radiolites, and such like
Water - In the sacred Scriptures, bread and water are commonly mentioned as the chief supports of human life; and to provide a sufficient quantity of water, to prepare it for use, and to deal it out to the thirsty, are among the principal cares of an oriental householder, The Moabites and Ammonites are reproached for not meeting the Israelites with bread and water; that is, with proper refreshments, Deuteronomy 33:4
Jericho - David's ambassadors, who had been insulted by the Ammonites, resided at Jericho till their beards were grown, 2 Samuel 10:4
Moab - Hanun king of the Ammonites having insulted David's ambassadors, David made war against him, and subdued Moab and Ammon; under which subjection they continued till the separation of the ten tribes. The Ammonites and the Moabites continued in subjection to the kings of Israel to the death of Ahab
Moab, Moabites - In Nehemiah 4:7 Arabians rather than Moabites are allies of the Ammonites (cf
Samuel - At the close of this period, when he was now an old man, the elders of Israel came to him at Ramah (1 Samuel 8:4,5,19-22 ); and feeling how great was the danger to which the nation was exposed from the misconduct of Samuel's sons, whom he had invested with judicial functions as his assistants, and had placed at Beersheba on the Philistine border, and also from a threatened invasion of the Ammonites, they demanded that a king should be set over them
Jehoiakim - Nebuchadnezzar, not able in person to chastise him, sent marauding "bands" of Chaldaeans, Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites (2 Kings 24:1-7)
Judges (1) - (4) The history of Jephthah is prefaced by Judges 10:17-18 , which tells of the Ammonite oppression; Jephthah’s exploits are recounted in Judges 11:1 to Judges 12:7 ; a biographical note ( Judges 11:1-3 ) introduces the hero, and a long passage ( 1618388138_1 ) follows, describing how the conflict with the Ammonites arose; it is a question concerning the ownership of the lands between the Jabhok and the Arnon, which are claimed by the Ammonites, but which the Israelites maintain have been in their possession for three hundred years. A section, which is of great interest archæologically ( Judges 11:30-40 ), tells then of a vow which Jephthah made to Jahweh, to the effect that if he returned victorious from the impending struggle with the Ammonites, he would offer up in sacrifice the first person whom he met on his return coming out of his dwelling
Marriage - There were three grades of prohibition: total in regard to the Canaanites on either side; total on the side of the males in regard to the Ammonites and Moabites; and temporary on the side of the males in regard to the Edomites and Egyptians, marriages with females in the two latter instances being regarded as legal
Gods, Pagan - The national god of the Ammonites was called Molech (1 Kings 11:7 ). Jephthah's reply to the Ammonites (Judges 11:24 ) refers to Chemosh as their god
Elder - The elders' position of authority was also clear from their asking Jephthah to lead them in the fight against the Ammonites (Judges 11:4-11 ), from their seeking a king from Samuel (1 Samuel 8:4-5 ), and from their anointing David king over all Israel (2 Samuel 5:3 ; 1 Chronicles 11:3 ; cf
Hebrews - He erected altars to the false gods of the Phoenicians, Moabites, and Ammonites, and not only permitted his wives to worship the gods of their own country, but he to some extent adored them, 1 Kings 11:5-7
Joab - ) In the war with Ammon, undertaken to avenge the indignity offered David's ambassadors by Hanun, Joab defeated Ammon's ally the Syrians while Abishai was defeating the Ammonites
Philistim - During the siege of Tyre, which held out thirteen years, Nebuchadnezzar used part of his army to subdue the Ammonites, the Moabites, the Egyptians, and other nations bordering on the Jews
Nebuchadnezzar - Nebuchadnezzar sent bands of Chaldees, Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites against him (Daniel 3:1-3)
David - He consolidated his power at home, took Jerusalem and made it his capital, removing thither the ark of God, 2 Samuel 6:1-23, organized his army, 1 Chronicles 11:1-47, and regulated the services of the sanctuary, 15:16, enlarged his harem, 2 Samuel 3:2-5; 2 Samuel 5:13-16, opened commercial intercourse with the king of Tyre, 2 Samuel 5:11, and also extended his power abroad, subduing the Philistines, Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites
Samuel, First Book of - On Nahash the Ammonite declaring that he would make a covenant with the inhabitants of Jabesh-gilead only on the condition of thrusting out all their right eyes, to "lay it for a reproach upon all Israel," Saul was stirred to action by the Spirit of God, and the Ammonites were slain
David - His kindness to the Gentile king of Ammon was refused and his messengers were insulted, which brought punishment upon the Ammonites and their allies
Israel - These tribes, along with the other Abrahamidæ the Edomites, Ammonites, and Moabites moved westward from the Euphrates along the eastern border of Palestine. The Ammonites, Moabites, and Edomites gained a foothold in the territories afterwards occupied by them
Jeroboam - Can this be the same Solomon? Can this be that Solomon to whom the Lord appeared twice? For Solomon went after Ashtoreth, the goddess of the Zidonians, and after Molech, the abomination of the Ammonites
Nehemiah - ) Nehemiah severed from Israel all the mixed multitude (Nehemiah 13), Ammonites and Moabites, and boldly cast out Tobiah from the chamber in the temple which Eliashib his connection had assigned him, and restored to it, after its cleansing, the temple vessels, meat offerings, and frankincense which had been previously kept there
Music, Instruments, Dancing - Judges 11:34 pictures Jephthah's daughter greeting his victorious return from battle against the Ammonites “with timbrels and with dances
Clean And Unclean - ...
Analogous notions may perhaps be traced in the prohibition of any sexual impersonation (Deuteronomy 22:5 ), any mingling of different species ( Deuteronomy 22:9-11 , Leviticus 19:19 ), and in the disqualifications on eunuchs, bastards, and the Ammonites and Moabites, the offspring of an incestuous union ( Deuteronomy 23:1-6 ); though some of these rules look like the product of later refinement
Tribes of Israel, the - According to the blessing of Jacob the tribe of Gad perhaps experienced numerous raids (Genesis 49:19 ) especially from groups like the Ammonites as reflected in the story of Jephthah (Judges 11:1 )
David - , but this order is not strictly chronological; moreover, it seems probable that in one or two cases duplicate, but varying, accounts appear: Philistines ( 2 Samuel 5:17-25 ), Moabites ( 2 Samuel 8:2 ), Zobah ( 2 Samuel 8:3-4 ), Syrians ( 2 Samuel 8:5-13 ), Edomites ( 2 Samuel 8:14 ), Ammonites, Syrians ( 2 Samuel 10:1 , 2 Samuel 11:1 , 2 Samuel 12:26-31 ), and Philistines ( 2 Samuel 21:15-22 )
Judea - One of them, namely, Scythopolis, already described in the account of Samaria, was situated to the west of Jordan; but the other nine were all to the east of that river, namely, Gadara, or Kedar, a strong place on a hill, the capital of Peraea in the time of Josephus, about sixty stadia east from the sea of Tiberias, and much frequented for its hot baths: Hippos, sometimes called Susitha, thirty stadia northwest of Gadara; Dium, or Dion, of which the situation is unknown, but conjectured by D'Anville to have been about seven leagues eastward from Pella, a considerable town supplied with copious fountains, on the river Jabbok, fourteen miles south-east of Gadara, and celebrated as the place to which the Christians retired, by divine admonition, before the destruction of Jerusalem; Canatha, south-east of Caesarea, and between the Jordan and Mount Hermon; Garasa, afterward Jaras, three leagues north- east from the upper extremity of the sea of Tiberias, and much noted during the crusades; Rabbath-Ammon, the capital of the Ammonites, south-east of Ramoth, and near the source of the Jabbok, on the confines of Arabia, afterward called Philadelphia by Ptolemy Philadelphus, from whom it had received considerable improvements, of which the ruins are still visible; Abila, four leagues east from Gadara, in a fertile tract between the river Hieromax and Mount Gilead; and Capitolais, a town in Batanaea, five or six leagues east north-east of Gadara
Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - After Saul led Israel to victory over the Ammonites (1 Samuel 11:1-13 ) Samuel called for an assembly at Gilgal, where he presided in the inauguration of Saul's reign at a public ceremony of covenant renewal (1 Samuel 11:14-12:25 )
Canaan - On the east and south-east, the kingdom of Solomon was extended by the conquest of the country of Moab, that of the Ammonites, and Edom; and tracts which were either inhabited or pastured by the Israelites, lay still farther eastward
Jews - Saul was their first sovereign, under whose reign they had perpetual struggles with the Ammonites, Moabites, and Philistines