What does Amen mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἀμήν firm. / verily 24
⧼ἀμήν⧽ firm. / verily 14
אָמֵֽן verily 13
אָ֘מֵ֥ן ׀ verily 3
וְאָמֵֽן verily 3
אָמֵ֥ן ׀ verily 2
ἀμήν⧽ firm. / verily 2
אָמֵ֗ן verily 2
ἀμήν› firm. / verily 1
[ἀμήν] firm. / verily 1
‹ἀμήν› firm. / verily 1
אָמֵ֔ן verily 1
ἀμὴν firm. / verily 1
! אָמֵ֕ן verily 1
אָמֵ֤ן ׀ verily 1
אָמֵן֙ verily 1
ἀμήν]» firm. / verily 1
! אָמֵ֑ן verily 1

Definitions Related to Amen

G281


   1 firm.
      1a metaph.
      faithful.
   2 verily, Amen.
      2a at the beginning of a discourse—surely, truly, of a truth.
      2b at the end—so it is, so be it, may it be fulfilled.
      It was a custom, which passed over from the synagogues to the Christian assemblies, that when he who had read or discoursed, had offered up solemn prayer to God, the others responded Amen, and thus made the substance of what was uttered their own.
      Additional Information: The word “Amen” is a most remarkable word.
      It was transliterated directly from the Hebrew into the Greek of the New Testament, then into Latin and into English and many other languages, so that it is practically a universal word.
      It has been called the best known word in human speech.
      The word is directly related—in fact, almost identical—to the Hebrew word for “believe” (amam), or faithful.
      Thus, it came to mean “sure” or “truly”, an expression of absolute trust and confidence.
      —HMM.
      

H543


   1 verily, truly, Amen, so be it.
   

Frequency of Amen (original languages)

Frequency of Amen (English)

Dictionary

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Amen
Strictly an adjective, signifying firm, and by a metaphor, faithful. So in Revelation 3:14 , our Lord is called "the Amen, the faithful and true Witness," where the last words explain the preceding appellation. In its adverbial use it means certainly, truly, surely. It is used at the beginning of a sentence by way of emphasis, frequently by our Savior, and is there commonly translated Verily. In John's gospel alone, it is often used by him in this way double, Verily, verily. At the end of a sentence it is often used, singly or repeated, especially at the end of hymns and prayers; as "Amen and Amen," Psalm 41:13 72:19 89:52 . The proper signification of it here is, to confirm the words which have preceded, assert the sincerity and invoke the fulfilment of them: so it is, so be it, let it be done. Hence, in oaths, after the priest has repeated the words of the covenant or imprecation, all those who pronounce the Amen, bind themselves by the oath, Numbers 5:22 Deuteronomy 27:15 Nehemiah 5:13 8:6 1 Chronicles 16:36 . Compare Psalm 106:48 .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Amen
This Hebrew word means firm, and hence also faithful (Revelation 3:14 ). In Isaiah 65:16 , the Authorized Version has "the God of truth," which in Hebrew is "the God of Amen." It is frequently used by our Saviour to give emphasis to his words, where it is translated "verily." Sometimes, only, however, in John's Gospel, it is repeated, "Verily, verily." It is used as an epithet of the Lord Jesus Christ (Revelation 3:14 ). It is found singly and sometimes doubly at the end of prayers (Psalm 41:13 ; 72:19 ; 89:52 ), to confirm the words and invoke the fulfilment of them. It is used in token of being bound by an oath (Numbers 5:22 ; Deuteronomy 27:15-26 ; Nehemiah 5:13 ; 8:6 ; 1 Chronicles 16:36 ). In the primitive churches it was common for the general audience to say "Amen" at the close of the prayer (1 Corinthians 14:16 ).
The promises of God are Amen; i.e., they are all true and sure (2 Corinthians 1:20 ).
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Amen
In current usage, the term "amen" has become little more than a ritualized conclusion to prayers. Yet the Hebrew and Greek words for amen appear hundreds of times in the Bible and have several uses. Amen is a transliteration of the Hebrew word amen [ 1 Chronicles 16:36 ; Nehemiah 8:6 ; and at the end of each of the first four books of Psalms, 41:13; 72:19; 89:52; 106:48).
Amen is never used solely to confirm a blessing in the Old Testament, but Israel did accept the curse of God on sin by it (twelve times in Deuteronomy 27 , and in Nehemiah 5:13 ), and once Jeremiah affirms God's statements of the blessings and the curses of the covenant with an amen (Jeremiah 11:5 ). It can also confirm a statement made by people (Numbers 5:22 ; 1 Kings 1:36 ; Nehemiah 5:13 ). These kinds of uses lie behind the popular, basically correct, dictum that amen means "So be it."
Amen has other uses. Jeremiah mocks the words of a false prophet with an amen (28:6). Because God is trustworthy, Isaiah can call him "the God of amen, " in whose name his servants should invoke blessings and take oaths (Isaiah 65:16 ; see also Revelation 3:14 ). But Jesus' use of amen is the most striking innovation.
Jesus introduces his teaching by saying amen lego humin [1], that is, "truly I say to you, " on nearly seventy occasions in the Gospels (thirty times in Matthew, thirteen in Mark, six in Luke, and twenty in John, where the amen is always doubled). Where the prophets often said, "Thus says the Lord, " Jesus often says, "Amen I say to you." Although some scholars see the formuLam merely as a method of giving emphasis to a statement, in actuality it constitutes a significant part of Jesus' implicit teaching about himself. We ought to consider Jesus' use of the term "amen" alongside his other implicit claims to deity, such as his claim of the right to forgive sins and to judge humankind, and his custom of performing miracles on his own authority. No mere human has the right to forgive sins, yet Jesus forgave sins. God is the judge of humankind, yet Jesus judges. God's agets ascribe the will and the glory to God when they perform miracles, yet Jesus performed miracles on his own authority. Likewise, prophets never spoke on their own authority. They say, "Thus says the Lord." Or, like Paul, they say they received a revelation from heaven. But Jesus says, "Truly I say to you" dozens of times, asserting that his words are certainly true because he says them.
Jesus often uses the formuLam when he corrects errors or is engaged in disputes. When Jesus instructed Nicodemus, for example, he appealed not to Scripture but to his own authority, saying "Amen, amen, I say to you" (John 3:3,5 ; see also Matthew 6:2,5 , 16 ; 18:3 ; Luke 13:35 ; John 5:19,24 , 25 ; 6:26,32 , 47,53 ). Amen lego humin also punctuates the teaching of truths unknown in the Old Testament, and seasons startling sayings for which Jesus offers no proof other than his own authority. Here the amen implies that Jesus' words, like the Father's, are true merely because he utters them (Matthew 24:34 ; 26:13 ; Mark 3:28 ; Luke 12:37 ; John 10:1 ). So in Matthew 5 Jesus comments on the Old Testament or Jewish interpretations of it six times in the chapter, saying, "You have heard that it was said , but I tell you." He concludes the first section with the amen in 5:26, and by so doing asserts that his authority exceeds the Jewish interpreters', and even brings a revelation that surpasses that of the Old Testament law itself.
In this way, whenever Jesus says "amen lego humin" [1], he shows awareness of his authority, his deity. This evidence of Jesus' messianic self-consciousness is important because it resists skeptical attacks on the faith. Critics try to exclude many texts that present Christ's deity on the grounds that they are unauthentic. But implicit claims to deity, whether they be Jesus' use of the amen or other ones, appear in virtually every paragraph of the Gospels, and cannot be explained away.
Paul's use of amen returns to the Old Testament world, except that he utters amen only to bless, not to curse. Many times Paul's letters burst into praise of God the Father or God the Son and seal the confession with the amen (Romans 1:25 ; 9:5 ; 11:36 ; Galatians 1:3-5 ; Ephesians 3:21 ; Philippians 4:20 ; 1 Timothy 1:17 ; 6:16 ; 2 Timothy 4:18 ). A doxology appears at or near the end of several letters, and all close with the amen. Other letters end with a blessing on his readers, again completed with amen (1Col 16:23-24; Galatians 6:18 ). Paul also invites his readers to say amen to the promises of God (2Col 1:20; see also Revelation 22:20 ). Amen also closes spontaneous doxologies in Revelation; there, however, the object of praise is more often the Son than the Father (1:6-7; 5:14; 7:12; 19:4). In all this Paul and Revelation resemble the Jewish custom of the day, in which Jews said amen when they heard another bless the Lord whether in private prayer (Tobit 8:8 ) or in worship. But they surpass it in the sheer spontaneity and enthusiasm of their praises.
Several other New Testament epistles follow Paul by praising God and/or calling on him to bestow the grace the readers need (Hebrews 13:20-21 ; 1 Peter 4:11 ; 5:10-11 ; 2 Peter 3:17-18 ; Jude 24-25 ; Revelation 22:21 ). As in Paul, these final words often recapitulate the main themes of the letter, which the writer seals with the amen that both declare and pleads, "So be it! May God indeed be praised for bestowing the gifts his people need."
Daniel Doriani
Webster's Dictionary - Amen
(1):
(interj., adv., & n.) An expression used at the end of prayers, and meaning, So be it. At the end of a creed, it is a solemn asseveration of belief. When it introduces a declaration, it is equivalent to truly, verily.
(2):
(v. t.) To say Amen to; to sanction fully.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Amen
("firm", "faithful", else "verily".) Jesus is "the Amen, the, faithful and true witness" (Revelation 3:14). Compare 2 Corinthians 1:20; John 1:14; John 1:17; John 14:6. "The God of Amen" (Hebrew for "truth") (Isaiah 65:16). Jesus alone introduces His authoritative declarations with Amen in the beginning; in Matthew, Mark, and Luke, singly, in John (John 3:3; John 3:5; John 3:11; John 10:1) always doubled. It is most marked how the apostles and others avoid the use of it in the beginning, which is His divine prerogative. Jeremiah 28:6 is not an exception; it is praying for the divine ratification of what preceded. In oaths those who pronounce the "Amen" bind themselves by the oath (Numbers 5:22; Deuteronomy 27:15-26).
God alone can seal all His declarations of promise or threat with the "Amen," verily, in its fullest sense; our assertions mostly need some qualification. As John records Christ's discourses on the deeper things of God, which man is slow to believe, the double Amen is appropriately found at the beginning of such discourses 25 times. Amen was the proper response to a prayer, an oath, or a solemn promise (1 Kings 1:30; Nehemiah 5:13; Nehemiah 8:6; 1 Chronicles 16:36; Jeremiah 11:5); the God of Amen witnesses our covenants. Jewish tradition states that the people responded to the priest's prayer not "Amen," but, "Blessed be the name of the glory of His kingdom for ever." But in synagogues, as in the Christian assemblies, and in family and private prayers, Amen was the response (Matthew 6:13; 1 Corinthians 14:16).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Amen
(Hebrew: aman, strengthen) A word in scriptural and liturgical use, meaning "so be it." It is used as an acclamation which indicates that the speaker adopts for his own what has been said by another (Deuteronomy 27), as an affirmation of the speaker's own thought, and as a formula of conclusion at the end of prayers. It was often spoken by Our Lord, and is given as one of His names (Apocalypse 3:14).
King James Dictionary - Amen
AMEN'. This word, with slight differences or orthography, is in all the dialects of the Assyrian stock. As a verb, it signifies to confirm, establish, verify to trust, or give confidence as a noun, truth, firmness, trust, confidence as an adjective, firm, stable. In English, after the oriental manner, it is used at the beginning, but more generally at the end of declarations and prayers, in the sense of, be it firm, be it established.
And let all the people say amen. Psalms 104 .
The word is used also as a noun.
"All the promises of God are amen in Christ " that is, firmness, stability, constancy.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Amen
Revelation 3:14 (a) This word is a word of finality. Its actual meaning is "so be it." CHRIST takes this name to indicate the permanence of His decisions, the certainty of His program, and the finality of His judgment. The angels sang a song which begins and ends with this word. It is found in Revelation 7:12. There are seven glories in this prayer or song, and these describe the perfections of GOD. Nothing can be added to this revelation, and certainly nothing may be taken from it.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Amen
AMEN . A Hebrew form of affirmation usually translated in the LXX [1] by an equivalent Greek expression ( Numbers 5:22 , Deuteronomy 27:15 ‘so be it,’ Jeremiah 28:6 ( Jeremiah 36:6 ) ‘truly’), but sometimes transliterated ( 1 Chronicles 16:36 ) as in English. It is an indication of solemn assent, chiefly in prayer, to the words of another, on the part either of an individual ( Numbers 5:22 ) or of an assembly ( Deuteronomy 27:15 ); sometimes reduplicated ( Psalms 41:13 ), sometimes accompanied by a rubrical direction ( Psalms 106:48 ). From the synagogue it passed into the liturgical use of Christian congregations, and is so referred to in 1 Corinthians 14:16 ‘the (customary) Amen at thy giving of thanks’ (? Eucharist). The use peculiar to the NT is that ascribed to our Lord in the Gospels, where the word ‘verily’ followed by ‘I say’ introduces statements which He desires to invest with special authority ( Matthew 5:18 , Mark 3:28 , Luke 4:24 etc.) as worthy of unquestioning trust. The Fourth Gospel reduplicates a form which, though Christ may Himself have varied the phrase in this manner, is nevertheless stereotyped by this Evangelist ( John 1:51 ; John 1:24 other places), and marks the peculiar solemnity of the utterances it introduces. The impression created by this idiom may have influenced the title of ‘the Amen’ given to the Lord in the Epistle to Laodicea ( Revelation 3:14 ). A strikingly similar phrase is used by St. Paul in 2 Corinthians 1:20 ‘through him ( i.e . Jesus Christ as preached) is the Amen’ the seal of God’s promises. Its use in doxologies is frequent.
J. G. Simpson.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Amen
is a transliteration of a Hebrew word signifying something as certain, sure and valid, truthful and faithful. It is sometimes translated, “so be it.” In the Old Testament it is used to show the acceptance of the validity of a curse or an oath (Numbers 5:22 ; Deuteronomy 27:15-26 ; Jeremiah 11:5 ), to indicate acceptance of a good message (Jeremiah 28:6 ), and to join in a doxology in a worship setting to affirm what has been said or prayed (1 Chronicles 16:36 ; Nehemiah 8:6 ; Psalm 106:48 ). “Amen” may confirm what already is, or it may indicate a hope for something desired. In Jewish prayer, “amen” comes at the end as an affirmative response to a statement or wish made by others, and is so used in the New Testament epistles (Romans 1:25 ; Romans 11:36 ; Romans 15:33 ; 1 Corinthians 16:24 ; Galatians 1:5 ; Ephesians 3:21 ; Philippians 4:20 ). Paul ended some of his letters with “amen” (1 Thessalonians 5:28 ; 2 Thessalonians 3:18 ).
In the gospels, Jesus used “amen” to affirm the truth of His own statements. English translations often use “verily,” “truly,” “I tell you the truth” to translate Jesus' amen. He never said it at the end of a statement, but always at the beginning: “Amen, I say to you” (Matthew 5:18 ; Matthew 16:28 ; Mark 8:12 ; Mark 11:23 ; Luke 4:24 ; Luke 21:32 ; John 1:51 ; John 5:19 ). In John's Gospel, Jesus said “Amen, amen.” That Jesus prefaced His own words with “amen” is especially important, for He affirmed that the kingdom of God is bound up with His own person and emphasized the authority of what He said.
Jesus is called “The Amen” in Revelation 3:14 , meaning that He Himself is the reliable and true witness of God. Perhaps the writer had in mind Isaiah 65:16 where the Hebrew says “God of Amen.”
Roger L. Omanson
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Amen
A strong assertion of affirmation and assent. The first timewe read of its use was when a woman was supposed to have been unfaithful to her husband and was made to drink the bitter water. The priest pronounced a curse upon her if she had been guilty, and the woman had to answer Amen, Amen. Numbers 5:22 . So when the priest upon mount Ebal rehearsed the various curses, it was appended to each "And all the people shall say, Amen." Deuteronomy 27:14-26 .
When David declared that Solomon should be his successor, Benaiah said "Amen: the Lord God of my lord the king say so too." 1 Kings 1:36 . So when David brought up the ark, and delivered a psalm of thanksgiving, all the people said, Amen, and praised the Lord. 1 Chronicles 16:36 : cf. also Nehemiah 5:13 ; Nehemiah 8:6 .
In one instance the exclamation does not signify more than 'may it be.' Hananiah prophesied falsely that within two full years all the vessels of the Lord's house would be returned from Babylon; Jeremiah said "Amen, the Lord do so;" though he knew it was a false prophecy he could well hope that such a thing might be. Jeremiah 28:6 .
At the end of each of the first four books of the Psalms Amen is added. Psalm 41:13 ; Psalm 72:19 ; Psalm 89:52 ; Psalm 106:48 . In these instances it is not another acquiescing in what is said, but the writer adds Amen at the end, signifying 'may it so be,' and three times it is repeated.
The Hebrew word is always translated 'Amen,' except twice in Isaiah 65:16 , where it is rendered 'truth.' "He who blesseth himself in the earth, shall bless himself in the God of 'truth ;' and he that sweareth in the earth, shall swear by the God of 'truth.' " And in Jeremiah 11:5 , where it is translated 'So be it,' God declared that He would perform the oath that He had sworn, and the prophet answered, "So be it, O Lord." A cognate Hebrew word signifies 'to believe:' it is used in Genesis 15:6 .
In the N.T. it is often added to the ascription of praise and to benedictions, as in Hebrews 13:21,25 . As a response see 1 Corinthians 14:16 ; Revelation 5:14 ; Revelation 7:12 ; Revelation 22:20 . There is another way in which the word is used, as in 2 Corinthians 1:20 , "Whatever promises of God [1], in him is the yea [2] and in him the Amen [3] for glory to God by us." And that Christ is the verification of all the promises is so true that He Himself is called 'the Amen:' " These things saith the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the beginning of the creation of God." Revelation 3:14 . As there are responses in heaven, as seen in some of the above texts, so there should be responses on earth in the assemblies of the saints, and not simply a hearing of prayer and praise. It is the word constantly used by the Lord, and translated 'verily.'
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Amen
One of the distinguishing names of the Lord Jesus Christ, as Christ God-man Mediator. For so Jesus condescended to make use of it. (Revelation 3:14) And the meaning of it, in the original language, shews the great blessedness of it, as it concerns his people, in the Lord Jesus condescending to do so. For the word, in the original Greek, from whence it is taken, means verily, certain, sure, true, faithful. And surely, the Lord Jesus Christ is all these, and infinitely more, JEHOVAH'S Yea and Amen, as he saith himself; the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the beginning of the creation of God; that is in his mediatorial character.
And it is worthy our closest remark, that our Lord very frequently began his discourses with this word, and repeated it-"Verily, verily, I say unto you;" that is, in plain terms, (and indeed, it is the very word in the original) Amen, Amen. And it is yet worthy of farther remark, that none but the Lord Jesus ever did use such words, at the opening of the discourse, by way of confirmation. As if the use of it was particularly his, and belonged to him only, as his name. All the gospels, indeed, end with Amen. But then, this seems to be but as a farther proof that they are his, and he puts, therefore, his name as a seal at the end of them, by way of establishing their truth.
And I beg to remark yet farther, by way of shewing the sweetness and peculiar claim that the Lord Jesus hath to this name, that all the promises are said to be, Yea and Amen in Christ Jesus, (2 Corinthians 1:20) that is, strictly and properly speaking, they are His; for He himself is the One great promise of the Bible, and all are therefore, promises in and by Him. And the prophet Isaiah (Isaiah 65:16) describes the believer in the gospel church, as saying, That he who blesseth himself in the earth shall bless himself in the God of truth; that is, the God Amen. It were devoutly to be wished, that whenever this sacred name is used, in our public worship, or private devotion, our minds were to recollect the person of the Lord Jesus. For certain it is, when we say Amen to the giving of thanks, (see 1 Corinthians 14:16) we do, to all intents and purposes, use the name of Christ, however inattentively it be said. And, therefore, if this were rightly considered, we should use it with an eye of love, and faith, and thankfulness to him.
I shall only beg to add, to what hath been offered on this precious name of our Lord Jesus, that as John is the only one of the Evangelists who hath recorded, so very particularly, our Lord's discourses with those double Amens, or Verilys, it is plain, that he considered them very highly important. And the apostle Paul, in desiring that no one should ignorantly say Amen in the church, at the assemblies of the faithful, seems to have same sentiment with John, that every one naming Christ should know Christ.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Amen (2)
AMEN.—Like the Greek ἀμήν, this is practically a transliteration of the Heb. אָמִן, which itself is a verbal adjective connected with a root signifying make firm, establish. In the last instance, and as we are concerned with it, it is an indeclinable particle. Barth treats it as originally a substantive (= ‘firmness,’ ‘certainty’). For the derivation, cf. our English ‘yes,’ ‘yea,’ which is also connected with an old verbal root of similar significance.
As a formula of solemn confirmation, asseveration and assent, it was established in old and familiar usage amongst the Jews in the time of our Lord. Its function is specially associated with worship, prayer, the expression of will and desire, the enunciation of weighty judgments and truths. For modes in which Amen is used may be distinguished—(1) Initial, when it lends weight to the utterance following. (2) Final, when used by the speaker himself in solemn confirmation of what precedes. (3) Responsive, when used to express assent to the utterance of another, as in prayers, benedictions, oaths, etc. (4) Subscriptional, when used to mark the close of a writing, but hardly amounting to much more than a peculiar variant of ‘Finis.’
The subscriptional Amen requires but a brief notice. No instance of it is found in the OT; and as regards the closing Amen in the several Scriptures of the NT there is for the most part a lack of textual authority. The Authorized Version, following the TR [1] , in most instances has it; the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 in most instances omits it. Where it is found, in the Epistles and the Apocalypse, it is rather due to the fact that these writings close with a doxology, prayer, or benediction. The variations of authority in such cases seem to a large extent capricious: else why. e.g., Amen at the end of 1 Corinthians and not at the end of 2 Corinthians? The closing Amen in each of the Gospels, though without authority, is a genuine instance of the subscriptional use of later times. This use has a further curious illustration in the practice of copyists of MSS [2] who wrote 99 at the end of their work, this being the total numerical value of the characters in ἀμήν. For the purposes of the present article it will be necessary to examine the whole Biblical usage of ‘Amen.’
1. Amen in the OT.—The formula is found in (a) the Pentateuch (Numbers 5:22, Deuteronomy 27 passim) as a ritual injunction (LXX Septuagint γένοιτο throughout). (b) In 1 Kings 1:36, 1 Chronicles 16:36, Nehemiah 5:13, Jeremiah 11:5; Jeremiah 28:6 it is mentioned as being actually used (LXX Septuagint in 1 Kings 1:36 γένοιτο οὕτως, Jeremiah 28:6 ἀληθῶς, elsewhere ἀμήν). (c) In the Psalms (Psalms 41:13; Psalms 72:19; Psalms 89:52; Psalms 106:48) we meet with its liturgical use (LXX Septuagint γένοιτο). The most common equivalent for Amen in the LXX Septuagint is γένοιτο; and with this may be compared St. Paul’s familiar μὴ γένοιτο, the negative formula of dissent and deprecation.
No clear instance of the use of an initial Amen occurs. Hogg thinks we have such in 1 Kings 1:36, Jeremiah 11:5; Jeremiah 28:6; but in each of these cases it will be found that the Amen is a responsive assent to something that precedes. It is true that the LXX Septuagint rendering in Jeremiah 28:6 (ἀληθῶς) shows that the translators were inclined to regard this as an instance of an initial Amen; but even here the term is really an ironical response to the false prophecy of Hananiah in Jeremiah 28:2-4. Almost all the instances, indeed, in which Amen is met with in the OT are examples of the responsive use; the only considerable instances of the final use being found at the end of each of the first three divisions of the Psalter. In the Apocrypha we have further instances of the responsive Amen in Tobit 8:8 and in Judith 13:20; Judith 15:10 (Authorized and Revised Versions in the latter book renders ‘So be it’). The doubled formula (‘Amen, Amen,’ cf. Judith 13:20) thus used is naturally explained as an expression of earnestness. It may here be added that among the Jews at a much later period Amen has a responsive and desiderative use in connexion with every kind of expression of desire and felicitation; e.g. ‘May he live to see good days: Amen!’
2. Amen in the Gospels.—We must set aside the instances of subscriptional Amen (see above) as without authority. In Matthew 6:13 some ancient authorities support the conclusion of the Lord’s Prayer with doxology and Amen; but it can hardly be doubted that Amen here, along with the doxology which it closes, is not original, but due to liturgical use (see ‘Notes on Select Readings’ in Westcott-Hort’s NT in Greek, ad loc.). In all the other instances in the Gospels it is the initial Amen that is found, given always and only as a usus loquendi of Christ in the formula, ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν (σοι), according to the Synoptists, and ἀμὴν ἀμήν λέγω ὑμῖν (σοι), according to St. John.
Now, whilst final Amen as a formula of conclusion or response remains unaltered throughout in NT in the various versions, it is of interest to notice the different ways in which this initial Amen is treated. The Vulgate, e.g., invariably keeps the untranslated form, and reads Amen (or Amen, Amen) dico vobis. The modern Greek equivalent is ἀληθῶς (ἀληθῶς ἀληθῶς); and with this accords our Authorized and Revised Versions ‘Verily,’ and also Luther’s Wahrlich. And, indeed, among the Synoptists themselves there are indications that an initial Amen has sometimes been replaced by another term. This is specially so in the case of St. Luke, who has only 6 instances of ἀμήν as against 30 in St. Matthew , , 13 in St. Mark. We have, e.g., ναί in Luke 11:51 for ἀμήν in the parallel Matthew 23:36; ἀληθῶς in Luke 9:27 (cf. Matthew 16:28, Mark 9:1). All this goes to show that this use of Amen on the part of Jesus was quite a peculiarity.
The very λέγω ὑμῖν alone would have been noticeable as a mode of assertion: the addition of ἀμήν does but intensify this characteristic, as an enforcement and corroboration of the utterances that are thus prefaced. The Heb. אָמן, which in our Lord’s time was usual only in responses, thus appears to have been taken by Him as an expedient for confirming His own statement ‘in the same way as if it were an oath or a blessing.’ Formulae of protestation and affirmation involving an oath were in use among Rabbinical teachers to enforce teachings and sayings, and with these the mode of Jesus invites comparison and contrast.
The attempt of Delitzsch to explain this Amen (particularly in the double form) through the Aramaic אָמַינָא ‘I say,’ cannot be sustained. Jannaris, again (. Times, Sept. [3] 1902, p. 564), has ventured the suggestion that ἀμήν thus used is a corruption of ἦ μήν (εἶ μήν); but interesting and ingenious as this may be, it lacks confirmation, and amongst the instances of the use of ἦ μήν which he adduces from the LXX Septuagint, the papyri, etc., not one suits the case here by showing any such construction as ἦ μὴν λέγω ὑμῖν in use.
A parallel between Amen and our ‘Yes’ has been already suggested: and in the NT we similarly find ἀμήν and ναί closely associated (2 Corinthians 1:20, Revelation 1:7), whilst we have before noticed how in St. Luke ναί is found as a substitute for ἀμήν. It may not therefore be out of place here to suggest that we have an illustration and analogy as regards the use of an initial Amen in the use of an introductory ‘Yes’ sometimes found in English (see, e.g., Shakspeare, 2 Hen. IV. i. iii. 36; Pope, Moral Essays, i. 1).
The double Amen, which occurs 25 times in St. John, and is peculiar to that Gospel, has provoked much curiosity as to how it is to be explained. If Jesus used as a formula in teaching now ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν and again ἀμὴν ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν, it is very strange that the Synoptics should invariably represent Him as using the former, and the Fourth Gospel invariably as using the latter. Why not instances of both promiscuously through all the Gospels if the two were thus alike used?
The statement that the Johannine form ‘introduces a truth of special solemnity and importance’ (as Plummer in Camb. Gr. Test. for Schools, etc., ‘St. John,’ note on ch. John 1:51) is quite gratuitous, as a comparison of the sayings and discourses of our Lord will show. It is too obviously a dictum for the purpose of explanation. The truth is, if we have regard to the exclamatory character of ἀμήν as a particle in this special use, there is nothing surprising in its being thus repeated; and we have the analogy of the repeated Amen in responses, as noticed above. Why St. John alone should give the formula in this particular way is a further question. If a consideration of the phenomena connected with the composition of the Fourth Gospel leads to the conclusion that in the form in which the utterances of Jesus are there presented we have not His ipsissima verba, we may most naturally regard the repetition of ἀμήν as a peculiarity due to the Evangelist, and (taking the evidence of the Synoptists into account) not necessarily a form actually used by Jesus.
3. Amen in the rest of the NT.—In the numerous instances in which Amen occurs in the NT outside the Gospels, it is almost entirely found in connexion with prayers, doxologies, or benedictions, as a solemn corroborative conclusion (final use). In addition, we have the responsive use of Amen illustrated in 1 Corinthians 14:16 (see below, s. ‘Liturgical use’) and Revelation 5:14 : and ἀμήν in Revelation 22:20 is responsive to the ἔρχομαι ταχύ preceding. Extra-canonical writings furnish plentiful examples of the same use. Two instances, again, of an introductory Amen in the Apocalypse (Revelation 7:12; Revelation 19:4), as a form of exultant acclamation, are interesting, but are quite distinct from the initial Amen in the utterances of Jesus in the Gospels.
Amen as a substantive appears in two forms: (1) τὸ ἀμήν, (2) ὁ ἁμήν. We meet with the former in 1 Corinthians 14:16 and 2 Corinthians 1:20. In both cases there appears to be a reference to a liturgical Amen. In the latter passage, indeed, it might be contended that ἀμήν is merely in correspondence with ναί, both simply conveying the idea of confirmation and assurance; but if we follow the better supported reading (as in Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885) the presence of such a reference can hardly be denied.
The use of ὁ ἀμήν as a name for our Lord in Revelation 3:14 is striking and peculiar. The attempt, however, to explain it by reference to 2 Corinthians 1:20 is not satisfactory. The curious expression ‘the God of Amen’ (Authorized and Revised Versions ‘the God of truth’) in Isaiah 65:16 is not sufficiently a parallel to afford an explanation, for the Amen in this case is not a personal name, but the Authorized and Revised Versions furnishes a satisfactory equivalent in the rendering ‘truth.’ Surely, however, there need be little difficulty about the use of such a term as a designation of Jesus. Considering the wealth of descriptive epithets applied to Him in the NT and other early Christian writings, and also the terminology favoured by the author of the Apocalypse, we must feel that this use of Amen, if bold, is not unnatural or unapt, so suggestive as the term is of truth and firmness. Another but very different use of Amen as a proper name may be mentioned. Among certain of the Gnostics ἈΜήΝ figured as the name of an angel (Hippolytus, Philosophumena, ccxviii. 79, ccciv. 45).
4. Amen in liturgical use
(a) Jewish.—In the Persian period Amen was in use as ‘the responsory of the people to the doxology of the Priests and the Levites’ (see Nehemiah 8:6, 1 Chronicles 16:36, Psalms 106:48). In the time of Christ it had become an established and familiar formula of the synagogue worship in particular, the response used in the Temple being a longer form: ‘Blessed be the Name of the glory of His kingdom for ever and ever!’ In still later times a formula of response was used which was apparently a combination of the synagogue Amen with the Temple responsory: ‘Amen: praised be the great Name for ever and ever!’ In the synagogue service the Amen was said by the people in response to the reader’s doxology. (In the great synagogue of Alexandria the attendant used to signal the congregation with a flag when to give the response). Amen was also the responsory to the priestly blessing.
Responsive Amen at the end of prayers was evidently an old custom among the Jews. In later times they are said to have discouraged this, because Amen at the end of every prayer had become the habit of Christians. The use of Amen in this connexion was thus considerably restricted; but certain synagogue prayers were still specified as to be followed by the Amen.
The Rabbis in their liturgical exactness rigorously determined the sense of Amen, and, among other things, enjoined that every doxology, on whatever occasion, must be followed by this response. Curious sayings were current among them, emphasizing the significance and value of Amen. Should, e.g., the inhabitants of hell exclaim ‘Amen!’ when the holy Name of God is praised, it will secure their release (Yalk. ii. 296 to Isaiah 26:2).
(b) Christian.—This use of Amen was undoubtedly borrowed by the Christians from the Jewish synagogue, as, indeed, other liturgical features were. St. Paul’s words in 1 Corinthians 14:16 are of special interest here. The reader is so to recite his prayers that the ignorant should have the boon of answering the Amen to the doxology. The ἰδιώτης (הֶדִיוֹמ) for whom he pleads is similarly considered by the Rabbis, and they give the same instruction. It cannot be maintained that the term εὐχαριστία used here by St. Paul has that special and, so to speak, technical sense which it afterwards acquires as applied to the Lord’s Supper, and that so ‘the Amen’ (τὸ ἀμήν) intended is specifically the response connected with the observance of that institution. At the same time, the whole reference clearly indicates that Amen as a responsory in Christian worship was already a regular and familiar usage.
It is, however, in connexion with the Eucharist, in the special sense of the term, that the Fathers particularly mention the responsive Amen, and refer to it as said after the doxology with which the long Prayer of Consecration closed. Justin Martyr (Apol. 2), Tertullian (de Spectaeul. 25), Dionysius of Alexandria (ap. Euseb. Historia Ecclesiastica), and Chrysostom (Hom. 35 in 1 Cor.) make such reference. This prayer, of course, was at first said aloud, so as to be heard by all; but in the course of time (after the 8th cent.) the custom grew for the officiating minister to say it sotto vocc. Even then, such importance was attached to the response of the people that the priest was required to say the closing words (‘world without end’) aloud, so that then the ‘Amen’ might be said. This in the West: in the Greek Church it was similarly required that the words of the institution should be said aloud, though the first part of the prayer was said inaudibly, so that the people might hear them and make their response. A writer of the 9th cent. (Florus Magister), referring to this usage, says: ‘Amen, which is responded by the whole church, means It is true. This, therefore, the faithful respond at the consecration of so great a mystery, as also in every prayer duly said, and by responding declare assent.’ A similar use of Amen at the end of the Exhortation (which is not a prayer), commencing the second part of the eucharistic service (see Book of Common Prayer), and at the end of the corresponding ‘Preface’ in the old Gallican Liturgy, may also be pointed out.
Jerome has an interesting reference to the loud congregational Amen, which he describes as resounding like thunder (‘ad similitudinem cœlestis tonitrui’—Com. ad Galat.). This corresponds to a synagogue custom of uttering the ‘Amen with the full power’ of the voice (Shab. 119b).
The modern practice of singing Amen at the close of hymns in public worship is partly due to a musical demand for a suitable cadence to conclude the tune: but it is also in harmony with the most ancient practice of closing hymns with doxologies, which naturally carried an Amen with them. The discrimination observable in some hymnals, whereby hymns containing a prayer or a doxology are closed with Amen and others not, arises from misapprehension. Amen not only means ‘So be it,’ but equally ‘So it is,’ and should thus be suitable as a conclusion to all hymns that are appropriate for Christian worship.
(c) Mohammedan.—Among the Mohammedans Amen is used liturgically, but only to a slight extent. It is universally used by them after every recital of the first Sura of the Koran—the so-called Surat al-Fâtihat (= Preface or Introduction). This brief, prayer-like form is held in great veneration, and has among them a place corresponding to that of the Paternoster amongst Christians.
Literature.—The Bible Dictionaries, s.v.; Jewish Encyclopedia, s.v.; Berakhoth i. 11–19; H. W. Hogg, Jewish Quart. Review, Oct. 1896; articles in Expository Times, by Nestle (Jan. 1897), and Jannaris (Sept. [3] 1902); Dalman, Die Worte Jesu (English translation 1902, p. 226ff.); Scudamore, Notitia Eucharistica.
J. S. Clemens.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Amen
The lack of a common language has always been a barrier to the mutual knowledge and intercourse of the great nations of mankind, all the more that the days when the educated men of all European nations were wont to converse in Latin have long since passed away. To a certain extent the gulf has been bridged for men of science by a newly-invented vocabulary of their own, and a general use of Latin and Greek names for all the objects of their study. In the world of religion it still remains a great obstacle to all attempts to realize a truly catholic and universal Church. The Latin of the Roman Catholic missal, which seems so unintelligible to the mass of the worshippers that a sign language (of ritual) is largely the medium by which they follow the services when not absorbed in the reading of devotional manuals in their own mother tongue, is but a caricature of such a general medium of interpretative forms of worship. It is, therefore, a matter of great interest to study the use of those few words of ancient origin which have taken root in the religions language of so many great Christian nations, and have come to convey, in all the services where they are used, the same or a similar meaning. Of these, perhaps the most familiar are the words ‘Amen’ and ‘Hallelujah.’ These old Heb. phrases were taken, of course, from the Bible, where, save in the case of Luther’s edition and the Septuagint version of the earlier books of the OT, no attempt has been made to replace them by foreign equivalents. They have a deep interest for Christians, not merely as a reminder of their essential unity and their ancient history, and as a recollection of the debt which we owe to a race so often despised, but as a reminiscence of the very words which came from our Lord’s own mouth, in the days when He was sowing the seed of which we are reaping the fruits.
A brief examination of the history of the word ‘Amen’ will be sufficient to prove the meaning which it had, the way in which it acquired this meaning, and the certainty that it was one of the very words which fell from the Master and had for Him a message of rare and unusual significance. The original use of the word (derived from a Heb. root אמן, meaning ‘steadfast,’ and a verb, ‘to prop,’ akin to Heb. אֱמֶח, ‘truth,’ Assyrian temenû, ‘foundation,’ and Eth. amena, ‘trust’ [1]) was intended to express certainty. In the mouth of Benaiah (1 Kings 1:36) and Jeremiah (Jeremiah 28:6) it appears as first word in the sentence, as a strong form of assent to a previous statement. It was not till after the Exile that it assumed its far commoner place as the answer, or almost the refrain in chorus, to the words of a previous speaker, and as such took its natural position at the close of the five divisions of the Psalms. It is uncertain how far this formed part of the people’s response in the ritual of the Temple, but it is certain that it acquired a fixed place in the services of the synagogues, where it still forms a common response of the congregation. This was sometimes altered later, in opposition to the Christian practice, and ‘God Faithful King’ was used instead. The object of this use of ‘Amen’ was, in Massie’s words, ‘to adopt as one’s own what has just been said’ (Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) i. 80), and it thus finds a fitting place in the mouth of the people to whom Nehemiah promulgated his laws (Nehemiah 5:13). To express emphasis, in accordance with Hebrew practice the word was often doubled, as in the solemn oath of Numbers 5:22 (cf. Nehemiah 8:6). This was further modified by the insertion of ‘and’ in the first three divisions of the Psalter. ‘Amen’ later became the last word of the first speaker, either as simple subscription-as such it stands appended to three of the Psalms (41, 72, 89), and in many NT Epistles, after both doxologies (15 times) and benedictions (6 timed in Revised Version )-or as the last word of a prayer (Revised Version only in Prayer of Manasses; but 2 others in Vulgate, viz. Nehemiah 13:31, Tobit 13:18). In two old Manuscripts of Tobit (end), as in some later Manuscripts of the NT, it appears by itself without a doxology. The later Jews were accustomed to use ‘Amen’ frequently in their homes (e.g. after grace before meals, etc.), and laid down precise rules for the ways of enunciating and pronouncing it. These are found in the Talmudic tract Berâkhôth (‘Blessings’), and are intended to guard against irreverence, haste, etc. So great was the superstition which attached to it that many of the later Rabbis treated it almost as a fetish, able to win blessings not only in this life but in the next; and one commentator, Eliezer ben Hyrcanus, went so far as to declare that by its hearty pronunciation in chorus the godless in Israel who lay in the penal fires of Gehenna might one day hope for the opening of their prison gates and a free entrance into the abode of the blessed, though Hogg suggests that this sentiment was extracted from a pun on Isaiah 26:2 (Elijahu Zutta, xx.; Shab. 119b; Siddur R. Amram, 13b; cf. Yalk. ii. 296 on Isaiah 26:2).
‘Amen’ would naturally have passed from the synagogues to the churches which took their rise among the synagogue-worshippers, but the Master Himself gave a new emphasis to its value for Christians by the example of His own practice. In this, as in all else, He was no slavish imitator of contemporary Rabbis, He spoke ‘as having authority and not as the scribes’ (Mark 1:22), and in this capacity it is not surprising that He found a new use for the word of emphasis, which neither His predecessors nor His followers have ventured to imitate, though the title applied to Him in Revelation 3:14 is founded upon His own chosen practice. In His mouth, by the common evidence of all the Gospels (77 times), the word is used to introduce His own words and clothe them with solemn affirmation. He plainly expressed His dislike for oaths (Matthew 5:34), and in Dalman’s view (Words of Jesus, 229)-and no one is better qualified to speak on the subject-He found here the word He needed to give the assurance which usually came from an oath. But in doing this ‘He was really making good the word, not the word Him,’ and it is therefore natural that no other man has ever ventured to follow His custom. That it was His habitual way of speaking is doubly plain from a comparison of all four Gospels, even though St. Luke, who wrote for men unacquainted with Hebrew, has sought where possible to replace the word by a Greek equivalent (ἀληθῶς, etc.). St. John has always doubled the word, probably for emphasis, since Delitzsch’s explanation from a word אֶמַינֶא = ‘I say’ is shown by Dalman (p. 227f.) to be wrong and based on a purely Babylonian practice.
The rest of the NT presents examples of all the older uses of the phrase, though the earliest is found only in the Jewish Apocalypse (Revelation 7:12; Revelation 19:14) which has probably been worked up into the Christian Book of ‘Revelation,’ and in one passage (Revelation 22:20) christianized from it. Here it is perhaps a conscious archaic form, brought in to add to the mysterious language of the vision, which may originally, like the Book of Enoch or Noah, have been ascribed to some earlier seer. The language of St. Paul in 1 Corinthians 14:16 shows that the synagogue practice of saying ‘Amen’ as a response early became habitual among the worshippers of ‘the Nazarene,’ even if we had not been led to infer this by the growing reluctance of the Jews to emphasize this feature of their service. The use (? Jewish) in Revelation 5:14 corresponds with this custom (cf. Psalms 106:48). It is plain that the complete absence of the word in Acts-itself a link with the Third Gospel-must be ascribed to the peculiar style and attitude of the author, and not at all to the actual practice in the churches.
Twice in the NT (2 Corinthians 1:20, Revelation 3:14) the word ‘Amen’ is used as a noun implying the ‘Faithful God,’ but it is hard to tell whether this is to be understood as a play on words based on Isaiah 65:16 (אֱמֶת, ‘truth,’ being read as אָמֶן, ‘Amen’), or whether it is connected with the manner in which the Master employed the phrase as guaranteed by His own authority and absolute ‘faithfulness.’
The Church of the fathers made much of the word ‘Amen’ in all its OT uses, and introduced it into their services, not only after blessings, hymns, etc. (cf. Euseb. iv. 15, vii. 9), but after the reception of the Sacrament-a custom to which Justin refers in his [2] account of the manner in which this service was conducted (Apol. i. 64, 66). This is confirmed by Ambrose. The practice is still in vogue in the Eastern Church, was adopted in the Scottish Liturgy of 1637, and dropped only in the 6th cent. by the Western Church. Sometimes the ‘Amen’ was even repeated after the lesson had been read. From the Jews and the Christians it passed over to the Muhammadan ritual, where it is still repeated after the first two sûras of the Qur’ân, even though its meaning is wholly misunderstood by the Muslim imâms who guess at various impossible explanations. In the Book of Common Prayer it appears in various forms-as the end of the priest’s prayer, as the response of the people, or as the unanimous assent of both priest and people. Curiously enough, among Presbyterians it is said by the minister only. One relic of the Gospel language is retained in the Bishops’ Oath of Supremacy, which commences almost in the style of one of Christ’s famous declarations. In legal terminology the term has been introduced to strengthen affirmation, and formed an item in the ‘style’ of proclamations until the 16th century. Hogg notes that in English, as in Syriac, it has come to mean ‘consent,’ and has been enabled thus to acquire the sense of ‘the very last,’ even though it commenced its career as first word in the sentence.
The foregoing remarks may enable the reader to judge of the strange changes to which the meaning of this word has been subjected, the important part it has played, and the historical interest which attaches to its every echo.
Literature.-The articles in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) , Dict. of Christ and the Gospels , Encyclopaedia Biblica , and Jewish Encyclopedia ; G. Dalman, The Words of Jesus, Eng. translation , Edinb. 1902, p. 226ff.; H. W. Hogg, in Jewish Quarterly Review ix. [3] 1-23; Oxf. Heb. Lex., s.v. אמן; Thayer Grimm’s Gr.-Eng. Lexicon of the NT, tr. Thayer , s.v. ἀμήν; articles in Expository Times viii. [4] 190, by Nestle, and xiii. [5] 563, by Jannaris.
L. St. Alban Wells.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Amen
1: ἀμήν (Strong's #281 — N/A — amen — am-ane' ) is transliterated from Hebrew into both Greek and English. "Its meanings may be seen in such passages as Deuteronomy 7:9 , 'the faithful (the Amen) God,' Isaiah 49:7 , 'Jehovah that is faithful.' Isaiah 65:16 , 'the God of truth,' marg., 'the God of Amen.' And if God is faithful His testimonies and precepts are 'sure (amen),' Psalm 19:7 ; 111:7 , as are also His warnings, Hosea 5:9 , and promises, Isaiah 33:16 ; 55:3 . 'Amen' is used of men also, e.g., Proverbs 25:13 .
"There are cases where the people used it to express their assent to a law and their willingness to submit to the penalty attached to the breach of it, Deuteronomy 27:15 , cp. Nehemiah 5:13 . It is also used to express acquiescence in another's prayer, 1 Kings 1:36 , where it is defined as "(let) God say so too," or in another's thanksgiving, 1 Chronicles 16:36 , whether by an individual, Jeremiah 11:5 , or by the congregation, Psalm 106:48 .
"Thus 'Amen' said by God 'it is and shall be so,' and by men, 'so let it be.'"
"Once in the NT 'Amen' is a title of Christ, Revelation 3:14 , because through Him the purposes of God are established, 2 Corinthians 1:20
"The early Christian churches followed the example of Isreal in associating themselves audibly with the prayers and thanksgivings offered on their behalf, 1 Corinthians 14:16 , where the article 'the' points to a common practice. Moreover this custom conforms to the pattern of things in the Heavens, see Revelation 5:14 , etc.
"The individual also said 'Amen' to express his 'let it be so' in response to the Divine 'thus it shall be,' Revelation 22:20 . Frequently the speaker adds 'Amen' to his own prayers and doxologies, as is the case at Ephesians 3:21 , e.g.
"The Lord Jesus often used 'Amen,' translated 'verily,' to introduce new revelations of the mind of God. In John's Gospel it is always repeated, 'Amen, Amen,' but not elsewhere. Luke does not use it at all, but where Matthew, Matthew 16:28 , and Mark, Mark 9:1 , have 'Amen,' Luke has 'of a truth;' thus by varying the translation of what the Lord said, Luke throws light on His meaning."* [1] See VERILY.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Amen
אמן , in Hebrew, signifies true, faithful, certain. It is used likewise in affirmation; and was often thus employed by our Saviour: "Amen, amen," that is, "Verily, verily." It is also understood as expressing a wish, "Amen! so be it!" or an affirmation, "Amen, yes, I believe it:" Numbers 5:22 . She shall answer, "Amen! amen!" Deuteronomy 27:15-17 , &c. "All the people shall answer, Amen! amen!" 1 Corinthians 14:16 . "How shall he who occupieth the place of the unlearned, say, Amen! at thy giving of thanks? seeing he understandeth not what thou sayest." "The promises of God are Amen in Christ;" that is, certain, confirmed, granted, 2 Corinthians 1:20 . The Hebrews end the five books of Psalms, according to their distribution of them, with "Amen, amen;" which the Septuagint translate, Γενοιτο , γενοιτο , and the Latins, Fiat, fiat. The Gospels, &c, are ended with AMEN. The Greek, Latin, and other churches, preserve this word in their prayers, as well as alleluia and hosanna. At the conclusion of the public prayers, the people anciently answered with a loud voice, "Amen!" and Jerom says, that, at Rome, when the people answered, "Amen!" the sound was like a clap of thunder, in similitudinem caelestis tonitrui Amen reboat. [1] The Jews assert that the gates of heaven are opened to him who answers, "Amen!" with all his might.
The Jewish doctors give three rules for pronouncing the word:
1. That it be not pronounced too hastily and rapidly, but with a grave and distinct voice.
2. That it be not louder than the tone of him that blesses.
3. That it be expressed in faith, with a certain persuasion that God would bless them, and hear their prayers.
AMEN is a title of our Lord, "The Amen, the true and faithful witness,"
Revelation 1:14 .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Amen
Amen (â-mĕn'), firm, faithful, verily. The proper signification of this word is that one person confirms the words of another, and expresses his wish for the success and accomplishment of the other's vows and declarations. Thus it is used in Numbers 5:22; Deuteronomy 27:15-26; 1 Kings 1:36; Jeremiah 28:6. Also after ascriptions of praise, Psalms 106:48; and in A. V. of Matthew 6:12, but omitted in R. V. Again, we find it at the beginning of a sentence, to signify the firm certainty of what was about to be said, as very frequently in our Lord's addresses (Matthew 25:40; John 3:3; John 3:5; John 3:11, and in other places), where it is usually rendered "verily." The promises of the gospel, too, are said to be "yea, and amen," 2 Corinthians 1:20, to indicate their stability. And once the word is used as a proper name. Revelation 3:14, applied to him from whose lips every syllable is assured truth; so that, though heaven and earth should pass, nothing that he has spoken can remain unaccomplished. Matthew 24:35.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Amen
(lit. "so be it"); response given after hearing a prayer or blessing and at certain points during the prayer service; expresses concurrence with what has just been said
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Amen,
literally "true" and used as a substantive, "that which is true," "truth," (Isaiah 65:16 ) a word used in strong asseverations, fixing, as it were, the stamp of truth upon the assertion which it accompanied, and making it binding as an oath. Comp. (Numbers 5:22 ) In the synagogues and private houses it was customary for the people or members of the family who were present to say "amen" to the prayers which were offered. (Matthew 6:13 ; 1 Corinthians 14:16 ) And not only public prayers, but those offered in private, and doxologies, were appropriately concluded with "amen." (Romans 9:5 ; 11:36 ; 15:33 ; 16:27 ; 2 Corinthians 13:14 ) etc.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Amen
‘Amen’ is a transliteration from a Hebrew word meaning ‘surely, truly, certainly, trustworthily’. It was used as a formula expressing agreement to a variety of statements or announcements; for example, an oath (Numbers 5:19-22), a blessing or curse from God (Deuteronomy 27:11-26; Jeremiah 11:5), an announcement (1 Kings 1:36), a prophecy (Jeremiah 28:6), an expression of praise (1 Chronicles 16:36; Psalms 41:13; Judges 1:24-25), a prayer (1 Corinthians 14:16), a statement (Revelation 1:7) or a promise (Revelation 22:20).
Since the promises of God find their true fulfilment (their ‘yes’, their ‘amen’) in Jesus Christ, he may be called ‘the Amen’. He is what the Old Testament calls ‘the God of truth’, ‘the God of the amen’ (2 Corinthians 1:20; Revelation 3:14; cf. Isaiah 65:16). Christians acknowledge this by adding their own ‘amen’ (2 Corinthians 1:20). Jesus, by introducing many of his statements with ‘Amen’ (i.e. ‘Verily’ or ‘Truly’), guaranteed that those statements were true, certain, reliable and authoritative (Matthew 8:10; Matthew 10:15; Matthew 10:23; Matthew 10:42; Matthew 11:11; Matthew 13:17; etc.). (See also TRUTH.)
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Amen
A Hebrew word meaning "so be it," or "so it is," as it isused at the end of prayers, hymns or Creed. It signifies approvalof, or assent to, what has gone before. The use of the "Amen" inPublic Worship emphasizes the Priesthood of the Laity, as forexample, in the consecration of the elements in the Holy Communion,while the celebrating Priest stands before God offering to Him thisholy Oblation, he does it in company with all the faithful, and tosignify their cooperation with him in this great act they say"Amen," adopting his words and acts as their own. In the earlyChurch the "Amen" was said with such heartiness, an ancient writerdescribes it as sounding "like a clap of thunder." (See RESPONSIVESERVICE).

Sentence search

Amen - It is used likewise in affirmation; and was often thus employed by our Saviour: "Amen, Amen," that is, "Verily, verily. " It is also understood as expressing a wish, "Amen! so be it!" or an affirmation, "Amen, yes, I believe it:" Numbers 5:22 . She shall answer, "Amen! Amen!" Deuteronomy 27:15-17 , &c. "All the people shall answer, Amen! Amen!" 1 Corinthians 14:16 . "How shall he who occupieth the place of the unlearned, say, Amen! at thy giving of thanks? seeing he understandeth not what thou sayest. " "The promises of God are Amen in Christ;" that is, certain, confirmed, granted, 2 Corinthians 1:20 . The Hebrews end the five books of Psalms, according to their distribution of them, with "Amen, Amen;" which the Septuagint translate, Γενοιτο , γενοιτο , and the Latins, Fiat, fiat. The Gospels, &c, are ended with Amen. At the conclusion of the public prayers, the people anciently answered with a loud voice, "Amen!" and Jerom says, that, at Rome, when the people answered, "Amen!" the sound was like a clap of thunder, in similitudinem caelestis tonitrui Amen reboat. [1] The Jews assert that the gates of heaven are opened to him who answers, "Amen!" with all his might. ...
Amen is a title of our Lord, "The Amen, the true and faithful witness,"...
Revelation 1:14
a'Mon, or a'Men - ( Nahum 3:8 ) Amen was one of the eight gods of the first order and chief of the triad of Thebes. He was worshipped at that city as Amen-Ra, or "Amen the Sun
Amen - ) Jesus is "the Amen, the, faithful and true witness" (Revelation 3:14). "The God of Amen" (Hebrew for "truth") (Isaiah 65:16). Jesus alone introduces His authoritative declarations with Amen in the beginning; in Matthew, Mark, and Luke, singly, in John (John 3:3; John 3:5; John 3:11; John 10:1) always doubled. In oaths those who pronounce the "Amen" bind themselves by the oath (Numbers 5:22; Deuteronomy 27:15-26). ...
God alone can seal all His declarations of promise or threat with the "Amen," verily, in its fullest sense; our assertions mostly need some qualification. As John records Christ's discourses on the deeper things of God, which man is slow to believe, the double Amen is appropriately found at the beginning of such discourses 25 times. Amen was the proper response to a prayer, an oath, or a solemn promise (1 Kings 1:30; Nehemiah 5:13; Nehemiah 8:6; 1 Chronicles 16:36; Jeremiah 11:5); the God of Amen witnesses our covenants. Jewish tradition states that the people responded to the priest's prayer not "Amen," but, "Blessed be the name of the glory of His kingdom for ever. " But in synagogues, as in the Christian assemblies, and in family and private prayers, Amen was the response (Matthew 6:13; 1 Corinthians 14:16)
Amen - ” In the Old Testament it is used to show the acceptance of the validity of a curse or an oath (Numbers 5:22 ; Deuteronomy 27:15-26 ; Jeremiah 11:5 ), to indicate acceptance of a good message (Jeremiah 28:6 ), and to join in a doxology in a worship setting to affirm what has been said or prayed (1 Chronicles 16:36 ; Nehemiah 8:6 ; Psalm 106:48 ). “Amen” may confirm what already is, or it may indicate a hope for something desired. In Jewish prayer, “amen” comes at the end as an affirmative response to a statement or wish made by others, and is so used in the New Testament epistles (Romans 1:25 ; Romans 11:36 ; Romans 15:33 ; 1 Corinthians 16:24 ; Galatians 1:5 ; Ephesians 3:21 ; Philippians 4:20 ). Paul ended some of his letters with “amen” (1 Thessalonians 5:28 ; 2 Thessalonians 3:18 ). ...
In the gospels, Jesus used “amen” to affirm the truth of His own statements. English translations often use “verily,” “truly,” “I tell you the truth” to translate Jesus' Amen. He never said it at the end of a statement, but always at the beginning: “Amen, I say to you” (Matthew 5:18 ; Matthew 16:28 ; Mark 8:12 ; Mark 11:23 ; Luke 4:24 ; Luke 21:32 ; John 1:51 ; John 5:19 ). In John's Gospel, Jesus said “Amen, Amen. ” That Jesus prefaced His own words with “amen” is especially important, for He affirmed that the kingdom of God is bound up with His own person and emphasized the authority of what He said. ...
Jesus is called “The Amen” in Revelation 3:14 , meaning that He Himself is the reliable and true witness of God. Perhaps the writer had in mind Isaiah 65:16 where the Hebrew says “God of Amen
Amen - 1: ἀμήν (Strong's #281 — N/A — Amen — am-ane' ) is transliterated from Hebrew into both Greek and English. "Its meanings may be seen in such passages as Deuteronomy 7:9 , 'the faithful (the Amen) God,' Isaiah 49:7 , 'Jehovah that is faithful. , 'the God of Amen. ' And if God is faithful His testimonies and precepts are 'sure (amen),' Psalm 19:7 ; 111:7 , as are also His warnings, Hosea 5:9 , and promises, Isaiah 33:16 ; 55:3 . 'Amen' is used of men also, e. ...
"Thus 'Amen' said by God 'it is and shall be so,' and by men, 'so let it be. '" ...
"Once in the NT 'Amen' is a title of Christ, Revelation 3:14 , because through Him the purposes of God are established, 2 Corinthians 1:20 ...
"The early Christian churches followed the example of Isreal in associating themselves audibly with the prayers and thanksgivings offered on their behalf, 1 Corinthians 14:16 , where the article 'the' points to a common practice. ...
"The individual also said 'Amen' to express his 'let it be so' in response to the Divine 'thus it shall be,' Revelation 22:20 . Frequently the speaker adds 'Amen' to his own prayers and doxologies, as is the case at Ephesians 3:21 , e. ...
"The Lord Jesus often used 'Amen,' translated 'verily,' to introduce new revelations of the mind of God. In John's Gospel it is always repeated, 'Amen, Amen,' but not elsewhere. Luke does not use it at all, but where Matthew, Matthew 16:28 , and Mark, Mark 9:1 , have 'Amen,' Luke has 'of a truth;' thus by varying the translation of what the Lord said, Luke throws light on His meaning
Amen - In current usage, the term "amen" has become little more than a ritualized conclusion to prayers. Yet the Hebrew and Greek words for Amen appear hundreds of times in the Bible and have several uses. Amen is a transliteration of the Hebrew word Amen [ 1 Chronicles 16:36 ; Nehemiah 8:6 ; and at the end of each of the first four books of Psalms, 41:13; 72:19; 89:52; 106:48). ...
Amen is never used solely to confirm a blessing in the Old Testament, but Israel did accept the curse of God on sin by it (twelve times in Deuteronomy 27 , and in Nehemiah 5:13 ), and once Jeremiah affirms God's statements of the blessings and the curses of the covenant with an Amen (Jeremiah 11:5 ). These kinds of uses lie behind the popular, basically correct, dictum that Amen means "So be it. "...
Amen has other uses. Jeremiah mocks the words of a false prophet with an Amen (28:6). Because God is trustworthy, Isaiah can call him "the God of Amen, " in whose name his servants should invoke blessings and take oaths (Isaiah 65:16 ; see also Revelation 3:14 ). But Jesus' use of Amen is the most striking innovation. ...
Jesus introduces his teaching by saying Amen lego humin [1], that is, "truly I say to you, " on nearly seventy occasions in the Gospels (thirty times in Matthew, thirteen in Mark, six in Luke, and twenty in John, where the Amen is always doubled). Where the prophets often said, "Thus says the Lord, " Jesus often says, "Amen I say to you. We ought to consider Jesus' use of the term "amen" alongside his other implicit claims to deity, such as his claim of the right to forgive sins and to judge humankind, and his custom of performing miracles on his own authority. When Jesus instructed Nicodemus, for example, he appealed not to Scripture but to his own authority, saying "Amen, Amen, I say to you" (John 3:3,5 ; see also Matthew 6:2,5 , 16 ; 18:3 ; Luke 13:35 ; John 5:19,24 , 25 ; 6:26,32 , 47,53 ). Amen lego humin also punctuates the teaching of truths unknown in the Old Testament, and seasons startling sayings for which Jesus offers no proof other than his own authority. Here the Amen implies that Jesus' words, like the Father's, are true merely because he utters them (Matthew 24:34 ; 26:13 ; Mark 3:28 ; Luke 12:37 ; John 10:1 ). So in Matthew 5 Jesus comments on the Old Testament or Jewish interpretations of it six times in the chapter, saying, "You have heard that it was said , but I tell you. " He concludes the first section with the Amen in 5:26, and by so doing asserts that his authority exceeds the Jewish interpreters', and even brings a revelation that surpasses that of the Old Testament law itself. ...
In this way, whenever Jesus says "amen lego humin" [1], he shows awareness of his authority, his deity. But implicit claims to deity, whether they be Jesus' use of the Amen or other ones, appear in virtually every paragraph of the Gospels, and cannot be explained away. ...
Paul's use of Amen returns to the Old Testament world, except that he utters Amen only to bless, not to curse. Many times Paul's letters burst into praise of God the Father or God the Son and seal the confession with the Amen (Romans 1:25 ; 9:5 ; 11:36 ; Galatians 1:3-5 ; Ephesians 3:21 ; Philippians 4:20 ; 1 Timothy 1:17 ; 6:16 ; 2 Timothy 4:18 ). A doxology appears at or near the end of several letters, and all close with the Amen. Other letters end with a blessing on his readers, again completed with Amen (1Col 16:23-24; Galatians 6:18 ). Paul also invites his readers to say Amen to the promises of God (2Col 1:20; see also Revelation 22:20 ). Amen also closes spontaneous doxologies in Revelation; there, however, the object of praise is more often the Son than the Father (1:6-7; 5:14; 7:12; 19:4). In all this Paul and Revelation resemble the Jewish custom of the day, in which Jews said Amen when they heard another bless the Lord whether in private prayer (Tobit 8:8 ) or in worship. ...
Several other New Testament epistles follow Paul by praising God and/or calling on him to bestow the grace the readers need (Hebrews 13:20-21 ; 1 Peter 4:11 ; 5:10-11 ; 2 Peter 3:17-18 ; Jude 24-25 ; Revelation 22:21 ). As in Paul, these final words often recapitulate the main themes of the letter, which the writer seals with the Amen that both declare and pleads, "So be it! May God indeed be praised for bestowing the gifts his people need
Amen - ‘Amen’ is a transliteration from a Hebrew word meaning ‘surely, truly, certainly, trustworthily’. ...
Since the promises of God find their true fulfilment (their ‘yes’, their ‘amen’) in Jesus Christ, he may be called ‘the Amen’. He is what the Old Testament calls ‘the God of truth’, ‘the God of the Amen’ (2 Corinthians 1:20; Revelation 3:14; cf. Christians acknowledge this by adding their own ‘amen’ (2 Corinthians 1:20). Jesus, by introducing many of his statements with ‘Amen’ (i
Amen (2) - AMEN. For modes in which Amen is used may be distinguished—(1) Initial, when it lends weight to the utterance following. ’...
The subscriptional Amen requires but a brief notice. No instance of it is found in the OT; and as regards the closing Amen in the several Scriptures of the NT there is for the most part a lack of textual authority. , Amen at the end of 1 Corinthians and not at the end of 2 Corinthians? The closing Amen in each of the Gospels, though without authority, is a genuine instance of the subscriptional use of later times. For the purposes of the present article it will be necessary to examine the whole Biblical usage of ‘Amen. Amen in the OT. The most common equivalent for Amen in the LXX Septuagint is γένοιτο; and with this may be compared St. ...
No clear instance of the use of an initial Amen occurs. Hogg thinks we have such in 1 Kings 1:36, Jeremiah 11:5; Jeremiah 28:6; but in each of these cases it will be found that the Amen is a responsive assent to something that precedes. It is true that the LXX Septuagint rendering in Jeremiah 28:6 (ἀληθῶς) shows that the translators were inclined to regard this as an instance of an initial Amen; but even here the term is really an ironical response to the false prophecy of Hananiah in Jeremiah 28:2-4. Almost all the instances, indeed, in which Amen is met with in the OT are examples of the responsive use; the only considerable instances of the final use being found at the end of each of the first three divisions of the Psalter. In the Apocrypha we have further instances of the responsive Amen in Tobit 8:8 and in Judith 13:20; Judith 15:10 (Authorized and Revised Versions in the latter book renders ‘So be it’). The doubled formula (‘Amen, Amen,’ cf. It may here be added that among the Jews at a much later period Amen has a responsive and desiderative use in connexion with every kind of expression of desire and felicitation; e. ‘May he live to see good days: Amen!’...
2. Amen in the Gospels. —We must set aside the instances of subscriptional Amen (see above) as without authority. In Matthew 6:13 some ancient authorities support the conclusion of the Lord’s Prayer with doxology and Amen; but it can hardly be doubted that Amen here, along with the doxology which it closes, is not original, but due to liturgical use (see ‘Notes on Select Readings’ in Westcott-Hort’s NT in Greek, ad loc. In all the other instances in the Gospels it is the initial Amen that is found, given always and only as a usus loquendi of Christ in the formula, ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν (σοι), according to the Synoptists, and ἀμὴν ἀμήν λέγω ὑμῖν (σοι), according to St. ...
Now, whilst final Amen as a formula of conclusion or response remains unaltered throughout in NT in the various versions, it is of interest to notice the different ways in which this initial Amen is treated. , invariably keeps the untranslated form, and reads Amen (or Amen, Amen) dico vobis. And, indeed, among the Synoptists themselves there are indications that an initial Amen has sometimes been replaced by another term. All this goes to show that this use of Amen on the part of Jesus was quite a peculiarity. ...
The attempt of Delitzsch to explain this Amen (particularly in the double form) through the Aramaic אָמַינָא ‘I say,’ cannot be sustained. ...
A parallel between Amen and our ‘Yes’ has been already suggested: and in the NT we similarly find ἀμήν and ναί closely associated (2 Corinthians 1:20, Revelation 1:7), whilst we have before noticed how in St. It may not therefore be out of place here to suggest that we have an illustration and analogy as regards the use of an initial Amen in the use of an introductory ‘Yes’ sometimes found in English (see, e. ...
The double Amen, which occurs 25 times in St. The truth is, if we have regard to the exclamatory character of ἀμήν as a particle in this special use, there is nothing surprising in its being thus repeated; and we have the analogy of the repeated Amen in responses, as noticed above. Amen in the rest of the NT. —In the numerous instances in which Amen occurs in the NT outside the Gospels, it is almost entirely found in connexion with prayers, doxologies, or benedictions, as a solemn corroborative conclusion (final use). In addition, we have the responsive use of Amen illustrated in 1 Corinthians 14:16 (see below, s. Two instances, again, of an introductory Amen in the Apocalypse (Revelation 7:12; Revelation 19:4), as a form of exultant acclamation, are interesting, but are quite distinct from the initial Amen in the utterances of Jesus in the Gospels. ...
Amen as a substantive appears in two forms: (1) τὸ ἀμήν, (2) ὁ ἁμήν. In both cases there appears to be a reference to a liturgical Amen. The curious expression ‘the God of Amen’ (Authorized and Revised Versions ‘the God of truth’) in Isaiah 65:16 is not sufficiently a parallel to afford an explanation, for the Amen in this case is not a personal name, but the Authorized and Revised Versions furnishes a satisfactory equivalent in the rendering ‘truth. Considering the wealth of descriptive epithets applied to Him in the NT and other early Christian writings, and also the terminology favoured by the author of the Apocalypse, we must feel that this use of Amen, if bold, is not unnatural or unapt, so suggestive as the term is of truth and firmness. Another but very different use of Amen as a proper name may be mentioned. Amen in liturgical use...
(a) Jewish. —In the Persian period Amen was in use as ‘the responsory of the people to the doxology of the Priests and the Levites’ (see Nehemiah 8:6, 1 Chronicles 16:36, Psalms 106:48). In the time of Christ it had become an established and familiar formula of the synagogue worship in particular, the response used in the Temple being a longer form: ‘Blessed be the Name of the glory of His kingdom for ever and ever!’ In still later times a formula of response was used which was apparently a combination of the synagogue Amen with the Temple responsory: ‘Amen: praised be the great Name for ever and ever!’ In the synagogue service the Amen was said by the people in response to the reader’s doxology. Amen was also the responsory to the priestly blessing. ...
Responsive Amen at the end of prayers was evidently an old custom among the Jews. In later times they are said to have discouraged this, because Amen at the end of every prayer had become the habit of Christians. The use of Amen in this connexion was thus considerably restricted; but certain synagogue prayers were still specified as to be followed by the Amen. ...
The Rabbis in their liturgical exactness rigorously determined the sense of Amen, and, among other things, enjoined that every doxology, on whatever occasion, must be followed by this response. Curious sayings were current among them, emphasizing the significance and value of Amen. , the inhabitants of hell exclaim ‘Amen!’ when the holy Name of God is praised, it will secure their release (Yalk. —This use of Amen was undoubtedly borrowed by the Christians from the Jewish synagogue, as, indeed, other liturgical features were. The reader is so to recite his prayers that the ignorant should have the boon of answering the Amen to the doxology. Paul has that special and, so to speak, technical sense which it afterwards acquires as applied to the Lord’s Supper, and that so ‘the Amen’ (τὸ ἀμήν) intended is specifically the response connected with the observance of that institution. At the same time, the whole reference clearly indicates that Amen as a responsory in Christian worship was already a regular and familiar usage. ...
It is, however, in connexion with the Eucharist, in the special sense of the term, that the Fathers particularly mention the responsive Amen, and refer to it as said after the doxology with which the long Prayer of Consecration closed. Even then, such importance was attached to the response of the people that the priest was required to say the closing words (‘world without end’) aloud, so that then the ‘Amen’ might be said. (Florus Magister), referring to this usage, says: ‘Amen, which is responded by the whole church, means It is true. ’ A similar use of Amen at the end of the Exhortation (which is not a prayer), commencing the second part of the eucharistic service (see Book of Common Prayer), and at the end of the corresponding ‘Preface’ in the old Gallican Liturgy, may also be pointed out. ...
Jerome has an interesting reference to the loud congregational Amen, which he describes as resounding like thunder (‘ad similitudinem cœlestis tonitrui’—Com. This corresponds to a synagogue custom of uttering the ‘Amen with the full power’ of the voice (Shab. ...
The modern practice of singing Amen at the close of hymns in public worship is partly due to a musical demand for a suitable cadence to conclude the tune: but it is also in harmony with the most ancient practice of closing hymns with doxologies, which naturally carried an Amen with them. The discrimination observable in some hymnals, whereby hymns containing a prayer or a doxology are closed with Amen and others not, arises from misapprehension. Amen not only means ‘So be it,’ but equally ‘So it is,’ and should thus be suitable as a conclusion to all hymns that are appropriate for Christian worship. —Among the Mohammedans Amen is used liturgically, but only to a slight extent
Amen - The priest pronounced a curse upon her if she had been guilty, and the woman had to answer Amen, Amen. So when the priest upon mount Ebal rehearsed the various curses, it was appended to each "And all the people shall say, Amen. ...
When David declared that Solomon should be his successor, Benaiah said "Amen: the Lord God of my lord the king say so too. So when David brought up the ark, and delivered a psalm of thanksgiving, all the people said, Amen, and praised the Lord. ' Hananiah prophesied falsely that within two full years all the vessels of the Lord's house would be returned from Babylon; Jeremiah said "Amen, the Lord do so;" though he knew it was a false prophecy he could well hope that such a thing might be. ...
At the end of each of the first four books of the Psalms Amen is added. In these instances it is not another acquiescing in what is said, but the writer adds Amen at the end, signifying 'may it so be,' and three times it is repeated. ...
The Hebrew word is always translated 'Amen,' except twice in Isaiah 65:16 , where it is rendered 'truth. There is another way in which the word is used, as in 2 Corinthians 1:20 , "Whatever promises of God [1], in him is the yea [1] and in him the Amen [3] for glory to God by us. " And that Christ is the verification of all the promises is so true that He Himself is called 'the Amen:' " These things saith the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the beginning of the creation of God
Amen - Amen'. ...
And let all the people say Amen. ...
"All the promises of God are Amen in Christ " that is, firmness, stability, constancy
Amon - The ancient Egyptian name is Amen. Amen was one of the eight gods of the first order, and chief of the triad of Thebes. He was worshiped at that city as Amen-ra, or "Amen the sun
Amen - The use of the "Amen" inPublic Worship emphasizes the Priesthood of the Laity, as forexample, in the consecration of the elements in the Holy Communion,while the celebrating Priest stands before God offering to Him thisholy Oblation, he does it in company with all the faithful, and tosignify their cooperation with him in this great act they say"Amen," adopting his words and acts as their own. In the earlyChurch the "Amen" was said with such heartiness, an ancient writerdescribes it as sounding "like a clap of thunder
Amen - So in Revelation 3:14 , our Lord is called "the Amen, the faithful and true Witness," where the last words explain the preceding appellation. At the end of a sentence it is often used, singly or repeated, especially at the end of hymns and prayers; as "Amen and Amen," Psalm 41:13 72:19 89:52 . Hence, in oaths, after the priest has repeated the words of the covenant or imprecation, all those who pronounce the Amen, bind themselves by the oath, Numbers 5:22 Deuteronomy 27:15 Nehemiah 5:13 8:6 1 Chronicles 16:36
Amen - And surely, the Lord Jesus Christ is all these, and infinitely more, JEHOVAH'S Yea and Amen, as he saith himself; the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the beginning of the creation of God; that is in his mediatorial character. ...
And it is worthy our closest remark, that our Lord very frequently began his discourses with this word, and repeated it-"Verily, verily, I say unto you;" that is, in plain terms, (and indeed, it is the very word in the original) Amen, Amen. All the gospels, indeed, end with Amen. ...
And I beg to remark yet farther, by way of shewing the sweetness and peculiar claim that the Lord Jesus hath to this name, that all the promises are said to be, Yea and Amen in Christ Jesus, (2 Corinthians 1:20) that is, strictly and properly speaking, they are His; for He himself is the One great promise of the Bible, and all are therefore, promises in and by Him. And the prophet Isaiah (Isaiah 65:16) describes the believer in the gospel church, as saying, That he who blesseth himself in the earth shall bless himself in the God of truth; that is, the God Amen. For certain it is, when we say Amen to the giving of thanks, (see 1 Corinthians 14:16) we do, to all intents and purposes, use the name of Christ, however inattentively it be said. ...
I shall only beg to add, to what hath been offered on this precious name of our Lord Jesus, that as John is the only one of the Evangelists who hath recorded, so very particularly, our Lord's discourses with those double Amens, or Verilys, it is plain, that he considered them very highly important. And the apostle Paul, in desiring that no one should ignorantly say Amen in the church, at the assemblies of the faithful, seems to have same sentiment with John, that every one naming Christ should know Christ
si'Hon - ) Shortly before the time of Israel's arrival he had dispossessed the Moabites of a splendid territory, driving them south of the natural bulwark of the Amen. He and all his host were destroyed, and their district from Amen to Jabbok became at once the possession of the conqueror
Jotbah - The city of Meshullemeth, Manasseh's queen, mother of Amen (2 Kings 21:19)
Amen - In Isaiah 65:16 , the Authorized Version has "the God of truth," which in Hebrew is "the God of Amen. In the primitive churches it was common for the general audience to say "Amen" at the close of the prayer (1 Corinthians 14:16 ). ...
The promises of God are Amen; i
Amon (1) - The Egyptian name is Amen, "the hidden," or "mysterious"; one of the eight gods of the first order; thief of the Theban triad, worshipped as Amen-ra (i
Mephaath - of Amen, in the "downs" (mishor ), the modern Belka (Jeremiah 48:21)
Amen, - (Numbers 5:22 ) In the synagogues and private houses it was customary for the people or members of the family who were present to say "amen" to the prayers which were offered. (Matthew 6:13 ; 1 Corinthians 14:16 ) And not only public prayers, but those offered in private, and doxologies, were appropriately concluded with "amen
Amen - Amen . From the synagogue it passed into the liturgical use of Christian congregations, and is so referred to in 1 Corinthians 14:16 ‘the (customary) Amen at thy giving of thanks’ (? Eucharist). The impression created by this idiom may have influenced the title of ‘the Amen’ given to the Lord in the Epistle to Laodicea ( Revelation 3:14 ). Jesus Christ as preached) is the Amen’ the seal of God’s promises
Om - among the Hindus an exclamation of assent, like Amen, then an invocation, and later a symbol of the trinity formed by Vishnu, Siva, and Brahma
Maranatha - The imperative sense is made probable by Revelation 22:20 (’Amen. Amen. Amen (= ‘O our Lord, come! Amen’) is strikingly parallel with the remarkable phrase in Revelation 22:20 (‘Amen. An old Jewish acrostic hymn, still extant in all types of the Jewish liturgy, the initial letters of the lines of which may be read ‘Amen
Naha'Liel - ( Numbers 21:19 ) It lay "beyond," that is, north of, the Amen, ver
no-a'Mon - (temple of Amon ) ( Nahum 3:8 ) No, (Jeremiah 46:25 ; Ezekiel 30:14,16 ) a city of Egypt, better known under the name of Thebes or Diospolis Magna, the ancient and splendid metropolis of upper Egypt The second part of the first form as the name of Amen , the chief divinity of Thebes, mentioned or alluded to in connection with this place in Jeremiah. It seems most reasonable to suppose that No is a Shemitic name and that Amen is added in Nahum (l. ) to distinguish Thebes from some other place bearing the same name or on account of the connection of Amen with that city
Amen - ) To say Amen to; to sanction fully
Verily - ]'>[1] When a Rabbi would add impressiveness to a doctrine, he prefaced it with Amen, ‘Verily,’ signifying that it was a tradition received by Moses on Sinai. ]'>[2] The congregation responded Amen to the prayers in the synagogue, a usage which passed into the Christian ecclesia;‡ [3] and the Talmud warns against ‘an orphan Amen,’ meaning one uttered without consideration, or in ignorance whereto the response is being made. Amen. ...
Jesus, like the Rabbis, was accustomed, by way of bespeaking His hearers’ attention, to preface important declarations with Amen, ‘Verily. § 3: ‘Multum commendat quod ita pronuntiat; quodammodo, si dici fas est, juratio ejus est, Amen, Amen dico vobis. ‘Amen‘; ExpT Mammon - 1: μαμωνᾶς (Strong's #3126 — Noun Masculine — mamonas — mam-mo-nas' ) a common Aramaic word for "riches," akin to a Hebrew word signifying "to be firm, steadfast" (whence "Amen"), hence, "that which is to be trusted;" Gesenius regards it as derived from a Heb
Verily - ...
2: ἀμήν (Strong's #281 — N/A — Amen — am-ane' ) the transliteration of a Heb. See Amen
Amen - Amen (â-mĕn'), firm, faithful, verily. " The promises of the gospel, too, are said to be "yea, and Amen," 2 Corinthians 1:20, to indicate their stability
Hail Mary - Amen
Air Machine Blessing - Through Christ Our Lord, Amen
Praise - Amen. Amen. Amen. Amen. Amen. Amen. Amen. Amen. Amen. Amen. Amen. Amen. Amen. Amen. And the four living creatures said, Amen. Amen: Blessing, and glory, and wisdom, and thanksgiving, and honour, and power, and might, be unto our God for ever and ever. Amen. ...
Westcott notes that all except (12) and perhaps (16) are closed by Amen. Amen
Water of Jealousy - " and having thrown the handful of meal on the altar, "caused the woman to drink" the potion thus drugged, she moreover answering to the words of his imprecation, "Amen, Amen
Baptism, Conditional - The form is, "If thou artnot already baptized, (name) I baptize thee in the Name of theFather, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, Amen
Jumpers - Several of the more zealous itinerant preachers encouraged the people to cry out gogoniant (the Welch word for glory, ) Amen, &c
Doxology - Doxology the Less, was anciently only a single sentence without a response, running in these words: "Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost, world without end, Amen
Yea - All the promises of God in him are yea, and in him are Amen
Amen - Of these, perhaps the most familiar are the words ‘Amen’ and ‘Hallelujah. ...
A brief examination of the history of the word ‘Amen’ will be sufficient to prove the meaning which it had, the way in which it acquired this meaning, and the certainty that it was one of the very words which fell from the Master and had for Him a message of rare and unusual significance. Amena, ‘trust’
‘Amen’ would naturally have passed from the synagogues to the churches which took their rise among the synagogue-worshippers, but the Master Himself gave a new emphasis to its value for Christians by the example of His own practice. Paul in 1 Corinthians 14:16 shows that the synagogue practice of saying ‘Amen’ as a response early became habitual among the worshippers of ‘the Nazarene,’ even if we had not been led to infer this by the growing reluctance of the Jews to emphasize this feature of their service. ...
Twice in the NT (2 Corinthians 1:20, Revelation 3:14) the word ‘Amen’ is used as a noun implying the ‘Faithful God,’ but it is hard to tell whether this is to be understood as a play on words based on Isaiah 65:16 (אֱמֶת, ‘truth,’ being read as אָמֶן, ‘Amen’), or whether it is connected with the manner in which the Master employed the phrase as guaranteed by His own authority and absolute ‘faithfulness. ’...
The Church of the fathers made much of the word ‘Amen’ in all its OT uses, and introduced it into their services, not only after blessings, hymns, etc. 9), but after the reception of the Sacrament-a custom to which Justin refers in his [2] account of the manner in which this service was conducted (Apol. Sometimes the ‘Amen’ was even repeated after the lesson had been read
Ring - It is placed on the fourthfinger of the woman's left hand, and the ancient ceremony of doingso was to place it first on the thumb at the Name of the firstPerson of the Trinity; on the next finger, at the Name of the Son;on the third at the Name of the Holy Ghost, and then on the fourthfinger, and leaving it there at the word "Amen
Gloria Patri - Amen
Responsive Service - (See Amen; FORMS;also VERSICLES
Truth - As the Old Testament spoke of the God of truth or, to use the related word, the God of the Amen (Isaiah 65:16), so the New Testament speaks of Jesus as the Amen. He is the one in whom God’s truth is perfectly expressed, and through whom God’s promises are perfectly fulfilled (John 1:17; 2 Corinthians 1:20; Revelation 3:14; see Amen). This is in keeping with the Old Testament usage of ‘truth’ as applying to the revealed Word of God (Psalms 25:5; Psalms 86:11; Psalms 119:142; see REVELATION)
Immortality - " (Mark 9:44; Mar 9:46; Mar 9:48) How ought true believers in Jesus to rejoice in the consciousness of their interest in him, to join the hymn of the apostle; "Now unto the King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only wise God, be honour and glory for ever and ever, Amen
Seven Words of Christ -
The second was addressed to the penitent thief, "Amen, I say to thee, this day thou shalt be with me in Paradise" (Luke 23)
Eating - " All present say, Amen. " The Amen is, as before, repeated. " This is followed up with prayer, in which is generally expressed the Lord's goodness to Israel, beseeching him to pity Jerusalem and his temple, to restore the throne of David, and to send Elias and the Messiah, and to deliver them out of their long captivity: all answer Amen
Witness - And he it is that both gives a conviction to the heart of the firmness and security of all the promises of God in Christ Jesus, add witnesseth to the safety of every believer's gracious estate in Christ Jesus, in testifying that all the promises of God in him are Yea, and in him Amen
Saviour - Amen
Candlestick - —Maclaren, God of the Amen, p
Amon - An Egyptian divinity, who, primarily worshipped as the god of fertility, and later as Amen-ra-setn-nteru (‘Amon, the sun-god, the king of the gods’), was the local deity of Thebes. His supremacy, recognized for 1100 years by all Egyptian rulers with the exception of Amenophis IV
Selah - ...
One class more have concluded that the word Selah means an end, not unlike the Amen. (Luke 24:44) He is the great end, no doubt, as well as the beginning, in his mediatorial character, of all the creation of God, the Amen, and the faithful witness of heaven
Ebal - " The six princes who were upon the top of the mountain, and the six tribes who were below at its foot, answered, "Amen. " Afterward, the priests, turning toward Mount Ebal, upon which were the princes of the other six tribes, cried, with a loud voice, "Cursed be the man that maketh any graven image;" and were answered by the princes opposite to them and their tribes, "Amen
Prince - Amen
Bitter Water - ” The woman affirmed the oath with a double, “amen
Gerizim - On the slopes of this mountain the tribes descended from the handmaids of Leah and Rachel, together with the tribe of Reuben, were gathered together, and gave the responses to the blessing pronounced as the reward of obedience, when Joshua in the valley below read the whole law in the hearing of all the people; as those gathered on Ebal responded with a loud Amen to the rehearsal of the curses pronounced on the disobedient
Hades - Occurs eleven times in the Greek Testament, Matthew 11:23; Matthew 16:18; Acts 2:31; Revelation 1:18, etc. The New Testament Hades does not differ essentially from the Hebrew Sheol, but Christ has broken the power of death, dispelled the darkness of Hades, and revealed to believers the idea of heaven as the state and abode of bliss in immediate prospect after a holy life. Christ declares, "I am alive for evermore, Amen; and have the keys of death and of Hades
Hell - Amen
Egypt - Amenhotep III (1391-1353 B. The great successes of the Empire led to internal power struggles, especially between the powerful priesthood of Amen-Re and the throne. ...
Amenhotep III's son, Amenhotep IV (1353-1335 B. As Thebes was dominated by the powerful priesthood of Amen-Re, Akhenaton moved the capital over two hundred miles north to Akhetaton, modern tell el-Amarna. His second successor made clear his loyalties to Amen-Re by changing his name from Tutankhaton to Tutankhamen and abandoning the new capital in favor of Thebes. While the high priesthood of Amen-Re controlled Thebes, the Twenty-first Dynasty ruled from the east Delta city of Tanis, biblical Zoan (Numbers 13:22 ; 2 Kings 23:29-3530 ; Ezekiel 30:14 ; Isaiah 19:11 ; Isaiah 30:4 ). During the New Testament period, Egypt, under direct rule of the Roman emperors, was the breadbasket of Rome. Thus the god Amen, later called Amen-Re, became the chief god of the Empire because of the position of Thebes. More striking parallels are found in wisdom literature, as between Proverbs 22:1 and the Egyptian Instruction of Amen-em-ope
Sign of the Cross - The most important of the sacramentals. Amen. The sign of the cross is made at the beginning and end of public and private prayers, in the administration of all the sacraments, and in all the Church's blessings, over the people, the person, or the objects
Ascension Day - During the Ascription the people standand at the end respond, Amen
Lambe, Alphonsus - We ask this through Jesus Christ, Our Lord, Amen
Faithful - ” This is the same root that gives us the word “amen. In the New Testament the adjective “faithful” is a derivative of the Greek noun meaning “faith. Once again the fundamental meaning is that the one so described is trustworthy and loyal. This sort of fidelity, or faithfulness, is used in both the Old Testament and the New Testament to describe God's relation to the world and to describe the quality of relationship that Israel and Christians are called upon to have with God and with one another
Remembrancer - Blessed and almighty Spirit, I would say, fill my heart, my house, the church, and every member of Jesus with thyself, and glorify the Lord Christ in all sweet remembrances! Amen
Alfie Lambe - We ask this through Jesus Christ, Our Lord, Amen
No - Named from Amen, Thebes' chief god (from whence the Greeks call it "the city of Zeus" or "Diospolis". ) Appearing in many kings' names, as Amenophis. " A human figure with ram's head, seated on a chair (See Amen. Ezekiel's prophecy that it should be "rent asunder" is fulfilled to the letter, Amen's vast temple lying shattered as if by an earthquake (Ezekiel 30:16). The sacred name was Ηa-Αmen , "the abode of Amen"; the common name was Ap or Ape, "capital. is the so named Memnonium of Amenophis III, called Miamun or "Memnon," really the Ramesseium of Rameses the Great, with his statue of a single block of syenite marble, 75 ft
No - The Theban Ammon was often entitled ‘Amen-Rç, king of the gods,’ being identified with the sun-god Rç
Water of Jealousy - As she stood holding the offering, so the priest held an earthen vessel of holy water mixed with the dust of the floor of the sanctuary, and declared her freedom from hurt if innocent, but cursed her if guilty; he then wrote the curses in a book and washed them INTO (so translated Numbers 5:23) the bitter water, which the woman had then to drink, answering "amen" to the curse
Heaven - The firmament or wide expanse in which are seen the sun, moon, and stars. Amen
Mount Nebo - Old Testament saints were far less blessed in this particular than New Testament believers. " Amen
Unity, Church - Again, in the New Testament the Church is calledthe Body of Christ, the kingdom of heaven, the Bride, and its peopleare declared to be branches of the one Vine Jesus Christ Himself. "The great thought running through all the New Testament descriptionsof the Church is that of the Church's unity in itself through itsunion with Christ the Head. Amen
Eating - " Those present answer, "Amen. All present answer, "Amen;" and then recite Psalms 34:9-10
Hosanna - ...
The expression, which has preserved its Hebrew form (like ‘Amen’ and ‘Hallelujah’), was originally (in Hebrew) a cry addressed to God ‘ Save now ’! used as an invocation of blessing
Tree - It has been thought so by some writers, and there is reason for the opinion; and when we consider how God the Holy Ghost, from the description of the garden of Eden, in the very opening of the Bible, to the closing the canon of Scripture, in the description of the Paradise of God, makes use of the several names of "the tree of life, and the tree of knowledge of good and evil," which were evidently symbolical and sacramental, I cannot but pause over the several elegantly and highly finished representations which the whole Book of God abounds with, more or less, from beginning to end, and accept them as such. Amen
Consecration - Then the bishop, sitting under a cloth of state in the aisle of the chancel, near the communion table, took a written book in his hand, and pronounced curses upon those who should hereafter profane that holy place by musters of soldiers, or keeping profane law courts, or carrying burdens through it; and at the end of every curse he bowed to the east, and said, Let all the people say, Amen. When the curses were ended, which were about twenty, he pronounced a like number of blessings upon ALL that had any hand in framing and building that sacred and beautiful church; and on those that had given, or should hereafter give, any chalices, plate, ornaments, or other utensils; and, at the end of every blessing, he bowed to the east, and said, Let all the people say, Amen. After this came the sermon, then the sacrament, which the bishop consecrated and administered in the following manner:...
As he approached the altar, he made five or six low bows; and coming up to the side of it, where the bread and wine were covered, he bowed seven times
Adultery - The priest then told her that if she was really innocent, she had nothing to fear; but if guilty, she might expect to suffer all that the law had denounced against her, to which she answered, "Amen, Amen. "...
After this, the priest filled a pitcher out of the brazen vessel, near the altar of burnt offerings, cast some dust of the pavement into it, mingled something with it as bitter as wormwood, and then read the curses, and received her answer of Amen. —After this stop he pronounced the curses, and the woman was obliged to declare her acquiescence in them by a repeated Amen. "...
This procedure had also the effect of keeping in mind, among the Jews, God's high displeasure against this violation of his law; and though some lax moralists have been found, in modern times, to palliate it, yet the Christian will always remember the solemn denunciations of the New Testament against a crime so aggravated, whether considered in its effects upon the domestic relations, upon the moral character of the guilty parties, or upon society at large,—"Whoremongers and adulterers God will judge
Hallelujah - ‘Amen’), ‘Hallelujah’ passed from the OT to the NT (cf
Ship - Amen
Mount - MOUNT, MOUNT OF THE LORD...
We find the church of Christ continually distinguished by this name in the Old Testament Scripture, and as such we cannot pass it over without some attention to the subject; otherwise the name itself is too familiar to every reader to require explanation. ...
Oh, that the Lord may graciously enable every one of this description to say with the church, Until the day of grace break, and the shadows flee away, I will get me to the mountain, the church, there the myrrh of Christ's fragrancy in sufferings will refresh me, until the day of glory and the everlasting light, unmixed with the shades of night, shall break in upon my soul, and I shall then dwell in the everlasting mountain of the house of God for ever! Amen
Directory - A kind of regulation for the performance of religious worship, drawn up by the assembly of divines in England, at the instance of the parliament, in 1644. It consisted of some general heads, which were to be managed and filled up at discretion; for it prescribed no form of prayer, or circumstances of external worship, nor obliged the people to any responses, excepting Amen. The substance of it is as follows:...
It forbids all salutations and civil ceremony in the churches;...
the reading the scriptures in the congregation is declared to be part of the pastoral office;...
all the canonical books of the old and New Testament (but not of the Apocrypha) are to be publicly read in the vulgar tongue: how large a portion is to be read at once, is left to the minister, who has likewise the liberty of expounding, when he judges it necessary
Scriptures - In the strict sense of the word, Scriptures no doubt mean writings, generally speaking, for all writings are Scriptures; but long use hath long fixed to the term the Holy Scriptures, and them only, including the two books of the Old and New Testament. But the blessed Book of God, comprized as it is in the two sacred canons of the Old and New Testament, form the Holy Scriptures, concerning which, as the Lord Jesus saith of the breasts of his spouse, they are like two young roes that are twins. Doth the Old Testament shadow forth by type and figure the person work, character, and relation of the Lord Jesus Christ? And what is the New Testament record but the sum and substance of the same? Doth the Old Testament relate the prophecies, hold forth the promises, and insist upon the doctrines, which were to be revealed openly, and completed in the person of Jesus? And is not Jesus, in the testimony given of him in the New Testament, the spirit of prophecy, the yea and Amen of all the promises, and the pardon and remission of sins, the glorious doctrine in his blood and righteousness fully proclaimed and confirmed to his church and people? In short, the former prefigured, and the latter realized, the immense event of salvation, and all in Christ. Nothing do we find predicted of Jesus in the Old Testament but what the New brought forth the accomplishment of; and nothing that we hear of or meet with concerning the person and glory of Christ in the New Testament, but what the Old had foretold. And it is the most blessed of all employments to be everlastingly studying those precious oracles of divine truth, which the Lord Jesus so strongly enjoined in relation to the Old Testament, and which all his believing people find more refreshing than their necessary food, both in the Old and New
Believe - ...
'Âmên (אָמֵן, Strong's #543), “truly; genuinely; Amen; so be it. The Septuagint renders it as “truly” (lethinos) once; transliterates it as “amen” three times; and translates it as “so be it” (genoito) the rest of the time. It functions as an assertion of a person’s agreement with the intent of a speech just delivered: “And Benaiah the son of Jehoiada answered the king, and said, Amen: the Lord God of my lord the king say so too
Alpha And Omega (2) - Thus in Revelation 1:17; Revelation 2:8 the Isaian title ‘the first and the last’ is applied to Christ, and in Revelation 3:14 He is called ‘the Amen … the beginning of the creation of God. And, because this is so, it is further declared, ‘the Amen is also through him. ’ The conception that Christ is the Amen or fulfilment of all the promises of God, as ‘heir of all things’ and we ‘joint heirs with him’ (Romans 4:13; Romans 8:17, 1 Corinthians 3:22, Hebrews 1:2, Revelation 21:7), is comparatively familiar to us. ’ In Pauline language, Christ ‘the Beloved,’ the ‘Son of his love,’ is the Yea and the Amen of the promises of God. It is only in the eschatological sense that Christ becomes the original object and the ultimate fulfilment of the Divine purpose and promises, ‘the Yea, the Amen,’ ‘the Alpha and the Omega, the first and the last, the beginning and the end
Thanksgiving - Amen
Hananiah - Jeremiah said Amen, praying it might be so; but warned him that for the broken wooden yokes he should have iron yokes, adding "Hananiah, the Lord hath not sent thee, but thou makest this people trust in a lie . Hananiah's namesake in New Testament is a similar warning in stance of God' s vengeance on the man "whosoever loveth and maketh a lie" (Acts 5); a foretaste of the final retribution (Revelation 22:15)
Thanksgiving - Amen
Gods, Pagan - ...
Old Testament Many pagan gods had their origin as gods of certain places such as cities or regions. In Old Testament times, such gods or a combination of gods became nationalistic symbols as their cities or regions struggled for political dominance. Thus the god Amen, later called Amen-Re, became the chief god of the empire because of the position of Thebes. Under Amenhotep III, the successes of the empire led to internal power struggles between the powerful priesthood of Amen-Re and the throne. Amenhotep IV changed his name to Akhenaton and embarked on a revolutionary reform which promoted worship of the sun disc Aton above all other gods. His second successor made clear his loyalties to Amen-Re by changing his name from Tutankhaton to Tutankhamen and abandoning the new capital in favor of Thebes. The following dynasty, while promoting Amen-Re seems to have favored gods of the north. Ezekiel lamented this pagan practice by certain women of Jerusalem (Ezekiel 8:14 ). ...
Some confusion surrounds the various usages of Baal in the Old Testament. ” Other divine names in the Old Testament combine Baal and a noun, such as Baal-berith (“Lord of the covenant,” Judges 9:4 ) and Baal-zebub (“Lord of flies,” 2 Kings 1:2 ). Astarte (a Greek form of the name) appears in the Old Testament in the singular as “Ashtoreth, the goddess of the Zidonians” (1Kings 11:5,1 Kings 11:33 ; 2 Kings 23:13 ) as well as in the plural form, Ashtaroth (Judges 10:6 , Acts 19:23-416 ; 1 Samuel 12:10 ), representing local manifestations of the godess. ...
Various other deities of Palestine impacted the Old Testament story. ...
New Testament The pagan gods of the New Testament world were the deities of the Greco-Roman pantheon and certain eastern gods whose myths gave rise to the mystery religions. ...
By New Testament times, thinking persons no longer accepted the system of Greek mythology literally. ...
A few of the Greco-Roman gods are mentioned in the New Testament. ...
Other Greco-Roman gods are not mentioned in the New Testament but formed an important part of Hellenistic culture. Although not mentioned in the New Testament, a temple to Aphrodite at Corinth was said to employ a thousand cultic prostitutes and contributed to the city's reputation for immorality. His name became the Greek word used in the New Testament for the abode of the dead (Matthew 11:23 ; Matthew 16:18 ; Luke 10:15 ; Luke 16:23 ; Acts 2:27 ,Acts 2:27,2:31 ; Revelation 1:18 ; Revelation 20:13-14 ). ...
Certain Greek gods became the centers of cults which were quite influential in New Testament times
Litany of Loreto - It is most frequently used in shorter forms of public devotion, such as Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, a visit to the church during the day, or on occasion of special devotions to the Mother of God. Amen
Loreto, Litany of - It is most frequently used in shorter forms of public devotion, such as Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, a visit to the church during the day, or on occasion of special devotions to the Mother of God. Amen
Thebes - The sacred name of Thebes was P-amen "the abode of Amon," which the Greeks reproduced in their Diospolis , especially with the addition the Great
Samaritans - But in the New Testament this name is the appellation of a race of people who sprung originally from an intermixture of the ten tribes with gentile nations. In consequence of this refusal, and the subsequent state of enmity, the Samaritans not only took occasion to calumniate the Jews before the Persian kings, Ezra 4:4 Nehemiah 4:1-23 , but also, recurring to the directions of Moses, Deuteronomy 27:11-13 , that on entering the promised land half of the people should stand on Mount Gerizim to respond Amen to the covenant pronounced by the Levites, they erected a temple on that mountain, and instituted sacrifices according to the prescriptions of the Mosaic law, although the original altar, according to the Hebrew Scriptures, stood on Mount Ebal, Deuteronomy 27:4 Joshua 8:30-35
the Unmerciful Servant - Give Him suddenly any Old Testament text to open up and He was ready on the spot to do it. Amen! stuck in my throat, says Macbeth. And Amen stuck many a night in Halyburton's throat over the fifth petition. He had trespassed against Halyburton that day in a way that Halyburton has not the courage to set down in black and white in his diary that night, and therefore he could neither say Amen, nor get to sleep
Ethiopia - ...
An Azerch-Amen reigned in Ethiopia, we know from the monuments; perhaps = Zerah (Rawlinson)
Faithfulness - In the Hebrew Old Testament, the noun occurs 49 times, mainly in the Book of Psalms (22 times). The assurance of the abundance of life is in the expression quoted in the New Testament ( Onesimus - A name well known in the New Testament, whose history is exceedingly interesting. How truly blessed doth the epistle open, after subscribing himself as the prisoner of the Lord, in praying that grace and peace to Philemon might flow from God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ! And how blessedly doth the apostle close his letter, in a similar prayer, that the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ might be with his spirit! Amen
Promise - Reference is often made (a) to the great fundamental promises given to Abraham, relating to the birth of Isaac, the blessing of his descendants, and the inheritance of the land of Canaan (e. He emphasizes the fact that the promises in all their variety and fullness were fulfilled in Christ, ‘for how many scever be the promises of God, in him is the yea: wherefore also through him is the Amen’ (2 Corinthians 1:20)
Garden - The occurrence of no less than 250 botanical terms in Old Testament shows the Israelite predilection for flowers, fruits, and pleasure grounds. Manasseh and Amen were buried in Uzza's garden (2 Kings 21:18; 2 Kings 21:26)
Gregorius, Saint., the Illuminator - The venerable patriarch greatly rejoiced on reading them, and exclaimed, "Now let us praise Him Who was before the worlds, worshipping the most Holy Trinity and the Godhead of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, now and ever, world without end, Amen," which words are said after the Nicene Creed in the Armenian church (Malan
Perpetua, Vibia - The shepherd gave Perpetua a piece of cheese, which she received "junctis manibus" and consumed, the attendants saying "Amen
Worship - One of the brethren began to pray; then another and another; one began the Lord’s Prayer, and all joined; each prayer was followed by a hearty and fervent “Amen. …...
‘After the hymns came reading from the Old Testament Scriptures,† and readings or recitations concerning the life and death, the sayings and deeds of Jesus. Amen. Amen. And when he has concluded the prayer and thanksgivings, all the people present express their assent by saying, “Amen. In the evolution of the primitive liturgy we can discern a close adherence to the apostolic combination of prayer and praise with instruction and intercession leading up to the gift of sacramental grace. At the same time we note the constant loyalty to the principle on which Hooker lays such stress-that sacraments are ‘not physical but moral instruments of salvation, duties of service and worship, which unless we perform as the Author of grace requireth, they are unprofitable. ...
This thought leads straight up into the high region of speculation entered by Freeman when he traces back the ultimate principle of the Eucharist and of the Divine Office to the fundamental doctrines of the Incarnation and the Perpetual Priesthood of Christ
Names of Our Lord - These are given below as found in the Old Testament, used by Himself, by the Apostles and Evangelists, and by others, particularly in the liturgy. ...
IN THE OLD TESTAMENT ...
Almighty Word, Wisdom of Solomon 18:15
Brightness of Eternal Light, Wisdom of Solomon 7:26
Child, Isaiah 9:6
Counsellor, Isaiah 9:6
Desire of Eternal Hills, Genesis 49:26
Desired of all nations, Aggeus 2:8
Emmanuel, Isaiah 7:14
Expectation of nations, Genesis
Father of World to Come, Isaiah
God the Mighty, Isaiah 9:6
Holy One of Israel, Isaiah 43:3
Holy One, Psalms 15:10
Just Branch, Jeremiah 23:5
Just, Isaiah 45:8
King of Glory, Psalms 23:7
Lord of Hosts, Isaiah 9:7
Lord Our Just One, Jeremiah 23:6
Man of Sorrows, Isaiah 53:3
Man, Michah 5:5
My Just One, Isaiah 41:10
Orient, Song of Solomon 18:15
Prince of Peace, Isaiah 9:6
Root of Jesse, Isaiah 11:10
Ruler of the Earth, Isaiah 16:1
Sun of Justice, Malachi 4:2
Wonderful, Isaiah 9:6
USED BY HIMSELF ...
Bread of Life, John 6:35
Door, John 10:9
Good Shepherd, John 10:11
Life, John 11:25
Light of the World, John 9:5
Lord, John 13:13
Master, John 13:13
Resurrection and Life, John 11:25
Son of Man, Matthew 8:2O
Son, John 5:22
Vine, John 15:1
Way, Truth, and Life, John 14:6
USED BY THE APOSTLES and EVANGELISTS ...
Advocate, 1 John 2:1
Almighty, Apocalypse 1:8
Alpha and Omega, Apocalypse 1:8
Amen, Apocalypse 3:14
Author and Finisher of Faith, Hebrews 12:2
Author of Life, Acts 3:15
Beginning and End, Apocalypse 1:8
Blessed God, Mark 14:61
Child Jesus, Luke 2:43
Christ Jesus, 1 Timothy 1:1
Christ, Matthrew 1:18
Corner-Stone, Epheisans 2:21
Day Star, 2 Peter 1:19
Faith, Hebrews 12:2
Faithful Witness, Apocalypse 1:5
First and Last, Apocalypse 1:17
First Born from the Dead, Apocalypse 1:5
Galitean, Matthew 26:69
God of the Jews, Romans 3:29
Great Pastor, Hebrews 13:20
He that is to come, Hebrews 10:37
Head, Ephesians 4:15
High Priest, Hebrews 2:17
Jesus Christ the Just, 1 John 2:1
Jesus, Matthew 27:17
Key of David, Apocalypse 3:7
King of Kings, Apocalypse 19:16
Lamb of God, John 1:29
Life Eternal, 1 John 1:2
Lion of the Tribe of Juda, Apocalypse 5:5
Living Stone, 1 Peter 2:4
Lord Jesus Christ, Acts 10:48
Lord of All, Galatians 4:1
Lord of Lords, Apocalypse 19:16
Lord Our God, Apocalypse 4:11
Mediator, Hebrews 9:15
Messias, John 1:41 (passim)
Only Begotten of the Father, John 1:14
Our Lord Jesus Ghrist, Romans 1:4
Pascha Nostrum, 1 Corinthians 5:7
Power of God, 1 Corinthians 1:24
Priest, Hebrews 8:4
Prince of the kings of the earth, Apocalypse 1:5
Rabbi, John 1:18
Rock of Scandal, Romans 9:33
Root of David, Apocalypse 5:6
Saviour of the world, John 4:42
Saviour, Luke 2:11
Son of David, Mark 12:86
Son of God, Matthew 8:29
Son of Joseph, Luke 3:23
Son of the Living God, Matthew 16:16
Star of the morning, Apocalypse 2:23
Stone of stumbling, 1 Peter 2:8
Stone, Matthew 21:42
Teacher, John 3:2
That which was from the beginning, 1 John 1:1
Victim, Ephesians 5:2
Wisdom of God, 1 Corinthians 1:24
Word, John 1:1
Word of God, Song of Solomon 7:26
Word of Life, 1 John 1:1
USED BY OTHERS ...
Adonai, O Antiphons
Angel in the liturgy of the Mass
Captain of our salvation, Ephiphany, Matins
Captain of the Martyrs, Octain of Saint Stephen, Matins
Carpenter's Son, Matthew 13:55
Christ our King, First Wednesday in Advent, Matins
Christ the Lord, Saturday within Octave of Christmas, Matins
Eagle, Saint Maximus, Homily 42
Eternal, Christmas Day, Lauds
Eternal Word of God made Flesh, Ember Saturday in Advent, Martins
Glory of Thy people Israel, Luke 2:32
God of God, title in Gloria
God our Saviour, Christmas Day, Vespers (I)
God the Son, Saturday within Octave of Christmas, Matins
Great Prophet, First Sunday in Advent, Lauds
Heavenly Bridegroom, Epiphany, Lauds
Holy, Luke 1:35
Holy One of God, Luke 4
King of all the earth, Second Monday in Advent, Vespers
King of Angel Hosts above, Circumcision, Matins
King of Heaven, Christmas Day, Matins
King of Israel, Mark 15:32
King of Righteousness, Third Thursday in Advent, Matins
King of the Gentiles, O Antiphons
King of the Jews, Matthew 2:2
King Peaceful, Christmas Day, Vespers (I)
Light to the revelation of the Gentiles, Luke 2:32
Light of Light, title in Gloria
Lord of Angels, Eve of Epiphany, Matins
Lord Our King, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord our Lawgiver, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord our Saviour, Circumcision, Matins
Lord that shall rule, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord the King, Ephiphany, Matins
Lord the Ruler, Second Sunday in Advent, Matins
Levi - See another instance, (Exodus 32:25-28) The other instance at Meribah, sets forth the frailty both of Moses and Aaron: (see Numbers 20:1-13) But by taking into one view both instances at Meribah, we are certainly constrained to look farther than to the Aarons, or to all the sons of Levi, under the Old Testament dispensation, for the accomplishment of Moses's dying prediction that the Urim and Thummim of JEHOVAH might be with the Lord's Holy One; and to none can we make the smallest application, but to the Almighty Aaron of "a better covenant, established upon better promises. Here, reader, is brought the pure incense, and that whole burnt sacrifice, Christ Jesus upon JEHOVAH'S altar; even Christ himself, who is both the New Testament altar of JEHOVAH, the high priest, and the sacrifice. O Lord! may we well say, in making our responses to the prayer of Moses, Bless, Lord, our Lord Jesus, the sum and substance of all salvation: accept the work of his hands the infinite merit of his whole redemption work! Let sin, Satan, death, and hell, be smitten all of them through the centre, the very loins of their rebellion, and let all that hate our Jesus flee before him! Amen
Glory - " Amen
Psalms, Book of - Amen and Amen
Body - Old Testament . Throughout the Old Testament, the body is presented as a marvelous gift from God, which evidences his indescribable wisdom and power (Psalm 139:14-16 ). Throughout the intertestamental period, the belief in the future resurrection and glorification of the body became even more developed (2Baruch 50:3-4; 22:13; 1Enoch 20:8; 2 Maccabees 7:9,36 ). ...
New Testament The essential corporeality of human existence is supremely set forth in the New Testament. The physical resurrection of his body not only served as the Father's "amen" to the life and ministry of Jesus, but also as a kind of "firstfruits" of the resurrection of all believers (1 Corinthians 15:20-23 )
Ebal - The priests pronounced after Joshua (Joshua 8:33-34) the blessings and curses, the people responded Amen
Abba - 5, where ‘Maran atha’ and ‘Amen’ close a public prayer); and (4
Promise - But ‘how many so ever he the promises of God, in him is the Yea: wherefore also through him is the Amen, unto the glory of God through us
Zebulun - 1400, as Hinnatuni , which at that time was held by Amen-hotep
Preaching - The people bowing their heads and worshipping the Lord with their faces to the ground; and at the close of the prayer, with uplifted hands, they solemnly pronounced, "Amen! Amen!" Then all standing, Ezra, assisted at times by the Levites, read the law distinctly, gave the sense, and caused them to understand the reading. The first word the preacher uttered to the people when he ascended the pulpit was, "Peace be with you;" or, "The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Ghost, be with you all;" to whom the assembly first added, "Amen," and in after times they answered, "And with thy spirit. We know the fate of Savonarola, and others might be added; but all lamented the momentary duration of the effects produced by their labours
David - Amen and Amen
Nicodemus - working Teacher is not enough for seeing the kingdom of God, Jesus with a twice repeated Amen solemnly declares; there must be new birth from above (margin John 3:3; John 3:5; John 3:7), "of water (the outward sign) and of the Spirit" (the essential thing, not inseparably joined to the water baptism: Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38 (See BAPTISM)), so that, as an infant just born, the person is a "new creature"; compare Naaman the type, 2 Kings 5:14; 2 Corinthians 5:17; Ezekiel 36:25-26
Peniel - And when the reader hath duly attended to the several striking particularities here recorded, and compared them with other Scriptures, I venture to believe that his conclusions will correspond with mine, that this, and indeed all the representations of the Old Testament concerning the Lord's appearance and manifestation to his people, are directly spoken of in reference to the person of the Lord Jesus Christ. (See Genesis 48:15-16) And if we add to these striking particulars what is said of the Lord, and by the Lord, under the character of human feelings, in other parts of the Old Testament, I cannot but conclude that the whole is abundantly confirmed, that it is the Lord Jesus, and him only, in his mediatorial character, who is all along to be understood as the visible JEHOVAH. (John 17:2-3) Surely nothing can be more blessed than to discover Jesus thus refreshing Old Testament saints with such precious manifestations of himself, as if to shew what love he had to his church and people, and how much he longed for the time appointed when he would openly manifest himself as our glorious Head, and Surety, and Saviour. Amen
Oath - The Jewish use of ‘Amen’ in acceptance of an adjuration is often appealed to as if it occurred here (see Tholuck, op. Much more prominence has been assigned to His habitual expression ‘Verily’ (= ‘Amen’), which He used in an unprecedented way (G. Dalman speaks as if Jesus, feeling the need of asseveration, and embarrassed by the recollection that He had said ‘Swear not at all,’ fixed upon ‘Amen’ as an evasive but virtual oath (cf. Bruce (Expositor’s Greek Testament , 1897), A. Bruce (Expositor’s Greek Testament , 1897), H. Dods (Expositor’s Greek Testament , 1910); on James, by W. Cesterley (Expositor’s Greek Testament , 1910), R
the Angel of the Church in Smyrna - And I glorify Thee through our eternal High-Priest, Jesus Christ, through whom, and in the Holy Ghost, be glory to Thee, both now and ever, Amen. So may our Lord gather my soul among His elect, Amen
John, the Gospel According to - John, the last surviving apostle, would surely be consulted on the canonicity of New Testament Scriptures which by God's providence he lived to see completed. Mill New Testament) says John did attest it. He uses in a sense congruous to Old Testament, and sanctioned by the Spirit, the terms used by gnostics in a false sense. That the writer was a Jew appears from his quoting the Hebrew Old Testament (not Septuagint): John 12:40; John 19:37. The sameness of John the Baptist's style and John's (John 1:16; John 3:31-36) is just what was to be expected, the evangelist insensibly catching his former master's phraseology. Peculiar to John are "verily, verily" (Amen, Amen) beginning a sentence (others use it at the end of a sentence, Jesus alone at the beginning), John 1:51; "little children" (John 13:33), as in 1 John; "in the name" (John 5:43), i
Synagogue - --The word synagogue ( sunagoge ), which means a "congregation," is used in the New Testament to signify a recognized place of worship. --It will be enough, in this place, to notice in what way the ritual, no less than the organization, was connected with the facts of the New Testament history, and with the life and order of the Christian Church. The third, sixth and ninth hours were in the times of the New Testament, (Acts 3:1 ; 10:3,9 ) and had been probably for some time before, (Psalm 55:17 ; Daniel 6:10 ) the fixed times of devotion. From the synagogue, lastly, come many less conspicuous practices, which meet us in the liturgical life of the first three centuries: Ablution, entire or partial, before entering the place of meeting, (John 13:1-15 ; Hebrews 10:22 ) standing, and not kneeling, as the attitude of prayer, (Luke 18:11 ) the arms stretched out; the face turned toward the Kibleh of the east; the responsive Amen of the congregation to the prayers and benedictions of the elders. --The language of the New Testament shows that the officers of the synagogue exercised in certain cases a judicial power
Lord's Day - John, which mentions that the custom of the Christians was to meet together early in the morning on a certain ‘fixed day’ and sing hymns to Christ as a god, and bind themselves by a sacramentum to commit no crime. 120), where we read that on the day called Sunday the Christians met together, out of both city and country, and held a religious service at which first the writings of Apostles and Prophets were read; then the president preached; after which common prayers were said; and when these were ended, bread and wine were brought to the president, who uttered prayers and thanksgivings, to which the people said, ‘Amen’; all present then participated in the Eucharist, the deacons carrying it to the absent
Spitting - Amen
Firstborn - " It is astonishing to what minute circumstances every thing in the church of the Old Testament had a reference, by way of typifying the Lord Jesus Christ in this pre-eminency of character, as the first, and first-born, and first-fruits, and the firstlings of the flock, and of the herd. " Amen,...
I will detain the reader no longer than just to remark, that the offering of the first fruits had an eye to the Lord Jesus, similar to what hath been shewn respecting the first-born
Didymus, Head of the Catechetical School - Occasionally he kindles and glows with strong devotional fervour, and concludes an eloquent passage on the glory of the Holy Trinity with a thrice-repeated Amen
Preaching - Then he offered up prayer and praise to God, the people bowing their heads, and worshipping the Lord with their faces to the ground; and, at the close of the prayer, with uplifted hands, they solemnly pronounced, Amen, Amen. The first word the preacher uttered to the people, when he ascended the pulpit, was "Peach be with you, " or "The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Ghost, be with you all;" to which the assembly at first added, "Amen:" and, in after times, they answered, "And with thy spirit. We know the fate of Savonarrola, and more might be added: but all lamented the momentary duration of the effects produced by their labours. Old Latimer, in a coarse frieze gown, trudged afoot, his Testament hanging at one end of his leathern girdle, and his spectacles at the other, and without ceremony instructed the people in rustic style from a hollow tree; while the courtly Ridley in satin and fur taught the same principles in the cathedral of the metropolis. Crammer, though a timorous man, ventured to give king Henry the Eighth a New Testament, with the label, Whoremongers and adulterers God will judge; while Knox, who said, there was nothing in the pleasant face of a lady to affray him, assured the queen of Scots, that, "If there were any spark of the Spirit of God, yea, of honesty and wisdom in her, she would not be offended with his affirming in his sermons, that the diversions of her court were diabolical crimes evidences of impiety or insanity
the Sower Who Went Forth to Sow - In that house, after the psalm and the scripture and the prayer, the head of the house remains on his knees for, say, five or six seconds after he utters the Amen. They have family worship also, but before he has said Amen the head of the house is up off his knees and has begun to give his orders about this and that to his servants
Tongues Gift of - ...
It is obvious that the Corinthians were specially susceptible to such abnormal powers; with a considerable section of the church γλωσσολαλία was more popular than teaching and prophecy, in spite of the fact that as a purely subjective phenomenon it was of no value to the outsider (ἰδιώτης), who could not even say ‘Amen’ to the formula of thanksgiving (1 Corinthians 14:16). Moffatt, The New Testament: A New Translation3, London, 1914]'>[1]). ) finds traces of glossolalia in the Testament of Job and in the magical papyri, e. Moffatt, The New Testament: A New Translation3, London, 1914]'>[1] xiii
Zacharias - This son must be brought up as a Nazirite in the highest form of Levitical devotion (Numbers 6:4, Judges 13:4, Lamentations 4:7, Amos 2:12); he should, like another Elijah (1 Kings 18:37), turn many of the children of Israel unto the Lord, and be the forerunner, as foretold by Malachi, to Messiah Himself (Luke 1:15-17). The worshippers in the Temple courts marvelled why he tarried so long; the thought likely to occur to them was that God had slain the priest as unworthy (Bruce); and when at last he did make his appearance, he could neither explain the reason for his delay, nor give them the Aaronic benediction (Numbers 6:22-24), which was pronounced after every morning and evening sacrifice by the priest with uplifted hands, the people responding to it with a loud Amen (Keil, Bibl
Lord's Day, the - The adjective is found only one other time in the New Testament, in 1 Corinthians 11:20 , where Paul speaks of "the Lord's Supper. New Testament evidence suggests that by the 50s, if not earlier, Christians were attaching special significance to Sunday. After prayers and thanksgivings by the president and a congregational "Amen, " the deacons distribute the bread and wine to those who are present (and then carry some to those who are absent)
Jew - The most common title for Jews in the Old Testament is "Israel" or "Israelites," but in the New Testament "Jews" is most frequently used. Amen
Philip: Deacon And Evangelist - And Bengel writes with his needle-pointed pen and says that "from the Old Testament point of view, progress is made from the knowledge of Christ to the knowledge of Jesus; while from the New Testament point of view, the progress is made from the knowledge of Jesus to the knowledge of Christ. The men who trace the hidden meaning of every word and even of every letter in the New Testament are those who understand best the end and nature of our Scriptural calling. I found rest and rejoicing in it, and the sweet language of my soul continually was, Amen, Lord Jesus. Amen, Lord Jesus
Judah - And surely, as it is said of Christ in one blessed Scripture, that the names of his people are all "written in the book of life," (Revelation 20:15) and in another he bids his people to "rejoice that their names are written there," (Luke 10:20) as when considering himself the shepherd of his flock, and his people the sheep of his fold, he saith that "he calleth them all by name, and leadeth them out," (John 10:3) and as the whole flocks of the mountains and of the vale, and of the cities of Benjamin, Jerusalem, and Judah, shall all pass again under the hands of him that telleth them, (Jeremiah 33:13) surely it is not stretching the Scripture to say, that the Shebeth of Jehudah is as eminently descriptive of the greatness of his character, when speaking of this use of it, in writing, as in ruling, for sovereignty is implied in both, And the poor feeble hand that is now writing these lines, (earnestly begging forgiveness if he errs in the matter) cannot conclude this article without first saying, (and will not the reader for himself also join the petition?) Oh, that the almighty Jehudah may have graciously exercised the Shebeth of his power, and written my poor name, worthless as it is, among the millions he hath marked down in the book of life! Amen
Faith - stem (contained in Amen and denoting what is firm, reliable ), may carry a meaning identical with the above ‘the just shall live by his faithfulness ’ (RVm Faith - Christians find their security and hope in God as revealed in Jesus Christ, and say "amen" to that unique relationship to God in the Holy Spirit through love and obedience as expressed in lives of discipleship and service. ...
The Old Testament . The Hebrew language has six terms that develop the fundamental ideas of belief, trust, and loyalty. ...
The recognition and acknowledgment of the relationship into which God enters with people is a declaratory saying of "amen" to God and a special religious attitude of the people of God. Fundamental to this rebellion is the claim: "You did not trust him or obey him" (Deuteronomy 9:23 ). ...
The setting and origin of the term "faith" as used in the Old Testament are intimately linked to the covenant between God and his people. In the fulfillment of this promise lies the challenge of the New Testament to redefine faith. ...
The New Testament . The transition from the Old Testament to the New Testament understanding of faith involves an appreciation of the continuity between them and that which is unique in the New Testament. The concepts of covenant, people of God, revelation, and the activity of God in history continue from the Old Testament to the New Testament. The unique understanding in the New Testament is defined by a new covenant, and the people of God being identified by their response to God's Son, Jesus. In the language of the New Testament, the common Greek of Jesus' day, we are told how God enters history as the Christ in the person of his Son Jesus, and remains active in the world through his Holy Spirit and the church. ...
The Septuagint, as a transitional text between the Hebrew of the Old Testament and the Greek of the New Testament, fixes the theological vocabulary that the church uses to define what God has done, is doing, and will do. The meaning of faith in the New Testament is then both a reflection of its continuity with the Old Testament and an expression of its uniqueness in a different historical and cultural setting. In the representative selections from the Old Testament that we have examined, only one term, mn [1], is consistently translated in the Septuagint by a single concept, pisteuein/pistos [2]. It is this concept that the Synoptic Gospels, Acts, the Epistles, and the Johannine writings use to examine and illustrate the meaning of faith in the New Testament. ...
The church, in responding to the example and words of Jesus radicalized the Old Testament meaning of faith. The fundamental Jewish position—that the law is God's love-gift to his people and that by fulfilling its requirements they could attain the righteousness of Godis countered in the Epistles by the claim that salvation is by faith in the crucified and risen Christ. The writer to the Hebrews uses this same definition, plus the examples of Old Testament persons of faith and Jesus, as a basis for the exhortation to live the life of faith and Jesus, as a basis for the exhortation to live the life of faith in the face of its hindrances (Hebrews 10:35-12:12 ). ...
The later letters in the New Testament to Timothy and Titus, in addition to their continuing use of these dynamic definitions of faith, distinguish true faith from false faith by making the content of faith confessional (2 Timothy 4:3 ; Titus 1:9 ). Hals, Grace and Faith in the Old Testament ; D
Lord's Prayer - Amen
Hymns - ...
In 5:12 the angels offer a fuller doxology to the Lamb, and the response of all creation with a fourfold doxology, and of the living creatures with the familiar ‘Amen’ which ended the eucharistic thanksgiving of the Church on earth, is ‘highly suggestive of the devotional attitude of the Asiatic Church in the time of Domitian towards the Person of Christ’ (Swete, op
Synagogue - ) In the New Testament synagogue (Greek) is used of the Christian assembly only by the most Judaic apostle (James 2:2). So in Lamentations 2:6, "He (the Lord) hath destroyed His places of assembly. ...
The synagogue required no priest to minister; this and the reading of the Old Testament prepared the way for the gospel. Three were archisunagogai , "chiefs of the synagogue"; then also the "angel" or "bishop" who prayed publicly and caused the law to be read and sometimes preached; and three deacons for alms; the interpreter of the old Hebrew Testament, who paraphrased it; also the theological schoolmaster and his interpreter (Lightfoot, Acts 3:1; Acts 10:3; Acts 10:9); so in Old Testament, Psalms 55:17; Daniel 6:10. ), the Amen in responses (1 Corinthians 14:16), the leaping as if they would rise toward heaven in the Alexandrian church (Clemens Alex. , to have succeeded the prophets, and to have been succeeded by the scribes, Ezra presiding; among the members Joshua, the high priest Zerubbabel, Daniel, the three children Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, Nehemiah, Mordecai; their aim being to restore the crown or glory of Israel, the name of God as great, mighty, and terrible (Daniel 9:4; Jeremiah 32:18; Deuteronomy 7:21); so they completed the Old Testament canon, revising the text, introducing the vowel points which the Masorete editors have handed down to us, instituting "the feast" Ρurim , organizing the synagogue ritual. )...
The only Old Testament notice of anything like such a body is Nehemiah 8:13, "chiefs of the fathers of all the people, the priests; and the Levites . In plan and ornamentation they are much alike
Free Will - Amen
Arminianism - But he endeavoured, in the first place, to assert liberty of conscience, and of worship; and then, upon that fundamental principle, to persuade all Christians, however divided in opinion, to lay aside the distinctions of sect and party, and in one united body to consult that tranquillity and peace which is so agreeable to the Christian name. On the one hand, it has been placed above every other synod since the Apostolic age, for its temper, moderation, and sanctity; on the other, it has been charged with injustice and cruelty, and burlesqued in such lines as these:—...
Dordrechti synodus nodus; chorus integer, aeger; Conventus, ventus; sessio, stramen, Amen. The following is a literal version:—...
The synod of Dort, a knot; the whole assembly, sick; The convention, wind; the session, straw, Amen
Apocalyptic - This is particularly the case in the Book of Revelation, in which not only earlier apocalypses but the whole Old Testament is plundered for ideas and symbols. ...
Apocalyptic and Revelation The fundamental conviction of apocalyptic is that the world may be understood, but only by revelation that enables understanding. 13), with this final shout of praise echoed by an "Amen!" back at the center. Charles, The Book of Enoch ; idem, Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs ; S. Frost, Old Testament Apocalyptic ; D. Minear, New Testament Apocalyptic ; F
Mary - We meet with many of the name of Mary in the New Testament:...
·The Virgin Mary. An angel's nature would not have suited the purpose of redemption: it was human nature that had sinned, and broken the divine law; it must be human nature that shall make Amends, by obedience and death. Amen
Timothy, Epistles to - Amen. He reviews his service, and has to lament that all in Asia (that is, Asia Minor including Ephesus) had turned away from him
Hymn - ...
It is possible that the curious phrase, ‘Amen, come’ (Revelation 22:20), may be an acrostic reference to a Jewish hymn which is still sung in the synagogue (’En Kçtóhçnú, ‘There is none like our God,’ Singer, p
the Wedding Guest Who Sat Down in the Lowest Room - I am He that liveth and was dead, and, behold, I am alive for evermore, Amen: and have the keys of hell and of death
Hosanna - Hosanna was, says Alford (on Matthew 21:9), ‘originally a formula of supplication, but [1] conventionally [2] of gratulation, so that it is followed by a dative, and by “in the highest,”—meaning “may it also be ratified in heaven,”—and he cites 1 Kings 1:36, where Benaiah answers David, saying, ‘Amen: the Lord, the God of my lord the king, say so too
Holiness - " (Psalms 89:35) The Son of God is also spoken of with peculiar emphasis, as essentially holly in himself, in his divine nature, "being One with the Father, over all God blessed for ever, Amen
English Versions - , which gives a metrical paraphrase of parts of both Testaments. In a subsequent treatise ( Treatise concerning the Old and New Testament , ed. And therfor and bi him we seien Amen to god, to oure glorie. Amen. The Lollard controversy died down amid the strain of the French wars and the passions of the wars of the Roses; and when, in the 16th century, religious questions once more came to the front, the situation had been fundamentally changed through the invention of printing
Christianity - And who is there that has ever known the excellency of this system; who is there that has ever experienced its happy efficacy; who is there that has ever been convinced of its divine origin, its delightful nature and peaceful tendency, but must join the benevolent and royal poet in saying, "Let the whole earth be filled with its glory? Amen and Amen
Synagogue - In plan and details of ornamentation these Galilæan synagogues display a general similarity. In contrast to the first item of the service, in which all took part, the prayers were said by a single individual chosen for the purpose, named ‘the deputy of the congregation,’ the worshippers’ however, repeating the Amen at the close of each collect
Paul in Arabia - And, does Adam burst out into his bridegroom doxology,-This is now bone of my bone, and flesh of my flesh!-than Paul instantly adds, Amen! But I speak concerning Christ and His Church. But he always turned it over at such sacramental seasons till he came again to that great self-examination Psalm, where he found it written concerning himself: These things hast thou done, and I kept silence
the Importunate Widow - No sooner have we said, Amen! than we must say with our very next breath, O Thou that hearest prayer; to Thee shall all flesh come
Synagogue - Hence we not only hear of synagogues in houses in the Talmud, but of churches in houses in the New Testament, Romans 16:5 ; 1 Corinthians 16:19 ; Colossians 4:15 ; Philippians 2; Acts 3:46; Acts 5:42 . ...
The "synagogue preacher," דרשן , whose business it is, in consequence of his office, to address the people, is an official personage that has been introduced in later times; at least we find no mention of such a one in the New Testament. The meeting, as far as the religious exercises were concerned, was ended with a prayer, to which the people responded Amen, when a collection was taken for the poor
Peter - And as to his primacy that Rome makes so much of, we cannot read our New Testament without coming on proofs on every page that Peter held a foremost place among the twelve disciples. The difference is this: The New Testament recognises a certain precedency in Peter, whereas the Church of Rome claims for him an absolute supremacy. Peter was naturally and constitutionally of the enthusiastic temperament, and his conversion and call to the discipleship did not decompose or at all suppress his true nature; the primal elements of his character remained, and the original balance and the proportion of those elements remained. " Such, then, was Peter's so perilous temperament, which he bad inherited from his father Jonas. At the same time, blame Peter as much as you like; dwell upon the faults of his temperament, and the defects of his character, and the scandals of his conduct, as much as you like; I defy you to deny that, with it all, he was not a very attractive and a very lovable man. ...
...
Of the four outstanding temperaments then, Peter's temperament was of the ardent and enthusiastic order. And, indeed, a deep-springing, strong-flowing, divinely-purified, and divinely-directed enthusiasm is always the best temperament for the foundation and the support of the truly prophetic, apostolic, and evangelic character. It was one of the prophetic notes of the coming Messiah's own temperament that the zeal of God's house would eat Him up. ...
Closely connected with Peter's peculiar temperament, and, indeed, a kind of compensation for being so possessed by it, was his exquisite sense of sin. ...
It was Peter's deep and rich temperament, all but completely sanctified, that made Peter so forgetful of himself as a preacher, and so superior to all men's judgments, and so happy, to use his own noble words, to be reproached for the name of Christ. Amen"...
Christ - Without him they are void of meaning, and never to be fulfilled; but in him they are all yea, and Amen
Roman Catholics - And a succession in the church being now supposed necessary under the New Testament, as Aaron had his succession under the old dispensation, which was a figure of the new, this succession can now, they contend, be shown only in the chair of St. That seven sacraments were instituted by Jesus Christ, namely, baptism, confirmation, eucharist, penance, extreme unction, orders, and matrimony; and that they confer grace. To prove that confirmation, or imposition of hands, is a sacrament, they quote Acts 8:17 : "They," the Apostles, "laid their hands on them," believers, "and they received the Holy Ghost. " Penance is a sacrament in which the sins we commit after baptism, duly repented of, and confessed to a priest, are forgiven; and which they think was instituted by Christ himself when he breathed upon his Apostles after his resurrection, and said, "Receive ye the Holy Ghost; whose sins ye remit, are remitted; and whose sins ye retain, are retained," John 20:23 . The sacrament of holy orders is inferred from 1 Timothy 4:14 : "Neglect not the gift that is in thee, which was given thee by prophecy, with the laying on the hands of the presbytery," or priesthood, as they render it. That marriage is a sacrament, they think evident from Ephesians 5:32 : "This is a great mystery," representing the mystical union of Christ and his church. "Matrimony," say they, "is here the sign of a holy thing, and therefore it is a sacrament. That in the mass, or public service, there is offered unto God a true and propitiatory sacrifice for the quick and dead; and that in the sacrament of the eucharist, under the forms of bread and wine, are really and substantially present the body and blood, together with the soul and divinity, of our Lord Jesus Christ; and that there is a conversion made of the whole substance of the bread into his body, and of the wine into his blood, which is called transubstantiation; according to our Lord's words to his disciples, "This is my body," &c, Matthew 26:26 ; wherefore it becomes with them an object of adoration. They make use of the sign of the cross in all their sacraments, to give us to understand, that they have their whole force and efficacy from the cross. I profess also that there are truly and properly seven sacraments of the new law, instituted by Jesus Christ our Lord, and for the salvation of mankind, (though all are not necessary for every one,) namely, baptism, confirmation, eucharist, penance, extreme unction, order, and matrimony; and that they confer grace; and of these, baptism, confirmation, and order cannot be reiterated without sacrilege. I also receive and admit the ceremonies of the Catholic church, received and approved in the solemn administration of all the above said sacraments. I profess, likewise, that in the mass, is offered to God a true,...
proper, and propitiatory sacrifice for the living and the dead; and that in the most holy sacrament of the eucharist there is truly, really, and substantially the body and blood, together with the soul and divinity, of our Lord Jesus Christ; and that there is made a conversion of the whole substance of the bread into the body, and of the whole substance of the wine into the blood, which conversion the Catholic church calls transubstantiation. I confess, also, that under either kind alone, Christ whole and entire, and a true sacrament, is received. Amen
Romans, Book of - ” Other interpreters hold that “the righteousness of God” is the activity of God, understanding the term primarily from its use in the Greek translation of the Old Testament where it refers to God's acting in His saving power. ...
Paul alone in the New Testament explained the transition from the realm of Adam to the realm of Christ as a dying and rising with Christ (Romans 6:5-11 ). He stressed that the righteousness of God is demonstrated in His faithfulness to all His promises—even those to Israel in the Old Testament. ...
In the conclusion to the letter (Romans 15:14-16:27 ), Paul summarized his ministry and his plans for the future, requesting their prayers (Romans 15:14-33 ); then he commended Phoebe (Romans 16:1-2 ), sent greetings to individual Christians (Romans 16:3-24 ), and ended his letter with praise for God—“to the only wise God through Jesus Christ be glory for endless ages! Amen” (Romans
Peter, Second Epistle of - God’s promises of mercy and threatenings of judgment are Yea and Amen. The most obvious references are in 2 Peter 1:16-18 , which agrees fundamentally, though not precisely, with the Synoptic narratives of the Transfiguration, and in 1:14, which seems to point to the incident in John 21:18-19
Calvinists - Wherefore all men are conceived in sin, and are born the children of wrath, unfit for every good connected with salvation, prone to evil, dead in sins, and the servants of sin; and without the Holy Spirit regenerating them, they neither will nor can return to God, Amend their depraved natures, nor dispose themselves for its Amendment. ...
Now unto him that is able to keep you from falling, and to present you faultless before the presence of his glory with exceeding joy, to the only wise God our Saviour, be glory and majesty, dominion and power, both now and ever, Amen
Lord's Prayer (i) - ...
(4) For thine … Amen. may compare the critical apparatus of the Latin Testament of Wordsworth-White, or of the pre-Lutheran German Bible as edited by Kurrelmeyer. ]'>[8] version by Parliamentary Papers, 1903, No
Living (2) - * Old Testament - " In the post-Talmudic period THE MASORAH (Buxtorf, Tiberias) notes:...
(1) as to the verses, how many are in each book, the middle verse in each; how many begin with certain letters, or end with the same word, or had a certain number of words and letters, or certain words a number of times;...
(2) as to the words, the Qeri 's (marginal readings) and kethib 's (readings of the text); also words found so many times in the beginning, middle, or end of a verse, or with a particular meaning; also in particular words where transcribers' mistakes were likely, whether they were to be written with or without the vowel letters; also the accentuation;...
(3) as to the letters, how often each occurred in the Old Testament, etc. Synagogue rolls contain separately the Pentateuch, the haphtaroth (literally, "dismissals," being read just before the congregations departed) or sections of the prophets, and the megilloth , namely, Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, and Esther: all without vowels, accents, and sophpasuks. ...
Of the 581 manuscripts collated by Kennicott, 102 have the whole Old Testament. Amen. The variations were trifling, chiefly of vowel letters; so that we have the assurance that our Old Testament text is almost as pure as attainable. The Septuagint is two centuries later than the last book of Old Testament It is only in the period immediately following the closing of the Old Testament canon that its few corruptions have arisen, for subsequently the jealous care of its purity has been continually on the increase. ...
The New Testament quotes mainly the Septuagint Old Testament, but corrects it by the Hebrew when needful (Matthew 21:5; Matthew 9:13; Matthew 4:15-16; John 19:37; 1 Corinthians 3:19; 1 Corinthians 15:54; Luke 22:37; Romans 9:33). The Christian interpreters soon rejected these subtleties and maintained the historical reality of Old Testament events. Clement of Alexandria laid down the fourfold view of the Old Testament: literal, symbolical, moral, and prophetic (
As Christ and His apostles in the New Testament interpreted many parts and facts of the Old Testament, so we must interpret other parts and facts of the Old Testament which they have left uninterpreted, on analogous principles of interpretation. The New Testament does not note the spiritual meaning of every Old Testament type and history, and the fulfillment of every prophecy; space would not admit of it. "Ιn Vetere Τestamenlo Νovum latet, in Νovo Vetus patet "; the New Testament is hidden in the Old Testament, the Old Testament is revealed in the New (2 Corinthians 3:6-18). The whole substance of the Old Testament is in the New Testament, but the details are to be unfolded by prayerful search. The moral aim is the reason for the disproportionate space occupied by personal biographies of men remarkable for piety or wickedness, and for the gaps which occur in parts of the Old Testament history. Christ and His apostles bring to light the moral and spiritual truths wrapped up in the Old Testament letter (Matthew 5-7; Matthew 19:5-6; Matthew 22:32<
Hebrews - Amen. And there seems to me sufficient evidence, that this was as general and as uniform for the first century after the apostolic age as in respect to many other books of the New Testament; and more so, than in respect to several. On the other hand, Bolton, a sharp-sighted critic, and well acquainted with the Aramean language, who has gone through with the New Testament, and found almost every where marks, as he thinks, of translation from Aramean documents, confesses, that, in respect to this epistle, he finds not a single vestige of incorrect translation from an Aramean original, and no marks that there ever was such an original. This testimony is of considerable importance in respect to the question before us, as it comes from a critic who spent many years on the study of that which is most intimately connected with the very subject under consideration, namely, the detection of the Aramean originals of the various parts of the New Testament. Whoever wishes to see this last position established beyond any reasonable doubt, may read Hug's "Introduction to the New Testament," vol
Revelation, the - Revelation 18 gives the lamentations of various classes and orders over the fall of the great and splendid city, under the form of which the harlot is portrayed. " To which John responds, "Amen, come, Lord Jesus
Samaria, Samaritans - It was permitted to add ‘Amen’ to a blessing asked by a Cuthaean, but only after hearing the whole blessing (M
Science (2) - equivalent for ‘Amen’ (Luke 9:27; Luke 12:44; Luke 21:3)
Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - ; Halleluia and Amen , xxvi
Holy Ghost - " Did such passages stand lone, there might, indeed, be some plausibility in the criticism which resolves them into a personification; but, connected as they are with the whole body of evidence, as to the concurring doctrine of both Testaments, they are inexpugnable. " This, we may observe, affords an eminent proof, that the writers of the New Testament understood the phrase, "the Spirit of God," as it occurs in the Old Testament, personally. If, then, the Apostles understood that the Holy Ghost was a Person, a point which will presently be established, we have, in the text just quoted from the book of Genesis, a key to the meaning of those texts in the Old Testament where the phrases, "My Spirit," "the Spirit of God," and "the Spirit of the Lord," occur; and inspired authority is thus afforded us to interpret them as of a Person; and if of a Person, the very effort made by Socinians to deny his personality, itself, indicates that that Person must, from the lofty titles and works ascribed to him, be inevitably divine. Three Persons, and three only, are associated also, both in the Old and New Testament, as objects of supreme worship; and form the one "name" in which the religious act of solemn benediction is performed, and to which men are bound by solemn baptismal covenant. ...
Amen. " What attribute is capable of interceding, or how can the doctrine of the Gospel intercede? Personification, too, is the language of poetry, and takes place naturally only in excited and elevated discourse; but if the Holy Spirit be a personification, we find it in the ordinary and cool strain of mere narration and argumentative discourse in the New Testament, and in the most incidental conversations, "Have ye received the Holy Ghost since ye believed? We have not so much as heard whether there be any Holy Ghost. " Could it be any attribute of God which said this, or could it be the doctrine of the Gospel? Finally, that the Holy Ghost is a person, and not an attribute, is proved by the use of masculine pronouns and relatives in the Greek of the New Testament, in connection with the neuter noun Πνευμα , Spirit, and also by many distinct personal acts being ascribed to him, as, "to come," "to go," "to be sent," "to teach," "to guide," "to...
comfort," "to make intercession," "to bear witness," "to give gifts," "dividing them to every man as he will," "to be vexed," "grieved," and "quenched