What does Altar mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
הַמִּזְבֵּ֖חַ altar. 34
מִזְבַּ֣ח altar. 26
הַמִּזְבֵּ֔חַ altar. 25
הַמִּזְבֵּֽחַ altar. 24
הַמִּזְבֵּ֑חַ altar. 22
הַמִּזְבֵּ֙חַ֙ altar. 20
מִזְבַּ֥ח altar. 16
הַמִּזְבֵּ֔חָה altar. 13
מִזְבֵּ֖חַ altar. 12
מִזְבֵּ֔חַ altar. 11
θυσιαστηρίου the altar for slaying and burning of victims used of. 11
מִזְבַּ֤ח altar. 10
הַמִּזְבֵּ֑חָה altar. 9
מִזְבֵּ֙חַ֙ altar. 8
הַמִּזְבֵּֽחָה altar. 7
הַמִּזְבֵּ֗חַ altar. 7
θυσιαστήριον the altar for slaying and burning of victims used of. 6
בַּמִּזְבֵּֽחַ altar. 5
מִזְבַּ֖ח altar. 5
הַמִּזְבֵּ֛חַ altar. 5
לַמִּזְבֵּ֑חַ altar. 4
מִזְבַּח֙ altar. 4
מִזְבֵּ֑חַ altar. 4
θυσιαστηρίῳ the altar for slaying and burning of victims used of. 4
הַמִּזְבֵּ֤חַ altar. 3
מִזְבֵּ֗חַ altar. 3
לַמִּזְבֵּֽחַ altar. 3
הַמִּזְבֵּ֥חַ altar. 3
מִזְבְּחִ֔י altar. 3
הַמִּזְבֵּ֣חַ altar. 2
לַמִּזְבֵּ֔חַ altar. 2
וְלַמִּזְבֵּ֔חַ altar. 2
מִזְבַּ֨ח altar. 2
מִזְבְּחִ֑י altar. 2
הַמִּזְבֵּ֜חַ altar. 2
הַמִּזְבֵּ֖חָה altar. 2
מִזְבַּחֲךָ֣ altar. 2
מִזְבְּחֽוֹ altar. 2
מִֽזְבַּחֲךָ֖ altar. 2
לַמִּזְבֵּ֖חַ altar. 2
לַמִּזְבֵּ֙חַ֙ altar. 1
וְהַקְטֵ֣יר 1
מִזְבְּחִ֖י altar. 1
מִזְבְּחִי֙ altar. 1
וְהַמִּזְבֵּ֖חַ altar. 1
מִזְבֵּֽחַ altar. 1
מִזְבַּ֬ח altar. 1
וּלְמִזְבַּ֤ח altar. 1
הַמִּזְבֵּ֡חַ altar. 1
הַמִּזְבֵּחַ֒ altar. 1
הַמִּזְבֵּ֗חָה altar. 1
؟ הַמִּזְבֵּ֥חַ altar. 1
מִזְבְּחוֹ֙ altar. 1
! מִזְבֵּ֔חַ altar. 1
: הַמִּזְבֵּ֑חַ altar. 1
מִזְבֵּ֥חַ altar. 1
מִזְבֵּ֜חַ altar. 1
הַֽמִּזְבֵּ֖חַ altar. 1
βωμὸν an elevated place. 1
בַּמִּזְבֵּ֖חַ altar. 1
וְהַמִּזְבֵּ֣חַ altar. 1
וְהַֽהַרְאֵ֖ל hearth 1
(וְהָאֲרִיאֵ֗ל) hearth 1
אֹתֽוֹ sign of the definite direct object 1
מַדְבְּחָ֔ה altar. 1
מִזְבַּ֧ח altar. 1
וּמִזְבַּ֥ח altar. 1
מִּזְבֵּ֥חַ altar. 1
וּלְמִזְבַּ֧ח altar. 1
הַמִּזְבֵּ֣חַ ׀ altar. 1
מִזְבֵּ֣חַ altar. 1
מִזְבְּחִ֗י altar. 1
הַמִּזְבֵּחַ֮ altar. 1
וּמִזְבַּ֣ח altar. 1
לְמִזְבַּ֥ח altar. 1
לְהַמִּזְבֵּ֑חַ altar. 1
מִזְבֵּ֧חַ altar. 1
θυμιατήριον a utensil for fumigating or burning incense. 1
הַמִּזְבַּ֣ח altar. 1
וּמִזְבַּ֧ח altar. 1
הַמִּזְבֵּ֧חַ altar. 1
הַמִּזְבַּ֥ח altar. 1
מִזְבַּ֛ח altar. 1
מִזְבְּחֶֽךָ altar. 1
קַרְנֹתָיו֙ horn. 1

Definitions Related to Altar

H4196


   1 Altar.
   

G2379


   1 the Altar for slaying and burning of victims used of.
      1a the Altar of whole burnt offerings which stood in the court of the priests in the temple at Jerusalem.
      1b the Altar of incense which stood in the sanctuary or the Holy Place.
      1c any other Altar.
         1c1 metaph.
         , the cross on which Christ suffered an expiatory death: to eat of this Altar i.e. to appropriate to one’s self the fruits of Christ’s expiatory death.
         

H741


   1 hearth, Altar hearth, Altar.
   

G1041


   1 an elevated place.
      1a very often a raised place on which to offer a sacrifice, an Altar.
      

H6999


H4056


   1 Altar.
   

H7161


   1 horn.
      1a horn.
      1b of strength (fig).
      1c flask (container for oil).
      1d horn (as musical instrument).
      1e horn (of horn-like projections on the Altar).
      1f of rays of light.
      1g hill.
   2 a place conquered by Israel probably in Bashan.
   

G2369


   1 a utensil for fumigating or burning incense.
   2 an Altar of incense.
   

Frequency of Altar (original languages)

Frequency of Altar (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Protector
(altar-cover, vespebale, or stragulum) A cover of cloth, baize, or velvet, of any color, though usually green or red, used on the altar outside the time of sacred functions, to prevent staining or soiling of the altar-cloth.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Main Altar
(altar, main) The chief altar in a church, mounted by steps, and in the center of the sanctuary. At this altar most ceremonies take place.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Frontal, Altar
(antependium - Latin: ante, before; pendere, hang)
An appendage covering the entire front of the altar; a similar covering should be used at the back if it be seen by the people. It may be made of precious metals, wood, cloth of gold, or other precious materials. If the altar be of carved wood or marble it may be considered sufficiently ornamental, and the antependium deemed unnecesary.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Rail, Altar
(communion rail) A rail separating the sanctuary from the body of the church. It is of carved wood, metal, marble, or other precious material, about two and a half feet high.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Rail
(communion rail) A rail separating the sanctuary from the body of the church. It is of carved wood, metal, marble, or other precious material, about two and a half feet high.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar, Lady
(Lady altar) That altar which occupies the most prominent position in a church after the main altar, viz., at the Epistle side of the latter.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Our Lady, Altar of
(Lady altar) That altar which occupies the most prominent position in a church after the main altar, viz., at the Epistle side of the latter.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lady Altar
(Lady altar) That altar which occupies the most prominent position in a church after the main altar, viz., at the Epistle side of the latter.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lamp, Altar
A lamp kept continuously burning before the tabernacle. Though it may be of any metal and form, it should be lighted by oil only, pure olive oil being recommended.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Fixed Altar
A permanent stone structure formed of a consecrated table and support, erected on a solid foundation.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ledge, Altar
A step placed behind the altar for candlesticks, flowers, etc.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Altar
A table-like structure, on which sacrifices and incense were offered, built of various materials, usually of stone, but sometimes of brass, etc. It is evident that sacrifices were offered long before the flood; but the first mention of an altar in Scripture is when Noah left the ark. Mention is made of altars reared by Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Moses. The latter was commanded to build an altar of earth, Exodus 20:24 . If stone was employed, it must be rough and unhewn, probably lest the practice of sculpture should lead them to violate the second commandment. It was not to be furnished with steps, Deuteronomy 27:2-6 .
The altars in the Jewish tabernacle, and in the temple at Jerusalem, were the following: 1. The altar of burnt offerings. 2. The altar of incense. 3. The table of showbread, for which see BREAD .
1. THE ALTAR OF BURNT-OFFERINGS was a kind of coffer of shittim- wood covered with brass plates, about seven feet six inches square, and four feet six inches in height. At the four corners were four horns, or elevations. It was portable, and had rings and staves for bearing in, Exodus 27:1-28:43 . It was placed in the court before the tabernacle, towards the east. The furniture of the altar was of brass, and consisted of a pan, to receive the ashes that fell through the grating; shovels; basins, to contain the blood with which the altar was sprinkled; and forks, to turn and remove the pieces of flesh upon the coals. The fire was a perpetual one, kindled miraculously, and carefully cherished. Upon this altar the lamb of the daily morning and evening sacrifice was offered, and the other stated and voluntary blood-sacrifices and meat and drink-offerings. To this also certain fugitives were allowed to flee and find protection. The altar in Solomon's temple was larger, being about thirty feet square and fifteen feet high, 2 Chronicles 4:1 . It is said to have been covered with thick plates of brass and filled with stones, with an ascent on the east side. It is often called "the brazen altar."
2. THE ALTAR OF INCENSE was a small table of shittim-wood, covered with plates of gold; it was eighteen inches square, and three feet high, Exodus 30:1-38 37:25 , etc. At the four corners were four horns, and all around its top was a little border or crown. On each side were two rings, into which staves might be inserted for the purpose of carrying it. It stood in the Holy place; not in the Holy of Holies, but before it, between the golden candlestick and the table of showbread, and the priests burned incense upon it every morning and evening. So Zacharias, Luke 1:9,11 . See TEMPLE .
3. ALTAR AT ATHENS, inscribed "to the unknown God," Acts 17:23 . It is certain. Both from Paul's assertion and the testimony of Greek writers, that altars to an unknown or gods existed at Athens. But the attempt to ascertain definitely whom the Athenians worshipped under this appellation must ever remain fruitless for want of sufficient data. The inscription afforded to Paul a happy occasion of proclaiming the gospel; and those who embraced it found it indeed that the Being whom they had thus ignorantly worshipped was the one only living and true God.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Linens, Altar
Certain linens used during the Sacrifice of the Mass. They are the corporal, pall, purificator, and finger-towels.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mother Mary! at Thine Altar
Hymn written in the 19th century by Reverend F. W. Faber.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lanterns, Altar
Lanterns used to protect the altar-candles and lamp if they cannot be kept lighted, and to accompany the Blessed Sacrament when It is transferred from one altar to another, or taken to the sick as Viaticum.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Double Altar
One having a double front so constructed that Mass may be celebrated simultaneously on both sides, often found in churches of religious communities when the community chapel is separate from the one to which others are admitted.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Incense Altar
See Tabernacle ; Temple.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Gospel Side of Altar
The left side of the altar as one faces it, so called because portions of the Gospels are read there at Mass.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Canopy, Altar
(Greek: konops, gnat: originally used as a protection against insects)
An ornamental covering of cloth, stone, wood, or metal, used to crown an altar, throne, pulpit, statue, etc. In liturgical use: the structure covering an altar, called also baldachinum; the covering suspended over the throne occupied by dignitaries of the Church or princes; the covering, always white, under which the Blessed Sacrament is sometimes borne in processions. For transporting the Blessed Sacrament from one altar to the other, or for taking the Holy Viaticum to the sick, it is customary in some places to use a small canopy with a single staff. Relics excepting rarely those of the True Cross or some instrument of the Passion are not carried under a canopy in processions. A processional canopy is used for a bishop at his solemn reception into his cathedral city and when he makes his first pastoral visit to any town or parish within his jurisdiction.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Cavity, Altar
A small square or oblong chamber in the body of an altar, in which relics are placed.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Candles, Altar
Candles made chiefly from bees-wax and prescribed for use at Mass and other liturgical functions.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Altar
In the old church in the wilderness, there were three altars erected. One, called the altar of incense; another, the altar of burnt offerings; and the third, the altar, or table of shew-bread. These material altars were all typical of Christ. And so jealous was the Lord concerning the altar, on which all offerings were to be made, that the whole of the materials of which it was formed were to be of earth only; or, if of stone, it was not to be hewn stone. And wherefore were matters conducted with such caution? Surely it was to shew, that in all offerings the Lord was to be offered only what was his own. "If thou lift up thy tool upon it, thou hast polluted it.." (Exodus 20:24-26) For, as every altar represented Christ, it was lessening Christ's dignity and the infinite value of his sacrifice, to presume to mingle any thing with this. Now then, as Christ is our New Testament altar, let us see to it, that we bring nothing to offer upon this altar of our own. Let Jesus be all and in all; both the Sacrifice and the Sacrificer, the High Priest, the Offering, and the Altar. We have (saith Paul) an altar whereof they have no right to eat which serve the tabernacle. (Hebrews 13:10) I cannot forbear remarking, that seeing the holy jealousy of the Lord, as noted in these things, how very wrong must it be, not to say profane, to call the communion table the altar, and to talk of companions to the altar, in the books so called, as if such things could be companions to Christ. Surely it doth manifest great ignorance in divine things.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Carpets, Altar
Ordinarily green, cover the sanctuary and altar-steps, or at least the upper platform or predella.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Cards, Altar
Printed cards placed in the middle and at each side of an altar, containing certain prayers to be said by the celebrant at Mass.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Candlestick, Altar
Six candlesticks with candles, three on each side of the crucifix, kept on the main altar. Two, one at each side of the altar, must be used during low Mass. Extra candlesticks and candelabra are used for ornamentation. Altar-candlesticks may be of any kind of metal, or gilded or silvered wood. Their use became general only in Hebrews 16th century.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Altar
(Heb. mizbe'ah, from a word meaning "to slay"), any structure of earth (Exodus 20:24 ) or unwrought stone (20:25) on which sacrifices were offered. Altars were generally erected in conspicuous places (Genesis 22:9 ; Ezekiel 6:3 ; 2 Kings 23:12 ; 16:4 ; 23:8 ; Acts 14:13 ). The word is used in Hebrews 13:10 for the sacrifice offered upon it--the sacrifice Christ offered. Paul found among the many altars erected in Athens one bearing the inscription, "To the unknown God" ( Acts 17:23 ), or rather "to an [1] unknown God." The reason for this inscription cannot now be accurately determined. It afforded the apostle the occasion of proclaiming the gospel to the "men of Athens."
The first altar we read of is that erected by Noah (Genesis 8:20 ). Altars were erected by Abraham (Genesis 12:7 ; 13:4 ; 22:9 ), by Isaac (Genesis 26:25 ), by Jacob (33:20; 35:1,3), and by Moses (Exodus 17:15 , "Jehovah-nissi").
In the tabernacle, and afterwards in the temple, two altars were erected.
The altar of burnt offering (Exodus 30:28 ), called also the "brasen altar" (Exodus 39:39 ) and "the table of the Lord" (Malachi 1:7 ). This altar, as erected in the tabernacle, is described in Exodus 27:1-8 . It was a hollow square, 5 cubits in length and in breadth, and 3 cubits in height. It was made of shittim wood, and was overlaid with plates of brass. Its corners were ornamented with "horns" (Exodus 29:12 ; Leviticus 4:18 ).
In Exodus 27:3 the various utensils appertaining to the altar are enumerated. They were made of brass. (Compare 1 Samuel 2:13,14 ; Leviticus 16:12 ; Numbers 16:6,7 .)
In Solomon's temple the altar was of larger dimensions (2 Chronicles 4:1 . Compare 1 Kings 8:22,64 ; 9:25 ), and was made wholly of brass, covering a structure of stone or earth. This altar was renewed by Asa (2 Chronicles 15:8 ). It was removed by Ahaz (2 Kings 16:14 ), and "cleansed" by Hezekiah, in the latter part of whose reign it was rebuilt. It was finally broken up and carried away by the Babylonians (Jeremiah 52:17 ).
After the return from captivity it was re-erected (Ezra 3:3,6 ) on the same place where it had formerly stood. (Compare 1 Maccabees 4:47 .) When Antiochus Epiphanes pillaged Jerusalem the altar of burnt offering was taken away.
Again the altar was erected by Herod, and remained in its place till the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans (70 A.D.).
The fire on the altar was not permitted to go out (Leviticus 6:9 ).
In the Mosque of Omar, immediately underneath the great dome, which occupies the site of the old temple, there is a rough projection of the natural rock, of about 60 feet in its extreme length, and 50 in its greatest breadth, and in its highest part about 4 feet above the general pavement. This rock seems to have been left intact when Solomon's temple was built. It was in all probability the site of the altar of burnt offering. Underneath this rock is a cave, which may probably have been the granary of Araunah's threshing-floor (1 Chronicles 21:22 ).
The altar of incense (Exodus 30:1-10 ), called also "the golden altar" (39:38; Numbers 4:11 ), stood in the holy place "before the vail that is by the ark of the testimony." On this altar sweet spices were continually burned with fire taken from the brazen altar. The morning and the evening services were commenced by the high priest offering incense on this altar. The burning of the incense was a type of prayer (Psalm 141:2 ; Revelation 5:8 ; 8:3,4 ). This altar was a small movable table, made of acacia wood overlaid with gold (Exodus 37:25,26 ). It was 1 cubit in length and breadth, and 2 cubits in height.
In Solomon's temple the altar was similar in size, but was made of cedar-wood (1 Kings 6:20 ; 7:48 ) overlaid with gold. In Ezekiel 41:22 it is called "the altar of wood." (Compare Exodus 30:1-6 .)
In the temple built after the Exile the altar was restored. Antiochus Epiphanes took it away, but it was afterwards restored by Judas Maccabaeus (1 Maccabees 1:23 ; 4:49 ). Among the trophies carried away by Titus on the destruction of Jerusalem the altar of incense is not found, nor is any mention made of it in Hebrews 9 . It was at this altar Zacharias ministered when an angel appeared to him (Luke 1:11 ). It is the only altar which appears in the heavenly temple (Isaiah 6:6 ; Revelation 8:3,4 ).
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Altar
Structure on which offerings are made to a deity. The Hebrew word for altar is mizbeah [1], from a verbal root meaning "to slaughter." Greek renders this word as thusiasterion [2], "a place of sacrifice." In the developed temple ritual, the same word is used for both the altar of holocausts and the altar of incense. Thus, an altar is a place where sacrifice is offered, even if it is not an event involving slaughter.
Altars could be natural objects or man-made constructs. Four materials are recorded as being used in altars: stone, earth, metal, and brick. Archaeology has provided numerous examples of altars from Palestine dating back to approximately 3000 b.c. Natural rocks were also used (Judges 6:20 ). An altar could stand alone, or it was located in the courtyard of a shrine.
Their Jerusalem temple had two altars: the altar of incense and the altar of holocausts. The altar of incense was placed inside the sanctuary in front of the curtain screening the Holy of Holies. It was made of gold-covered wood. It stood upright and measured 1 x 1 x 2 cubits. Archaeological data indicate that all four corners of the upper surface were slightly peaked. Twice a day, incense was burned on the altar.
The altar of holocausts stood in the courtyard of the temple. Like the other objects in the courtyard, the altar was made of bronze. It measured 20 x 20 x 10 cubits (2 Chronicles 4 ). Ahaz replaced this altar with one modeled on an alter he had seen in Damascus (2 Kings 16 ). He moved the old altar, using it for divination. In Ezekiel's vision the courtyard altar also was horned (Ezekiel 43:15 ).
Altars were places where the divine and human worlds interacted. Altars were places of exchange, communication, and influence. God responded actively to altar activity. The contest between Elijah and the prophets of Baal involving an altar demonstrated interaction between Yahweh and Baal. Noah built an altar and offered a sacrifice to Yahweh. God smelled the aroma and found it pleasing. He responded to Noah's action by declaring that he would never again destroy all living things through a flood. In the patriarchal period, altars were markers of place, commemorating an encounter with God (Genesis 12:7 ), or physical signs of habitation. Abraham built an altar where he pitched his tent between Bethel and Ai. Presumably at that altar he "called on the name of the Lord" (Genesis 12:8 ). Interestingly, we are not told if there was a response. In the next passage, however, Abraham went to Egypt and fell into sin, lying about Sarah out of fear of Pharaoh. Perhaps there was no true communication at the altar between Bethel and Ai.
Sacrifices were the primary medium of exchange in altar interactions. The priestly code of Leviticus devotes a great deal of space to proper sacrificial procedure, and to what sacrifices are appropriate in various circumstances. Sacrifice was the essential act of external worship. Unlike the divinities of the nations surrounding ancient Israel, Yahweh did not need sacrifices to survive. The Israelites, however, needed to perform the act of sacrifice in order to survive (Exodus 30:21 ). The act of sacrifice moved the offering from the profane to the sacred, from the visible to the invisible world. By this action the worshiper sealed a contract with God. Blood, believed to contain the "life" of an animal (or a human being), was particularly important in the sacrificial ritual. It was sprinkled against the altar (Leviticus 1 ); once a year, blood was smeared on the horns of the incense altar.
The horns of the altar may have functioned as boundary markers, setting apart the sacred space that was the actual place of intersection of the divine and human spheres. In the stark and moving story of Abraham's encounter with God at Moriah, Abraham built an altar and arranged the wood on it (Genesis 22:9 ). After Isaac was laid on the altar, but before he was sacrificed, God proclaimed his recognition that Isaac had "not [3] withheld." By placing Isaac on the altar, Abraham transferred him from the profane to the sacred.
This sacred altar and its horns, where the atoning blood was splashed, provided a place of sanctuary. The altar was a place where an unintentional murderer could gain a haven (Exodus 21:13-14 ). If the murder was premeditated, however, then the altar was clearly profaned by the murderer's presence and the individual could be taken away and killed. Joab was denied the sanctuary of the horns because he had conspired to kill Amasa and Abner. In an oracle against Israel (Amos 3:14 ), God declared that "the horns of the altar will be cut off and fall to the ground." The message is clear: There will be no place to intercede with God, and no place to claim his sanctuary.
After the exile, the first thing to be rebuilt was the altar. Then the temple was reconstructed. The temple was ultimately secondary to the altar. In chastising the religious establishment, Jesus underlined the sacredness of the altar, making clear his understanding that the altar "makes the gift sacred" (Matthew 23:19 ). In Revelation the altar in the heavenly temple shelters martyred souls and even speaks (Revelation 16:7 ). The New Testament writer of Hebrews (13:10) implies that the ultimate altar is the cross. Here divine and human interchange is consummated. The cross becomes the sanctuary of the believer, providing protection from the penalties of sin.
Thomas W. Davis
See also Offerings and Sacrifices ; Priest, Priesthood
Bibliography . R. de Vaux, Ancient Israel ; M. Haran, Temples and Temple Service in Ancient Israel ; C. L. Meyers, HBD, pp. 22-25.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Incense, Altar of
INCENSE, ALTAR OF . See Tabernacle, § 6 ( c ), and Temple, § 4 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Horns, Altar
The projections at each corner of the Jewish altar. Though dropped in Christian usage, the name is still used to designate the four corners of the altar.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Horns of Altar
See Altar
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Altar
The first of which we have mention was built by Noah after leaving the ark (Genesis 8:20). The English (from the Latin) means an elevation or high place: not the site, but the erections on them which could be built or removed (1 Kings 12:7; 2 Kings 23:15). So the Greek bomos , and Hebrew bamath . But the proper Hebrew name mizbeach is "the sacrificing place;" Septuagint thusiasterion. Spots hallowed by divine revelations or appearances were originally the sites of altars (Genesis 12:7; Genesis 13:18; Genesis 26:25; Genesis 35:1). Mostly for sacrificing; sometimes only as a memorial, as that named by Moses Jehovah Nissi, the pledge that Jehovah would war against Amalek to all generations (Exodus 17:15-16), and that built by Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh, "not for burnt offering, nor sacrifice, but as a witness" (Joshua 22:26-27).
Altars were to be made only of earth or else unhewn stone, on which no iron tool was used, and without steps up to them (Exodus 20:24-26). Steps toward the E. on the contrary are introduced in the temple yet future (Ezekiel 43:17), marking its distinctness from any past temple. No pomp or ornament was allowed; all was to be plain and simple; for it was the meeting place between God and the sinner, and therefore a place of shedding of blood without which there is no remission (Leviticus 17:11; Hebrews 9:22), a place of fellowship with God for us only through death. The mother dust of earth, or its stones in their native state as from the hand of God, were the suitable material. The art of sinful beings would mar, rather than aid, the consecration of the common meeting ground. The earth made for man's nourishment, but now the witness of his sin and drinker in of his forfeited life, was the most suitable (see Fairbairn, Typology). The altar was at "the door of the tabernacle of the tent of the congregation" (Exodus 40:29).
In the tabernacle the altar of burnt offering was made of shittim (acacia) boards overlaid with brass, terming a square of five cubits, or eight feet. three cubits high or five feet, the hollow within being probably filled with earth or stones. A ledge (Hebrew karkob ) projected on the side for the priest to stand on, to which a slope of earth gradually led up on the S. side, and outside the ledge was a network of brass. At the grainers were four horn shaped projections. to which the victim was bound (Psalms 118:27), and which were touched with blood in consecrating priests (2 Chronicles 29:12-184), and in the sin offering (Leviticus 4:7). The horn symbolizes might. The culmination's of the altar, being hornlike, imply the mighty salvation and security which Jehovah engages to the believing worshippers approaching Him in His own appointed way. Hence it was the asylum or place of refuge (1 Kings 1:50; Exodus 21:14).
So the Antitype, Christ (Isaiah 27:5; Isaiah 25:4). To grasp the altar horns in faith was to lay hold of Jehovah's strength. In Solomon's temple the altar square was entirely of brass, and was 20 cubits, or from 30 to 35 feet, and the height 10 cubits. In Malachi 1:7; Malachi 1:12, it is called "the table of the Lord." In Herod's temple the altar was 50 cubits long, and 50 broad, and 15 high; a pipe from the S.W. grainer conveyed away the blood to the brook Kedron. Except in emergencies (as Judges 6:24; 1 Samuel 7:9-10; 2 Samuel 24:18; 2 Samuel 24:25; 1 Kings 8:64; 1 Kings 18:31-32) only the one altar was sanctioned (Leviticus 17:8-9; Deuteronomy 12:13-14), to mark the unity and ubiquity of God, as contrasted with the many altars of the manifold idols and local deities of pagandom. Every true Israelite, wherever he might be, realized his share in the common daily sacrifices at the one altar in Zion, whence Jehovah ruled to the ends of the earth.
Christ is the antitype, the one altar or meeting place between God and man, the one only atonement for sinners, the one sacrifice, and the one priest (Acts 4:12; Hebrews 13:10). Christ's Godhead, on which He offered His manhood, "sanctifieth the gift" (Matthew 23:19), and prevents the sacrifice being consumed by God's fiery judicial wrath against man's sin. To those Judaizers who object that Christians have no altar or sacrificial meats, Paul says, "we have" (the emphasis in Greek is on have; there is no we) emphatically, but it is a spiritual altar and sacrifice. So Hebrews 4:14-15; Hebrews 8:1; Hebrews 9:1; Hebrews 10:1; Hebrews 10:19-21. The interpretation which makes "altar" the Lord's table is opposed to the scope of the Epistle to the Heb., which contrasts the outward sanctuary with the unseen spiritual sanctuary.
Romanisers fall under the condemnation of Hosea 8:11. The Epistle to the Hebrew reasons, servile adherents to visible altar meats are excluded from our Christian spiritual altar and meats: "For He, the true Altar, from whom we derive spiritual meats, realized the sin offering type" (of which none of the meat was eaten, but all was burnt: Leviticus 6:30) "by suffering without the gate: teaching that we must go forth after Him from the Jewish high priest's camp of legal ceremonialism and meats, which stood only until the gospel times of reformation" (Hebrews 9:10-11). The temple and holy city were the Jewish people's camp in their solemn feasts.
The brass utensils for the altar (Exodus 27:3) were pans, to receive the ashes and fat; shovels, for removing the ashes; basins, for the blood; flesh hooks, with three prongs, to take flesh out of the cauldron (1 Samuel 2:13-14); firepans, or censers, for taking coals off the altar, or for burning incense (Leviticus 16:12; Numbers 16:6-7; Exodus 25:38); the same Hebrew maktoth means snuff dishes, as "tongs" means snuffers for the candlesticks. Asa "renewed" the altar, i.e. reconsecrated it, after it had been polluted by idolatries (2 Chronicles 20:8). (See AHAZ (see) removed it to the N. side of the new altar which Urijah the priest had made after the pattern which Ahaz had seen at Damascus (2 Kings 16:14). Hezekiah had it "cleansed" (1618091924_70) of all the uncleanness brought into it in Ahaz' reign. Manasseh, on his repentance, repaired it (2 Chronicles 33:16). Rabbis pretended it stood on the spot where man was created. In Zerubbabel's temple the altar was built before the temple foundations were laid (Ezra 3:2).
After its desecration by Antiochus Epiphanes, Judas Maccabaeus built a new altar of unhewn stones. A perpetual fire kept on it symbolized the perpetuity of Jehovah's religion; for, sacrifice being the center of the Old Testament worship, to extinguish it would have been to extinguish the religion. The perpetual fire of the Persian religion was different, for this was not sacrificial, but a symbol of God, or of the notion that, fire was a primary element. The original fire of the tabernacle "came out from before the Lord, and consumed upon the altar the burnt offering and the fat" (Leviticus 9:24). The rabbis say, It couched upon the altar like a lion, bright as the sun, the flame solid and pure, consuming things wet and dry alike, without smoke. The divine fire on the altar; the shekinah cloud, representing the divine habitation with them, which was given to the king and the high priest with the oil of unction; the spirit of prophecy; the Urim and Thummim whereby the high priest miraculously learned God's will; and the ark of the covenant, whence God gave His answers in a clear voice, were the five things of the old temple wanting in the second temple.
Heated stones (Hebrew) were laid upon the altar, by which the incense was kindled (Isaiah 6:6). The golden altar of incense (distinguished from the brazen altar of burnt offering), of acacia wood (in Solomon's temple cedar) underneath, two cubits high, one square. Once a year, on the great day of atonement, the high priest sprinkled upon its horns the blood of the sin offering (Exodus 30:6-10; Leviticus 16:18-19). Morning and evening incense was burnt on it with fire taken from the altar of burnt offering. It had a border round the top, and two golden rings at the sides for the staves to bear it with. It was "before the veil that is by the ark of the testimony, before the mercy seat;" between the candlestick and the shewbread table. In Hebrews 9:4, KJV, "censer," not "altar of incense," is right; for the latter was in the outer not the inner holy place.
The inner, or holiest, place "had the golden censer" belonging to its yearly atonement service, not kept in it. The altar of incense also was close by the second veil, directly before the ark (1 Kings 6:22), "by (Hebrew belonging to) the oracle," i.e. holiest place. Jesus' death rent the veil, and has brought the antitypes to the candlestick, shewbread table, and altar of incense into the heavenly, holiest place. This altar alone appears there, namely, that of prayer and praise. Christ is the heavenly attar as well as the only intercession, through the incense of whose merits our prayers are accepted. "The souls under the altar" (Revelation 6:9) are shut up unto Him in joyful expectancy, until He come to raise the sleeping bodies (Revelation 8:3-4). (See NADAB and (See ABIHU (see) were smitten for burning "strange fire" (i.e. fire not taken from the altar of burnt offering), thereby breaking the He between the incense altar and the sacrificial burnt offering altar. The incense daily offered symbolized prayer (Psalms 141:2; Luke 1:10).
As the incense on the altar within drew its kindling from the fire of the sacrificial altar without, so believing prayer of the heart within, continually ascending to God, rests on one's having first once for all become sharer in the benefit of Christ's outward sacrificial atonement. Therefore the inner altar was ornate and golden, the outer altar bore marks of humiliation and death. Nowhere is an altar in the sacrificial sense in the Christian church recognized in the New Testament The words "we have an altar" (Hebrews 13:10; note that it is not altars, such as apostate churches erect in their worship), so far from sanctioning a Christian altar on earth, oppose the idea; for Christ Himself is our altar of which we spiritually eat, and of which they who Judaize, by serving the tabernacle and resting on meats and ordinances, "have no right to eat." Our sacrifices are spiritual, not the dead letter; compare Hebrews 13:9; Hebrews 13:15-16.
The "altar to an unknown God" mentioned by Paul (Acts 17:22) was erected in time of a plague at Athens, when they knew not what god to worship for removing it. Epimenides caused black, and white sheep to be let loose from the Areopagus, and wherever they lay down to be offered to the appropriate deity. Diogenes Laertius, Pausanias, and Philostratus, pagan writers, confirm the accuracy of Scripture by mentioning several altars at Athens to the unknown or unnamed deity. "Superstitious" is too severe a word for the Greek; Paul's object was to conciliate, and he tells the Athenians: Ye are "rather religious," or "more given to religion" than is common, "rather given to veneration." In Ezekiel 43:15 "altar" is lit. harel , "mount of God," denoting the high security which it will afford to restored Israel; a high place indeed, but the high place of God, not of idols.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar of Repose
(altar of repository) A bye-altar where the Sacred Host consecrated Holy Thursday is reserved for Mass of the Presanctified.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar of Repository
(altar of repository) A bye-altar where the Sacred Host consecrated Holy Thursday is reserved for Mass of the Presanctified.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Cover
(altar-cover, vespebale, or stragulum) A cover of cloth, baize, or velvet, of any color, though usually green or red, used on the altar outside the time of sacred functions, to prevent staining or soiling of the altar-cloth.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar, High
(altar, main) The chief altar in a church, mounted by steps, and in the center of the sanctuary. At this altar most ceremonies take place.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar, Main
(altar, main) The chief altar in a church, mounted by steps, and in the center of the sanctuary. At this altar most ceremonies take place.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Frontal
(antependium - Latin: ante, before; pendere, hang)
An appendage covering the entire front of the altar; a similar covering should be used at the back if it be seen by the people. It may be made of precious metals, wood, cloth of gold, or other precious materials. If the altar be of carved wood or marble it may be considered sufficiently ornamental, and the antependium deemed unnecesary.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Canopy
(Greek: konops, gnat: originally used as a protection against insects)
An ornamental covering of cloth, stone, wood, or metal, used to crown an altar, throne, pulpit, statue, etc. In liturgical use: the structure covering an altar, called also baldachinum; the covering suspended over the throne occupied by dignitaries of the Church or princes; the covering, always white, under which the Blessed Sacrament is sometimes borne in processions. For transporting the Blessed Sacrament from one altar to the other, or for taking the Holy Viaticum to the sick, it is customary in some places to use a small canopy with a single staff. Relics excepting rarely those of the True Cross or some instrument of the Passion are not carried under a canopy in processions. A processional canopy is used for a bishop at his solemn reception into his cathedral city and when he makes his first pastoral visit to any town or parish within his jurisdiction.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar of Our Lady
(Lady altar) That altar which occupies the most prominent position in a church after the main altar, viz., at the Epistle side of the latter.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar, Portable
(portable altar) A small, flat slab of natural stone, consecrated ordinarily by a bishop, containing in a stone-covered cavity relics of two canonized martyrs, inserted in the center of the table of an altar which is not entirely consecrated. The host and chalice are placed on this stone during the Sacrifice of the Mass. The stone is portable and may be placed in any suitable altar: it really constitutes the altar.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Stone
(portable altar) A small, flat slab of natural stone, consecrated ordinarily by a bishop, containing in a stone-covered cavity relics of two canonized martyrs, inserted in the center of the table of an altar which is not entirely consecrated. The host and chalice are placed on this stone during the Sacrifice of the Mass. The stone is portable and may be placed in any suitable altar: it really constitutes the altar.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Societies
(tabernacle societies) Groups of devout persons, usually women, who make vestments and altar linens and keep them in repair, and provide altar vessels, furniture, and ornaments. Many of these societies give the fruit of their labors to missionary and poor churches.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar, Stripping of the
A ceremony which takes place on Holy Thursday symbolizing the moment in the Passion of Christ when He was stripped of His garments by the Jews. The celebrant assisted by deacon and subdeacon removes from the altars of the church the altar-cloths and all ornamentation, leaving but the crucifix and candlesticks.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Crucifix
A crucifix, large enough to be seen by both celebrant and laity, which must be on the altar whenever Mass is celebrated. If the Crucifixion be the subject of the altar-piece or picture behind the altar, this will suffice for the altar-crucifix.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Lamp
A lamp kept continuously burning before the tabernacle. Though it may be of any metal and form, it should be lighted by oil only, pure olive oil being recommended.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar, Fixed
A permanent stone structure formed of a consecrated table and support, erected on a solid foundation.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Bell
A small bell kept at the epistle side of the altar, rung during Mass at the Sanctus and at the elevation of the Sacred Species, as an invitation to those present to take part in the act of adoration at the Consecration.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Cavity
A small square or oblong chamber in the body of an altar, in which relics are placed.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Ledge
A step placed behind the altar for candlesticks, flowers, etc.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Vase
A vase used for flowers in decorating the altar.
King James Dictionary - Altar
AL'TAR, n. L. altare, probably from the same root as altus, high.
1. A mount a table or elevated place, on which sacrifices where anciently offered to some deity. Altars were originally made of turf, afterwards of stone, wood or horn some were round, others square, others triangular. They differed also in height, but all faced the east. The principal altars of the Jews were, the altar of incense, of burnt-offerings, and of shewbread all of shittim wood, and covered with gold or brass. 2. In modern churches, the communion table and, figuratively, a church a place of worship. 3. In scripture, Christ is called the altar of Christians, he being the atoning sacrifice for sin. We have an altar, whereof they have no right to eat, who serve tabernacles. Hebrews 13 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Tomb
An oblong monument over a grave covered with a slab and resembling an altar.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Stole
An ornament shaped as the ends of a stole and fastened to the front of the altar in the Middle Ages.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Candles
Candles made chiefly from bees-wax and prescribed for use at Mass and other liturgical functions.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Linens
Certain linens used during the Sacrifice of the Mass. They are the corporal, pall, purificator, and finger-towels.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Altar
is a structure used in worship as the place for presenting sacrifices to God or gods.
Old Testament The Hebrew word for altar that is used most frequently in the Old Testament is formed from the verb for slaughter and means literally, “slaughter place.” Altars were used primarily as places of sacrifice, especially animal sacrifice.
While animals were a common sacrifice in the Old Testament, altars were also used to sacrifice grain, fruit, wine, and incense. The grain and fruit sacrifices were offered as a tithe of the harvest or as representative first fruits of the harvest. They were presented in baskets to the priest who set the basket before the altar (Deuteronomy 26:2-4 ). Wine was offered along with animal and bread sacrifices. Incense was burned on altars to purify after slaughterings and to please God with sweet fragrance.
“Altar” is distinct from “temple.” Whereas temple implies a building or roofed structure, altar implies an open structure. Altar and temple were often adjacent, though not all altars had a temple adjacent. The reference to Abraham's sacrifice of Isaac (Genesis 22:1 ) may indicate that the animal to be sacrificed was placed on the altar alive, but bound, and slaughtered on the altar. Such may have been the earliest practice. By the time of the Levitical laws, the animal was slaughtered in front of the altar, dismembered, and only the fatty portions to be burned were placed on the altar (for example, Leviticus 1:2-9 ).
In the Old Testament, altars are distinguished by the material used in their construction. The simplest altars, and perhaps oldest, were the earthen altars ( Exodus 20:24 ). This type altar was made of either mud-brick or a raised roughly shaped mound of dirt. Mud-brick was a common building material in Mesopotamia, so mud-brick altars would have appeared most likely in Mesopotamia. An earthen altar would not have been very practical for permanently settled people, for the rainy season each year would damage or destroy the altar. This type altar might be more indicative of a nomadic people who move regularly and are less concerned with the need for a permanent altar. It might also reflect the Mesopotamian ancestry of the Hebrews, since the mud-brick was the typical building material there.
The stone altar is the most commonly mentioned altar in biblical records and the most frequently found in excavations from Palestine. A single large stone could serve as an altar ( Judges 6:19-23 ; Judges 13:19-20 ; 1 Samuel 14:31-35 ). Similarly, unhewn stones could be carefully stacked to form an altar (Exodus 20:25 , 1 Kings 18:30-35 ). Such stone altars were probably the most common form of altar prior to the building of the Solomonic Temple. A number of examples of stone altars have been excavated in Palestine. The sanctuary at Arad, belonging to the period of the Divided Monarchy (900 B.C. to 600 B.C.) had such a stone altar. The Hebrew stone altars were not to have steps (Exodus 20:25-26 ), probably in part to distinguish them from Canaanite altars which did have steps. A striking circular Canaanite altar dating from 2500 B.C. to 1800 B.C. was excavated at Megiddo. It was 25 feet in diameter and 45 1/2 feet high. Four steps led up to the top of the altar. Apparently in later times, the requirement forbidding steps on Hebrew altars was not enforced, for in Ezekiel's vision of the restored Temple, the altar has three levels and many steps.
Other stone altars have been escavated in Palestine. One from Beersheba, belonging also to the period of the Divided Monarchy, was of large hewn stones and had, when reassembled, horns on the four corners (Exodus 27:2 ; 1 Kings 1:50 ). Apparently the Exodus restrictions concerning unhewn stones, like those concerning steps, were not consistently followed throughout the Old Testament period.
The third type altar mentioned in the Old Testament is the bronze altar. The central altar in the court of Solomon's temple was a bronze altar. Its dimensions are given as 20 cubits by 20 cubits by 10 cubits high (about 30 feet square and 15 feet high) [1]. Yet is unclear whether the entire altar was made of bronze, or if it had a bronze overlay on a stone altar. It is also possible that the bronze portion was a grate set on top of the otherwise stone altar (Exodus 27:4 ). This altar is regularly known as the altar of burnt offering . The earlier tabernacle had a similar altar made of acacia (or shittim, KJV) wood overlaid with bronze (Exodus 27:1-2 ). The tabernacle altar was smaller, only 5 cubits square and 3 cubits high. The location of the altar of burnt offering of the tabernacle and Solomon's Temple is not given specifically. It is located “at” or “before” the door of the Tent of Meeting, which is also the place sacrificial animals are slaughtered. Generally reconstructions of the tabernacle and Temple locate the altar in the center of the courtyard, but the text seems to favor a location near the entrance of the tabernacle/Temple structure. The rationale was probably to locate the altar as close as possible to the focal point of God's presence, near the ark itself.
Ezekiel's vision of the restored Temple had the altar of burnt offering located in the center of the courtyard. Although the dimensions are not fully given in the text, it seems that this altar was approximately 18 cubits square and 12 cubits high (Ezekiel 43:13-17 ). Ezekiel's altar had three superimposed levels, each slightly smaller than the preceding, and had steps from the east leading up to the top.
Both the altar of the tabernacle and that of Ezekiel are described as having horns. It is likely that the altar of burnt offering in Solomon's Temple also had horns. The stone altar found at Beersheba has such horns preserved. Apparently grasping the horns of the altar was a way of seeking sanctuary or protection when one was charged with a serious offense (1 Kings 1:50-51 ; 1 Kings 2:28-34 ; compare Exodus 21:12-14 ). More importantly, the horns of the altar were the place where blood from a sacrificial animal was applied for atonement from sin (for example, Exodus 30:1-64 ; Leviticus 4:7 ). Jeremiah graphically described the people's sin as being so severe that they were engraved on the horns of the altar (Jeremiah 17:1 ). During certain festivals a sacred procession led into the Temple and up to the horns of the altar (Psalm 118:27 ). Probably this procession carried the chosen animal sacrifice to atone for the people's sin and ended at the place of sacrifice.
During the reign of Ahaz, the bronze altar or altar of burnt offering in Solomon's Temple was displaced by an altar that Ahaz had built on a Syrian model (2 Kings 16:10-16 ). This altar was apparently larger than the bronze altar of Solomon and was placed in the central position in the courtyard to be the main altar of sacrifice.
No biblical description exists for the altar of burnt offering from the Second Temple. However, such an altar was constructed even before the Temple was rebuilt (Ezra 3:2 ). Josephus described the altar in the rebuilt Temple of Herod. He wrote that the altar was fifty cubits square and fifteen cubits high with a ramp leading to the top. This altar would have been much larger than the earlier ones.
A fourth type of altar mentioned in the Bible is the gold altar or altar of incense . It was located in the inner room of the sanctuary, just outside the holy of holies (1 Kings 7:48-50 ). The incense altar is described in Exodus as constructed of acacia wood, overlaid with gold, with dimensions one cubit square and two cubits high (1618091924_22 ). Like the altar of burnt offering, the altar of incense had horns on the four corners. As its name implies, incense was burned on this altar. The incense served as a means of purification after slaughtering animals, a costly sacrifice, and also as a sweet smelling offering that would be pleasing to God.
Another Hebrew word for altar that is used infrequently in the Old Testament means literally, “high place” (Hebrew, bamah ). Such “high places” were probably raised platforms at which sacrifices and other rites took place. The “high place” may have been itself a kind of altar, though this is not certain. The circular Canaanite altar mentioned above may be an example of a “high place,” an elevated place of sacrifice and worship.
New Testament The Greek word used for altar literally translates “place of sacrifice.” New Testament references to altars concern proper worship (Matthew 5:23-24 ) and hypocrisy in worship (Matthew 23:18-20 ). The altar of incense described in the Old Testament (Exodus 30:1-6 ) is mentioned in Luke (Luke 1:11 ). Several New Testament references to altars refer back to Old Testament altar events (Romans 11:3 ; James 2:21 ). In Revelation, John described a golden altar (Revelation 9:13 ) that, like the Old Testament bronze altar, had horns.
While direct references to altar and the sacrifice of Jesus Christ are few in the New Testament (Romans 13:10 ), the message that Jesus Christ is the ultimate sacrifice who puts us right with God is the theme of the New Testament.
Theological Significance Altars in the Bible were places of sacrifice. Beyond that function, altars also were places of God's presence. The patriarchal narratives regularly record the building of an altar at the site of a theophany, a place where God had appeared to an individual (Genesis 12:7 ; Genesis 26:24-25 ). It was quite natural to build an altar and commemorate the appearance of God with a sacrifice. If God had once appeared at a site, that would be a good location for Him to appear again. Thus sacrifices would be offered there with the feeling that God was present and would accept the offering. With the building of the Solomonic Temple, the presence of God was associated especially with the ark of the covenant. The altar of burnt offering then came to signify more of a sense of reconciliation or mediation. The worshiper brought a sacrifice to the altar where it was burned and thereby given to God. The acceptance of the offerings by the priest symbolized God's acceptance, manifest in blessings (Exodus 20:24 ) and covenant renewal.
Joel F. Drinkard, Jr.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Lanterns
Lanterns used to protect the altar-candles and lamp if they cannot be kept lighted, and to accompany the Blessed Sacrament when It is transferred from one altar to another, or taken to the sick as Viaticum.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar in Scripture
Many altars are mentioned in Scripture, e.g., those of Noe and Abraham, altars erected for the worship of idols, altars of holocaust and of incense, of the Tabernacle and of the Temple, and the altar described in the Apocalypse.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Curtains
Of linen, silk, or precious stuffs, formerly drawn around the altar during certain parts of the mass.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Steps
Of wood, stone, or brick, extend around the altar on three sides. There are three, five, or seven at the high altar, while side altars must have at least one.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar, Double
One having a double front so constructed that Mass may be celebrated simultaneously on both sides, often found in churches of religious communities when the community chapel is separate from the one to which others are admitted.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar, Bye
One subordinate to the high altar, usually applied to altars situated in the bays of the nave, transepts, etc.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar, Privileged
One to which the apostolic see has attached a plenary indulgence applicable only to the souls in purgatory, and gained every time mass is offered upon it.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Carpets
Ordinarily green, cover the sanctuary and altar-steps, or at least the upper platform or predella.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Screen
Originally a piece of ornamental precious cloth suspended above the altar at the rear and known as the dossel or dorsal. A permanent or movable structure of metal, stone, or wood was later introduced instead of the cloth; the side facing the church is called the retable; the reverse, the counterretable. When richly ornamented with panels, statues, etc., the structure is called a reredos. Such altar decorations are also known as altar-pieces.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Piece
Painted or frescoed picture on the wall or hung in frame above the altar; a statue or statuary group on the altar. See also reredos.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Cards
Printed cards placed in the middle and at each side of an altar, containing certain prayers to be said by the celebrant at Mass.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Bread
Round wafers of wheaten bread, unleavened in the Latin, Maronite, and Armenian Rites, used as one of the Eucharistic elements.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Vessels
Sacred vessels used in the worship of the Blessed Sacrament. They are the chalice, paten, ciborium, and ostensorium or monstrance.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Boys
Servers at the altar, not in minor orders, at Mass, Vespers, Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, Marriage, Holy Communion, etc. See ACOLYTE.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Candlesticks
Six candlesticks with candles, three on each side of the crucifix, kept on the main altar. Two, one at each side of the altar, must be used during low Mass. Extra candlesticks and candelabra are used for ornamentation. Altar-candlesticks may be of any kind of metal, or gilded or silvered wood. Their use became general only in Hebrews 16th century.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Side
That part of the altar facing the congregation. The Epistle side of the altar is termed the left, and the Gospel, the right, with reference to the altar crucifix.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Herse
The framework used in the erection of a temporary canopy over an altar on special occasions. The name is probably derived from a cloth-covered frame or hearse formerly used over the corpse in funerals.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar, Gospel Side of
The left side of the altar as one faces it, so called because portions of the Gospels are read there at Mass.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Gregorian Altar
The privileged altar of Saint Gregory the Great, in the church of Saint Gregory on Monte Crelio in Rome. It is related that Saint Gregory, by saying one Mass, liberated the soul of a monk, named Justus, from Purgatory; so the faithful have confidently hoped that any Mass on this altar would free a soul from Purgatory. The Congregation of Indulgences approved this confidence. The indulgence of the Gregorian altar is no longer granted to other altars.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar, Gregorian
The privileged altar of Saint Gregory the Great, in the church of Saint Gregory on Monte Crelio in Rome. It is related that Saint Gregory, by saying one Mass, liberated the soul of a monk, named Justus, from Purgatory; so the faithful have confidently hoped that any Mass on this altar would free a soul from Purgatory. The Congregation of Indulgences approved this confidence. The indulgence of the Gregorian altar is no longer granted to other altars.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Horns
The projections at each corner of the Jewish altar. Though dropped in Christian usage, the name is still used to designate the four corners of the altar.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar, Epistle Side of
The right side of the altar as one faces it, so called because, very frequently, parts of the Bible taken from the epistles of the Apostles are read there during Mass as lessons.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Epistle Side of Altar
The right side of the altar as one faces it, so called because, very frequently, parts of the Bible taken from the epistles of the Apostles are read there during Mass as lessons.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar
The table on which a sacrifice is offered. In the Church founded by Christ the altar is the table on which the Sacrifice of the Mass is offered. In ancient basilicas it was placed so that the priest faced the laity. Later, church altars were placed against or near the wall of the apse, so that the celebrant faced the east and the people were behind him, in the manner which now generally obtains. Altars of the early Church were probably of wood. Altars of stone and precious metals were introduced at a later date, and ecclesiastical law now stipulates that to be consecrated an altar must be of stone. In the primitive Church two types of altars were used: the arcosolium or monumentum arcuatum, consisting of an archlike niche hewn in the catacombs over the grave of a martyr, which was covered by a slab of marble; and the detached altar found in the cubicula, or sepulchral chapels, formed by a slab of stone or marble resting on columns, or on a structure in which were enclosed the relics of martyrs. A decree of Saint Felix I stipulated that Mass should be celebrated on the tombs of martyrs. The tomb or chest type of altar thus replaced the simple table, and every altar must now contain the relics of martyrs. In the Greek Church, the altar proper is square, and the top should be constructed of wood, or have at least one board in it. Two coverings are used on it, one of linen, and the other of brocade or embroidery. The term altar is also applied to that part of churches of the Greek Rite practically corresponding to the sanctuary in churches of the Latin Rite, including the altar proper, a small side altar, the seats of the clergy, and the throne of the bishop.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Cloths
Three coverings of linen or hemp used on the altar during Mass.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar Wine
Wine made from the genuine juice of the grape, used as one of the Eucharistic elements.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Altar
EarthenExo20:24 (c) This altar may represent the Cross of Calvary on which JESUS as the Lamb of GOD died for those who break the holy law of GOD. Immediately after giving the Ten Commandments, the Lord requested that this altar be built at once. He knew that His laws would be broken, He knew that men would need a sacrifice for their sins; He therefore planned that this altar should be built at once so that men could have a way of forgiveness and salvation immediately. It is called an altar of earth because it belongs strictly to this earth. GOD makes no provision for forgiveness and salvation after death. No sacrifice of any kind is available to the lost sinner after he dies. There is no altar in hell.
Stone Exodus 20:25 (c) This altar is to be made of stone to indicate that it is permanent, substantial, solid and cannot be tampered with by man. No tool was to be used in the making of it. Stones are made by GOD. It is a picture of Calvary which was GOD's institution. He planned it, He designed that JESUS was to die there. It must not be tampered with by man. Its blessings are eternal. Calvary came from the heart of GOD through the ages of eternity.
Brazen Exodus 27:1-2 (c) This may be taken as a type of the cross of Calvary, where the Lamb of GOD was offered as a sacrifice for original sin, and a sacrifice for sins committed, and also as a sacrifice for our own wicked selves. CHRIST must die for our character, as well as our conduct. On that altar, the animal represented the Saviour who died both for us and for our sins. He died for what we are as burnt offering. He died for our deeds as the trespass offering.
Golden Exodus 30:1-3 (c) This altar represents the Cross of CHRIST where the beautiful and perfect life of CHRIST was offered up to GOD as a sweet perfume and fragrant incense. The life of CHRIST which was perfect was offered to GOD instead of our lives which are so imperfect. It is typical also of the consecrated life of the believer from which there ascends to GOD as a sweet odor the sacrifices of our lips in thanksgiving, worship and praise.
Idol1Ki18:26 (c) Here we may think of a false altar which is a type of the religious plans and schemes of men wherein they hope to appease the god of their imagination, and to obtain his favor even though what they are doing is not Scriptural.
False2Ki16:10 (c) Here and elsewhere we find altars built ostensibly for the worship of GOD, but really for the worship of idols. These false altars are symbolical for the world's religious schemes and plans under the name of Christianity. Worldly men devise worldly plans for the worship of those who live in their sins, and yet seek a religious outlet for their feelings. Every false religion has an "altar" of this kind.
Deserted Psalm 84:3 (c) Here is brought before us clearly that GOD's people had forsaken both the worship and the service of the Lord to such an extent that the fires had gone out, the altar was cold, and no priest was near. The birds felt so much at home around these altars that they built their nests where the priests should have been serving, and the fires should have been burning.
Christian Matthew 5:23 (b) This probably teaches us that there is a place of worship called "the altar" to which the believer goes for worship, praise and prayer. It may be in the church building or in the home. When we come to this hallowed place, we are to come with a heart that is open and free from bitterness, free from spite, and free from grudges. We are to be a forgiving people if we expect forgiveness from Heaven.
Unknown Acts 17:23 (a) This altar is probably typical of the false faiths by which people go through the motions of seeking and worshipping GOD, though their words and actions indicate clearly that they do not know Him, nor His character, nor His ways.
Hebrews 13:10 (a) The word here probably represents the Lord's table, and all the holy associations which accompany the Gospel of CHRIST.
Revelation 8:3 (c) From this we learn that in some mysterious way there is such an altar in Heaven. At that altar the fragrant incense of the prayers and the worship of Christians ascends to GOD and permeates Heaven.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Altar
Mizbêach (מִזְבֵּחַ, Strong's #4196), “altar.” This noun has cognates in Aramaic, Syriac, and Arabic. In each of these languages the consonantal root is mdbh. Mizbêach occurs about 396 times in the Old Testament.
This word signifies a raised place where a sacrifice was made, as in Gen. 8:20 (its first biblical appearance): “And Noah builded an altar unto the Lord; and took of every clean beast, and of every clean fowl, and offered burnt offerings on the altar.” In later references, this word may refer to a table upon which incense was burned: “And thou shalt make an altar to burn incense upon: of shittim wood shalt thou make it” (Exod. 30:1).
From the dawn of human history, offerings were made on a raised table of stone or ground (Gen. 4:3). At first, Israel’s altars were to be made of earth—i.e., they were fashioned of material that was strictly the work of God’s hands. If the Jews were to hew stone for altars in the wilderness, they would have been compelled to use war weapons to do the work. (Notice that in Exod. 20:25 the word for “tool” is chereb, “sword.”)At Sinai, God directed Israel to fashion altars of valuable woods and metals. This taught them that true worship required man’s best and that it was to conform exactly to God’s directives; God, not man, initiated and controlled worship. The altar that stood before the holy place (Exod. 27:1-8) and the altar of incense within the holy place (Exod. 30:1-10) had “horns.” These horns had a vital function in some offerings (Lev. 4:30; 16:18). For example, the sacrificial animal may have been bound to these horns in order to allow its blood to drain away completely (Ps. 118:27).
Mizbêach is also used of pagan altars: “But ye shall destroy their altars, break their images, and cut down their groves” (Exod. 34:13).This noun is derived from the Hebrew verb zabach, which literally means “to slaughter for food” or “to slaughter for sacrifice.”Zabach has cognates in Ugaritic and Arabic (dbh), Akkadian (zibu), and Phoenician (zbh). Another Old Testament noun derived from zabach is zabach (162 times), which usually refers to a sacrifice that establishes communion between God and those who eat the thing offered.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Incense, Altar of
See ALTAR.
Webster's Dictionary - Altar
(1):
(n.) In the Christian church, a construction of stone, wood, or other material for the celebration of the Holy Eucharist; the communion table.
(2):
(n.) A raised structure (as a square or oblong erection of stone or wood) on which sacrifices are offered or incense burned to a deity.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - High Altar
(altar, main) The chief altar in a church, mounted by steps, and in the center of the sanctuary. At this altar most ceremonies take place.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Altar
ALTAR . 1 . The original purpose of an altar was to serve as a means by which the blood of an animal offered in sacrifice might be brought into contact with, or otherwise transferred to, the deity of the worshipper. For this purpose in the earliest period a single stone sufficed. Either the blood was poured over this stone, which was regarded as the temporary abode of the deity, or the stone was anointed with part, and the rest poured out at its base. The introduction of fire to consume the flesh in whole or in part belongs to a later stage in the history of sacrifice (wh. see). But even when this stage had long been reached, necessity might compel a temporary reversion to the earlier modus operandi , as we learn from Saul’s procedure in 1 Samuel 14:33 f. From the altar of a single ‘great stone’ ( 1 Samuel 6:14 ) the transition was easy to an altar built of unhewn stones ( Exodus 20:25 , Deuteronomy 27:5 f. RV [1] ), which continued to he the normal type of Hebrew altar to the end (see 1Ma 4:41 ; Jos. [2] BJ V. v. 6).
2 . Another type of pre-historic altar, to which much less attention has been paid, had its origin in the primitive conception of sacrifice as the food of the gods. As such it was appropriately presented on a table. Now the nearest analogy to the disc of leather spread on the ground, which was and is the table of the Semitic nomad, was the smooth face of the native rock, such as that on which Manoah spread his offering ( Judges 13:19 f., cf. Judges 6:20 f.). The well-known rock-surfaces, in Palestine and elsewhere, with their mysterious cup-marks typical specimens are illustrated PEFSt [3] , 1900, 32 ff., 249 to receive the sacrificial blood, can scarcely be other than pre-historic table-altars. The similarly marked table-stones of Syrian dolmens also belong here. A further stage in the evolution of the table altar is seen in the elaborate structures recently discovered within the West-Semitic area. In these the rock is cut away so as to leave the altar standing free, to which rock-cut steps lead up, an arrangement forbidden, from motives of decency, by the earliest legislation ( Exodus 20:26 , with which cf. Exodus 28:42 f. and parall. from a later date). The uppermost step served as a platform for the officiating priest. Some show cup-hollows for libations of blood (see illust. in Moore’s ‘Judges’ in SBOT [4] p. 83), while that first discovered at Petra has a depression for the altar-hearth ( PEFSt [3] , 1900, 350 ff. with sketch; see also Ariel). Its dimensions are 9 ft. by 6, with a height above the platform of 3 ft. The altars of the more important sanctuaries under the Hebrew monarchy, such as Bethel, were probably of a similar nature. A description of ‘the altar of burnt-offering’ of the Tabernacle will be given under Tabernacle; for the corresponding altars of the Temple of Solomon and its successors, and of Ezekiel’s sketch, see Temple.
3 . A third variety of primitive altar is the mound of earth ( Exodus 20:24 ), a copy in miniature of the hill-tops which were at all times favourite places of worship (see High Place).
4 . All the types of altar above described were intended for the ordinary open-air sacrificial service, details of which will be found under Sacrifice. There is no clear reference earlier than Jeremiah to the use of incense, and no reference at all to any altar of incense in the legitimate worship before the Exile, for 1 Kings 7:48 in its present form is admittedly late, and the altar of 1 Kings 6:20 must be the table of shewbread (see Temple, Shewbread).
5 . From what has already been said, it is evident that an altar was the indispensable requisite of every place of worship. It was not until the 7th cent. b.c. that Josiah succeeded in abolishing ‘the high places’ and destroying or desecrating their altars ( 2 Kings 23:5 ff.), in accordance with the fundamental demand of the Deuteronomic law-code ( Deuteronomy 12:1 ff.). In the older historical and prophetical writings, however, and even in the earliest legislation (see Exodus 20:24 RV [1] ), the legitimacy of the local altars is never called in question. On the contrary, religious leaders such as Samuel and Elijah show their zeal for the worship of J″ [7] by the erection and repair of altars.
6 . As altars to which a special interest attaches may be mentioned that erected by David on the threshing floor of Araunah ( 2 Samuel 24:18 ff.), the site of which is marked by the present mosque of ‘the Dome of the Rock’; the altar erected by Ahaz after the model of one seen by him at Damascus ( 2 Kings 16:10 ff.); the sacrificial and incense altars to the host of heaven in the courts and probably even on the roof of the Temple ( 2 Kings 23:12 , Jeremiah 19:13 ); and finally, the altar to Olympian Zeus placed by Antiochus Epiphanes on the top of the altar of burnt-offering ( 1Ma 1:54 ).
7 . Reference must also be made to altars as places of refuge for certain classes of criminals, attested both by legislation ( Exodus 21:13 f.) and history ( 1Ki 1:51 ; 1 Kings 2:28 ; see more fully, Refuge [5]8). The origin and precise significance of the horns of the altar , of which the refugee laid hold (1Kings ll . cc .), and which played an important part in the ritual ( Exodus 29:12 , Leviticus 4:7 ff.), have not yet received a satisfactory explanation. A small limestone altar, showing the horns in the form of rounded knobs at the four corners, has just been discovered at Gezer ( PEFSt [3] , 1907, p. 196, with illust.).
A. R. S. Kennedy.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Herse, Altar
The framework used in the erection of a temporary canopy over an altar on special occasions. The name is probably derived from a cloth-covered frame or hearse formerly used over the corpse in funerals.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - the Altar of Incense
was made of shittim wood, overlaid with pure gold. Exodus 30:1-5 ; Exodus 37:25-28 . It was in length and in breadth 1 cubit, and in height 2 cubits. In Solomon's temple this altar was made of cedar overlaid with gold, but its size is not given. In the temple described by Ezekiel the altar of incense is 2 cubits in length, and 3 cubits in height. Ezekiel 41:22 . The Altar of Incense is also called the GOLDEN ALTAR. Its situation was in the holy place, with the golden candlestick and the table of showbread. On this altar holy incense was to be burnt both morning and evening, typical of the Lord Jesus being a perpetual sweet savour to God. It was by the side of this altar that the angel appeared to Zacharias when he announced the conception and birth of John the Baptist. Luke 1:11 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - the Brazen Altar
was to be made of shittim wood overlaid with brass, whence its name; it was to be 3 cubits high and 5 cubits on each side.* Exodus 27:1-8 . In the temple built by Solomon this altar was made of brass, and was 10 cubits high and 20 cubits in length and breadth (same size as the holiest of all). 2 Chronicles 4:1 . See Ezekiel 43:13-17 for the altar in the future temple. The brazen altar was also called "the altar of burnt offering:" on it a fire was constantly burning, Leviticus 6:9 , and on it the offerings were consumed, that is, on the 'grate' that was placed in its midst. It had horns at each of its corners, on which the blood of the sin offering was placed. Thither men fled for refuge and caught hold of the horns for safety. 1 Kings 1:50,51 : cf. Exodus 21:14 . The position of the brazen altar arrested the offerer as he entered the court, and pointed out that the only way of access to the Lord was by a sacrifice. Death must take place ere fallen man could enter the dwelling place of God.
*The number 5 suggests responsibility thus 5 senses; 5 fingers, and 5 toes- man in exercise and responsibility. The ALTAR is the symbol of Christ and His work, which meets responsibility.
In the N.T. the principle is brought out, that to eat of a sacrifice manifests communion with the altar on which the sacrifice is made. So that one cannot drink the Lord's cup and the cup of demons, nor partake of the Lord's table and of the table of demons. 1 Corinthians 10:18-21 .
To the Hebrew believers it was said, "We have an altar whereof they have no right to eat which serve the tabernacle." Hebrews 13:10 . This refers to the sin-offering, whose blood was carried into the holiest, the flesh of which was not eaten, but burnt without the camp. Jesus had suffered without the gate, and hence to be in company with Him, believers were instructed to quit the camp; that is, to leave Judaism. As still serving the tabernacle they had no right to the christian's altar.
In the Revelation there is the golden altar in heaven, and much incense ascends with the prayers of the saints; but fire from the brazen altar is cast upon the earth, and it is followed by judgements, Revelation 8:3-5 : cf. also Revelation 9:13 . And John heard the altar say (as the passage should read) "Yea, Lord God Almighty, true and righteous are thy judgements," Revelation 16:7 : this is no doubt the brazen altar, cf. chap. 6:9, and Isaiah 6:6 .
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Altar
A kind of table or raised place whereon the ancient sacrifices were offered. 2. The table, in Christian churches, where the Lord's supper is administered. Altars are, doubtless, of great antiquity; some suppose they were as early as Adam; but there is no mention made of them till after the flood, when Noah built one, and offered burnt offerings on it. The Jews had two altars in and about their temple; 1. The altar of burnt offerings; 2. The altar of incense; some also call the table for shew bread an altar, but improperly, Exodus 20:24-25 . 1 Kings 18:30 . Exodus 25:27 ; Exodus 25:30 : Hebrews 9:1-28 :
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Altar
A structure on which to offer sacrifices to God: imitated by the heathen in honour of their false gods. The first altar we read of was built by Noah on leaving the ark, on which he offered burnt offerings of every clean beast and clean fowl. Genesis 8:20 . Abraham, Isaac and Jacob alsobuilt altars to the Lord: these would have been constructed of stoneor earth, but it is remarkable that we seldom read of their offering sacrifices on them. At times it is simply said they built an altar unto the Lord and at other times they built an altar and called upon the name of the Lord. The altars appear to have been erected as places of drawing near to God, of which sacrifice was the basis.
Moses was told that in all places where God recorded His name they should build an altar of wood or of stone and offer thereon sheep and oxen for burnt offerings and peace offerings; but such altars if made of stone were not to be made of hewn stone; for had they lifted up a tool upon it, it would have been defiled. Exodus 20:25,26 . There must be nothing of man's handiwork in approaching to God: a principle, alas, grossly violated in the professing church of God! It is added, "neither shalt thou go up by steps unto mine altar, that thy nakedness be not discovered thereon." Man's contrivance is here forbidden, for in divine things anything of his onlymanifests the utter shamelessness of that which springs from fallen nature: cf. Colossians 2:20-23 . When the tabernacle was made, minute instructions were given to Moses, and he was to make everything as had been shownhim in the mount.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Altar to the Unknown God
Whatever the origin of this inscription on the altar at Athens, it afforded the apostle Paul an admirable thesis for his discourse to the idolatrous Athenians. It was this very God he had come to reveal to them. Acts 17:23 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Altar
In the NT, as in the Septuagint , the usual term for ‘altar’ is θυσιαστήριον-a word otherwise confined to Philo, Josephus, and ecclesiastical writers-while βωμός, as contrasted with a Jewish place of sacrifice, is a heathen altar. The most striking example of the antithesis is found in 1 Maccabees 1:54-59. Antiochus Epiphanes erected a small altar to Jupiter-‘the abomination of desolation’ (1 Maccabees 1:54)-upon the θυσιαστήριον of the temple, and ‘on the twenty-fifth day of the month they sacrificed upon the idol-altar (βωμός) which was upon the altar of God (θυσιαστήριον).’ The NT contains only a single distinct reference to a pagan altar-the βωμός which St. Paul observed in Athena bearing the inscription Ἀγνώστῳ Θεῷ (Acts 17:23).
1. The altar on which sacrifices were presented to God was indispensable to OT religion. Alike in the simple cultus of patriarchal times and the elaborate ritual of fully developed Judaism, its position was central. The altar was the place of meeting between God and man, and the ritual of blood-the supposed seat of life-was the essence of the offering. Whatever details might be added, the rite of sprinkling or dashing the blood against the altar, or allowing it to flow on the ground at its base, could never be omitted. The Levitical cultus was continued in Jerusalem till the destruction of the Temple by the Romans in a.d. 70, and the attitude and practice of the early Jewish-Christian Church in reference to it form an interesting and difficult problem. It has been generally assumed that, when our Lord instituted the New Covenant in His own blood (Mark 14:24, Luke 22:20), He implicitly abrogated the Levitical law, and that, when His sacrifice was completed, the disciples must at once have perceived that it made every altar obsolete. But there is not wanting evidence that enlightenment came slowly; that the practice of the Jewish-Christian Church was not altered suddenly, but gradually and with not a little misgiving. Hort observes that ‘respecting the continued adherence to Jewish observances, nothing is said which implies either its presence or its absence’ (Judaistic Christianity, 42). But there are many clear indications that the first Christians remained Jews-McGiffert (Apostol. Age, 65) even suggests that they were ‘more devout and earnest Jews than they had ever been’-continuing to worship God at the altar in the Temple like all their countrymen. ‘They had no desire to be renegades, nor was it possible to regard them as such. Even if they did not maintain and observe the whole cultus, yet this did not endanger their allegiance.… The Christians did not lay themselves open to the charge of violating the law’ (Weizsäcker, Apostol. Age, i. 46), They went up to the Temple at the hour of prayer (Acts 3:1), which was the hour of sacrifice; they took upon themselves vows, and offered sacrifices for release (Acts 21:20-21); and even St. Paul, the champion of spiritual freedom, brought sacrifices (προσφοράς) to lay on the altar in the Holy City (Acts 24:17). The inference that the New Covenant left no place for any altar or Mosaic sacrifice is first explicitly drawn by the writer of Hebrews (see Temple).
2. Apart from a passing allusion to the altars which were thrown down in Elijah’s time (Romans 11:3), St. Paul makes two uses of the θυσιαστήριον in the Temple. (1) In vindicating the right of ministers of the gospel to live at the charge of the Christian community, he instances the well-known Levitical practice: ‘those who wait upon the altar have their portion with (συμμερίζονται) the altar’ (1 Corinthians 9:13), part of the offering being burnt in the altar fire, and part reserved for the priests, to whom the law gives the privilege ‘altaris esse socios in dividenda victima’ (Beza). Schmiedel (in loc.) thinks that the reference may be to priests who serve ‘am Tempel der Heiden wie der Juden,’ but probably for St. Paul the only θυσιαστήριον was the altar on which sacrifice was offered to the God of Israel. (2) In arguing against the possibility of partaking of the Eucharist and joining in idolatrous festivals, St. Paul appeals to the ethical significance of sacrifice, regarded not as an atonement but as a sacred meal between God and man. The altar being His table and the sacrifice His feast, the hospitality of table-communion is the pledge of friendship between Him and His worshippers. All who join in the sacrifice are partakers with the altar (κοινωνοὶ τοῦ θυσιαστηρίου), one might almost say commensals with God. ‘According to antique ideas, those who eat and drink together are by the very act tied to one another by a bond of friendship and mutual obligation’ (W. R. Smith, Rel. Sem.2, 247). How revolting it is, then, to pass from the altar of God or, by parity of reasoning, from the τρὰπεζα τοῦ Κυρίου, to the orgies of pagan gods, the τρὰπεζα δαιμονίων.
3. The writer of Hebrews refers to the old Jewish altar and to a new Christian one. (1) Reasoning somewhat in the manner of Philo, he notes the emergence of a mysterious priest from a tribe which has given none of its sons to minister at the altar, and on this circumstance bases an ingenious argument for the imperfection of the Levitical priesthood, and so of the whole Mosaic system (Hebrews 7:13). (2) Against those Christians who occupy themselves with (sacrificial) meats the writer says: ‘We have an altar, whereof they have no right to eat who serve the tabernacle’ (Hebrews 13:10). Few sentences have given rise to so much misunderstanding, ‘Ἔχομεν can only denote Christians, and what is said of them must be allegorically intended, for they have no τῇ σκηνῇ λατρεύοντες, and no θυσιαστήριον in the proper sense of the word’ (von Soden). The point which the writer seeks to make is that in connexion with the great Christian sacrifice there is nothing corresponding to the feasts of ordinary Jewish (or of heathen) sacrifices. Its τύπος is the sacrifice of the Day of Atonement, no part of which was eaten by priest or worshipper, the mind alone receiving the benefit of the offering. So we Christians serve an altar from which we obtain a purely spiritual advantage. Whether the writer actually visualized the Cross of Christ as the altar at which all His followers minister, like λειτουργοί in the Tabernacle,-as many have supposed-is doubtful. Figurative language must not be unduly pressed,
The writer of Rev., whose heaven is a replica of the earthly Temple and its solemn ritual, sees underneath the altar the souls of martyrs-the blood poured out as an oblation (cf. Philippians 2:17, 2 Timothy 4:6) representing the life or ψυχή-and hears them crying, like the blood of Abel, for vengeance (Revelation 6:9-10; cf. En. 22.5). In Revelation 8:3 and Revelation 9:13 the θυσιαστήριον is not the altar of burnt-offering but that of incense (see Incense). In Revelation 14:18 the prophet sees an angel come out from the altar, the spirit or genius of fire, an Iranian conception; and in Revelation 16:7 he personifies the altar itself and makes it proclaim the truth and justice of God.
Literature.-I. Benzinger, Heb. Arch., Freiburg, 1894, p. 378f.; W. Nowack, Heb. Arch., Freiburg, 1894, ii. 17f.; A. Edersheim, The Temple, its Ministry and Services, London, 1874; Schürer, History of the Jewish People (Eng. tr. of GJV).] , ii. i. 207f.; W. R. Smith, Rel. Sem.2, London, 1894; J. Wellhausen, Reste arab. Heidenthums, Berlin, 1887, p. 101f.; A. C. McGiffert, Apostol. Age, Edinb. 1897, p. 36f.; C. v. Weizsäcker, Apostol. Age, 2 vols., London, 1894-95, i. 43ff.
James Strahan.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Altar
Sacrifices are nearly as ancient as worship, and altars are of almost equal antiquity. Scripture speaks of altars, erected by the patriarchs, without describing their form, or the materials of which they were composed. The altar which Jacob set up at Bethel, was the stone which had served him for a pillow; Gideon sacrificed on the rock before his house.
The first altars which God commanded Moses to raise, were of earth or rough stones; and it was declared that if iron were used in constructing them they would become impure, Exodus 20:24-25 . The altar which Moses enjoined Joshua to build on Mount Ebal, was to be of unpolished stones, Deuteronomy 27:5 ; Joshua 8:31 ; and it is very probable that such were those built by Samuel, Saul, and David. The altar which Solomon erected in the temple was of brass, but filled, it is believed, with rough stones, 2 Chronicles 4:1-3 . It was twenty cubits long, twenty wide, and ten high. That built at Jerusalem, by Zerubbabel, after the return from Babylon, was of rough stones; as was that of Maccabees. Josephus says that the altar which in his time was in the temple was of rough stones, fifteen cubits high, forty long, and forty wide.
Among the Romans altars were of two kinds, the higher and the lower; the higher were intended for the celestial gods, and were called altaria, from altus; the lower were for the terrestrial and infernal gods, and were called arae. Those dedicated to the heavenly gods were raised a great height above the surface of the earth; those of the terrestrial gods were almost even with the surface; and those for the infernal deities were only holes dug in the ground called scrobiculi. Before temples were in use the altars were placed in the groves, highways, or on tops of mountains, inscribed with the names, ensigns, or characters of the respective gods to whom they belonged. The great temples at Rome generally contained three altars; the first in the sanctuary, at the foot of the statue, for incense and libations; the second before the gate of the temple, for the sacrifices of victims; and the third was a portable one for the offerings and sacred vestments or vessels to lie upon. The ancients used to swear upon the altars upon solemn occasions, such as confirming alliances, treaties of peace, &c. They were also places of refuge, and served as an asylum and sanctuary to all who fled to them, whatever their crimes were.
The principal altars among the Jews were those of incense, of burnt- offering, and the altar or table for the shew bread. The altar of incense was a small table of shittim wood covered with plates of gold. It was a cubit long, a cubit broad, and two cubits high. At the four corners were four horns. The priest, whose turn it was to officiate, burnt incense on this altar, at the time of the morning sacrifice between the sprinkling of the blood and the laying of the pieces of the victim on the altar of burnt-offering. He did the same also in the evening, between the laying of the pieces on the altar and the drink-offering. At the same time the people prayed in silence, and their prayers were offered up by the priests. The altar of burnt-offering was of shittim wood also, and carried upon the shoulders of the priests, by staves of the same wood overlaid with brass. In Moses's days it was five cubits square, and three high: but it was greatly enlarged in the days of Solomon, being twenty cubits square, and ten in height. It was covered with brass, and had a horn at each corner to which the sacrifice was tied. This altar was placed in the open air, that the smoke might not sully the inside of the tabernacle or temple. On this altar the holy fire was renewed from time to time, and kept constantly burning. Hereon, likewise, the sacrifices of lambs and bullocks were burnt, especially a lamb every morning at the third hour, or nine of the clock, and a lamb every afternoon at three, Exodus 20:24-25 ; Exodus 27:1-2 ; Exodus 27:4 ; Exodus 38:1 . The altar of burnt-offering had the privilege of being a sanctuary or place of refuge. The wilful murderer, indeed, sought protection there in vain; for by the express command of God he might be dragged to justice, even from the altar. The altar or table of shew bread was of shittim wood also, covered with plates of gold, and had a border round it adorned with sculpture. It was two cubits long, one wide, and one and a half in height. This table stood in the sanctum sanctorum, [1] and upon it were placed the loaves of shew bread. After the return of the Jews from their captivity, and the building of the second temple, the form and size of the altars were somewhat changed.
Sacrifices according to the laws of Moses, could not be offered except by the priests; and at any other place than on the altar of the tabernacle or the temple. Furthermore, they were not to be offered to idols, nor with any superstitious rites. See Leviticus 17:1-7 ; Deuteronomy 12:15-16 . Without these precautionary measures, the true religion would hardly have been secure. If a different arrangement had been adopted, if the priests had been scattered about to various altars, without being subjected to the salutary restraint which would result from a mutual observation of each other, they would no doubt some of them have willingly consented to the worship of idols; and others, in their separate situation, would not have been in a condition to resist the wishes of the multitude, had those wishes been wrong. The necessity of sacrificing at one altar, (that of the tabernacle or temple,) is frequently and emphatically insisted on, Deuteronomy 12:13-14 ; and all other altars are disapproved, Leviticus 26:30 , compare Joshua 22:9-34 . Notwithstanding this, it appears that, subsequently to the time of Moses, especially in the days of the kings, altars were multiplied; but they fell under suspicions, although some of them were perhaps sacred to the worship of the true God. It is, nevertheless, true, that prophets, whose characters were above all suspicion, sacrificed, in some instances, in other places than the one designated by the laws, 1 Samuel 13:3-14 ; 1 Samuel 16:1-5 ; 1 Kings 18:21-40 .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Altar
Altar. Noah built an altar when he left the ark. Genesis 8:20. In the early times altars were usually built in certain spots hallowed by religious associations, e.g., where God appeared. Genesis 12:7; Genesis 13:18; Genesis 26:25; Genesis 35:1. Though generally erected for the offering of sacrifice, in some instances they appear to have been only memorials. Genesis 12:7; Exodus 17:15-16. Altars were most probably originally made of earth. The law of Moses allowed them to be made of either earth or unhewn stones. Exodus 20:24-25. I. The altar of burnt offering. It differed in construction at different times. In the tabernacle, Hebrews 10:9-1004 ff; Exodus 38:1 ff., it was comparatively small and portable. In shape it was square. It was five cubits in length, the same in breadth, and three cubits high. It was made of planks of shittim or acacia wood overlaid with brass. The interior was hollow. Exodus 27:8. At the four corners were four projections called horns, made, like the altar itself, of shittim wood overlaid with brass, Exodus 27:2, and to them the victim was bound when about to be sacrificed. Psalms 118:27. Round the altar, midway between the top and bottom, ran a projecting ledge, on which perhaps the priest stood when officiating. To the outer, edge of this, again, a grating or network of brass was affixed, and reached to the bottom of the altar. At the four corners of the network were four brazen rings, into which were inserted the staves by which the altar was carried. These staves were of the same materials as the altar itself. As the priests were forbidden to ascend the altar by steps, Exodus 20:26, it has been conjectured that a slope of earth led gradually up to the ledge from which they officiated. The place of the altar was at "the door of the tabernacle of the congregation." Exodus 40:29. In Solomon's temple the altar was considerably larger in its dimensions. It differed too in the material of which it was made, being entirely of brass. 1 Kings 8:64; 2 Chronicles 7:7. It had no grating, and instead of a single, gradual slope, the ascent to it was probably made by three successive platforms, to each of which it has been supposed that steps led. The altar erected by Herod in front of the temple was 16 cubits in height and 50 cubits in length and breadth. According to Leviticus 6:12-13, a perpetual fire was to be kept burning on the altar. II. The altar of incense, called also the golden altar to distinguish it from the altar of burnt offering, which was called the brazen altar. Exodus 38:30. That in the tabernacle was made of acacia wood, overlaid with pure gold. In shape it was square, being a cubit fn length and breadth and two cubits in height. Like the altar of burnt offering it had horns at the four corners, which were of one piece with the rest of the altar. This altar stood in the holy place, "before the vail that is by the ark of the testimony." Exodus 30:6; Exodus 40:5. The altar of Solomon's temple was similar, 1 Kings 7:48; 1 Chronicles 28:18, but was made of cedar overlaid with gold. In Acts 17:23 reference is made to an altar to an unknown god. There were several altars in Athens with this inscription, erected during the time of a plague, since they knew not what god was offended and required to be propitiated. In the New Testament the word altar does not occur in connection with Christian worship. Altar, sacrifice, priest, and temple, being typical of Christ and the Christian dispensation, have passed away. Their work was done when the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once was made. For, by one offering, he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified. 1618091924_2; Hebrews 10:14.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Repose, Altar of
(altar of repository) A bye-altar where the Sacred Host consecrated Holy Thursday is reserved for Mass of the Presanctified.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Repository, Altar of
(altar of repository) A bye-altar where the Sacred Host consecrated Holy Thursday is reserved for Mass of the Presanctified.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Stone, Altar
(portable altar) A small, flat slab of natural stone, consecrated ordinarily by a bishop, containing in a stone-covered cavity relics of two canonized martyrs, inserted in the center of the table of an altar which is not entirely consecrated. The host and chalice are placed on this stone during the Sacrifice of the Mass. The stone is portable and may be placed in any suitable altar: it really constitutes the altar.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Societies, Altar
(tabernacle societies) Groups of devout persons, usually women, who make vestments and altar linens and keep them in repair, and provide altar vessels, furniture, and ornaments. Many of these societies give the fruit of their labors to missionary and poor churches.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Vase, Altar
A vase used for flowers in decorating the altar.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Tomb, Altar
An oblong monument over a grave covered with a slab and resembling an altar.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Stole, Altar
An ornament shaped as the ends of a stole and fastened to the front of the altar in the Middle Ages.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Scripture, Altar in
Many altars are mentioned in Scripture, e.g., those of Noe and Abraham, altars erected for the worship of idols, altars of holocaust and of incense, of the Tabernacle and of the Temple, and the altar described in the Apocalypse.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Steps, Altar
Of wood, stone, or brick, extend around the altar on three sides. There are three, five, or seven at the high altar, while side altars must have at least one.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Screen, Altar
Originally a piece of ornamental precious cloth suspended above the altar at the rear and known as the dossel or dorsal. A permanent or movable structure of metal, stone, or wood was later introduced instead of the cloth; the side facing the church is called the retable; the reverse, the counterretable. When richly ornamented with panels, statues, etc., the structure is called a reredos. Such altar decorations are also known as altar-pieces.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Vessels, Altar
Sacred vessels used in the worship of the Blessed Sacrament. They are the chalice, paten, ciborium, and ostensorium or monstrance.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Side, Altar
That part of the altar facing the congregation. The Epistle side of the altar is termed the left, and the Gospel, the right, with reference to the altar crucifix.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Wine, Altar
Wine made from the genuine juice of the grape, used as one of the Eucharistic elements.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Altar
The first altar of which we have any account is that built by Noah when he left the ark. (Genesis 8:20 ) In the early times altars were usually built in certain spots hallowed by religious associations, e.g., where God appeared. (Genesis 12:7 ; 13:18 ; 26:25 ; 35:1 ) Though generally erected for the offering of sacrifice, in some instances they appear to have been only memorials. (Genesis 12:7 ; Exodus 17:15,16 ) Altars were most probably originally made of earth. The law of Moses allowed them to be made of either earth or unhewn stones. (Exodus 20:24,25 ) I. The Altar of Burnt Offering . It differed in construction at different times. (1) In the tabernacle, ( Exodus 27:1 ) ff.; Exodus 38:1 ff., it was comparatively small and portable. In shape it was square. It as five cubits in length, the same in breadth, and three cubits high. It was made of planks of shittim (or acacia) wood overlaid with brass. The interior was hollow. ( Exodus 27:8 ) At the four corners were four projections called horns made, like the altar itself, of shittim wood overlaid with brass, (Exodus 27:2 ) and to them the victim was bound when about to be sacrificed. (Psalm 118:27 ) Round the altar, midway between the top and bottom, ran a projecting ledge, on which perhaps the priest stood when officiating. To the outer edge of this, again, a grating or network of brass was affixed, and reached to the bottom of the altar. At the four corners of the network were four brazen rings, into which were inserted the staves by which the altar was carried. These staves were of the same material as the altar itself. As the priests were forbidden to ascend the altar by steps, (Exodus 20:26 ) it has been conjectured that a slope of earth led gradually up to the ledge from which they officiated. The place of the altar was at the door of the tabernacle of the congregation.)" (Exodus 40:29 ) (2) In Solomon's temple the altar was considerably larger in its dimensions. It differed too in the material of which it was made, being entirely of brass. (1 Kings 8:64 ; 2 Chronicles 7:7 ) It had no grating, and instead of a single gradual slope, the ascent to it was probably made by three successive platforms, to each of which it has been supposed that steps led. The altar erected by Herod in front of the temple was 15 cubits in height and 50 cubits in length and breadth. According to (Leviticus 6:12,13 ) a perpetual fire was to be kept burning on the altar. II. The Altar of Incense , called also the golden altar to distinguish it from the altar of burnt offering which was called the brazen altar. ( Exodus 38:30 ) (a) That in the tabernacle was made of acacia wood, overlaid with pure gold. In shape it was square, being a cubit in length and breadth and two cubits in height. Like the altar of burnt offering it had horns at the four corners, which were of one piece with the rest of the altar. This altar stood in the holy place, "before the vail that is by the ark of the testimony." (Exodus 30:6 ; 40:5 ) (b) The altar of Solomon's temple was similar, (1 Kings 7:48 ; 1 Chronicles 28:18 ) but was made of cedar overlaid with gold. III. Other Altars . In ( Acts 17:23 ) reference is made to an alter to an unknown God. There were several altars in Athens with this inscription, erected during the time of a plague. Since they knew not what god was offended and required to be propitiated.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Lights on the Altar
(See ALTAR LIGHTS.) In addition to what isset forth in the article to which the reader is referred, wereproduce from Wheatley on the Prayer Book the following: "Amongother ornaments of the Church were two lights enjoined by theInjunctions of King Edward VI to be set upon the Altar as asignificant ceremony to represent the Light which Christ's Gospelbrought into the world. And this, too, was ordered by the very sameInjunction which prohibited all other lights and tapers that usedto be superstitiously set before images or shrines. And theselights, used time out of mind in the Church, are still continuedin most, if not all, Cathedral and Collegiate churches andchapels, . . . and ought also by this rubric, to be used in allparish churches and chapels."
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Altar Vessels
(See VESSELS, SACRED).
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Altar
1: θυσιαστήριον (Strong's #2379 — Noun Neuter — thusiasterion — thoo-see-as-tay'-ree-on ) probably the neuter of the adjective thusiasterios, is derived from thusiazo, "to sacrifice." Accordingly it denotes an "altar" for the sacrifice of victims, though it was also used for the "altar" of incense, e.g., Luke 1:11 . In the NT this word is reserved for the "altar" of the true God, Matthew 5:23,24 ; 23:18-20,35 ; Luke 11:51 ; 1 Corinthians 9:13 ; 10:18 , in contrast to bomos, No. 2, below. In the Sept. thusiasterion is mostly, but not entirely, used for the divienely appointed altar; it is used for idol "altars," e.g., in Judges 2:2 ; 6:25 ; 2 Kings 16:10 .
2: βωμός (Strong's #1041 — Noun Masculine — bomos — bo'-mos ) properly, "an elevated place," always denotes either a pagan "altar" or an "altar" reared without Divine appointment. In the NT the only place where this is found is Acts 17:23 , as this is the only mention of such. Three times in the Sept., but only in the Apocrypha, bomos is used for the Divine altar. In Joshua 22 the Sept. translators have carefully observed the distinction, using bomos for the altar which the two and a half tribes erected, Joshua 22:10,11,16,19,23,26,34 , no Divine injunction being given for this; in Joshua 22:19,28,29 , where the altar ordained of God is mentioned, thusiasterion is used.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Super-Altar
A small portable slab of stone used to consecrateupon and placed on an unconsecrated Altar or a wooden Altar.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Altar
From the time of Noah there are biblical records of people who erected altars, usually to commemorate special religious experiences that people had with God. Some stories record the offering of sacrifices on these altars (Genesis 8:20; Genesis 12:7; Genesis 13:18; Genesis 22:9; Genesis 26:25; Genesis 33:20; Genesis 35:3; Exodus 17:15).
Even after the establishment of the tabernacle with its specially appointed bronze altar of sacrifice, Israelites at times erected altars to commemorate important events (Deuteronomy 27:5; Joshua 8:30-31; Joshua 22:10; Judges 6:24-26; 2 Samuel 24:18-25; 1 Kings 18:30). But these altars were not to be permanent or lavish. They were to consist simply of a mound of earth or a heap of loose stones, depending upon which material was available in the region. The altars were not to be so high that they required steps, in order to avoid any immodesty which might occur if a priest lifted up his robes while climbing the steps (Exodus 20:24-26).
Altar
In the NT, as in the Septuagint , the usual term for ‘altar’ is θυσιαστήριον-a word otherwise confined to Philo, Josephus, and ecclesiastical writers-while βωμός, as contrasted with a Jewish place of sacrifice, is a heathen altar. The most striking example of the antithesis is found in 1 Maccabees 1:54-59. Antiochus Epiphanes erected a small altar to Jupiter-‘the abomination of desolation’ (1 Maccabees 1:54)-upon the θυσιαστήριον of the temple, and ‘on the twenty-fifth day of the month they sacrificed upon the idol-altar (βωμός) which was upon the altar of God (θυσιαστήριον).’ The NT contains only a single distinct reference to a pagan altar-the βωμός which St. Paul observed in Athena bearing the inscription Ἀγνώστῳ Θεῷ (Acts 17:23).
1. The altar on which sacrifices were presented to God was indispensable to OT religion. Alike in the simple cultus of patriarchal times and the elaborate ritual of fully developed Judaism, its position was central. The altar was the place of meeting between God and man, and the ritual of blood-the supposed seat of life-was the essence of the offering. Whatever details might be added, the rite of sprinkling or dashing the blood against the altar, or allowing it to flow on the ground at its base, could never be omitted. The Levitical cultus was continued in Jerusalem till the destruction of the Temple by the Romans in a.d. 70, and the attitude and practice of the early Jewish-Christian Church in reference to it form an interesting and difficult problem. It has been generally assumed that, when our Lord instituted the New Covenant in His own blood (Mark 14:24, Luke 22:20), He implicitly abrogated the Levitical law, and that, when His sacrifice was completed, the disciples must at once have perceived that it made every altar obsolete. But there is not wanting evidence that enlightenment came slowly; that the practice of the Jewish-Christian Church was not altered suddenly, but gradually and with not a little misgiving. Hort observes that ‘respecting the continued adherence to Jewish observances, nothing is said which implies either its presence or its absence’ (Judaistic Christianity, 42). But there are many clear indications that the first Christians remained Jews-McGiffert (Apostol. Age, 65) even suggests that they were ‘more devout and earnest Jews than they had ever been’-continuing to worship God at the altar in the Temple like all their countrymen. ‘They had no desire to be renegades, nor was it possible to regard them as such. Even if they did not maintain and observe the whole cultus, yet this did not endanger their allegiance.… The Christians did not lay themselves open to the charge of violating the law’ (Weizsäcker, Apostol. Age, i. 46), They went up to the Temple at the hour of prayer (Acts 3:1), which was the hour of sacrifice; they took upon themselves vows, and offered sacrifices for release (Acts 21:20-21); and even St. Paul, the champion of spiritual freedom, brought sacrifices (προσφοράς) to lay on the altar in the Holy City (Acts 24:17). The inference that the New Covenant left no place for any altar or Mosaic sacrifice is first explicitly drawn by the writer of Hebrews (see Temple).
2. Apart from a passing allusion to the altars which were thrown down in Elijah’s time (Romans 11:3), St. Paul makes two uses of the θυσιαστήριον in the Temple. (1) In vindicating the right of ministers of the gospel to live at the charge of the Christian community, he instances the well-known Levitical practice: ‘those who wait upon the altar have their portion with (συμμερίζονται) the altar’ (1 Corinthians 9:13), part of the offering being burnt in the altar fire, and part reserved for the priests, to whom the law gives the privilege ‘altaris esse socios in dividenda victima’ (Beza). Schmiedel (in loc.) thinks that the reference may be to priests who serve ‘am Tempel der Heiden wie der Juden,’ but probably for St. Paul the only θυσιαστήριον was the altar on which sacrifice was offered to the God of Israel. (2) In arguing against the possibility of partaking of the Eucharist and joining in idolatrous festivals, St. Paul appeals to the ethical significance of sacrifice, regarded not as an atonement but as a sacred meal between God and man. The altar being His table and the sacrifice His feast, the hospitality of table-communion is the pledge of friendship between Him and His worshippers. All who join in the sacrifice are partakers with the altar (κοινωνοὶ τοῦ θυσιαστηρίου), one might almost say commensals with God. ‘According to antique ideas, those who eat and drink together are by the very act tied to one another by a bond of friendship and mutual obligation’ (W. R. Smith, Rel. Sem.2, 247). How revolting it is, then, to pass from the altar of God or, by parity of reasoning, from the τρὰπεζα τοῦ Κυρίου, to the orgies of pagan gods, the τρὰπεζα δαιμονίων.
3. The writer of Hebrews refers to the old Jewish altar and to a new Christian one. (1) Reasoning somewhat in the manner of Philo, he notes the emergence of a mysterious priest from a tribe which has given none of its sons to minister at the altar, and on this circumstance bases an ingenious argument for the imperfection of the Levitical priesthood, and so of the whole Mosaic system (Hebrews 7:13). (2) Against those Christians who occupy themselves with (sacrificial) meats the writer says: ‘We have an altar, whereof they have no right to eat who serve the tabernacle’ (Hebrews 13:10). Few sentences have given rise to so much misunderstanding, ‘Ἔχομεν can only denote Christians, and what is said of them must be allegorically intended, for they have no τῇ σκηνῇ λατρεύοντες, and no θυσιαστήριον in the proper sense of the word’ (von Soden). The point which the writer seeks to make is that in connexion with the great Christian sacrifice there is nothing corresponding to the feasts of ordinary Jewish (or of heathen) sacrifices. Its τύπος is the sacrifice of the Day of Atonement, no part of which was eaten by priest or worshipper, the mind alone receiving the benefit of the offering. So we Christians serve an altar from which we obtain a purely spiritual advantage. Whether the writer actually visualized the Cross of Christ as the altar at which all His followers minister, like λειτουργοί in the Tabernacle,-as many have supposed-is doubtful. Figurative language must not be unduly pressed,
The writer of Rev., whose heaven is a replica of the earthly Temple and its solemn ritual, sees underneath the altar the souls of martyrs-the blood poured out as an oblation (cf. Philippians 2:17, 2 Timothy 4:6) representing the life or ψυχή-and hears them crying, like the blood of Abel, for vengeance (Revelation 6:9-10; cf. En. 22.5). In Revelation 8:3 and Revelation 9:13 the θυσιαστήριον is not the altar of burnt-offering but that of incense (see Incense). In Revelation 14:18 the prophet sees an angel come out from the altar, the spirit or genius of fire, an Iranian conception; and in Revelation 16:7 he personifies the altar itself and makes it proclaim the truth and justice of God.
Literature.-I. Benzinger, Heb. Arch., Freiburg, 1894, p. 378f.; W. Nowack, Heb. Arch., Freiburg, 1894, ii. 17f.; A. Edersheim, The Temple, its Ministry and Services, London, 1874; Schürer, History of the Jewish People (Eng. tr. of GJV).] , ii. i. 207f.; W. R. Smith, Rel. Sem.2, London, 1894; J. Wellhausen, Reste arab. Heidenthums, Berlin, 1887, p. 101f.; A. C. McGiffert, Apostol. Age, Edinb. 1897, p. 36f.; C. v. Weizsäcker, Apostol. Age, 2 vols., London, 1894-95, i. 43ff.
James Strahan.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Altar Cross
The cross surmounting the Altar, made usually ofpolished brass or of some precious metal. The Altar Cross is handeddown to us from the Primitive Church, so that to-day wheresoeverthe English or the American flag waves there "the Altar and theCross" are set up. The Cross is placed over the middle of theAltar, in the most sacred and prominent part of the Church, "inorder that the holy symbol of our Faith may be constantly beforethe eyes of all who worship therein, to shine through the gloom ofthis world and point them to the skies."
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Altar
The Holy Table, of wood or stone, on which the Sacrament ofthe Lord's Body and Blood is offered to God as a "Sacrifice of Praiseand Thanksgiving." "Altar" and "Table" are used interchangeablyin Holy Scripture, and both words are used in the Prayer Book forthe same thing. From the very earliest times the Altar has alwaysbeen the most prominent object in the Church, being placed at theend of the chancel and elevated, being approached by three or moresteps. Architecturally as well as devotionally the Altar is thedistinctive feature, the objective point of the building to whichall else conforms. Properly speaking, the building is erected forthe Altar, and not the Altar for the building. (See LORD'S TABLE).
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Altar Linen
The linen pieces used in decorating the Altar forthe celebration of the Holy Communion are so called. There is firstthe "fair white linen cloth," the width of the top of the Altar,and falling over the ends fifteen or twenty inches ending with afringe. It is usually embroidered with five crosses to representthe five wounds of our Lord. Other pieces are the Corporal to coverthe middle part of the Altar and on which are placed the Paten andChalice during the Celebration; the "fair linen cloth," or thinlawn veil required by the rubric to cover the elements afterconsecration; the Purificators, and also the Pall,—each of whichis described under its proper title (which see).
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Altar Rail
The railing enclosing the Sanctuary in which the Altarstands, and at which the communicants kneel in receiving the HolyCommunion, is called, in the Institution Office the Altar Rail.Supposed to have been first introduced by Archbishop Laud as aprotection of the Altar against the lawlessness and irreverence ofthe Puritans.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Altar Lights
Two candles in candlesticks placed on the retable ofthe Altar and lighted at the celebration of the Holy Eucharist;frequently called Eucharistic Lights. They are used to symbolizeour Lord as the Light of the world in His two Natures, Humanand Divine. The symbolical use of lighted tapers in Divine Serviceis of primitive antiquity and their use is being generally restoredin both the English and American branches of the Church. This isevidenced by the table in the Tourist's Church Guide for 1898, inwhich it appears that in 1882 there were 581 churches in which theAltar Lights were used, while in 1898 the number had increased to4,334. (See LIGHTS ON THE ALTAR).

Sentence search

Altar Crucifix - A crucifix, large enough to be seen by both celebrant and laity, which must be on the Altar whenever Mass is celebrated. If the Crucifixion be the subject of the Altar-piece or picture behind the Altar, this will suffice for the Altar-crucifix
Main Altar - (altar, main) The chief Altar in a church, mounted by steps, and in the center of the sanctuary. At this Altar most ceremonies take place
Altar, Lady - (Lady Altar) That Altar which occupies the most prominent position in a church after the main Altar, viz
Our Lady, Altar of - (Lady Altar) That Altar which occupies the most prominent position in a church after the main Altar, viz
Lady Altar - (Lady Altar) That Altar which occupies the most prominent position in a church after the main Altar, viz
Altar, High - (altar, main) The chief Altar in a church, mounted by steps, and in the center of the sanctuary. At this Altar most ceremonies take place
Altar, Main - (altar, main) The chief Altar in a church, mounted by steps, and in the center of the sanctuary. At this Altar most ceremonies take place
Altar of Our Lady - (Lady Altar) That Altar which occupies the most prominent position in a church after the main Altar, viz
High Altar - (altar, main) The chief Altar in a church, mounted by steps, and in the center of the sanctuary. At this Altar most ceremonies take place
Altar Side - That part of the Altar facing the congregation. The Epistle side of the Altar is termed the left, and the Gospel, the right, with reference to the Altar crucifix
Side, Altar - That part of the Altar facing the congregation. The Epistle side of the Altar is termed the left, and the Gospel, the right, with reference to the Altar crucifix
Lord's Table, the - A Prayer Book name for the Altar (which see). In Scriptural usage the words "Altar" and "Table" are synonymous,that is, they are different names for the same thing in differentaspects or as respects different uses of it. The word "Altar" isalso used in the Prayer Book, in the Office of Institution for theinducting of a Priest to the charge of a Parish, in which he isdescribed as "one who serves at the Altar"; is directed to be"received within the rails of the Altar," and again, to "kneel atthe Altar to present his supplication for himself
Altar - ...
Old Testament The Hebrew word for Altar that is used most frequently in the Old Testament is formed from the verb for slaughter and means literally, “slaughter place. ” Altars were used primarily as places of sacrifice, especially animal sacrifice. ...
While animals were a common sacrifice in the Old Testament, Altars were also used to sacrifice grain, fruit, wine, and incense. They were presented in baskets to the priest who set the basket before the Altar (Deuteronomy 26:2-4 ). Incense was burned on Altars to purify after slaughterings and to please God with sweet fragrance. ...
“Altar” is distinct from “temple. ” Whereas temple implies a building or roofed structure, Altar implies an open structure. Altar and temple were often adjacent, though not all Altars had a temple adjacent. The reference to Abraham's sacrifice of Isaac (Genesis 22:1 ) may indicate that the animal to be sacrificed was placed on the Altar alive, but bound, and slaughtered on the Altar. By the time of the Levitical laws, the animal was slaughtered in front of the Altar, dismembered, and only the fatty portions to be burned were placed on the Altar (for example, Leviticus 1:2-9 ). ...
In the Old Testament, Altars are distinguished by the material used in their construction. The simplest Altars, and perhaps oldest, were the earthen Altars ( Exodus 20:24 ). This type Altar was made of either mud-brick or a raised roughly shaped mound of dirt. Mud-brick was a common building material in Mesopotamia, so mud-brick Altars would have appeared most likely in Mesopotamia. An earthen Altar would not have been very practical for permanently settled people, for the rainy season each year would damage or destroy the Altar. This type Altar might be more indicative of a nomadic people who move regularly and are less concerned with the need for a permanent Altar. ...
The stone Altar is the most commonly mentioned Altar in biblical records and the most frequently found in excavations from Palestine. A single large stone could serve as an Altar ( Judges 6:19-23 ; Judges 13:19-20 ; 1 Samuel 14:31-35 ). Similarly, unhewn stones could be carefully stacked to form an Altar (1 Kings 1:50-514 , 1 Kings 18:30-35 ). Such stone Altars were probably the most common form of Altar prior to the building of the Solomonic Temple. A number of examples of stone Altars have been excavated in Palestine. ) had such a stone Altar. The Hebrew stone Altars were not to have steps (Exodus 20:25-26 ), probably in part to distinguish them from Canaanite Altars which did have steps. A striking circular Canaanite Altar dating from 2500 B. Four steps led up to the top of the Altar. Apparently in later times, the requirement forbidding steps on Hebrew Altars was not enforced, for in Ezekiel's vision of the restored Temple, the Altar has three levels and many steps. ...
Other stone Altars have been escavated in Palestine. ...
The third type Altar mentioned in the Old Testament is the bronze Altar. The central Altar in the court of Solomon's temple was a bronze Altar. Yet is unclear whether the entire Altar was made of bronze, or if it had a bronze overlay on a stone Altar. It is also possible that the bronze portion was a grate set on top of the otherwise stone Altar (Exodus 27:4 ). This Altar is regularly known as the Altar of burnt offering . The earlier tabernacle had a similar Altar made of acacia (or shittim, KJV) wood overlaid with bronze (Exodus 27:1-2 ). The tabernacle Altar was smaller, only 5 cubits square and 3 cubits high. The location of the Altar of burnt offering of the tabernacle and Solomon's Temple is not given specifically. Generally reconstructions of the tabernacle and Temple locate the Altar in the center of the courtyard, but the text seems to favor a location near the entrance of the tabernacle/Temple structure. The rationale was probably to locate the Altar as close as possible to the focal point of God's presence, near the ark itself. ...
Ezekiel's vision of the restored Temple had the Altar of burnt offering located in the center of the courtyard. Although the dimensions are not fully given in the text, it seems that this Altar was approximately 18 cubits square and 12 cubits high (Ezekiel 43:13-17 ). Ezekiel's Altar had three superimposed levels, each slightly smaller than the preceding, and had steps from the east leading up to the top. ...
Both the Altar of the tabernacle and that of Ezekiel are described as having horns. It is likely that the Altar of burnt offering in Solomon's Temple also had horns. The stone Altar found at Beersheba has such horns preserved. Apparently grasping the horns of the Altar was a way of seeking sanctuary or protection when one was charged with a serious offense (1618091924_58 ; 1 Kings 2:28-34 ; compare Exodus 21:12-14 ). More importantly, the horns of the Altar were the place where blood from a sacrificial animal was applied for atonement from sin (for example, Exodus 29:12 ; Leviticus 4:7 ). Jeremiah graphically described the people's sin as being so severe that they were engraved on the horns of the Altar (Jeremiah 17:1 ). During certain festivals a sacred procession led into the Temple and up to the horns of the Altar (Psalm 118:27 ). ...
During the reign of Ahaz, the bronze Altar or Altar of burnt offering in Solomon's Temple was displaced by an Altar that Ahaz had built on a Syrian model (2 Kings 16:10-16 ). This Altar was apparently larger than the bronze Altar of Solomon and was placed in the central position in the courtyard to be the main Altar of sacrifice. ...
No biblical description exists for the Altar of burnt offering from the Second Temple. However, such an Altar was constructed even before the Temple was rebuilt (Ezra 3:2 ). Josephus described the Altar in the rebuilt Temple of Herod. He wrote that the Altar was fifty cubits square and fifteen cubits high with a ramp leading to the top. This Altar would have been much larger than the earlier ones. ...
A fourth type of Altar mentioned in the Bible is the gold Altar or Altar of incense . The incense Altar is described in Exodus as constructed of acacia wood, overlaid with gold, with dimensions one cubit square and two cubits high (Exodus 30:1-6 ). Like the Altar of burnt offering, the Altar of incense had horns on the four corners. As its name implies, incense was burned on this Altar. ...
Another Hebrew word for Altar that is used infrequently in the Old Testament means literally, “high place” (Hebrew, bamah ). The “high place” may have been itself a kind of Altar, though this is not certain. The circular Canaanite Altar mentioned above may be an example of a “high place,” an elevated place of sacrifice and worship. ...
New Testament The Greek word used for Altar literally translates “place of sacrifice. ” New Testament references to Altars concern proper worship (Matthew 5:23-24 ) and hypocrisy in worship (Matthew 23:18-20 ). The Altar of incense described in the Old Testament (Exodus 30:1-6 ) is mentioned in Luke (Luke 1:11 ). Several New Testament references to Altars refer back to Old Testament Altar events (Romans 11:3 ; James 2:21 ). In Revelation, John described a golden Altar (Revelation 9:13 ) that, like the Old Testament bronze Altar, had horns. ...
While direct references to Altar and the sacrifice of Jesus Christ are few in the New Testament (Romans 13:10 ), the message that Jesus Christ is the ultimate sacrifice who puts us right with God is the theme of the New Testament. ...
Theological Significance Altars in the Bible were places of sacrifice. Beyond that function, Altars also were places of God's presence. The patriarchal narratives regularly record the building of an Altar at the site of a theophany, a place where God had appeared to an individual (Genesis 12:7 ; Genesis 26:24-25 ). It was quite natural to build an Altar and commemorate the appearance of God with a sacrifice. The Altar of burnt offering then came to signify more of a sense of reconciliation or mediation. The worshiper brought a sacrifice to the Altar where it was burned and thereby given to God
Altar Protector - (altar-cover, vespebale, or stragulum) A cover of cloth, baize, or velvet, of any color, though usually green or red, used on the Altar outside the time of sacred functions, to prevent staining or soiling of the Altar-cloth
Altar Cover - (altar-cover, vespebale, or stragulum) A cover of cloth, baize, or velvet, of any color, though usually green or red, used on the Altar outside the time of sacred functions, to prevent staining or soiling of the Altar-cloth
Stragulum - (altar-cover, vespebale, or stragulum) A cover of cloth, baize, or velvet, of any color, though usually green or red, used on the Altar outside the time of sacred functions, to prevent staining or soiling of the Altar-cloth
Vespebale - (altar-cover, vespebale, or stragulum) A cover of cloth, baize, or velvet, of any color, though usually green or red, used on the Altar outside the time of sacred functions, to prevent staining or soiling of the Altar-cloth
Antependium - ) The hangings or screen in front of the Altar; an Altar cloth; the frontal
Ambitus Altaris - (Latin: space around an Altar), Altar enclosure in ancient churches, usually separated from choir enclosure
Altar - The Hebrew word for Altar is mizbeah [1], from a verbal root meaning "to slaughter. " In the developed temple ritual, the same word is used for both the Altar of holocausts and the Altar of incense. Thus, an Altar is a place where sacrifice is offered, even if it is not an event involving slaughter. ...
Altars could be natural objects or man-made constructs. Four materials are recorded as being used in Altars: stone, earth, metal, and brick. Archaeology has provided numerous examples of Altars from Palestine dating back to approximately 3000 b. An Altar could stand alone, or it was located in the courtyard of a shrine. ...
Their Jerusalem temple had two Altars: the Altar of incense and the Altar of holocausts. The Altar of incense was placed inside the sanctuary in front of the curtain screening the Holy of Holies. Twice a day, incense was burned on the Altar. ...
The Altar of holocausts stood in the courtyard of the temple. Like the other objects in the courtyard, the Altar was made of bronze. Ahaz replaced this Altar with one modeled on an alter he had seen in Damascus (2 Kings 16 ). He moved the old Altar, using it for divination. In Ezekiel's vision the courtyard Altar also was horned (Ezekiel 43:15 ). ...
Altars were places where the divine and human worlds interacted. Altars were places of exchange, communication, and influence. God responded actively to Altar activity. The contest between Elijah and the prophets of Baal involving an Altar demonstrated interaction between Yahweh and Baal. Noah built an Altar and offered a sacrifice to Yahweh. In the patriarchal period, Altars were markers of place, commemorating an encounter with God (Genesis 12:7 ), or physical signs of habitation. Abraham built an Altar where he pitched his tent between Bethel and Ai. Presumably at that Altar he "called on the name of the Lord" (Genesis 12:8 ). Perhaps there was no true communication at the Altar between Bethel and Ai. ...
Sacrifices were the primary medium of exchange in Altar interactions. It was sprinkled against the Altar (Leviticus 1 ); once a year, blood was smeared on the horns of the incense Altar. ...
The horns of the Altar may have functioned as boundary markers, setting apart the sacred space that was the actual place of intersection of the divine and human spheres. In the stark and moving story of Abraham's encounter with God at Moriah, Abraham built an Altar and arranged the wood on it (Genesis 22:9 ). After Isaac was laid on the Altar, but before he was sacrificed, God proclaimed his recognition that Isaac had "not [3] withheld. " By placing Isaac on the Altar, Abraham transferred him from the profane to the sacred. ...
This sacred Altar and its horns, where the atoning blood was splashed, provided a place of sanctuary. The Altar was a place where an unintentional murderer could gain a haven (Exodus 21:13-14 ). If the murder was premeditated, however, then the Altar was clearly profaned by the murderer's presence and the individual could be taken away and killed. In an oracle against Israel (Amos 3:14 ), God declared that "the horns of the Altar will be cut off and fall to the ground. ...
After the exile, the first thing to be rebuilt was the Altar. The temple was ultimately secondary to the Altar. In chastising the religious establishment, Jesus underlined the sacredness of the Altar, making clear his understanding that the Altar "makes the gift sacred" (Matthew 23:19 ). In Revelation the Altar in the heavenly temple shelters martyred souls and even speaks (Revelation 16:7 ). The New Testament writer of Hebrews (13:10) implies that the ultimate Altar is the cross
Piscina - ) A niche near the Altar in a church, containing a small basin for rinsing Altar vessels
Altars in the Temple of Jerusalem - The Altar of holocaust was located in front of the Temple proper and the Altar of incense stood in the Holy Place before the veil covering the door to the Holy of Holies. Solomon's Altar was similar in form to that of the Tabernacle, but larger, measuring 20 cubits in length and width and 10 in height, and constructed of unhewn stone and earth covered with plates of brass, hence called "brazen Altar. Antiochus Epiphanes desecrated this second Altar, 168, and on that account it was completely removed by Judas Machabeus, 165, and a new one was erected which apparently remained until the destruction of Herod's Temple by the Romans 70 A. The Altar of incense in Solomon's Temple was of the same dimensions as that of the Tabernacle and made of cedar wood overlaid with gold, hence called "golden Altar. " Its history repeats that of the Altar of holocaust. Near this Altar took place the annunciation to Zachary of the birth of John the Baptist (Luke 1)
Altar, Portable - (portable Altar) A small, flat slab of natural stone, consecrated ordinarily by a bishop, containing in a stone-covered cavity relics of two canonized martyrs, inserted in the center of the table of an Altar which is not entirely consecrated. The stone is portable and may be placed in any suitable Altar: it really constitutes the Altar
Altar Stone - (portable Altar) A small, flat slab of natural stone, consecrated ordinarily by a bishop, containing in a stone-covered cavity relics of two canonized martyrs, inserted in the center of the table of an Altar which is not entirely consecrated. The stone is portable and may be placed in any suitable Altar: it really constitutes the Altar
Stone, Altar - (portable Altar) A small, flat slab of natural stone, consecrated ordinarily by a bishop, containing in a stone-covered cavity relics of two canonized martyrs, inserted in the center of the table of an Altar which is not entirely consecrated. The stone is portable and may be placed in any suitable Altar: it really constitutes the Altar
Super-Altar - A small portable slab of stone used to consecrateupon and placed on an unconsecrated Altar or a wooden Altar
Altar of Repose - (altar of repository) A bye-altar where the Sacred Host consecrated Holy Thursday is reserved for Mass of the Presanctified
Altar of Repository - (altar of repository) A bye-altar where the Sacred Host consecrated Holy Thursday is reserved for Mass of the Presanctified
Repose, Altar of - (altar of repository) A bye-altar where the Sacred Host consecrated Holy Thursday is reserved for Mass of the Presanctified
Repository, Altar of - (altar of repository) A bye-altar where the Sacred Host consecrated Holy Thursday is reserved for Mass of the Presanctified
Altar - In the old church in the wilderness, there were three Altars erected. One, called the Altar of incense; another, the Altar of burnt offerings; and the third, the Altar, or table of shew-bread. These material Altars were all typical of Christ. And so jealous was the Lord concerning the Altar, on which all offerings were to be made, that the whole of the materials of which it was formed were to be of earth only; or, if of stone, it was not to be hewn stone. " (Exodus 20:24-26) For, as every Altar represented Christ, it was lessening Christ's dignity and the infinite value of his sacrifice, to presume to mingle any thing with this. Now then, as Christ is our New Testament Altar, let us see to it, that we bring nothing to offer upon this Altar of our own. Let Jesus be all and in all; both the Sacrifice and the Sacrificer, the High Priest, the Offering, and the Altar. We have (saith Paul) an Altar whereof they have no right to eat which serve the tabernacle. (Hebrews 13:10) I cannot forbear remarking, that seeing the holy jealousy of the Lord, as noted in these things, how very wrong must it be, not to say profane, to call the communion table the Altar, and to talk of companions to the Altar, in the books so called, as if such things could be companions to Christ
Gospel Side - The north side of the Altar (the left side as we facethe Altar) at which the Holy Gospel is read
Corporal - One of the pieces of Altar linen. A napkin of fine linento be spread on the Altar, and upon which the sacred vessels areplaced at the Holy Communion. When the Altar breads are on theAltar, the lower right hand corner of the corporal is turned backover them, except during the oblation and consecration
Altar - Altar. Noah built an Altar when he left the ark. In the early times Altars were usually built in certain spots hallowed by religious associations, e. Altars were most probably originally made of earth. The Altar of burnt offering. At the four corners were four projections called horns, made, like the Altar itself, of shittim wood overlaid with brass, Exodus 27:2, and to them the victim was bound when about to be sacrificed. Round the Altar, midway between the top and bottom, ran a projecting ledge, on which perhaps the priest stood when officiating. To the outer, edge of this, again, a grating or network of brass was affixed, and reached to the bottom of the Altar. At the four corners of the network were four brazen rings, into which were inserted the staves by which the Altar was carried. These staves were of the same materials as the Altar itself. As the priests were forbidden to ascend the Altar by steps, Exodus 20:26, it has been conjectured that a slope of earth led gradually up to the ledge from which they officiated. The place of the Altar was at "the door of the tabernacle of the congregation. In Solomon's temple the Altar was considerably larger in its dimensions. The Altar erected by Herod in front of the temple was 16 cubits in height and 50 cubits in length and breadth. According to Leviticus 6:12-13, a perpetual fire was to be kept burning on the Altar. The Altar of incense, called also the golden Altar to distinguish it from the Altar of burnt offering, which was called the brazen Altar. Like the Altar of burnt offering it had horns at the four corners, which were of one piece with the rest of the Altar. This Altar stood in the holy place, "before the vail that is by the ark of the testimony. The Altar of Solomon's temple was similar, 1 Kings 7:48; 1 Chronicles 28:18, but was made of cedar overlaid with gold. In Acts 17:23 reference is made to an Altar to an unknown god. There were several Altars in Athens with this inscription, erected during the time of a plague, since they knew not what god was offended and required to be propitiated. In the New Testament the word Altar does not occur in connection with Christian worship. Altar, sacrifice, priest, and temple, being typical of Christ and the Christian dispensation, have passed away
Chrismale - (Latin: cera, wax) (Greek: chrio, anoint) ...
Linen cloth waxed on one side, which must completely cover the table of the consecrated Altar. It must be the exact size of the table of the Altar and is placed under the three linen cloths, the waxed side towards the table, preventing the Altar cloths from being stained by the oil used at the consecration and keeping them dry. According to the rubrics it should be removed once a year during the stripping of the Altar on Maundy Thursday, but it may be changed whenever the Altar is washed
Cere-Cloth - (Latin: cera, wax) (Greek: chrio, anoint) ...
Linen cloth waxed on one side, which must completely cover the table of the consecrated Altar. It must be the exact size of the table of the Altar and is placed under the three linen cloths, the waxed side towards the table, preventing the Altar cloths from being stained by the oil used at the consecration and keeping them dry. According to the rubrics it should be removed once a year during the stripping of the Altar on Maundy Thursday, but it may be changed whenever the Altar is washed
Altar - " "Altar" and "Table" are used interchangeablyin Holy Scripture, and both words are used in the Prayer Book forthe same thing. From the very earliest times the Altar has alwaysbeen the most prominent object in the Church, being placed at theend of the chancel and elevated, being approached by three or moresteps. Architecturally as well as devotionally the Altar is thedistinctive feature, the objective point of the building to whichall else conforms. Properly speaking, the building is erected forthe Altar, and not the Altar for the building
Altar - " Accordingly it denotes an "altar" for the sacrifice of victims, though it was also used for the "altar" of incense, e. In the NT this word is reserved for the "altar" of the true God, Matthew 5:23,24 ; 23:18-20,35 ; Luke 11:51 ; 1 Corinthians 9:13 ; 10:18 , in contrast to bomos, No. thusiasterion is mostly, but not entirely, used for the divienely appointed Altar; it is used for idol "altars," e. ...
2: βωμός (Strong's #1041 — Noun Masculine — bomos — bo'-mos ) properly, "an elevated place," always denotes either a pagan "altar" or an "altar" reared without Divine appointment. , but only in the Apocrypha, bomos is used for the Divine Altar. translators have carefully observed the distinction, using bomos for the Altar which the two and a half tribes erected, Joshua 22:10,11,16,19,23,26,34 , no Divine injunction being given for this; in Joshua 22:19,28,29 , where the Altar ordained of God is mentioned, thusiasterion is used
the Altar of Incense - In Solomon's temple this Altar was made of cedar overlaid with gold, but its size is not given. In the temple described by Ezekiel the Altar of incense is 2 cubits in length, and 3 cubits in height. The Altar of Incense is also called the GOLDEN Altar. On this Altar holy incense was to be burnt both morning and evening, typical of the Lord Jesus being a perpetual sweet savour to God. It was by the side of this Altar that the angel appeared to Zacharias when he announced the conception and birth of John the Baptist
Altar Piece - Painted or frescoed picture on the wall or hung in frame above the Altar; a statue or statuary group on the Altar
Horns, Altar - The projections at each corner of the Jewish Altar. Though dropped in Christian usage, the name is still used to designate the four corners of the Altar
Altar Horns - The projections at each corner of the Jewish Altar. Though dropped in Christian usage, the name is still used to designate the four corners of the Altar
Altars, Consecration of - (Latin: consecrare, to make sacred) ...
Mass may be celebrated only on a consecrated fixed or portable Altar. A fixed Altar, a permanent structure of stone, must be consecrated by the bishop of the diocese, or by another bishop with his consent. Fixed Altars are consecrated in consecrated churches, or in those which, though only solemnly blessed, will later be consecrated. The ceremony consists in placing in the stone-covered cavity in the center of the Altar-table, near the front edge, relics of two canonized martyrs and three grains of incense, anointing the Altar with holy oils, incensing it, burning incense upon it, and celebrating Mass upon it. When a number of portable Altar-stones are consecrated, Mass is said on one of them
Candlestick, Altar - Six candlesticks with candles, three on each side of the crucifix, kept on the main Altar. Two, one at each side of the Altar, must be used during low Mass. Altar-candlesticks may be of any kind of metal, or gilded or silvered wood
Altar Candlesticks - Six candlesticks with candles, three on each side of the crucifix, kept on the main Altar. Two, one at each side of the Altar, must be used during low Mass. Altar-candlesticks may be of any kind of metal, or gilded or silvered wood
Retable - A shelf at the back of the Altar, usually fastened to thereredos, on which are placed the Altar cross, the vases for flowers,and the candlesticks. The necessity for the retable arises fromthe fact of the reverent usage of the Church, which requires thatnothing shall be placed on the Altar but the Eucharistic vessels,the book rest and the book
Altar - The first Altar of which we have any account is that built by Noah when he left the ark. (Genesis 8:20 ) In the early times Altars were usually built in certain spots hallowed by religious associations, e. (Genesis 12:7 ; Exodus 17:15,16 ) Altars were most probably originally made of earth. The Altar of Burnt Offering . ( Exodus 27:8 ) At the four corners were four projections called horns made, like the Altar itself, of shittim wood overlaid with brass, (Exodus 27:2 ) and to them the victim was bound when about to be sacrificed. (Psalm 118:27 ) Round the Altar, midway between the top and bottom, ran a projecting ledge, on which perhaps the priest stood when officiating. To the outer edge of this, again, a grating or network of brass was affixed, and reached to the bottom of the Altar. At the four corners of the network were four brazen rings, into which were inserted the staves by which the Altar was carried. These staves were of the same material as the Altar itself. As the priests were forbidden to ascend the Altar by steps, (Exodus 20:26 ) it has been conjectured that a slope of earth led gradually up to the ledge from which they officiated. The place of the Altar was at the door of the tabernacle of the congregation. )" (Exodus 40:29 ) (2) In Solomon's temple the Altar was considerably larger in its dimensions. The Altar erected by Herod in front of the temple was 15 cubits in height and 50 cubits in length and breadth. According to (Leviticus 6:12,13 ) a perpetual fire was to be kept burning on the Altar. The Altar of Incense , called also the golden Altar to distinguish it from the Altar of burnt offering which was called the brazen Altar. Like the Altar of burnt offering it had horns at the four corners, which were of one piece with the rest of the Altar. This Altar stood in the holy place, "before the vail that is by the ark of the testimony. " (Exodus 30:6 ; 40:5 ) (b) The Altar of Solomon's temple was similar, (1 Kings 7:48 ; 1 Chronicles 28:18 ) but was made of cedar overlaid with gold. Other Altars . There were several Altars in Athens with this inscription, erected during the time of a plague
Antependium - The name given to the covering hanging in front ofthe lectern, pulpit or Altar, and being the color of the ChurchSeason. The Altar hanging is usually called the Frontal
Altar Steps - Of wood, stone, or brick, extend around the Altar on three sides. There are three, five, or seven at the high Altar, while side Altars must have at least one
Altarage - ) The offerings made upon the Altar, or to a church. ) The profit which accrues to the priest, by reason of the Altar, from the small tithes
Steps, Altar - Of wood, stone, or brick, extend around the Altar on three sides. There are three, five, or seven at the high Altar, while side Altars must have at least one
Altar - Altars were generally erected in conspicuous places (Genesis 22:9 ; Ezekiel 6:3 ; 2 Kings 23:12 ; 16:4 ; 23:8 ; Acts 14:13 ). Paul found among the many Altars erected in Athens one bearing the inscription, "To the unknown God" ( Acts 17:23 ), or rather "to an
The first Altar we read of is that erected by Noah (Genesis 8:20 ). Altars were erected by Abraham (Genesis 12:7 ; 13:4 ; 22:9 ), by Isaac (Genesis 26:25 ), by Jacob (33:20; 35:1,3), and by Moses (Exodus 17:15 , "Jehovah-nissi"). ...
In the tabernacle, and afterwards in the temple, two Altars were erected. ...
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The Altar of burnt offering (Exodus 30:28 ), called also the "brasen Altar" (Exodus 39:39 ) and "the table of the Lord" (Malachi 1:7 ). This Altar, as erected in the tabernacle, is described in Exodus 27:1-8 . ...
In Exodus 27:3 the various utensils appertaining to the Altar are enumerated. ) ...
In Solomon's temple the Altar was of larger dimensions (2 Chronicles 4:1 . This Altar was renewed by Asa (2 Chronicles 15:8 ). ) When Antiochus Epiphanes pillaged Jerusalem the Altar of burnt offering was taken away. ...
Again the Altar was erected by Herod, and remained in its place till the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans (70 A. ...
The fire on the Altar was not permitted to go out (Leviticus 6:9 ). It was in all probability the site of the Altar of burnt offering. ...
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The Altar of incense (Exodus 30:1-10 ), called also "the golden Altar" (39:38; Numbers 4:11 ), stood in the holy place "before the vail that is by the ark of the testimony. " On this Altar sweet spices were continually burned with fire taken from the brazen Altar. The morning and the evening services were commenced by the high priest offering incense on this Altar. This Altar was a small movable table, made of acacia wood overlaid with gold (Exodus 37:25,26 ). ...
In Solomon's temple the Altar was similar in size, but was made of cedar-wood (1 Kings 6:20 ; 7:48 ) overlaid with gold. In Ezekiel 41:22 it is called "the Altar of wood. ) ...
In the temple built after the Exile the Altar was restored. Among the trophies carried away by Titus on the destruction of Jerusalem the Altar of incense is not found, nor is any mention made of it in Hebrews 9 . It was at this Altar Zacharias ministered when an angel appeared to him (Luke 1:11 ). It is the only Altar which appears in the heavenly temple (Isaiah 6:6 ; Revelation 8:3,4 )
Retrochoir - ) Any extension of a church behind the high Altar, as a chapel; also, in an apsidal church, all the space beyond the line of the back or eastern face of the Altar
Reredos - Screen of stone or wood at the back of the Altar, usually ornamented with panels, niches, statues, buttresses, and other decorations and often painted in brilliant colors. Its use dates front the 12th century, when only the Altar of relics had a reredos, but in the 14th century the main Altar was provided with one and it became an elaborate structure, usually conforming to the architecture of the church. It is connected with the Altar by means of a predella or Altar step
Altar - In the Church founded by Christ the Altar is the table on which the Sacrifice of the Mass is offered. Later, church Altars were placed against or near the wall of the apse, so that the celebrant faced the east and the people were behind him, in the manner which now generally obtains. Altars of the early Church were probably of wood. Altars of stone and precious metals were introduced at a later date, and ecclesiastical law now stipulates that to be consecrated an Altar must be of stone. In the primitive Church two types of Altars were used: the arcosolium or monumentum arcuatum, consisting of an archlike niche hewn in the catacombs over the grave of a martyr, which was covered by a slab of marble; and the detached Altar found in the cubicula, or sepulchral chapels, formed by a slab of stone or marble resting on columns, or on a structure in which were enclosed the relics of martyrs. The tomb or chest type of Altar thus replaced the simple table, and every Altar must now contain the relics of martyrs. In the Greek Church, the Altar proper is square, and the top should be constructed of wood, or have at least one board in it. The term Altar is also applied to that part of churches of the Greek Rite practically corresponding to the sanctuary in churches of the Latin Rite, including the Altar proper, a small side Altar, the seats of the clergy, and the throne of the bishop
Ciborium - ) A canopy usually standing free and supported on four columns, covering the high Altar, or, very rarely, a secondary Altar
Altar Screen - Originally a piece of ornamental precious cloth suspended above the Altar at the rear and known as the dossel or dorsal. Such Altar decorations are also known as Altar-pieces
Screen, Altar - Originally a piece of ornamental precious cloth suspended above the Altar at the rear and known as the dossel or dorsal. Such Altar decorations are also known as Altar-pieces
Lanterns, Altar - Lanterns used to protect the Altar-candles and lamp if they cannot be kept lighted, and to accompany the Blessed Sacrament when It is transferred from one Altar to another, or taken to the sick as Viaticum
Altar Lanterns - Lanterns used to protect the Altar-candles and lamp if they cannot be kept lighted, and to accompany the Blessed Sacrament when It is transferred from one Altar to another, or taken to the sick as Viaticum
the Brazen Altar - In the temple built by Solomon this Altar was made of brass, and was 10 cubits high and 20 cubits in length and breadth (same size as the holiest of all). See Ezekiel 43:13-17 for the Altar in the future temple. The brazen Altar was also called "the Altar of burnt offering:" on it a fire was constantly burning, Leviticus 6:9 , and on it the offerings were consumed, that is, on the 'grate' that was placed in its midst. The position of the brazen Altar arrested the offerer as he entered the court, and pointed out that the only way of access to the Lord was by a sacrifice. The Altar is the symbol of Christ and His work, which meets responsibility. the principle is brought out, that to eat of a sacrifice manifests communion with the Altar on which the sacrifice is made. ...
To the Hebrew believers it was said, "We have an Altar whereof they have no right to eat which serve the tabernacle. As still serving the tabernacle they had no right to the christian's Altar. ...
In the Revelation there is the golden Altar in heaven, and much incense ascends with the prayers of the saints; but fire from the brazen Altar is cast upon the earth, and it is followed by judgements, Revelation 8:3-5 : cf. And John heard the Altar say (as the passage should read) "Yea, Lord God Almighty, true and righteous are thy judgements," Revelation 16:7 : this is no doubt the brazen Altar, cf
Horns of Altar - See Altar ...
...
Incense, Altar of - See Altar
Holy Table - (See Altar
Gregorian Altar - The privileged Altar of Saint Gregory the Great, in the church of Saint Gregory on Monte Crelio in Rome. It is related that Saint Gregory, by saying one Mass, liberated the soul of a monk, named Justus, from Purgatory; so the faithful have confidently hoped that any Mass on this Altar would free a soul from Purgatory. The indulgence of the Gregorian Altar is no longer granted to other Altars
Altar, Gregorian - The privileged Altar of Saint Gregory the Great, in the church of Saint Gregory on Monte Crelio in Rome. It is related that Saint Gregory, by saying one Mass, liberated the soul of a monk, named Justus, from Purgatory; so the faithful have confidently hoped that any Mass on this Altar would free a soul from Purgatory. The indulgence of the Gregorian Altar is no longer granted to other Altars
Altar Societies - (tabernacle societies) Groups of devout persons, usually women, who make vestments and Altar linens and keep them in repair, and provide Altar vessels, furniture, and ornaments
Societies, Taberbacle - (tabernacle societies) Groups of devout persons, usually women, who make vestments and Altar linens and keep them in repair, and provide Altar vessels, furniture, and ornaments
Tabernacle Societies - (tabernacle societies) Groups of devout persons, usually women, who make vestments and Altar linens and keep them in repair, and provide Altar vessels, furniture, and ornaments
Societies, Altar - (tabernacle societies) Groups of devout persons, usually women, who make vestments and Altar linens and keep them in repair, and provide Altar vessels, furniture, and ornaments
Eucharistic Lights - (See Altar LIGHTS
Rail - (See Altar RAIL
Ariel - Altar; light or lion of God
Altar Cross - The cross surmounting the Altar, made usually ofpolished brass or of some precious metal. The Altar Cross is handeddown to us from the Primitive Church, so that to-day wheresoeverthe English or the American flag waves there "the Altar and theCross" are set up. The Cross is placed over the middle of theAltar, in the most sacred and prominent part of the Church, "inorder that the holy symbol of our Faith may be constantly beforethe eyes of all who worship therein, to shine through the gloom ofthis world and point them to the skies
ed - Instead of 'called the Altar Ed,' it has been translated 'gave a name to the Altar
Altar Rail - The railing enclosing the Sanctuary in which the Altarstands, and at which the communicants kneel in receiving the HolyCommunion, is called, in the Institution Office the Altar Rail. Supposed to have been first introduced by Archbishop Laud as aprotection of the Altar against the lawlessness and irreverence ofthe Puritans
Cantoris - Architecturally and ecclesiastically, the Altar is always regardedas the east whether it is so in reality or not. North side,therefore, is the left of the Altar as we face it
Altar - Spots hallowed by divine revelations or appearances were originally the sites of Altars (Genesis 12:7; Genesis 13:18; Genesis 26:25; Genesis 35:1). ...
Altars were to be made only of earth or else unhewn stone, on which no iron tool was used, and without steps up to them (Exodus 20:24-26). The Altar was at "the door of the tabernacle of the tent of the congregation" (Exodus 40:29). ...
In the tabernacle the Altar of burnt offering was made of shittim (acacia) boards overlaid with brass, terming a square of five cubits, or eight feet. The culmination's of the Altar, being hornlike, imply the mighty salvation and security which Jehovah engages to the believing worshippers approaching Him in His own appointed way. To grasp the Altar horns in faith was to lay hold of Jehovah's strength. In Solomon's temple the Altar square was entirely of brass, and was 20 cubits, or from 30 to 35 feet, and the height 10 cubits. " In Herod's temple the Altar was 50 cubits long, and 50 broad, and 15 high; a pipe from the S. Except in emergencies (as Judges 6:24; 1 Samuel 7:9-10; 2 Samuel 24:18; 2 Samuel 24:25; 1 Kings 8:64; 1 Kings 18:31-32) only the one Altar was sanctioned (Leviticus 17:8-9; Deuteronomy 12:13-14), to mark the unity and ubiquity of God, as contrasted with the many Altars of the manifold idols and local deities of pagandom. Every true Israelite, wherever he might be, realized his share in the common daily sacrifices at the one Altar in Zion, whence Jehovah ruled to the ends of the earth. ...
Christ is the antitype, the one Altar or meeting place between God and man, the one only atonement for sinners, the one sacrifice, and the one priest (Acts 4:12; Hebrews 13:10). To those Judaizers who object that Christians have no Altar or sacrificial meats, Paul says, "we have" (the emphasis in Greek is on have; there is no we) emphatically, but it is a spiritual Altar and sacrifice. The interpretation which makes "altar" the Lord's table is opposed to the scope of the Epistle to the Heb. The Epistle to the Hebrew reasons, servile adherents to visible Altar meats are excluded from our Christian spiritual Altar and meats: "For He, the true Altar, from whom we derive spiritual meats, realized the sin offering type" (of which none of the meat was eaten, but all was burnt: Leviticus 6:30) "by suffering without the gate: teaching that we must go forth after Him from the Jewish high priest's camp of legal ceremonialism and meats, which stood only until the gospel times of reformation" (1618091924_21). ...
The brass utensils for the Altar (Exodus 27:3) were pans, to receive the ashes and fat; shovels, for removing the ashes; basins, for the blood; flesh hooks, with three prongs, to take flesh out of the cauldron (1 Samuel 2:13-14); firepans, or censers, for taking coals off the Altar, or for burning incense (Leviticus 16:12; Numbers 16:6-7; Exodus 25:38); the same Hebrew maktoth means snuff dishes, as "tongs" means snuffers for the candlesticks. Asa "renewed" the Altar, i. side of the new Altar which Urijah the priest had made after the pattern which Ahaz had seen at Damascus (2 Kings 16:14). In Zerubbabel's temple the Altar was built before the temple foundations were laid (Ezra 3:2). ...
After its desecration by Antiochus Epiphanes, Judas Maccabaeus built a new Altar of unhewn stones. The original fire of the tabernacle "came out from before the Lord, and consumed upon the Altar the burnt offering and the fat" (Leviticus 9:24). The rabbis say, It couched upon the Altar like a lion, bright as the sun, the flame solid and pure, consuming things wet and dry alike, without smoke. The divine fire on the Altar; the shekinah cloud, representing the divine habitation with them, which was given to the king and the high priest with the oil of unction; the spirit of prophecy; the Urim and Thummim whereby the high priest miraculously learned God's will; and the ark of the covenant, whence God gave His answers in a clear voice, were the five things of the old temple wanting in the second temple. ...
Heated stones (Hebrew) were laid upon the Altar, by which the incense was kindled (Isaiah 6:6). The golden Altar of incense (distinguished from the brazen Altar of burnt offering), of acacia wood (in Solomon's temple cedar) underneath, two cubits high, one square. Morning and evening incense was burnt on it with fire taken from the Altar of burnt offering. In Hebrews 9:4, KJV, "censer," not "altar of incense," is right; for the latter was in the outer not the inner holy place. The Altar of incense also was close by the second veil, directly before the ark (1 Kings 6:22), "by (Hebrew belonging to) the oracle," i. Jesus' death rent the veil, and has brought the antitypes to the candlestick, shewbread table, and Altar of incense into the heavenly, holiest place. This Altar alone appears there, namely, that of prayer and praise. "The souls under the Altar" (Revelation 6:9) are shut up unto Him in joyful expectancy, until He come to raise the sleeping bodies (Revelation 8:3-4). fire not taken from the Altar of burnt offering), thereby breaking the He between the incense Altar and the sacrificial burnt offering Altar. ...
As the incense on the Altar within drew its kindling from the fire of the sacrificial Altar without, so believing prayer of the heart within, continually ascending to God, rests on one's having first once for all become sharer in the benefit of Christ's outward sacrificial atonement. Therefore the inner Altar was ornate and golden, the outer Altar bore marks of humiliation and death. Nowhere is an Altar in the sacrificial sense in the Christian church recognized in the New Testament The words "we have an Altar" (Hebrews 13:10; note that it is not Altars, such as apostate churches erect in their worship), so far from sanctioning a Christian Altar on earth, oppose the idea; for Christ Himself is our Altar of which we spiritually eat, and of which they who Judaize, by serving the tabernacle and resting on meats and ordinances, "have no right to eat. ...
The "altar to an unknown God" mentioned by Paul (Acts 17:22) was erected in time of a plague at Athens, when they knew not what god to worship for removing it. Diogenes Laertius, Pausanias, and Philostratus, pagan writers, confirm the accuracy of Scripture by mentioning several Altars at Athens to the unknown or unnamed deity. " In Ezekiel 43:15 "altar" is lit
Catabasion - ) A vault under Altar of a Greek church
Altar Vase - A vase used for flowers in decorating the Altar
Asylum - See Altar, Kin [1], Refuge [2]
Vase, Altar - A vase used for flowers in decorating the Altar
Dorsal - (Latin: dorsum, back) ...
Curtain at tbe back of the Altar
Dossel - (Latin: dorsum, back) ...
Curtain at tbe back of the Altar
Ledge, Altar - A step placed behind the Altar for candlesticks, flowers, etc
Altar Ledge - A step placed behind the Altar for candlesticks, flowers, etc
ex Voto - Latin term for a thing offered because of a binding promise or vow, usually an ornament for the Altar, sanctuary, or other part of a church, expressive of thanksgiving or petition for some favor. Votive candles are lit as an expression of faith in the intercession of the one at whose shrine or Altar they are lit
Altar - In the NT, as in the Septuagint , the usual term for ‘altar’ is θυσιαστήριον-a word otherwise confined to Philo, Josephus, and ecclesiastical writers-while βωμός, as contrasted with a Jewish place of sacrifice, is a heathen Altar. Antiochus Epiphanes erected a small Altar to Jupiter-‘the abomination of desolation’ (1 Maccabees 1:54)-upon the θυσιαστήριον of the temple, and ‘on the twenty-fifth day of the month they sacrificed upon the idol-altar (βωμός) which was upon the Altar of God (θυσιαστήριον). ’ The NT contains only a single distinct reference to a pagan Altar-the βωμός which St. The Altar on which sacrifices were presented to God was indispensable to OT religion. The Altar was the place of meeting between God and man, and the ritual of blood-the supposed seat of life-was the essence of the offering. Whatever details might be added, the rite of sprinkling or dashing the blood against the Altar, or allowing it to flow on the ground at its base, could never be omitted. It has been generally assumed that, when our Lord instituted the New Covenant in His own blood (Mark 14:24, Luke 22:20), He implicitly abrogated the Levitical law, and that, when His sacrifice was completed, the disciples must at once have perceived that it made every Altar obsolete. Age, 65) even suggests that they were ‘more devout and earnest Jews than they had ever been’-continuing to worship God at the Altar in the Temple like all their countrymen. Paul, the champion of spiritual freedom, brought sacrifices (προσφοράς) to lay on the Altar in the Holy City (Acts 24:17). The inference that the New Covenant left no place for any Altar or Mosaic sacrifice is first explicitly drawn by the writer of Hebrews (see Temple). Apart from a passing allusion to the Altars which were thrown down in Elijah’s time (Romans 11:3), St. (1) In vindicating the right of ministers of the gospel to live at the charge of the Christian community, he instances the well-known Levitical practice: ‘those who wait upon the Altar have their portion with (συμμερίζονται) the Altar’ (1 Corinthians 9:13), part of the offering being burnt in the Altar fire, and part reserved for the priests, to whom the law gives the privilege ‘altaris esse socios in dividenda victima’ (Beza). Paul the only θυσιαστήριον was the Altar on which sacrifice was offered to the God of Israel. The Altar being His table and the sacrifice His feast, the hospitality of table-communion is the pledge of friendship between Him and His worshippers. All who join in the sacrifice are partakers with the Altar (κοινωνοὶ τοῦ θυσιαστηρίου), one might almost say commensals with God. How revolting it is, then, to pass from the Altar of God or, by parity of reasoning, from the τρὰπεζα τοῦ Κυρίου, to the orgies of pagan gods, the τρὰπεζα δαιμονίων. The writer of Hebrews refers to the old Jewish Altar and to a new Christian one. (1) Reasoning somewhat in the manner of Philo, he notes the emergence of a mysterious priest from a tribe which has given none of its sons to minister at the Altar, and on this circumstance bases an ingenious argument for the imperfection of the Levitical priesthood, and so of the whole Mosaic system (Hebrews 7:13). (2) Against those Christians who occupy themselves with (sacrificial) meats the writer says: ‘We have an Altar, whereof they have no right to eat who serve the tabernacle’ (Hebrews 13:10). So we Christians serve an Altar from which we obtain a purely spiritual advantage. Whether the writer actually visualized the Cross of Christ as the Altar at which all His followers minister, like λειτουργοί in the Tabernacle,-as many have supposed-is doubtful. , whose heaven is a replica of the earthly Temple and its solemn ritual, sees underneath the Altar the souls of martyrs-the blood poured out as an oblation (cf. In Revelation 8:3 and Revelation 9:13 the θυσιαστήριον is not the Altar of burnt-offering but that of incense (see Incense). In Revelation 14:18 the prophet sees an angel come out from the Altar, the spirit or genius of fire, an Iranian conception; and in Revelation 16:7 he personifies the Altar itself and makes it proclaim the truth and justice of God
Altar - In the NT, as in the Septuagint , the usual term for ‘altar’ is θυσιαστήριον-a word otherwise confined to Philo, Josephus, and ecclesiastical writers-while βωμός, as contrasted with a Jewish place of sacrifice, is a heathen Altar. Antiochus Epiphanes erected a small Altar to Jupiter-‘the abomination of desolation’ (1 Maccabees 1:54)-upon the θυσιαστήριον of the temple, and ‘on the twenty-fifth day of the month they sacrificed upon the idol-altar (βωμός) which was upon the Altar of God (θυσιαστήριον). ’ The NT contains only a single distinct reference to a pagan Altar-the βωμός which St. The Altar on which sacrifices were presented to God was indispensable to OT religion. The Altar was the place of meeting between God and man, and the ritual of blood-the supposed seat of life-was the essence of the offering. Whatever details might be added, the rite of sprinkling or dashing the blood against the Altar, or allowing it to flow on the ground at its base, could never be omitted. It has been generally assumed that, when our Lord instituted the New Covenant in His own blood (Mark 14:24, Luke 22:20), He implicitly abrogated the Levitical law, and that, when His sacrifice was completed, the disciples must at once have perceived that it made every Altar obsolete. Age, 65) even suggests that they were ‘more devout and earnest Jews than they had ever been’-continuing to worship God at the Altar in the Temple like all their countrymen. Paul, the champion of spiritual freedom, brought sacrifices (προσφοράς) to lay on the Altar in the Holy City (Acts 24:17). The inference that the New Covenant left no place for any Altar or Mosaic sacrifice is first explicitly drawn by the writer of Hebrews (see Temple). Apart from a passing allusion to the Altars which were thrown down in Elijah’s time (Romans 11:3), St. (1) In vindicating the right of ministers of the gospel to live at the charge of the Christian community, he instances the well-known Levitical practice: ‘those who wait upon the Altar have their portion with (συμμερίζονται) the Altar’ (1 Corinthians 9:13), part of the offering being burnt in the Altar fire, and part reserved for the priests, to whom the law gives the privilege ‘altaris esse socios in dividenda victima’ (Beza). Paul the only θυσιαστήριον was the Altar on which sacrifice was offered to the God of Israel. The Altar being His table and the sacrifice His feast, the hospitality of table-communion is the pledge of friendship between Him and His worshippers. All who join in the sacrifice are partakers with the Altar (κοινωνοὶ τοῦ θυσιαστηρίου), one might almost say commensals with God. How revolting it is, then, to pass from the Altar of God or, by parity of reasoning, from the τρὰπεζα τοῦ Κυρίου, to the orgies of pagan gods, the τρὰπεζα δαιμονίων. The writer of Hebrews refers to the old Jewish Altar and to a new Christian one. (1) Reasoning somewhat in the manner of Philo, he notes the emergence of a mysterious priest from a tribe which has given none of its sons to minister at the Altar, and on this circumstance bases an ingenious argument for the imperfection of the Levitical priesthood, and so of the whole Mosaic system (Hebrews 7:13). (2) Against those Christians who occupy themselves with (sacrificial) meats the writer says: ‘We have an Altar, whereof they have no right to eat who serve the tabernacle’ (Hebrews 13:10). So we Christians serve an Altar from which we obtain a purely spiritual advantage. Whether the writer actually visualized the Cross of Christ as the Altar at which all His followers minister, like λειτουργοί in the Tabernacle,-as many have supposed-is doubtful. , whose heaven is a replica of the earthly Temple and its solemn ritual, sees underneath the Altar the souls of martyrs-the blood poured out as an oblation (cf. In Revelation 8:3 and Revelation 9:13 the θυσιαστήριον is not the Altar of burnt-offering but that of incense (see Incense). In Revelation 14:18 the prophet sees an angel come out from the Altar, the spirit or genius of fire, an Iranian conception; and in Revelation 16:7 he personifies the Altar itself and makes it proclaim the truth and justice of God
Baldachinum - A dome-like canopy in wood, stone, or metal erected over a high Altar, either supported by columns or suspended by a chain; also known as a ciborium. It originated in the Altar-canopy, a square covering suspended over the Altar to protect it from dust or material falling from the ceiling
Bench, Communion - An Altar rail with step, on which communicants kneel to receive Communion
Incense, Altar of - INCENSE, Altar OF
Altar Cloths - Three coverings of linen or hemp used on the Altar during Mass
Altar - It is evident that sacrifices were offered long before the flood; but the first mention of an Altar in Scripture is when Noah left the ark. Mention is made of Altars reared by Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Moses. The latter was commanded to build an Altar of earth, Exodus 20:24 . ...
The Altars in the Jewish tabernacle, and in the temple at Jerusalem, were the following: 1. The Altar of burnt offerings. The Altar of incense. THE Altar OF BURNT-OFFERINGS was a kind of coffer of shittim- wood covered with brass plates, about seven feet six inches square, and four feet six inches in height. The furniture of the Altar was of brass, and consisted of a pan, to receive the ashes that fell through the grating; shovels; basins, to contain the blood with which the Altar was sprinkled; and forks, to turn and remove the pieces of flesh upon the coals. Upon this Altar the lamb of the daily morning and evening sacrifice was offered, and the other stated and voluntary blood-sacrifices and meat and drink-offerings. The Altar in Solomon's temple was larger, being about thirty feet square and fifteen feet high, 2 Chronicles 4:1 . It is often called "the brazen Altar. THE Altar OF INCENSE was a small table of shittim-wood, covered with plates of gold; it was eighteen inches square, and three feet high, Exodus 30:1-38 37:25 , etc. Altar AT ATHENS, inscribed "to the unknown God," Acts 17:23 . Both from Paul's assertion and the testimony of Greek writers, that Altars to an unknown or gods existed at Athens
Altarpiece - ) The painting or piece of sculpture above and behind the Altar; reredos
Chalkstone - Soft stone easily crushed used for comparison to destruction of Altar (Isaiah 27:9 )
Altar Tomb - An oblong monument over a grave covered with a slab and resembling an Altar
Retable - ) A shelf behind the Altar, for display of lights, vases of wlowers, etc
Tomb, Altar - An oblong monument over a grave covered with a slab and resembling an Altar
Altar - Altars are, doubtless, of great antiquity; some suppose they were as early as Adam; but there is no mention made of them till after the flood, when Noah built one, and offered burnt offerings on it. The Jews had two Altars in and about their temple; 1. The Altar of burnt offerings; 2. The Altar of incense; some also call the table for shew bread an Altar, but improperly, Exodus 20:24-25
Altar Linen - The linen pieces used in decorating the Altar forthe celebration of the Holy Communion are so called. There is firstthe "fair white linen cloth," the width of the top of the Altar,and falling over the ends fifteen or twenty inches ending with afringe. Other pieces are the Corporal to coverthe middle part of the Altar and on which are placed the Paten andChalice during the Celebration; the "fair linen cloth," or thinlawn veil required by the rubric to cover the elements afterconsecration; the Purificators, and also the Pall,—each of whichis described under its proper title (which see)
Frontal, Altar - (antependium - Latin: ante, before; pendere, hang) ...
An appendage covering the entire front of the Altar; a similar covering should be used at the back if it be seen by the people. If the Altar be of carved wood or marble it may be considered sufficiently ornamental, and the antependium deemed unnecesary
Altar Frontal - (antependium - Latin: ante, before; pendere, hang) ...
An appendage covering the entire front of the Altar; a similar covering should be used at the back if it be seen by the people. If the Altar be of carved wood or marble it may be considered sufficiently ornamental, and the antependium deemed unnecesary
Antependium - (antependium - Latin: ante, before; pendere, hang) ...
An appendage covering the entire front of the Altar; a similar covering should be used at the back if it be seen by the people. If the Altar be of carved wood or marble it may be considered sufficiently ornamental, and the antependium deemed unnecesary
Eleloheisrael - The name given by Jacob to the Altar he erected near Shechem. God had just before altered his name into Israel, 'a prince of God;' Jacob connected the blessing involved in this name with a piece of land he bought, instead of with God's house at Bethel, and calls the Altar he had erected 'God, the God of Israel
Barachias - Father of Zacharias who was slain between the temple and the Altar
Frithstool - ) A seat in churches near the Altar, to which offenders formerly fled for sanctuary
Sacrificed - Offered to God upon an Altar destroyed, surrendered, or suffered to be lost
Carpets, Altar - Ordinarily green, cover the sanctuary and Altar-steps, or at least the upper platform or predella
Frontal - The name given to a hanging in front of the Altar
Altar Carpets - Ordinarily green, cover the sanctuary and Altar-steps, or at least the upper platform or predella
Radino - ) A step or raised shelf, as above a sideboard or Altar. Superaltar, and Gradin
Altar - EarthenExo20:24 (c) This Altar may represent the Cross of Calvary on which JESUS as the Lamb of GOD died for those who break the holy law of GOD. Immediately after giving the Ten Commandments, the Lord requested that this Altar be built at once. He knew that His laws would be broken, He knew that men would need a sacrifice for their sins; He therefore planned that this Altar should be built at once so that men could have a way of forgiveness and salvation immediately. It is called an Altar of earth because it belongs strictly to this earth. There is no Altar in hell. ...
Stone Exodus 20:25 (c) This Altar is to be made of stone to indicate that it is permanent, substantial, solid and cannot be tampered with by man. On that Altar, the animal represented the Saviour who died both for us and for our sins. ...
Golden Exodus 30:1-3 (c) This Altar represents the Cross of CHRIST where the beautiful and perfect life of CHRIST was offered up to GOD as a sweet perfume and fragrant incense. ...
Idol1Ki18:26 (c) Here we may think of a false Altar which is a type of the religious plans and schemes of men wherein they hope to appease the god of their imagination, and to obtain his favor even though what they are doing is not Scriptural. ...
False2Ki16:10 (c) Here and elsewhere we find Altars built ostensibly for the worship of GOD, but really for the worship of idols. These false Altars are symbolical for the world's religious schemes and plans under the name of Christianity. Every false religion has an "altar" of this kind. ...
Deserted Psalm 84:3 (c) Here is brought before us clearly that GOD's people had forsaken both the worship and the service of the Lord to such an extent that the fires had gone out, the Altar was cold, and no priest was near. The birds felt so much at home around these Altars that they built their nests where the priests should have been serving, and the fires should have been burning. ...
Christian Matthew 5:23 (b) This probably teaches us that there is a place of worship called "the Altar" to which the believer goes for worship, praise and prayer. ...
Unknown Acts 17:23 (a) This Altar is probably typical of the false faiths by which people go through the motions of seeking and worshipping GOD, though their words and actions indicate clearly that they do not know Him, nor His character, nor His ways. ...
Revelation 8:3 (c) From this we learn that in some mysterious way there is such an Altar in Heaven. At that Altar the fragrant incense of the prayers and the worship of Christians ascends to GOD and permeates Heaven
Altar - Altar . The original purpose of an Altar was to serve as a means by which the blood of an animal offered in sacrifice might be brought into contact with, or otherwise transferred to, the deity of the worshipper. From the Altar of a single ‘great stone’ ( 1 Samuel 6:14 ) the transition was easy to an Altar built of unhewn stones ( Exodus 20:25 , Deuteronomy 27:5 f. ]'>[1] ), which continued to he the normal type of Hebrew Altar to the end (see 1Ma 4:41 ; Jos. Another type of pre-historic Altar, to which much less attention has been paid, had its origin in the primitive conception of sacrifice as the food of the gods. , 249 to receive the sacrificial blood, can scarcely be other than pre-historic table-altars. A further stage in the evolution of the table Altar is seen in the elaborate structures recently discovered within the West-Semitic area. In these the rock is cut away so as to leave the Altar standing free, to which rock-cut steps lead up, an arrangement forbidden, from motives of decency, by the earliest legislation ( Exodus 20:26 , with which cf. 83), while that first discovered at Petra has a depression for the Altar-hearth ( PEFSt [1] ), the legitimacy of the local Altars is never called in question. ]'>[7] by the erection and repair of Altars. As Altars to which a special interest attaches may be mentioned that erected by David on the threshing floor of Araunah ( 2 Samuel 24:18 ff. ), the site of which is marked by the present mosque of ‘the Dome of the Rock’; the Altar erected by Ahaz after the model of one seen by him at Damascus ( 2 Kings 16:10 ff. ); the sacrificial and incense Altars to the host of heaven in the courts and probably even on the roof of the Temple ( 2 Kings 23:12 , Jeremiah 19:13 ); and finally, the Altar to Olympian Zeus placed by Antiochus Epiphanes on the top of the Altar of burnt-offering ( 1Ma 1:54 ). Reference must also be made to Altars as places of refuge for certain classes of criminals, attested both by legislation ( Exodus 21:13 f. The origin and precise significance of the horns of the Altar , of which the refugee laid hold (1Kings ll . A small limestone Altar, showing the horns in the form of rounded knobs at the four corners, has just been discovered at Gezer ( PEFSt el-Elohe-Israel - Upon the ‘parcel of ground’ which he had bought at Shechem, Jacob built an Altar and called it El-elohe-Israel , ‘El, the god of Israel,’ Genesis 33:20 (E Foursquare - It was the shape of the brazen Altar, Exodus 27:1 ; Exodus 38:1 ; the breastplate, Exodus 28:16 ; Exodus 39:9 ; and the Altar of incense, Exodus 30:2 ; Exodus 37:25 . Apparently it was the shape of the 'panels' of the base of the molten sea in Solomon's temple, 1 Kings 7:31 ; also of the court of the future temple, Ezekiel 40:47 ; the Altar of the same, Ezekiel 43:16 ; the portion of the land offered as a holy oblation, Ezekiel 48:20 ; for the sanctuary, Ezekiel 45:2 ; and for the city, Ezekiel 48:16
Cavity, Altar - A small square or oblong chamber in the body of an Altar, in which relics are placed
Altar Cavity - A small square or oblong chamber in the body of an Altar, in which relics are placed
Altar Curtains - Of linen, silk, or precious stuffs, formerly drawn around the Altar during certain parts of the mass
Tephramancy - ) Divination by the ashes of the Altar on which a victim had been consumed in sacrifice
Ed - ” Altar that the tribes assigned territory east of the Jordan built as a witness that Yahweh is God of both the eastern and western tribes. The building resulted in a dispute between the two groups of tribes, but Phinehas, the priest, helped settle the dispute, ensuring the Altar was a symbol and would not be used for burnt offering (Joshua 22:34 )
Alms-Plate - Dish on which alms-bags are deposited before being placed solemnly on an Altar; also, plate carried by beggars
Altar, Bye - One subordinate to the high Altar, usually applied to Altars situated in the bays of the nave, transepts, etc
Fenes-Tella - one to show the relics within an Altar, or the like
Altar - Altare, probably from the same root as altus, high. Altars were originally made of turf, afterwards of stone, wood or horn some were round, others square, others triangular. The principal Altars of the Jews were, the Altar of incense, of burnt-offerings, and of shewbread all of shittim wood, and covered with gold or brass. In scripture, Christ is called the Altar of Christians, he being the atoning sacrifice for sin. We have an Altar, whereof they have no right to eat, who serve tabernacles
Ostension - ) The showing of the sacrament on the Altar in order that it may receive the adoration of the communicants
Grate - A network of brass for the bottom of the great Altar of sacrifice (Exodus 27:4 ; 35:16 ; 38:4,5,30 )
Sedilia - ) Seats in the chancel of a church near the Altar for the officiating clergy during intervals of service
Genuflexion - A temporary bending of the knee as distinguished fromactual kneeling; usually made towards the Altar as the symbol ofChrist's Presence
Barachias - the father of Zacharias, mentioned Matthew 23:35 , as slain between the temple and the Altar. ...
Some think him to be Zacharias, the son of Jehoiada, who was killed by the orders of Joash, between the temple and the Altar, 2 Chronicles 24:21
Heave Offering - An offering or oblation heaved up or elevated before the Altar, as the shoulder of the peace offering
Altar Stole - An ornament shaped as the ends of a stole and fastened to the front of the Altar in the Middle Ages
Repository - A chapel or side-altar of repose in which a Sacred Host consecrated on Holy Thursday is kept until Good Friday
Stole, Altar - An ornament shaped as the ends of a stole and fastened to the front of the Altar in the Middle Ages
Mensa - A slab of stone used as the surface of the Altar is socalled
Gospel Side of Altar - The left side of the Altar as one faces it, so called because portions of the Gospels are read there at Mass
Altar Boys - Servers at the Altar, not in minor orders, at Mass, Vespers, Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, Marriage, Holy Communion, etc
Altar, Gospel Side of - The left side of the Altar as one faces it, so called because portions of the Gospels are read there at Mass
Settles - Apparently ledges or borders round the future Altar of burnt offering, as described by Ezekiel in Ezekiel 43:14,17,20 ; Ezekiel 45:19
Ed - In the Hebrew (and also in the Greek) text of Joshua 22:34 the name given by the two and a half tribes to the Altar erected by them on the east bank of the Jordan has dropped out. Our English translators have filled the gap by inserting Ed as the name of the Altar in question. ...
The location of this Altar on the east bank of the Jordan is required by the whole tenor of the narrative
Chancel - Part of the choir near the Altar of a church, where the officiating clergy stand. The word sanctuary is now used for the railed enclosure about the Altar
Altars of the Tabernacle - The Altar of holocaust was within the court of the Tabernacle to the east of the entrance. The Altar of incense, used for incense offerings in the Old Law, was within the Tabernacle
Super-Frontal - A covering on the top of the Altar which hangs downeight or ten inches in front, varying in color according to theChurch Season
Alms Bason - A shallow dish or plate, usually made of some preciousmetal, in which the offerings of the people are received and placedon the Altar
Cards, Altar - Printed cards placed in the middle and at each side of an Altar, containing certain prayers to be said by the celebrant at Mass
Altar Cards - Printed cards placed in the middle and at each side of an Altar, containing certain prayers to be said by the celebrant at Mass
Altarwise - ) In the proper position of an Altar, that is, at the east of a church with its ends towards the north and south
el-Elo'he-is'Rael - (God, the God of Israel ), the name bestowed by Jacob on the Altar which he erected facing the city of Shechem
Jehovah Nissi - ) Name given by Moses to the Altar commemorating Israel' s victory, under Jehovah, over Amalek. ) The rod of God in Moses' hand, when held up as a banner, brought victory; so it was the pledge of what the Altar represented, that Jehovah is the ensurer of victory to His people when rallying round Him (Psalms 60:4; Isaiah 11:10; Proverbs 18:10)
Acolyte - , Altar-boys; especially member of the highest of minor orders in the Latin Church. The chief duties of this office are: to light the candles on the Altar and to carry them in procession and during the solemn singing of the Gospel; to prepare wine and water for the Sacrifice of the Mass; to assist the ministers at Mass and other public services of the Church
Censer - A small portable vessel of metal fitted to receive burning coals from the Altar, and on which the incense for burning was sprinkled. (1 Kings 7:50 ; 2 Chronicles 4:22 ) The word rendered "censer" in (Hebrews 9:4 ) probably means the "altar of incense
High Place - The first Altar after the Flood was built on a mountain (Genesis 8:20 ). Abraham also built an Altar on a mountain (12:7,8). After the Israelites entered the Promised Land they were strictly enjoined to overthrow the high places of the Canaanites (Exodus 34:13 ; Deuteronomy 7:5 ; 12:2,3 ), and they were forbidden to worship the Lord on high places (Deuteronomy 12:11-14 ), and were enjoined to use but one Altar for sacrifices (Leviticus 17:3,4 ; Deuteronomy 12 ; 16:21 )
Iconostasis - (Greek: a picture screen) ...
The chief and most distinctive feature in most Eastern churches, consisting of a solid screen which divides the sanctuary from the body of the church, shutting off the Altar from the worshippers. As the Gothic builders used the reredos to beautify the Altar so the Eastern Church uses the ornamental screen in front. Originally the Eastern churches had only a slight barrier between the Altar and nave
Horn - ); (3) at the corners of the golden Altar, Revelation 9:13 (cp. Exodus 30:2 ; the horns were of one piece with the Altar, as in the case of the brazen Altar, Exodus 27:2 , and were emblematic of the efficacy of the ministry connected with it); (b) metaphorically, in the singular, "a horn of salvation," Luke 1:69 (a frequent metaphor in the OT, e
Decani - A term used to designate the south side of the choir, (theright side as we face the Altar) that being the side where the Deansits
Footpace - ) A dais, or elevated platform; the highest step of the Altar; a landing in a staircase
Jeho'Vah-Nis'si - (Jehovah my banner ), the name given by Moses to the Altar which he built in commemoration of the discomfiture of the Amalekites
Jadon - Josephus calls the man of God who denounced Jeroboam's Altar at Bethel "Jadon," intending probably "Iddo the seer
Osculatorium - It was used in the Middle Ages to convey the kiss of peace to the faithful, and was first brought to the Altar for the celebrant to kiss at the proper place in tke Mass, then brought to each of the congregation in turn at the Altar rails
Hanukkah - , to commemorate the dedication of the new Altar set up at the purification of the temple of Jerusalem to replace the Altar which had been polluted by Antiochus Epiphanes (1 Maccabees i
Ariel - Ariel apparently referred to the top of the Altar on which the priests burned sacrifices. Jerusalem under Assyrian attack was like the Altar
Tablet, Peace - It was used in the Middle Ages to convey the kiss of peace to the faithful, and was first brought to the Altar for the celebrant to kiss at the proper place in tke Mass, then brought to each of the congregation in turn at the Altar rails
el-Bethel - God of Bethel, the name of the place where Jacob had the vision of the ladder, and where he erected an Altar (Genesis 31:13 ; 35:7 )
Chantry - ) A chapel or Altar so endowed
Haikal - It contains the high Altar, and is usually closed by an embroidered curtain
Jehovah-Shalom - Jehovah send peace, the name which Gideon gave to the Altar he erected on the spot at Ophrah where the angel appeared to him (Judges 6:24 )
Canopy, Altar - (Greek: konops, gnat: originally used as a protection against insects) ...
An ornamental covering of cloth, stone, wood, or metal, used to crown an Altar, throne, pulpit, statue, etc. In liturgical use: the structure covering an Altar, called also baldachinum; the covering suspended over the throne occupied by dignitaries of the Church or princes; the covering, always white, under which the Blessed Sacrament is sometimes borne in processions. For transporting the Blessed Sacrament from one Altar to the other, or for taking the Holy Viaticum to the sick, it is customary in some places to use a small canopy with a single staff
Pan - The "ash-pans" mentioned in Exodus 27:3 were made of copper, and were used in connection with the Altar of burnt-offering. These were probably simply metal vessels employed for carrying burning embers from the brazen Altar to the Altar of incense
Ed - The words are literally rendered: "And the children of Reuben and the children of Gad named the Altar. " This great Altar stood probably on the east side of the Jordan, in the land of Gilead, "over against the land of Canaan. " After the division of the Promised Land, the tribes of Reuben and Gad and the half-tribe of Manasseh, on returning to their own settlements on the east of Jordan (Joshua 22:1-6 ), erected a great Altar, which they affirmed, in answer to the challenge of the other tribes, was not for sacrifice, but only as a witness ('Ed) or testimony to future generations that they still retained the same interest in the nation as the other tribes
Hanukkah - He made a new sacrificial Altar and holy vessels, burned incense on the incense Altar, lit the lampstands to give light to the Temple, placed bread on the table, and hung new curtains. He dedicated the new Altar with sacrifices, song, and joyous worship for eight days
Altar Canopy - (Greek: konops, gnat: originally used as a protection against insects) ...
An ornamental covering of cloth, stone, wood, or metal, used to crown an Altar, throne, pulpit, statue, etc. In liturgical use: the structure covering an Altar, called also baldachinum; the covering suspended over the throne occupied by dignitaries of the Church or princes; the covering, always white, under which the Blessed Sacrament is sometimes borne in processions. For transporting the Blessed Sacrament from one Altar to the other, or for taking the Holy Viaticum to the sick, it is customary in some places to use a small canopy with a single staff
Abihu - the son of Aaron, the high priest, was consumed, together with his brother Nadab, by fire sent front God, because he had offered incense with strange fire, instead of taking it from the Altar, Leviticus 10:1-2 . Some commentators believe that this fire proceeded from the Altar of burnt-offerings; others, that it came from the Altar of incense. It had a vastly more important meaning,—this instance of vengeance is a standing example of that divine wrath which shall consume all who pretend to serve God, except with incense kindled from the one Altar and offering by which he for ever perfects them that are sanctified
Abi'a, Course of, - the eighth of the 24 courses or classes into which the priests were divided for serving at the Altar
Altar - The first Altar we read of was built by Noah on leaving the ark, on which he offered burnt offerings of every clean beast and clean fowl. Abraham, Isaac and Jacob alsobuilt Altars to the Lord: these would have been constructed of stoneor earth, but it is remarkable that we seldom read of their offering sacrifices on them. At times it is simply said they built an Altar unto the Lord and at other times they built an Altar and called upon the name of the Lord. The Altars appear to have been erected as places of drawing near to God, of which sacrifice was the basis. ...
Moses was told that in all places where God recorded His name they should build an Altar of wood or of stone and offer thereon sheep and oxen for burnt offerings and peace offerings; but such Altars if made of stone were not to be made of hewn stone; for had they lifted up a tool upon it, it would have been defiled. There must be nothing of man's handiwork in approaching to God: a principle, alas, grossly violated in the professing church of God! It is added, "neither shalt thou go up by steps unto mine Altar, that thy nakedness be not discovered thereon
Altar - Sacrifices are nearly as ancient as worship, and Altars are of almost equal antiquity. Scripture speaks of Altars, erected by the patriarchs, without describing their form, or the materials of which they were composed. The Altar which Jacob set up at Bethel, was the stone which had served him for a pillow; Gideon sacrificed on the rock before his house. ...
The first Altars which God commanded Moses to raise, were of earth or rough stones; and it was declared that if iron were used in constructing them they would become impure, Exodus 20:24-25 . The Altar which Moses enjoined Joshua to build on Mount Ebal, was to be of unpolished stones, Deuteronomy 27:5 ; Joshua 8:31 ; and it is very probable that such were those built by Samuel, Saul, and David. The Altar which Solomon erected in the temple was of brass, but filled, it is believed, with rough stones, 2 Chronicles 4:1-3 . Josephus says that the Altar which in his time was in the temple was of rough stones, fifteen cubits high, forty long, and forty wide. ...
Among the Romans Altars were of two kinds, the higher and the lower; the higher were intended for the celestial gods, and were called Altaria, from altus; the lower were for the terrestrial and infernal gods, and were called arae. Before temples were in use the Altars were placed in the groves, highways, or on tops of mountains, inscribed with the names, ensigns, or characters of the respective gods to whom they belonged. The great temples at Rome generally contained three Altars; the first in the sanctuary, at the foot of the statue, for incense and libations; the second before the gate of the temple, for the sacrifices of victims; and the third was a portable one for the offerings and sacred vestments or vessels to lie upon. The ancients used to swear upon the Altars upon solemn occasions, such as confirming alliances, treaties of peace, &c. ...
The principal Altars among the Jews were those of incense, of burnt- offering, and the Altar or table for the shew bread. The Altar of incense was a small table of shittim wood covered with plates of gold. The priest, whose turn it was to officiate, burnt incense on this Altar, at the time of the morning sacrifice between the sprinkling of the blood and the laying of the pieces of the victim on the Altar of burnt-offering. He did the same also in the evening, between the laying of the pieces on the Altar and the drink-offering. The Altar of burnt-offering was of shittim wood also, and carried upon the shoulders of the priests, by staves of the same wood overlaid with brass. This Altar was placed in the open air, that the smoke might not sully the inside of the tabernacle or temple. On this Altar the holy fire was renewed from time to time, and kept constantly burning. The Altar of burnt-offering had the privilege of being a sanctuary or place of refuge. The wilful murderer, indeed, sought protection there in vain; for by the express command of God he might be dragged to justice, even from the Altar. The Altar or table of shew bread was of shittim wood also, covered with plates of gold, and had a border round it adorned with sculpture. After the return of the Jews from their captivity, and the building of the second temple, the form and size of the Altars were somewhat changed. ...
Sacrifices according to the laws of Moses, could not be offered except by the priests; and at any other place than on the Altar of the tabernacle or the temple. If a different arrangement had been adopted, if the priests had been scattered about to various Altars, without being subjected to the salutary restraint which would result from a mutual observation of each other, they would no doubt some of them have willingly consented to the worship of idols; and others, in their separate situation, would not have been in a condition to resist the wishes of the multitude, had those wishes been wrong. The necessity of sacrificing at one Altar, (that of the tabernacle or temple,) is frequently and emphatically insisted on, Deuteronomy 12:13-14 ; and all other Altars are disapproved, Leviticus 26:30 , compare Joshua 22:9-34 . Notwithstanding this, it appears that, subsequently to the time of Moses, especially in the days of the kings, Altars were multiplied; but they fell under suspicions, although some of them were perhaps sacred to the worship of the true God
Cherubic Hymn - (Cherubikon) Hymn sung by the choir in Greek and other Oriental liturgies at the time of "the great entrance," when the Bread and Wine are brought to the Altar
Cherubikon - (Cherubikon) Hymn sung by the choir in Greek and other Oriental liturgies at the time of "the great entrance," when the Bread and Wine are brought to the Altar
Hymn, Cherubic - (Cherubikon) Hymn sung by the choir in Greek and other Oriental liturgies at the time of "the great entrance," when the Bread and Wine are brought to the Altar
Hagioscope - ) An opening made in the interior walls of a cruciform church to afford a view of the Altar to those in the transepts; - called, in architecture, a squint
Radine - ) Any member like a step, as the raised back of an Altar or the like; a set raised over another
Gradual - A portion of Scripture formerly sung after the Epistlefor the Day, from the steps of the Pulpit or Altar, and hence calledGradual, from the Latin gradus, meaning a step
Ambulatory - The name given to the passageway running around andback of the Altar, being a continuation of the aisles of the church
Unknown God - Paul, wandering along the streets of Athens, saw an Altar bearing the dedication, ‘To an Unknown God’ ( Acts 17:23 ). There is evidence in other ancient writers in favour of the existence of such a dedication, and the conjecture may be permitted that the Altar was erected as a thank-offering for life preserved in some foreign country, the name of the proper divinity of which a very important thing in Greek ritual was unknown to the person preserved
Candlestick - Rubrical law prescribes that six great candlesticks be permanently stationed on the main Altar, three on either side of the central crucifix. An Altar candlestick consists of five parts, the foot, stem, knob about the middle of the stem, bowl to receive the drippings of wax, and the pricket, i
Bamah - " The very name implies the place is not sanctioned by ME; (God); it implies its own paganness: My place is called mizbeach , "altar. " Your sacrifices even to ME on a "high place" instead of My "altar" in the temple, were therefore a "provocation," Ezekiel 20:28 (Deuteronomy 12:1-5)
Grate - It refers to the 'grating' made of brass that formed part of the brazen Altar
Ara - ) The Altar; a southern constellation, south of the tail of the Scorpion
Antimensium - (Greek: anti, instead of; Latin: mensa, table) ...
Consecrated corporal of silk or linen containing relics of saints, which is spread on the Altar of Greek churches for the celebration of Mass
Introit - (Latin: entrance) ...
Fragment of a psalm with antiphon recited by the celebrant of Mass after finishing the prayers at the foot of the Altar and chanted by the choir at High Mass
Jerubba'al, - (contender with Baal ), the surname of Gideon, which he acquired in consequence of destroying the Altar of Baal, when his father defended him from the vengeance of the Abiezrites
Sanctuary - Meaning the "Holy Place"; the name given to thatportion of the Chancel within the rail where the Altar stands;from this fact the whole church building is frequently called theSanctuary of God
Araunah - The Jebusite from whom David purchased the place on which to build the Altar of the Lord. He there built an Altar, and offered burnt offerings and peace offerings, without anything being said of his building a house for the Lord on the spot: whereas in Chronicles David gave to Ornan 600 shekels of gold by weight for the place. Doubtless therefore 'the place' included a much larger area than was needed for David's Altar, and perhaps included the homestead of Araunah
el-Elohe-Israel - ” The name Jacob gave Altar he set up in land he bought near Shechem (Genesis 33:20 )
Altar, Epistle Side of - The right side of the Altar as one faces it, so called because, very frequently, parts of the Bible taken from the epistles of the Apostles are read there during Mass as lessons
Epistle Side of Altar - The right side of the Altar as one faces it, so called because, very frequently, parts of the Bible taken from the epistles of the Apostles are read there during Mass as lessons
el-Elohe-Israel - The name bestowed by Jacob on the Altar which he erected facing the city of Shechem
Sedilia - The name given tothe seats near the Altar, usually placed against the south wall, tobe used by the Clergy during the sermon at the Holy Communion
Altar - Mizbêach (מִזְבֵּחַ, Strong's #4196), “altar. 8:20 (its first biblical appearance): “And Noah builded an Altar unto the Lord; and took of every clean beast, and of every clean fowl, and offered burnt offerings on the Altar. ” In later references, this word may refer to a table upon which incense was burned: “And thou shalt make an Altar to burn incense upon: of shittim wood shalt thou make it” ( Altars were to be made of earth—i. If the Jews were to hew stone for Altars in the wilderness, they would have been compelled to use war weapons to do the work. ”)At Sinai, God directed Israel to fashion Altars of valuable woods and metals. The Altar that stood before the holy place ( Altar of incense within the holy place ( Altars: “But ye shall destroy their Altars, break their images, and cut down their groves” ( Arau'Nah - (ark ), a Jebusite who sold his threshing floor on Mount Moriah to David as a site for an Altar to Jehovah, together with his oxen
Jerubbaal - Contender with Baal; or, let Baal plead, a surname of Gideon; a name given to him because he destroyed the Altar of Baal (Judges 6:32 ; 7:1 ; 8:29 ; 1 Samuel 12:11 )
Hearth - The Altar hearth of Ezekiel 43:15-16 refers to the upper part of the Altar upon which the sacrifice was burnt (compare Leviticus 6:9 )
Faldstool - It is prescribed as a genuflexorium at the door of the church at the solemn reception of a bishop, at the Altar of the Blessed Sacrament, and before the high Altar
Altar Lights - Two candles in candlesticks placed on the retable ofthe Altar and lighted at the celebration of the Holy Eucharist;frequently called Eucharistic Lights. This isevidenced by the table in the Tourist's Church Guide for 1898, inwhich it appears that in 1882 there were 581 churches in which theAltar Lights were used, while in 1898 the number had increased to4,334. (See LIGHTS ON THE Altar)
Diaconicum - In the Greek Church; connotes: ...
(1) The annex to a basilica where Altar-supplies are kept
Garlands - The Altar and the priests and attendants were also in like manner adorned
Jehovah-Shalom - ” Name Gideon gave to the Altar he built at Ophrah (Judges 6:24 )
Altar Herse - The framework used in the erection of a temporary canopy over an Altar on special occasions
Herse, Altar - The framework used in the erection of a temporary canopy over an Altar on special occasions
Censer - Censers are described among the furniture of the Altar—the brazen Altar," not the Altar of incense. It is questioned, however, whether the golden Altar is not rather meant
Candlemas - ) The second day of February, on which is celebrated the feast of the Purification of the Virgin Mary; - so called because the candles for the Altar or other sacred uses are blessed on that day
Percher - ) A Paris candle anciently used in England; also, a large wax candle formerly set upon the Altar
Epistle Side - The south or right side of the Altar from which theEpistle is read
Reredos - ) A screen or partition wall behind an Altar
Mothering - ) A rural custom in England, of visiting one's parents on Midlent Sunday, - supposed to have been originally visiting the mother church to make offerings at the high Altar
Testimony - ...
...
The Altar raised by the Gadites and Reubenites (Joshua 22:10 )
Anaphora - (Greek: offering, sacrifice) ...
In the Greek Rite: ...
(1) part of the service which corresponds to Latin Canon of the Mass; ...
(2) offering of Eucharistic bread; ...
(3) aer (veil); ...
(4) procession in which offerings are brought to the Altar
High Mass - The complete rite of the Mass, the priest assisted by the deacon and subdeacon, and all the rubrics of the Order of Mass observed, such as chanting the Gospel, incensing Altar, ministers, and people; also called solemn Mass
Ospeler - ) A priest or deacon who reads the gospel at the Altar during the communion service
Squint - In medieval architecture, an oblique opening in the screen or chancel wall of a church, to enable those outside or in the aisles to see the main Altar
Jehovah-Nissi - Jehovah my banner, the title given by Moses to the Altar which he erected on the hill on the top of which he stood with uplifted hands while Israel prevailed over their enemies the Amalekites (Exodus 17:15 )
Friday, Good - Black vestments are worn by the priest, and until the Mass the Altar is covered July by a single linen cloth and there are no lights. The morning services are in three parts: a Prophecy; Lesson from the Scriptures, the reading of the Passion and prayers for all mankind, the unveiling and adoration of the Cross, accompanied by the chanting of the Improperia; and the Mass of the Presanctified, before which the Host, already consecrated on Holy Thursday, is taken in solemn procession from the Altar of Repose to the main Altar
Good Friday - Black vestments are worn by the priest, and until the Mass the Altar is covered July by a single linen cloth and there are no lights. The morning services are in three parts: a Prophecy; Lesson from the Scriptures, the reading of the Passion and prayers for all mankind, the unveiling and adoration of the Cross, accompanied by the chanting of the Improperia; and the Mass of the Presanctified, before which the Host, already consecrated on Holy Thursday, is taken in solemn procession from the Altar of Repose to the main Altar
Half - 24:6: “And Moses took half of the blood, and put it in basins; and half of the blood he sprinkled on the Altar. 27:5, the word means “halfway”: “And thou shalt put it under the compass of the Altar beneath, that the net may be even to the midst [2] of the Altar
Kiss, Liturgical Use of - At High Mass the celebrant kisses the Altar, and presents his left cheek to the deacon's, saying Pax tecum (peace be with you); the deacon conveys the salute to the sub-deacon, thence to the other clergy. The celebrant kisses the Altar nine times during Mass as a symbol of respect
Liturgical Use of Kiss - At High Mass the celebrant kisses the Altar, and presents his left cheek to the deacon's, saying Pax tecum (peace be with you); the deacon conveys the salute to the sub-deacon, thence to the other clergy. The celebrant kisses the Altar nine times during Mass as a symbol of respect
Urijah -
A high priest in the time of Ahaz (2 Kings 16:10-16 ), at whose bidding he constructed an idolatrous Altar like one the king had seen at Damascus, to be set up instead of the brazen Altar
Elizur - He presented the tribe's offerings at the dedication of the Altar (Numbers 7:30-35 )
Settle - ]'>[2] of ‘ăz ârâh , which is used of the two ledges between the base and the hearth of the Altar
Altar in Scripture - Many Altars are mentioned in Scripture, e. , those of Noe and Abraham, Altars erected for the worship of idols, Altars of holocaust and of incense, of the Tabernacle and of the Temple, and the Altar described in the Apocalypse
Tripod - ) Any utensil or vessel, as a stool, table, Altar, caldron, etc
Scripture, Altar in - Many Altars are mentioned in Scripture, e. , those of Noe and Abraham, Altars erected for the worship of idols, Altars of holocaust and of incense, of the Tabernacle and of the Temple, and the Altar described in the Apocalypse
Jehovah-Shalom - Jehovah of peace, or prosperity, the name given by Gideon to an Altar which he built in the place where the Angel-Jehovah had appeared to him, and saluted him by saying "Peace be unto thee," Judges 6:24
Altar to the Unknown God - Whatever the origin of this inscription on the Altar at Athens, it afforded the apostle Paul an admirable thesis for his discourse to the idolatrous Athenians
Reredos - A carved or sculptured screen of wood or stone placedabove and back of the Altar, The word is a compound of the oldEnglish rere, the same as "rear," and the French word dos,derived from the Latin dorsum, meaning "back
Predella - ) The step, or raised secondary part, of an Altar; a superaltar; hence, in Italian painting, a band or frieze of several pictures running along the front of a superaltar, or forming a border or frame at the foot of an Altarpiece
Cruet - ) A vessel used to hold wine, oil, or water for the service of the Altar
Jehovah-Nissi - ” Name Moses gave to the Altar he built after defeating the Amalekites (Exodus 17:15 )
Altar Bell - A small bell kept at the epistle side of the Altar, rung during Mass at the Sanctus and at the elevation of the Sacred Species, as an invitation to those present to take part in the act of adoration at the Consecration
Ahira - ” Leader of tribe of Naphtali under Moses (Numbers 1:15 ), who presented the tribe's offerings at the dedication of the Altar (Numbers 7:78-83 ) and led them in the wilderness marches
Jeho'Vah-Sha'Lom - " The Altar erected by Gideon in Orphrah was so called in memory of the salutation addressed to him by the angel of Jehovah, "Peace be unto thee
Lights on the Altar - (See Altar LIGHTS. ) In addition to what isset forth in the article to which the reader is referred, wereproduce from Wheatley on the Prayer Book the following: "Amongother ornaments of the Church were two lights enjoined by theInjunctions of King Edward VI to be set upon the Altar as asignificant ceremony to represent the Light which Christ's Gospelbrought into the world
Ed - The great Altar of Ed also was an Israelite work, founded by Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh, to be a witness of their having a share in the national covenant and sanctuary of Jehovah. half Manasseh built an Altar at the boundary of (literally, in the fore part of, not as KJV over against) Canaan, by the gelilot (circles, i. ...
The Altar was erected on the W. The Altar was "a great Altar to see to," i. The high cone of Kurn Surtabeh realizes the description of the Altar of witness; it crowns an almost isolated block of hill, closing in the broader part of the Jordan valley on the N. ...
The monument on the top is such as the Bible describes the Altar to have been. The Altar of Ed was 11 miles from the national sanctuary at Shiloh, and separated from it by a range of mountains. Or else "Canaan" may be used of the whole country of the nine and a half tribes, the Jordan valley being excepted; the Altar Ed being in front of the country of the nine and a half tribes (Keil and Delitzsch)
Grate, Grating - The grating of the tabernacle Altar was made of bronze and held rings through which carrying poles could be inserted (Exodus 27:4-7 ; Exodus 35:16 ; Exodus 38:4-5 ,Exodus 38:4-5,38:30 ; Exodus 39:39 )
Flesh Hook - A large fork used for handling large pieces of meat, especially at the sacrificial Altar
Gradual - (Latin: gradus, step) ...
The response and versicle to the Epistle, so called because at High Mass it was sung on the step of the Altar
Kidneys - These, 'with the fat thereof,' were often burned on the Altar in the sacrifices
Gentiles, Court of the - Josephus says there was in the court of the temple a wall or balustrade, breast high, having pillars at regular distances, with inscriptions on them in Greek and Latin, importing that strangers were forbidden to approach nearer to the Altar, Ephesians 2:14
Censer - , Calvin, and most modern scholars, translate it as ‘altar of incense. -may mean anything employed in the burning of incense, whether a censer in which, or an Altar upon which, the act is performed. When θυμιατήριον occurs in the Septuagint -2 Chronicles 26:19, Ezekiel 8:11, 4 Maccabees 7:11 -it no doubt means ‘censer,’ being a translation of מִקִטֶרָת, while the Altar of incense is τὸ θυσιαστήριον θυμιάματος (or -των) in Exodus 30:1; Exodus 30:27, Leviticus 4:7, 1 Chronicles 6:49, etc. But it is also certain that θυμιατήριον became the usual Hellenistic name for the Altar of incense, and Philo (Quis rer. Unless the writer of Hebrews follows the same usage, he entirely ignores the Altar of incense in his description of the furniture of the tabernacle, which is scarcely credible. (2) Prima facie, the author of Hebrews has fallen into error in naming this Altar among the furnishings of the most holy place. He does not say that the Holy of Holies contained the θυμιατήριον (contrast ἐν ᾗ in Hebrews 9:3), but that it had (ἔχουσα) such an Altar. Evidently he was thinking, not of the local position of the Altar, but of its intimate relation to the ministry of the inner sanctuary on the Day of Atonement
Chancel - ) That part of a church, reserved for the use of the clergy, where the Altar, or communion table, is placed
Archiparaphonista - His duties included: ...
choosing the chanters for a Pontifical Mass;
preceding the pope and placing a kneeling-stool before the Altar for him; and
bringing the water to the sub-deacon during the celebration of Mass
Censer - Latterly the portable metal vessel for receiving from the Altar burning coals, on which the priest sprinkled the incense for burning (2 Chronicles 26:16; 2 Chronicles 26:18-19; Luke 1:9). On the day of atonement the high priest was to carry the censer of the golden Altar within the most holy place, and put the incense on the fire in the censer "before the Lord" (Leviticus 16:12-13). ...
Solomon made censers of pure gold, probably to take fire from the brazen Altar, and to convey incense to the golden Altar on which it was to be offered morning and evening (Exodus 30:7-8; 1 Kings 7:50). "The golden Altar," moreover, is Christ Himself (Hebrews 13:10), resting on whom alone prayer is accepted before God
Bread - The shew bread was placed new upon the golden Altar. Christ is our New Testament Altar; and all offerings must be offered upon the golden Altar of his mediatorial nature. No Altar but that of earth, (because the earth is the Lord's,) was to be made for offering. If but a tool was lifted up upon the Altar of earth, or stone, the whole was polluted
Eliasaph - He presented the tribe's offerings at the dedication of the Altar (Numbers 7:42 )
Mattan -
A priest of Baal, slain before his Altar during the reformation under Jehoiada (2 Kings 11:18 )
Wood-Offering - It would seem that in the time of Nehemiah arrangements were made, probably on account of the comparative scarcity of wood, by which certain districts were required, as chosen by lot, to furnish wood to keep the Altar fire perpetually burning (Leviticus 6:13 )
North American College - There is a fine collegiate church with marble Altars and a painting of the Madonna over the high Altar
Mishkan - The (Tabernacle): a) the tabernacle or temporary Sanctuary in which the Divine Presence dwelled during the Jews� journeys through the desert; b) the portion of the tabernacle and the Temple building before the Holy of Holies which contained the inner Altar, the table for the showbread, and the menorah ...
Saint Mary Major - The baldachin of the high Altar is supported by four porphyry columns
Sunday, Passion - Altar, crucifixes, statues, and pictures are draped in violet
Benediction - Reverential instinct teachesthat it is unbecoming to transfer from the shop to the Altar orChurch articles designed for holy use without first being set apartfor such purpose. Hence it is usual to bless by some appropriateservice Altar furniture, linen and other objects for holy use, thatthey may be set apart from all unhallowed and common uses
Incense - The Altar of incense was more closely connected with the holiest place than the other things in the holy place, the shewbread table and the candlestick. outside the veil, before the golden Altar of incense; from its relation to the ark thus it became" most holy," as was also the Altar of incense (Leviticus 30:10). ...
When the priest entered the holy place with the incense, the people were all put out of the temple, and from between the porch and the Altar (Maimonides); Luke 1:10, "the whole multitude . On the day of atonement the high priest, after offering the bullock for himself, took incense in his left hand and a golden shovel full of live coals from the western side of the brazen Altar in his right, and went into the most holy place, his first entrance there (Leviticus 16:12-13). ...
"He shall take a (Hebrew the) censer (see Hebrews 9:4) full of burning coals of fire from off the Altar before the Lord, and his hands full of sweet incense beaten small, and bring it within the veil; and he shall put the incense upon the fire before the Lord, that the cloud of the incense may cover the mercyseat that is upon the testimony, that he die not. The incense of the golden Altar of incense within the sanctuary had to be lighted from the fire of the atoning Altar of burnt offering outside, otherwise the fire was "strange fire". (See Altar; ABIHU; NADAB. The Altar of incense was connected with the Altar of burnt offering by its horns being sprinkled with the blood of the sin offering on the Altar of burnt offering on the day of atonement (Leviticus 16:16; Leviticus 16:18; Exodus 30:10). ...
For prayer was offered by the pious Jews at the times of the morning and evening sacrifices on the Altar of burnt offering, which were accompanied with the incense on the Altar of incense, thus marking that prayer rests upon propitiation By sacrifice
Baldachin - ) A structure in form of a canopy, sometimes supported by columns, and sometimes suspended from the roof or projecting from the wall; generally placed over an Altar; as, the baldachin in St
Altar, Stripping of the - The celebrant assisted by deacon and subdeacon removes from the Altars of the church the Altar-cloths and all ornamentation, leaving but the crucifix and candlesticks
Calefactory - ) A hollow sphere of metal, filled with hot water, or a chafing dish, placed on the Altar in cold weather for the priest to warm his hands with
Nadab - He offered incense to the Lord with strange fire, that is, with common fire, and not with that which had been miraculously lighted upon the Altar, of burnt-offerings
Betrothal - This is the Marriage Vowand is usually said at the foot of the chancel steps, the marriageproper (with the ring) taking place at the Altar Rail
Chrismal - The word formerly designated the cloth covering wrapped about relics; a pall or corporal; a vessel for the Blessed Eucharist; a cere-cloth covering of the Altar-table; also, the white-hooded robes of the newly baptized
Chrismatory - The word formerly designated the cloth covering wrapped about relics; a pall or corporal; a vessel for the Blessed Eucharist; a cere-cloth covering of the Altar-table; also, the white-hooded robes of the newly baptized
Mars Hill - He used the Altar to an “unknown god” to present Jesus to them (Acts 17:22 )
Laetare Jerusalem - Celebrated in joyful spirit because the observance of Lent is half over, rose-colored vestments are worn instead of purple, and flowers are allowed on the Altar
Laetare Sunday - Celebrated in joyful spirit because the observance of Lent is half over, rose-colored vestments are worn instead of purple, and flowers are allowed on the Altar
Mothering Sunday - Celebrated in joyful spirit because the observance of Lent is half over, rose-colored vestments are worn instead of purple, and flowers are allowed on the Altar
Mediana Sunday - Celebrated in joyful spirit because the observance of Lent is half over, rose-colored vestments are worn instead of purple, and flowers are allowed on the Altar
Ariel - ...
...
A symbolic name for Jerusalem (Isaiah 29:1,2,7 ) as "victorious under God," and in Ezekiel 43:15,16 , for the Altar (marg
Golden Rose Sunday - Celebrated in joyful spirit because the observance of Lent is half over, rose-colored vestments are worn instead of purple, and flowers are allowed on the Altar
Vestal - ) A virgin consecrated to Vesta, and to the service of watching the sacred fire, which was to be perpetually kept burning upon her Altar
Retable - A shelf or panel of wood, stone, terra-cotta, or silver, raised above the rear of an Altar to support lights, ornaments, etc
Sunday, Golden Rose - Celebrated in joyful spirit because the observance of Lent is half over, rose-colored vestments are worn instead of purple, and flowers are allowed on the Altar
Sunday, Laetare - Celebrated in joyful spirit because the observance of Lent is half over, rose-colored vestments are worn instead of purple, and flowers are allowed on the Altar
Sunday, Mediana - Celebrated in joyful spirit because the observance of Lent is half over, rose-colored vestments are worn instead of purple, and flowers are allowed on the Altar
Sunday, Mothering - Celebrated in joyful spirit because the observance of Lent is half over, rose-colored vestments are worn instead of purple, and flowers are allowed on the Altar
Sunday, Rose - Celebrated in joyful spirit because the observance of Lent is half over, rose-colored vestments are worn instead of purple, and flowers are allowed on the Altar
Rejoice, o Jerusalem - Celebrated in joyful spirit because the observance of Lent is half over, rose-colored vestments are worn instead of purple, and flowers are allowed on the Altar
Oblation - The Oblations are the Breadand Wine placed on the Altar at the Offertory preparatory to theirConsecration
Levitical Priesthood - The original duties of the priests were the following: ...
to offer the daily sacrifice in the court of the Tabernacle or Temple (Exodus 29; 3Kings 8)
to sprinkle the blood of the victims on the Altar (Leviticus 1)
to burn the victims on the Altar (Leviticus 1)
to renew the loaves of proposition every Sabbath (Leviticus 24)
to offer incense morning and evening (Exodus 30)
to supply the lamps in the sanctuary with oil every day (Exodus 27)
to inspect the lepers (Leviticus 14)
to purify women after childbirth (Leviticus 12)
to teach and interpret the Law to the people (Leviticus 10)
to pray for the people (Leviticus 5)
Jerubbaal - ) Judges 6:32 translated, "they (not Joash, but one, for the townsmen generally) called him Jeroboam, saying, Let Baal fight against him, because he hath thrown down his Altar. " They took up Joash's words: "he that will fight for Baal (seeking to put to death the destroyer of his Altar) shall be put to death (himself; let us wait) TILL morning (to see, will Baal avenge his own wrong); let Baal fight for himself
Daily Sacrifice - (Daniel 8:12 ; 11:31 ; 12:11 ), a burnt offering of two lambs of a year old, which were daily sacrificed in the name of the whole Israelitish people upon the great Altar, the first at dawn of day, and the second at evening (Daniel 9:21 ), or more correctly, "between the two evenings
Nibhaz - The name is perhaps a deliberate corruption of the term for Altar (Mizbeah ) which had possibly become an object of worship
Amalberga, Saint - As a youth Charlemagne sought her in marriage, and attempted to abduct her, but was unable to move her from the Altar where she had taken refuge
Amalia, Saint - As a youth Charlemagne sought her in marriage, and attempted to abduct her, but was unable to move her from the Altar where she had taken refuge
Galbanum - An ingredient in the incense burned at the golden Altar, in the Holy Place, Exodus 30:34
Sacrifices in the Old Testament - The priest's office was to receive the blood of the victim and to offer it, pouring it round about the Altar or anointing therewith some parts of the same Altar. The true essence of the bloody sacrifice resided precisely in that oblation of the blood, for, as is explained in Leviticus 17, by virtue of the life contained in the blood, which belongs to God, atonement is made by the application of that blood upon the Altar. The fat covering the entrails, the two kidneys with their fat, the great lobe of the liver of all animals offered in sacrifice, and the fat tail of the rams were burned upon the Altar; the other parts were disposed of in various ways according to the various sacrifices. The blood was rubbed on the horns of the Altar of holocausts or the Altar: of incense, according to cases, then the remainder was poured out at the foot of the Altar. The choice pieces (fat, kidneys, lobes of the liver) were burnt on the Altar, and the rest eaten by the priests in the outer court. This consisted of a ram, whose blood was sprinkled around the Altar; the fatty portions were consumed on the Altar of holocausts, and the rest of the flesh was eaten by the priests inside the holy place. All bread offered at the sanctuary had to be unleavened, except that made of the first-fruits and presented at the Pentecost, and the bread offered with thanksgiving-sacrifices; even these were not brought to the Altar but went to the priests. Oil entered into the preparation of the bread; some also was burned with the other gifts on the Altar; wine was poured out as a libation before the Altar
Old Testament, Sacrifices in the - The priest's office was to receive the blood of the victim and to offer it, pouring it round about the Altar or anointing therewith some parts of the same Altar. The true essence of the bloody sacrifice resided precisely in that oblation of the blood, for, as is explained in Leviticus 17, by virtue of the life contained in the blood, which belongs to God, atonement is made by the application of that blood upon the Altar. The fat covering the entrails, the two kidneys with their fat, the great lobe of the liver of all animals offered in sacrifice, and the fat tail of the rams were burned upon the Altar; the other parts were disposed of in various ways according to the various sacrifices. The blood was rubbed on the horns of the Altar of holocausts or the Altar: of incense, according to cases, then the remainder was poured out at the foot of the Altar. The choice pieces (fat, kidneys, lobes of the liver) were burnt on the Altar, and the rest eaten by the priests in the outer court. This consisted of a ram, whose blood was sprinkled around the Altar; the fatty portions were consumed on the Altar of holocausts, and the rest of the flesh was eaten by the priests inside the holy place. All bread offered at the sanctuary had to be unleavened, except that made of the first-fruits and presented at the Pentecost, and the bread offered with thanksgiving-sacrifices; even these were not brought to the Altar but went to the priests. Oil entered into the preparation of the bread; some also was burned with the other gifts on the Altar; wine was poured out as a libation before the Altar
Flowers - May be used to adorn the Altar, fresh-cut ones being preferred, although plants and artificial flowers are permitted. ...
Pote adornar le Altar, flores frescemente seca preferite, ben que plantas e flores artificial son permittite
Abihu - The second son of Aaron, consecrated to the priesthood with his three brethren, Exodus 28:21 ; but consumed shortly after by fire from the Lord, with Nadab his brother, for burning incense with common fire instead of that kept perpetually on the Altar of burnt-offering, Leviticus 10:1-2 16:12 Numbers 16:46 . Their death is a solemn warning not to presume to worship God except with incense kindled at the one Altar which Christ hath sanctified, Hebrews 10:10-14
East, Turning to the - By this expression is meant turning to theAltar in saying the Creed and Glorias and in celebrating the HolyCommunion, this last being called the Eastward position. " For this reasonthey prayed facing the east, and when they came to build theirchurches they built them running east and west; the Chancel, inwhich the Altar is placed, being in the east and towards it theymade their prayers and confessed their belief. Thus it came aboutthat the Altar in our churches is always regarded architecturallyand ecclesiastically as the east whether it is so in reality ornot
Ebal - An Altar was also on Ebal (Deuteronomy 27:4-5 ). Joshua carried out the covenant ceremony on Ebal and Gerazim (Joshua 8:30-35 ; compare Joshua 24:1-27 ), building an Altar on Ebal
Incense - Incense was originally burned in censers , but these were latterly used only to carry coals from the great Altar to the ‘altar of incense
Apse - (Latin: apsis, arch) ...
Semicircular or polygonal termination to the choir or aisles of a church, in which the Altar was placed; so called from being vaulted. The term may be applied to the canopy over the Altar; a dome; the arched roof of a room; the bishop's seat; a reliquary; a semicircular recess with a roof
Profane - To profane the temple, to profane the Sabbath, to profane the Altar, are common expressions to denote the violation of the rest of the Sabbath, the entering of foreigners into the temple, or the want of reverence in those that entered it, and the impious sacrifices that were offered on the Altar of the Lord
Horn - The "horns of the Altar" were its four corners and elevation on them, Exodus 27:2 30:2 . See Altar
Censer - The vessel in which incense was presented on "the golden Altar" before the Lord in the temple (Exodus 30:1-9 ). The priest filled the censer with live coal from the sacred fire on the Altar of burnt-offering, and having carried it into the sanctuary, there threw upon the burning coals the sweet incense (Leviticus 16:12,13 ), which sent up a cloud of smoke, filling the apartment with fragrance. The Greek word thumiaterion, here rendered "censer," may more appropriately denote, as in the margin of Revised Version, "the Altar of incense
Jerubebbeth - Gedeon was sent by God to deliver Israel, which had forsaken Yahweh, and after destroying the Altar of Baal, routed the Israelite enemies, the Madianites, with 300 men
New Fire, Blessed of - The new fire is carried to the Altar in a procession, and the branches of a triple candle are lighted from it, and later the paschal candle
Candelabrum - Sometimes these chandeliers stood before the Altar
Gedeon - Gedeon was sent by God to deliver Israel, which had forsaken Yahweh, and after destroying the Altar of Baal, routed the Israelite enemies, the Madianites, with 300 men
Laver - Between the Altar and the tabernacle, a little to the south, stood a circular laver, which, together with its base, was made of the brazen ornaments which the women had presented for the use of the tabernacle, and was thence called כיור נחשת , Exodus 30:18 ; Exodus 40:7
Gideon - Gedeon was sent by God to deliver Israel, which had forsaken Yahweh, and after destroying the Altar of Baal, routed the Israelite enemies, the Madianites, with 300 men
Dedication, Feast of - The dedication commemorated in it was the dedication of a new Altar by Judas Maccabaens in b. The old Altar of Zerubbabel’s temple had been defiled in b. 167, when ‘an abomination of desolation’ was erected upon it (1 Maccabees 1:54), and the climax was reached on 25 Chislev, when sacrifices were offered upon this idol-altar standing on the Altar of God (v. For three years this state of profanation had continued, but when the third anniversary of the desecration came round, the heroic efforts of Judas Maccabaens and his companions had reached such success that they were able to cleanse the Holy Place and to set up a new Altar in place of that which had been defiled, spending a week in special services for its dedication; and, in order to commemorate this, Judas Maccabaens ordained ‘that the days of the dedication of the Altar should be kept in their seasons from year to year by the space of eight days, from the five and twentieth day of the month Chislev, with gladness and joy’ (1 Maccabees 4:59). 164, the question had arisen as to how the old Altar ought to be treated, seeing that it had suffered from heathen pollution, and the conclusion reached was that it should not be used any more, but a new one dedicated in its place, and that the old one should be pulled down and its stones stored in a convenient place ‘until there should come a prophet to give an answer concerning them’ (1 Maccabees 4:44-46). Had they listened, they would have found the Deliverer whom they were expecting, and incidentally also they would have learned the solution of the old difficulty about the stones of the desecrated Altar—that these might lie where they were, being needed no more, for there was being dedicated another Temple to supersede the old (cf
in Memoriam - The term memoria came to mean memorial, monument, Altar, or church, erected in remembrance of the departed; also called confession
Missal - (Latin: Missa, Mass) ...
Book containing prayers recited by the priest at the Altar during Mass, and all texts officially said or sung in connection with Mass throughout the year
Joseph, Little Daughters of Saint - A religious institute founded in Montreal, 1857, by the Sulpician, Father Antoine Mercier, to aid the clergy both by the ministry of prayer and certain temporal services, such as the manufacture of liturgical vestments, Altar-linens, etc
Little Daughters of Saint Joseph - A religious institute founded in Montreal, 1857, by the Sulpician, Father Antoine Mercier, to aid the clergy both by the ministry of prayer and certain temporal services, such as the manufacture of liturgical vestments, Altar-linens, etc
Discretion, Age of - In history, period of the French Revolution inaugurated November 10, 1793, when an actress, typifying the "Goddess of Reason," was enthroned upon the high Altar of Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris; and ending when the Law of February 21, 1795, restored some measure of religious liberty
Memoriam, in - The term memoria came to mean memorial, monument, Altar, or church, erected in remembrance of the departed; also called confession
Jehovah Shalom - ) Gideon so-called his Altar of thanksgiving (not sacrifice) in Ophrah, to commemorate the angel of Jehovah's salutation, "Peace be unto thee"; where rather judgment for national backslidings was to have been expected, and when he himself had feared death, as having seen the angel of Jehovah
Age of Discretion - In history, period of the French Revolution inaugurated November 10, 1793, when an actress, typifying the "Goddess of Reason," was enthroned upon the high Altar of Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris; and ending when the Law of February 21, 1795, restored some measure of religious liberty
Sacristans - They prepare the vestments, Altar vessels, and other things required by the ceremonial for any liturgical function
Saint Joseph, Little Daughters of - A religious institute founded in Montreal, 1857, by the Sulpician, Father Antoine Mercier, to aid the clergy both by the ministry of prayer and certain temporal services, such as the manufacture of liturgical vestments, Altar-linens, etc
Society of Missionary Catechists - In these districts the Missionary Catechists prepare the children for the reception of the sacraments, visit the poor and sick in their homes, clothe, and care for the destitute, train Altar boys, and cooperate with the heavily- burdened missionary priests in every way
Reason, Age of (2) - In history, period of the French Revolution inaugurated November 10, 1793, when an actress, typifying the "Goddess of Reason," was enthroned upon the high Altar of Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris; and ending when the Law of February 21, 1795, restored some measure of religious liberty
Ashes - The ashes on the Altar of burnt offering were gathered into a cavity in its surface
Six Points of Ritual - They are enumerated as follows:(1) Two Lights on the Altar
Horn - ...
But the word is used also metaphorically to denote the projecting corners of the Altar of burnt offerings (Exodus 27:2 ) and of incense (30:2). The horns of the Altar of burnt offerings were to be smeared with the blood of the slain bullock (29:12; Leviticus 4:7-18 ). The criminal, when his crime was accidental, found an asylum by laying hold of the horns of the Altar (1 Kings 1:50 ; 2:28 )
Incense - "Incense" sometimes signifies the sacrifices and fat of victims, as no other kind of incense was offered on the Altar of burnt-offerings, Psalm 66:15 . For a description of the Altar of incense, see Altar
Incense - When an Altar or an Altar-stone is consecrated, grains of incense are burned upon it, and other grains are put into the "sepulcher" or cavity in the stone, containing the relics of saints
Holy Place - It contained the table of showbread (Exodus 25:23-29 ) and the golden Altar of incense (30:1-11). Besides this there were ten lavers and the brazen Altar of burnt sacrifice
Oblation - (Latin: oblatum, offering) ...
The offering of the Altar bread about to be consecrated
Mambre, Vale of - When Abraham was dismissed from Egypt by the Pharao, he went with his nephew Lot towards Bethel, where they separated, and Abraham "came and dwelt by the vale of Mambre, which is in Hebron, and he built there an Altar to the Lord" (Genesis 13)
Shovel - Exodus 27:3 ; Exodus 38:3 , Numbers 4:14 , 1 Kings 7:40 ; 1Ki 7:45 , 2 Kings 25:14 , 2 Chronicles 4:11 ; 2 Chronicles 4:16 , Jeremiah 52:18 , of a utensil for removing the ashes from the Altar
Firepan - A utensil made of bronze (Exodus 27:3 ) or gold (1 Kings 7:50 , KJV, “censers”) used to carry live coals from the Altar of burnt offering (Exodus 27:3 ; Exodus 38:3 ), as censers for burning incense (Numbers 16:6 ,Numbers 16:6,16:17 ), and as trays for collecting the burnt wicks from the tabernacle lamps (Exodus 25:38 ; Exodus 37:23 ; the “snuffdishes” of the KJV)
Canopy - ) Also, a rooflike covering, supported on pillars over an Altar, a statue, a fountain, etc
el-Bethel - ” Either Bethel or place in or near Bethel, where Jacob built an Altar to God as memorial to his previous visit to Bethel, when he had seen a vision of God (Genesis 35:7 ; compare Genesis 28:10-19 )
Coal - The Altar of sacrifice burned coals (Leviticus 16:12 ), as did the blacksmith's fire (Isaiah 44:12 ) and the baker's (Isaiah 44:19 )
Vale of Mambre - When Abraham was dismissed from Egypt by the Pharao, he went with his nephew Lot towards Bethel, where they separated, and Abraham "came and dwelt by the vale of Mambre, which is in Hebron, and he built there an Altar to the Lord" (Genesis 13)
Regem Melech - ...
Jacob's "house of God" consisted as yet of but a pillar first and an Altar afterward (Genesis 28:17-18; Genesis 28:22; Genesis 36:1; Genesis 36:7); so the house of God at the time of Regem Melech consisted merely of an Altar, and congregation, and priests favored with God's presence in worship at it. God, as in Jacob's case, could bless the obedient at the bore Altar before the temple was reared
Deacon - The Roman Pontifical states his duties thus: to minister to the Altar, to baptize, to preach
Oblation - Gift offered at an Altar or shrine, especially a voluntary gift not involving blood
Gideon - (Γεδεών)...
Gideon was a man of valour who, according to Judges 6-8, received a visit from Jahweh’s messenger, overturned the Altar of Baal, saved Israel from the hand of Midian, chastised the men of Succoth, and finally refused a crown
Epistle - In Liturgy, selection most frequently from one of the letters, or Epistles of the Apostles read at Mass after the Collects, at the (priest's) right-hand side of the Altar and therefore called the Epistle side
Abel - His death symbolizes, too, the bloody sacrifice of the Cross and the unbloody one of the Altar
Net-Work - In the brazen Altar there was a grate of net-work made of brass
Sacrifice - See Offerings, Altar, and Lamb
Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament - The ceremony in which the priest removes the Sacred Host from the tabernacle and places it on the Altar for the adoration of the faithful. In public exposition the Sacred Host, having been removed from the tabernacle, is placed in a monstrance and elevated above the Altar-table, usually in a niche above the tabernacle proper
Stacte - nataph), one of the components of the perfume which was offered on the golden Altar (Exodus 30:34 ; RSV marg
Chemarim - In Zephaniah 1:4 distinct from "the priests," from chamar "to burn" or "blacken," the black-attired ministers of the idol priests, who felled the victim at the Altar
Attendance - Of which no man gave attendance at the Altar
Libation - Libations were also in use among the Hebrews, who poured a hin of wine on the victim after it was killed, and the several pieces of the sacrifice were laid on the Altar ready to be consumed in the flames
Surplice - It is worn over the cassock by clerics and Altar boys at many sacred functions, signifying the purity of heart becoming God's ministers
Elbethel - Name given by Jacob to the place of the Altar which he built at Beth-el to God who appeared to him when he fled from Esau
Ariel - In another sense, Ezekiel applies it to the Altar of God, Ezekiel 43:15 , and Isaiah to Jerusalem, as the hearth on which both the burnt offerings and the enemies of God should be consumed, Isaiah 29:1,2,7
Moreh - Here at this "plain," or rather (RSV) "oak," of Moreh, Abraham built his first Altar in the land of Palestine; and here the Lord appeared unto him
Abihu - A standing example of that divine wrath which shall consume all who offer God devotion kindled at any other save the one Altar and Offering of Calvary, whereby "He hath perfected forever them that are sanctified
Jacob - Genesis 25:26 (c) This is a type, throughout his life, of the Christian who, though he fails and falls, quickly builds an Altar, brings the Lamb of GOD by faith, and hides under Calvary and the precious blood for every sin
Sherezer - the congregation of priests at Jerusalem ministering at the Altar, (the temple was not yet completed), to ask whether they should still observe the fast on the tenth day of the fifth month, the anniversary of the burning of the temple
Censer - When Aaron made an atonement for himself and his house, he was to take a censer full of burning coals of fire from off the Altar of the Lord, Leviticus 16:12
Abia Course of - In 1 Chronicles 24:1-31 we have an account of the division of the priests into twenty-four classes, courses, or orders, who ministered at the Altar in rotation
Trespass - The Mosaic law required a trespasser not only to make satisfaction to the person injured, but by an offering at the Altar to reconcile himself to the divine Governor, Leviticus 5:1-19 ; 6:1-7 ; Psalm 51:4
Devotion to the Blessed Sacrament - The usual route of these processions is around the church beginning at the high Altar, following down the middle aisle, up the aisle on the Gospel side and around by the Epistle side, up again through the middle aisle back to the Altar
Ariel - In Ezekiel 43:15 "the Altar"; the secret of Israel's lion-like strength, her having God at peace with her through the atoning sacrifice there. The Ariel here must mean a lion carved Altar of God
Incense - The sacred perfume offered to God by burning on the incense Altar. Incense was to be burnt on the Altar made for the purpose twice a day, in the morning when the lamps were dressed, and also when they were lighted in the evening
Come Near, Approach - 44:13) or of the priests’ “approach” to the Altar ( Altar ( Ai - A royal city of the Canaanites, east of Bethel, near which Abraham once sojourned and built an Altar, Genesis 12:8 ; 13:3
Vial - The phialç was a flat vessel, resembling a saucer, specially used for pouring libations of wine upon the Altar of a deity
Ambrosian Basilica - The golden Altar-frontal dates from 835; and the brazen serpent on a column in the nave was brought from Constantinople, c
Basilica, Ambrosian - The golden Altar-frontal dates from 835; and the brazen serpent on a column in the nave was brought from Constantinople, c
Abijah - The Rabbins reproach this monarch with neglecting to destroy the profane Altar which Jeroboam had erected at Bethel; and with not suppressing the worship of the golden calves there after his victory over that prince
Burnt Offering - The word is applied to the offering which was wholly consumed by fire on the Altar, and the whole of which, except the refuse ashes "ascended" in the smoke to God
Litany Desk - The significance of this position may be seen byreference to the words of the prophet Joel read on Ash Wednesdayas the Epistle, "Let the Priests, the Ministers of the Lord, weepbetween the porch and the Altar, and let them say, Spare Thypeople, O Lord
Hamor - From the children of Hamor, Jacob purchased a parcel of land on which he erected an Altar
Fistula - Now at solemn papal high Mass, the chalice is brought from the Altar to the throne of the pope where he absorbs its contents through a golden pipe
Calamus - Now at solemn papal high Mass, the chalice is brought from the Altar to the throne of the pope where he absorbs its contents through a golden pipe
Halt - render the expression "How long go ye lame on both knees?" The Hebrew verb rendered "halt" is used of the irregular dance ("leaped upon") around the Altar (ver
Urijah - Chief priest who complied with Ahab's order to build an Assyrian-style Altar for the Jerusalem Temple (2 Kings 16:10-16 )
el-Elohe-Israel - Jacob so called the Altar he built on the spot before Shechem, already consecrated by Abram (Genesis 12:7; Genesis 33:19-20)
Sub Deacon - An inferior minister, who anciently attended at the Altar, prepared the sacred vessels, delivered them to the deacons in time of divine service, attended the doors of the church during communion service, went on the bishop's embassies with his letters, or messages, to foreign churches, and was invested with the first of the holy orders
Dorsal - ) A hanging, usually of rich stuff, at the back of a throne, or of an Altar, or in any similar position
Araunah - This spot was indicated by the prophet Gad as the place where an Altar should he erected to J″ Ariel - A name of uncertain meaning, perhaps = ‘God’s Altar-hearth,’ given to Jerusalem by Isaiah ( Isaiah 29:1 ff
Orientation - ), the placing of a church so that the chancel, containing the Altar toward which the congregation fronts in worship, will be on the east end
Abraham in Liturgy - The patriarch Abraham is specifically mentioned in the Roman Martyrology (October 9,); in the Litany for the Dying; in the Breviary, at Quinquagesima, Shrove Tuesday, Passion Sunday, and in the Magnificat, Benedictus and Psaltery; in the Missal, in the third Prophecy on Holy Saturday, Epistle of the thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost, Offertory of the Mass for the Dead, blessing in a Nuptial Mass, and in the Canon of the Mass; in the Pontifical, in the preface of the consecration of an Altar, blessing of a cemetery, and blessing and coronation of a king
Ashes - The ashes on the Altar of burnt-offering were gathered into a cavity in its surface
Siphon - Now at solemn papal high Mass, the chalice is brought from the Altar to the throne of the pope where he absorbs its contents through a golden pipe
Nadab - The oldest son of Aaron, slain by the lord for presumptuously offering strange fire on the Altar of burnt offering, Leviticus 10:1-20
Incense - It was offered along with every meat-offering; and besides was daily offered on the golden Altar in the holy place, and on the great day of atonement was burnt by the high priest in the holy of holies (30:7,8)
Banner - Moses called the Altar of thanksgiving, after Amalek's defeat, JEHOVAH NISSI, "Jehovah is my banner. " The Altar is the pledge that Jehovah, in covenant with Israel, shall enable His people to defeat utterly Amalek and all his foes
Sacrifice - Corban included all that was given to the Lord's service, whether firstfruits, tithes (Leviticus 2:12; Hebrews 10:1-33), and gifts, for maintaining the priests and endowing the sanctuary (Numbers 7:3; Numbers 31:50), or offerings for the Altar. Vegetable:...
(1) meat and drink offerings for the Altar outside,...
(2) incense and meat offerings for the holy place within. " 'Οwlah is the "burnt offering", that which ascends (from 'alah ) or "is burnt"; also kaleel , "whole," it all being consumed on the Altar; "whole burnt sacrifice. The burnt offering was wholly burnt upon the Altar; the sin offering was in part burnt upon the Altar, in part given to the priests, or burnt outside the camp. The peace offering was shared between the Altar, the priests, and the sacrificer. side of the Altar. The priest sprinkled the blood of the burnt offering, the peace offering, and the trespass offering "round about upon the Altar. "...
But in the sin offering, for one of the common people or a ruler, he took of the blood with his finger and put it upon the horns of the Altar of burnt offering, and poured out what blood remained at the bottom of the Altar; in the sin offering for the congregation and for the high priest he brought some of the blood into the sanctuary and sprinkled it seven times before the veil, and put some on the horns of the Altar of incense (Leviticus 4:3; Leviticus 4:6; Leviticus 4:25; Leviticus 4:30). The Mishna says the temple Altar was furnished with two holes at the S. The Hebrew for burning (hiktir ) on the Altar means to send up or make to ascend in smoke, rather than to consume (Leviticus 1:9). ...
The fat burned on the Altar was mainly "sweet fat" or suet , cheleb (Exodus 29:13; Exodus 29:22; Leviticus 3:4; Leviticus 3:10; Leviticus 3:15; Leviticus 4:9; Leviticus 7:4), distinct from mishman or shameen (Numbers 12:20). A different word, peder , denotes the fat of the burnt offering, not exclusively selected for the Altar as the cheleb of the other sacrifices (Leviticus 1:8; Romans 5:6-8; Leviticus 8:20). The first mention of throwing the blood upon the Altar (the established mode afterward in the burnt offerings, peace offerings, and trespass offering, but not the sin offering) was when Moses "threw (so Hebrew) half of the blood on the Altar" (Exodus 24:4-8), and after reading the covenant, and after that the people assented, he took the blood in the basins and "threw it on them, and said, Behold the blood of the covenant which the Lord hath made with you concerning all these words" (Hebrews 9:19-20; Hebrews 13:20). ...
In the sin offering, on the contrary, part of the blood was offered to Jehovah by being put on the horns of the Altar, and on certain occasions by being sprinkled within the tabernacle, while the rest was poured at the Altar base (Leviticus 4:6-7; Leviticus 4:17-18; Leviticus 4:25, etc. ...
The burnt offering came before the sin offering in the princes' offerings in dedicating the Altar and in reconsecrating the Nazarite, where personal holiness was subordinate to the idea of national consecration (Numbers 6:14; Numbers 7:15, etc. The additions to sacrificial ritual made by the law were the one Altar and the national priesthood and the details peculiar to the sin offering and the trespass offering. Then his need of a mediator appeared in the priest's taking the victim from the worshipper, sprinkling of the blood within the tabernacle, and putting some upon the horns (the highest part toward heaven) of the Altar, also placing in the Altar fire some of the fat a "sweet savour" to Jehovah (Leviticus 4:31). "...
Except the parts assigned to the Altar, the whole flesh of the sin offering (as being "most holy," i. (Compare Hebrews 9:7-12 on the typical sin offering on the day of atonement; the inauguration of the Mosaic covenant, Hebrews 9:13-23; the Passover, 1 Corinthians 5:7; the burning of the public or priestly sin offerings without the camp, Hebrews 13:10-13; the Altar of sacrifice typifying His passion, which "we have" as a present and us" though He "knew no sin," 2 Corinthians 5:21). The ceremonies of sacrifice were:...
(1) the victim's presentation at the Altar;...
(2) the laying on of hands, signifying consecration to death (Leviticus 24:14);...
(3) slaughtering, being the completion of the penal death, whereby the blood became the medium of expiation;...
(4) the sprinkling of the blood against the Altar, completing the expiation;...
(5) the burning of the flesh;...
(6) the sacrificial meal at the sanctuary
Steps - GOD's Altar was to be down where everybody could reach it. If there were steps to the Altar, the lame, the maimed, the sick, and the infirm would reveal their inability as they sought to reach it. GOD wanted His Altar on a level with the people where all could take advantage of the sacrifice easily
Burn - The “burning” of men’s bodies on the sacred Altar was a great act of desecration (1 Kings 13:2). ...
Interestingly, śâraph is never used for the “burning” of a sacrifice on the Altar, although a few times it designates the disposal of refuse, unused sacrificial parts, and some diseased parts. One of the śârâphim ministered to Isaiah by bringing a glowing coal from the Altar
Leaven - Salt was its opposite, and was never to be absent from the Altar burnt offering, representing the incorruptible imperishableness of Jehovah's covenant. Honey as liable to ferment also was excluded from the Altar burnt offerings. See Leviticus 2:11 "as an oblation of firstfruits ye shall offer them (leaven and honey) unto the Lord, but they shall not be burnt on the Altar for a sweet savour. " In Amos 4:5 the leavened bread was "with the sacrifice of thanksgiving of the peace offerings," not with burnt offerings of animals on the Altar
Berchmans, John, Saint - Patron of youths; Altar boys' societies are named after him
John Berchmans, Saint - Patron of youths; Altar boys' societies are named after him
Liturgical Colors - The Divine services are offered for various purposes and in honor of different classes of saints, and each of these is signified by an appropriate color, which is the color of the vestments worn by the officiating priest and his principal assistants, of the veil for covering the chalice used in the Mass, and of the draperies hung in front of the Altar and tabernacle
Luz - ) Luz was originally the city, Bethel the pillar and Altar of Jacob; in Genesis 12:8 it is called Bethel by anticipation (Genesis 28:19), after Ephraim's conquest the town Bethel arose
Feast of Asses - Stephen; entered into the sanctuary, placed herself near the Altar, and then celebrated mass; not forgetting to explain the fine qualities of the animal, and exhorting him to make a devout genuflection, with a variety of other fooleries
Adam (2) - Probably Reuben' s Altar of ED, or witness, was near, on the Kurn Surtabeh
Priest - ) One who officiates at the Altar, or performs the rites of sacrifice; one who acts as a mediator between men and the divinity or the gods in any form of religion; as, Buddhist priests
Sedilia - The earliest examples are found in the catacombs where one stone seat was placed at the side of the Altar
Badger - Badger skins were the outer covering of the tabernacle, in the wilderness; and of the ark, the table, the candlestick, the golden Altar, and Altar of burnt offering (Numbers 4:6-14)
Net - Netting or network refers to grillwork used as part of the ornament of the Altar of burnt offering (Exodus 27:4-5 ; Exodus 38:4 ) and of the capitals of the Temple columns (1 Kings 7:17-20 ). The grill-work of the Altar perhaps functioned as a vent
Horn - " (Habakkuk 3:4) Hence also we read of the horns of the Altar. (Jeremiah 17:1; Revelation 9:13) But whether these had reference to any thing ornamental, or to objects more important, when "the sacrifice was bound with cords even to the horns of the Altar," I cannot determine
Bethel - "He built there an Altar and called the place El-beth-el; " and there God met him, revealed His name to him, and confirmed the change of his name to Israel (cf. An Altar was erected and sacrifices offered to the idol; but it was condemned by a man of God, and the Altar was rent. There were sons of the prophets dwelling at Beth-el, 2 Kings 2:3 , but the idolatrous Altar was not destroyed until the days of Josiah
Fractio Panis - It is found on an arch over an Altar tomb
Panis, Fractio - It is found on an arch over an Altar tomb
Liver - kabhed, "heavy;" hence the liver, as being the heaviest of the viscera, Exodus 29:13,22 ; Leviticus 3:4,1,10,15 ) was burnt upon the Altar, and not used as sacrificial food
Jan Van Eyck - Besides collaborating with his brother in the Saint Bavon Altar-piece, he achieved fame as a portrait painter
Passage - The words "the passage of" are, however, more correctly rendered "by the side of," or "at the other side of," thus designating the position of the great Altar erected by the eastern tribes on their return home
Parson - Clergymen may imply any person ordained to serve at the Altar
Ariel - In the margin of Ezekiel 43:15 , the Altar is called the 'lion of God;' but the word is slightly different and is translated by some the 'hearth of God,' the place for offering all sacrifices to God
Eyck, Jan Van - Besides collaborating with his brother in the Saint Bavon Altar-piece, he achieved fame as a portrait painter
Urijah - He is called a faithful witness by Isaiah, Isaiah 8:2 ; but erred in constructing and using at the king's request an Altar unlike that prescribed in the law, Exodus 27:1-8 ; 38:1-7 ; 2 Kings 16:9-12
Laver - A large circular vessel, cast from the polished brass mirrors contributed by the Hebrew women, and placed between the door of the tabernacle and the Altar of burnt-offering, with water for the necessary sacred ablutions, Exodus 30:18-21 28:8 40:7 30:1 32:35
Reconciliation - Christ bids the man who has wronged his brother, to make peace with him, and secure his favor by confession and reparation, before presenting his gift at God's Altar, Matthew 5:23,24
Religious, Clothing of - The manner of profession for a nun, according to the Pontificale Romanum, prescribes that the professed receive the veil, ring, and bridal wreath from the bishop at the Altar
Ornaments - According to this it would seem that amongthe necessary ornaments for the proper furnishing of the churchare the following: the Altar, with its cross, candlesticks andcoverings; Paten and Chalice; Cruets, Font and Pulpit; and thatthe necessary vestments of the Priest are the chasuble, alb andgirdle, stole, surplice, cope; for the Bishop the same with theaddition of the rochette, mitre and Pastoral staff
Phinehas - When representatives of the people were sent to expostulate with the two and a half tribes who, just after crossing Jordan, built an Altar and departed without giving any explanation, Phinehas was their leader, and addressed them in the words recorded in Joshua 22:16-20 . This great Altar was intended to be all ages only a witness that they still formed a part of Israel
Abihu - Immediately before this we read that "there came a fire out from before the Lord and consumed upon the Altar the burnt offering and the fat. " Thatfire was never to go out, and doubtless the fire Abihu should have used was the fire that was upon the brazen Altar, as is ordained in Leviticus 16:12
Neri, Philip, Saint - Emblems: Altar, chasuble, and vial
Nahshon - First in the encampment, the march, as captain of Judah (Numbers 2:3; Numbers 10:14; Numbers 7:12), and in offering for dedicating the Altar; but third in order at the census (Numbers 1:1-7); died in the wilderness (Numbers 26:64-65)
Benediction With Ciborium - At least six candles are lighted on the Altar; the priest is usually vested in surplice and stole, but may wear the cope
Bellini, Giovanni - Among his famous Altar-pieces, consisting usually of Madonnas enthroned and accompanied by saints, are those done for the churches of Santa Maria dei Frari, Saint Zaccaria, and Saint Giobbe, in Venice
Brass - ' Brass is used as a symbol for righteousness according to the claims of God upon man, as in the brazen Altar; the Lord as seen in the vision in the Revelation has feet like fine brass, 'burning as in a furnace:' that is, righteous judgement according to responsibility
Ritualism - ) Specifically :(a) The principles and practices of those in the Church of England, who in the development of the Oxford movement, so-called, have insisted upon a return to the use in church services of the symbolic ornaments (altar cloths, encharistic vestments, candles, etc
Veil - ) A covering for a person or thing; as, a nun's veil; a paten veil; an Altar veil
Advent - Altar drapery and vestments are violet except on third Sunday, when rose color is used, and feasts
Manoah - He offered a kid as a burnt offering and the angel ascended in the flame of the Altar
Iddo - Josephus, and many others after him, are of opinion that it was Iddo who was sent to Jeroboam, while he was at Bethel, and was there dedicating an Altar to the golden calves; and that it was he who was killed by a lion, 1 Kings 13
Offerings, the - But even in the sin offering the fat was burnt on the brazen Altar, and it is once said to be for a sweet savour (Leviticus 4:31 ), thus forming a link with the burnt offering. Leaven, which always signifies what is human and hence evil (for if the human element is introduced into and works in the things of God it is evil), might never be burnt on the Altar to God, nor be in any of the offerings except in one special form of the meat offering (Leviticus 23:16-21 ), and in the bread accompanying a peace offering. Besides the word alah, mentioned above, the word qatar is commonly used for burning on the Altar: it signifies 'to burn incense,' 'to fumigate. ) The priest sprinkled the blood round about upon the Altar, and, except the skin which was the priest's, the whole of the animal was burnt as a sweet savour on the Altar. "It is the burnt offering because of the burning upon the Altar all night unto the morning, and the fire of the Altar shall be burning in it . Aaron had to put on his linen garments to remove the ashes from the Altar to 'the place of ashes' beside the Altar: he then changed his dress and carried the ashes outside the camp. It consisted of fine flour, unleavened, mingled with oil, and anointed with oil and with frankincense: in its simple elements a handful of flour with oil poured on was burnt on the Altar; but it might, in the form of cakes, be baken in an oven, or in a pan, or frying pan. Only a part of the flour and of the oil but all the frankincense was burnt upon the Altar, as a sweet savour unto Jehovah: the rest was food for the priest and his sons, not his daughters. He lived not to men or for their praise: hence all the frankincense was to ascend from the Altar. The blood was sprinkled round about the Altar. All the fat, the two kidneys, and the caul above the liver were burnt upon the Altar, an offering made by fire of a sweet savour unto the Lord. What remained was burnt with fire: indicating that communion to be real must be fresh, and not too far separated from the work of the Altar. That the peace offering typified communion is plain from the directions as to its disposal: part of it was accepted of God on the Altar, called 'the food of the offering'; part was the food of the priest (Christ), and the priest's sons (Christians); and part was eaten by the offerer and his friends (the people, and perhaps also the Gentiles, who in the kingdom will 'rejoice with his people'). Atonement was also made for the holy place and the Altar: all were reconciled by the blood of the sin offering, and on the ground of the same blood the sins of the people were administratively borne away into a land not inhabited. ...
In the case of sin on the part of the priest or the whole congregation, all approach was interrupted: so the blood had to be carried into the holy place, sprinkled there seven times, and placed on the horns of the Altar of incense — the place of the priest's approach — for the re-establishment of approach. In the case of a ruler or of one of the people the blood was sprinkled on the brazen Altar, the place where the people approached: this also was to restore approach for theindividual. ...
The sin offering is not, as a whole, said to be a sweet savour: sin is the prominent idea, yet the fat was burnt upon the Altar for a sweet savour. This does not seem to agree with the necessity of blood-shedding for remission, but the memorial burnt upon the Altar typified the judgement of God in dealing with sin. And as the flour reached the fire of judgement on the Altar, the death of Christ for sin was not left out in this most simple form of sin offering. Thus at the consecration of Aaron and his sons, the fat, the fat tail, the caul, the kidneys, and the right shoulder of the ram, together with one loaf of bread, one cake of oiled bread, and one wafer, were placed in the hands of Aaron, and in the hands of his sons, to wave them for a wave offering before the Lord, and then they were burnt on the Altar for a burnt offering
Fire - The ever-burning fire on the Altar was first kindled from heaven (Leviticus 6:9,13 ; 9:24 ), and afterwards rekindled at the dedication of Solomon's temple (2 Chronicles 7:1,3 ). The expressions "fire from heaven" and "fire of the Lord" generally denote lightning, but sometimes also the fire of the Altar was so called (Exodus 29:18 ; Leviticus 1:9 ; 2:3 ; 3:5,9 ). Fire for a sacred purpose obtained otherwise than from the Altar was called "strange fire" (Leviticus 10:1,2 ; Numbers 3:4 )
Moriah - ) The threshing floor of Araunah the Jebusite was the spot on which David reared an Altar by Gad's direction from Jehovah. So thenceforth David sacrificed there, and no longer on the Altar at Gibeon where the tabernacle was, separate from the ark, which was at Zion; for he could not go to Gibeon on account of the sword of the Angel, i. God's answer to his sacrifice at this Altar of the threshing floor, and God's removal of the plague, determined David's choice of it as the site of the temple (1 Chronicles 28:2; 1 Chronicles 21:28; 1 Chronicles 22:1; 2 Chronicles 3:1, etc
Offerings And Sacrifices - According to the earthen Altar law in Exodus 20:24-26 and the many references to such Altars in the early history of Israel as a nation in the land of Canaan, the Lord clearly intended that the Israelites perpetuate the practice of building solitary Altars and worshiping at them even after the tabernacle Altar existed. These Altars and the practice of worship at them were relatively simple compared to that called for in the "sanctuary" (i. The sanctuary included a corresponding burnt offering Altar but it was also an actual residence of God. , the burnt, grain, drink, and peace offerings at the solitary Altars), but the solitary Altar system did not include sin and guilt offerings. ...
The first reference to "burnt offerings" is Genesis 8:20 , where it is said that "Noah built an Altar to the Lord, and, taking some off all the clean animals and clean birds, he sacrificed burnt offerings on it. "...
The first occurrence of the term "peace offering" (seblamim, NIV "fellowship offering") is in Exodus 20:24 , where the Lord refers to it along with "burnt offerings" as part of the Altar law: "Make an Altar of earth for me and sacrifice on it your burnt offerings and fellowship offerings , your sheep and goats and your cattle. " Finally, all three terms appear together in Exodus 24:4-5 in the ritual for the ratification of the covenant at Mount Sinai: "He [3] got up early the next morning and built an [4] Altar at the foot of the mountain Then he sent young Israelite men, and they offered burnt offerings and sacrificed young bulls as fellowship offerings to the Lord" (here the NIV translates the apposition "sacrifices, fellowship offerings" simply as "fellowship offerings"; both terms are there in Hebrew). ...
After the tabernacle had been established the nation continued to offer burnt, grain, drink, and peace offerings on solitary earthen Altars as well as on the Altar in the tabernacle. In fact, the Lord himself commanded that they build such an Altar at Shechem (i. At least part of the purpose of this ceremony appears to have been to lay claim to the land that the Lord had promised Abram long before when he first entered the land and built an Altar in the same general location, near Shechem (Genesis 12:6-7 ). In some cases such Altars and the burnt and/or peace offerings presented on them were a means of calling on the name of the Lord in specific situations (see, e. In other instances Altars on high places were used for communal sacrificial meals before the Lord. minha see Leviticus 2 and Numbers 15:1-16 ), constituted a system of offerings used by the faithful at solitary Yahwistic Altars outside the tabernacle (see above). Only holy things could have contact with the Altar. But in that case the animal was not offered upon the Altar but instead sent as far away from the Altar as possible (e. ...
The normal form of blood manipulation for the burnt offering was relatively simple: the priest would "splash it around on the Altar" (Leviticus 1:5 ). This was not just a way of disposing of the blood, but a way of offering it on the Altar. It corresponded to arranging the pieces of the animal's carcass on the Altar (Leviticus 1:8-9 ). ...
The offerer normally slaughtered the animal, but the priests placed its various parts on the Altar fire (Leviticus 1:7-9 a) "to burn all of it on the Altar" as a "burnt offering, an offering made by fire, an aroma pleasing to the Lord" (v. The basic principle behind the burnt offering was that the whole animal was offered on the Altar, that is, with the exception of the hide of the larger animals that had been skinned as part of the slaughtering process (Leviticus 1:6 ; 7:8 ) and "the crop" of the birds "with its contents" (Leviticus 1:16 ). , libations) predates the tabernacle system and continued at other Altars even after the tabernacle and temple were available (see above). ...
The priest was to offer a part of the grain offering on the burnt offering Altar as a "memorial (portion)" to the Lord along with the salt of the covenant (v. If the grain was offered raw then incense was to be added to the memorial portion to lend it an especially pleasing aroma as it burned on the Altar (vv. ...
Since the memorial portion was burned on the Altar, the whole of the grain offering was to be unleavened with no honey added (Leviticus 2:11 ), and the priests were to consume the remainder as unleavened cakes (Leviticus 6:16-17 ). However, only the fat parts of the carcass were offered on the Altar to be burned "as an offering made by fire, an aroma pleasing to the Lord" (vv. , the consecration of the priests, Exodus 29:14,36 ; Leviticus 8:2,14 ; the inauguration of Altar worship, Leviticus 9:2-7,8-11,15-17 ). , the tent of meeting inside the tabernacle complex), put some of the blood on the horns of the incense Altar inside the Holy Place, and simply poured out the remainder of the blood at the base of the burnt offering Altar near the gate of the tabernacle complex (Leviticus 4:6-7,17-18 ). The blood of the leader and the common Israelite was applied only to the horns of the burnt offering Altar (Leviticus 4:30,34 ; 5:9 ), which was the boundary of penetration for the nonpriestly Israelite into the tabernacle
Bitter Water - The priest seated the woman before the sanctuary facing the Altar. The priest then took the offering and burned it upon the Altar, after which the woman drank the bitter water
Sparrow - ...
But let the reader pause over the thought of the sparrow making a nest for herself, and where in safety she might lay her young, high on the Altar of the Lord's house, far out of the reach of the malice of all robbers of her nest, or murderers of herself and her young; and then let him contemplate the beauty of the similitude, when a child of God flies to the New Testament Altar of his security, even to Jesus, and finds a rest in him, far above the reach of all disturbers of his repose, by resting in him, and resting to him, yea, making Jesus himself his rest, and his portion for ever! (See Psalms 84:1-4)...
Uriah - He fashioned in unscrupulous subserviency an Altar like the idolatrous pattern from Damascus furnished to him; this Altar he put in the temple court E. of the place where God's Altar had stood, and let Ahaz offer thereon his burnt offering, meat offering, drink offering, and blood of his peace offering; it was probably Abaz's pledge of submission to Assyria and its gods. ...
God's brazen Altar Uriah put on the N. side of the Damascus Altar, and Ahaz used it for his own private divinations
Fenestbella - It is generally constructed near the Altar at the south wall of the sanctuary or in the sacristy
League, Marquette - Gifts of clothing, vestments, and Altar-vessels are forwarded to the missions by the League
Marquette League - Gifts of clothing, vestments, and Altar-vessels are forwarded to the missions by the League
Lataste, Marie - She is said, from early childhood, to have been the recipient of extraordinary favors from Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament, and, from 1840, to have seen Christ on the Altar every time she assisted at Mass
Marie Lataste - She is said, from early childhood, to have been the recipient of extraordinary favors from Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament, and, from 1840, to have seen Christ on the Altar every time she assisted at Mass
Adonijah - The news of this revolt being brought to the king at once; upon which the friends of Adonijah dispersed, and he took refuge at the horns of the Altar
Dedication, Feast of the - 167), and the rebuilding of the Altar after the Syrian invaders had been driven out by Judas Maccabaeus
Music, Passion - Originated in the declamation of the Passion of Our Lord in front of the Altar by the deacon and later by different persons, as the words of Our Lord by the priest, of the Evangelist by the deacon, and of the crowd (turba) and others by the sub-deacon
Censer - A small vessel made of metal, to contain burning coals from the Altar, on which incense was sprinkled by the priest, that a cloud of incense might arise therefrom
Oath - ) A solemn affirmation, connected with a sacred object, or one regarded as sacred, as the temple, the Altar, the blood of Abel, the Bible, the Koran, etc
Thalassicon - It is generally constructed near the Altar at the south wall of the sanctuary or in the sacristy
Sacrarium - It is generally constructed near the Altar at the south wall of the sanctuary or in the sacristy
Perfumes - Moses also speaks of the art of the perfumer, in the English Bible "apothecary;" and gives the composition of two perfumes, of which one was to be offered to the Lord on the golden Altar, Exodus 30:34-38
Advent - The colorfor Altar hangings, etc
Holy Angels - When we gather around the Altar of God in the Holy Eucharistwe do so "with angels and archangels and with all the company ofHeaven
Sacrifice - An offering made to God on his Altar, by the hand of a lawful minister. It was around the one Altar of the only true God in the tabernacle, and afterwards in the temple, that all his people were to unite in his worship, Leviticus 17:4,9 Deuteronomy 12:5-18 . The burning of the whole victim on the Altar signified, on the part of the offerer, the entireness of his devotion of himself and all his substance to God; and, on the part of the victim, the completeness of the expiation. The priest poured out the blood about the Altar of burntsacrifices: he burnt on the fire of the Altar the fat of the lower belly, that which covers the kidneys, the liver, and the bowels. Before these things were committed to the fire of the Altar, the priest put them into the hands of the offerer, then made him lift them up on high, and wave them toward the four quarters of the world, the priest supporting and direction his hands. And the priest, taking a handful of this flour, with all the frankincense, sprinkled them on the fire of the Altar; and all the rest of the flour was his own: he was to eat it without leaven in the tabernacle, and none but priests were to partake of it. As to other offerings, fruits, wine, meal, wafers, or cakes, or any thing else, the priest always cast a part on the Altar; the rest belonged to him and the other priests. ...
The perpetual sacrifice of the tabernacle and temple, Exodus 29:38-40 Numbers 28:3 , was a daily offering of two lambs on the Altar of burnt offerings; one in the morning, the other in the evening. The lamb of the morning was offered about sunrise, after the incense was burnt on the golden Altar, and before any other sacrifice. This is the reason assigned why the blood especially, as being the very life and soul of the victim, was sprinkled on the Altar and poured out before the Lord to signify its utter destruction in the sinner's stead, Leviticus 17:11
ir-ha-Heres - The "altar" and "pillar" foretold (Isaiah 19:19-20) are memorial and spiritual (Joshua 22:22-26; Genesis 28:18; Malachi 1:11); for one only sacrificial Altar was lawful, namely, that at Jerusalem
Church Colors - From the most ancienttimes it has been customary to deck the Church's Altar with hangingsof rich material which vary in color with the Church Season. This use of the colors applies to the stole as well as tothe Altar hangings
Banner - " (Psalms 60:4) And when Moses built an Altar, after the victory obtained over Amalek, he called the name of it JEHOVAH Nissi; that is, the Lord is my banner. And what Lord but Christ? Were not both the Altar and the banner tokens of the Lord Jesus Christ? (Exodus 17:15) Hence, the church speaks, in allusion to Christ, "In the name of our God, we set up our banners
Communion - ...
B — 1: κοινωνός (Strong's #2844 — Noun Masculine — koinonos — koy-no-nos' ) "having in common," is rendered "have communion with (the Altar)," --the Altar standing by metonymy for that which is associated with it -- in 1 Corinthians 10:18 , RV (for AV, "are partakers of"), and in 1 Corinthians 10:20 , for AV, "have fellowship with (demons)
Sacrifice And Offering - Upon embarking from the ark after the great flood, Noah immediately built an Altar and offered burnt sacrifices. The Altar itself was consecrated through the offering of two lambs and a grain offering and a libation of wine. ...
The sacrifices that constituted much of the worship of Israel at this time were burned on an Altar that was made from accacia wood and overlaid with copper (Exodus 27:1 ). In addition to the sacrifices offered on this Altar, incense was burned on a smaller Altar (Exodus 30:1 ). While the sacrificial Altar was placed in the courtyard, just before the door of the tabernacle, the incense Altar was positioned inside the tabernacle, just before the ark of the covenant. See Altar . The priest then collected the blood and sprinkled it around the Altar and the sanctuary, and the worshiper cut up and skinned the animal. After the priest arranged the various parts on the Altar, the entire animal was burned as a sacrifice. Only a portion of this offering was burned on the Altar, with the remainder going to the priests. The priests, in turn, sprinkled the blood around the Altar. When the priest or the congregation sinned, the blood was sprinkled seven times before the veil in the sanctuary, and some of it was placed on the horns of the incense Altar. The rest of the blood was poured out at the base of the sacrificial Altar. In doing this, the people were defiling the Altar and despising God (Malachi 1:7-14 )
Abomination of Desolation - Jewish rabbis considered the prophecy fulfilled when the Jews erected an idol Altar, described as "the abomination of desolation" in 1 Maccabees 1:54; 1 Maccabees 6:7. He built an idolatrous Altar on the Altar of burnt offering to Jupiter Olympius, and dedicated the temple to him, and offered swine's flesh
Offering - The bread offered for the Altar was without leaven; for leaven was never offered on the Altar, nor with the sacrifices, Leviticus 2:11-12 . The priest in waiting received the offerings from the hand of him who brought them, laid a part on the Altar, and reserved the rest for his own subsistence as a minister of the Lord
Ebal - Here first in Canaan Abraham rested, and built an Altar to Jehovah who appeared unto him (Genesis 12:6-7). Here too Jacob dwelt upon returning from Mesopotamia, and bought a field from the children of Hamer, father of Shethem, and built the Altar El-elohe-Israel (Genesis 33:19-20). On Ebal the great Altar of unhewn stones was erected, plastered with lime and inscribed with the law (Deuteronomy 27:2-8) immediately after entering the Holy Land, when Joshua had the first leisure after destroying Ai. , the Ebal Altar building and the blessing and cursing being the only allusion to the central country. The Samaritan Pentateuch reads "Gerizim "for Ebal (Deuteronomy 27:4) as the site of the Altar and the plastered and law-inscribed stones; but all the Hebrew authorities are against it, and the site of the cursing is fitly the site of the Altar where the penalty of the curse is borne by the typical victim
Sacrifice And Offering - Such ‘holy gifts’ (Exodus 28:38 ) or offerings may be divided into three classes, namely, (1) Altar-offerings, comprising all such offerings as were brought into contact with the Altar (cf. to the Altar, or at least presented at the sanctuary, in other words, a present to God. ’ The former may be defined as an offering which is consumed, in whole or in part, upon the Altar , or, more briefly, as an Altar-offering. It is in this more restricted sense of Altar-offering that ‘sacrifice’ and ‘offering’ are employed synonymously in our English nomenclature of sacrifice. In the sacrificial system of OT, Altar-offerings ‘sacrifices,’ in the sense above defined are of two kinds, animal offerings and cereal offerings, using the latter term a fortiori for all non-bloody Altar-offerings, including not merely cereal oblations in the strict sense (flour, cakes, etc. ‘slaughter,’ from the verb zâbach , originally to slaughter generally, then specially to immolate the sacrificial victim, to sacrifice hence also the word for ‘ Altar ,’ mizbçach , lit. The complement of zebach in this sense of animal sacrifice is minchâh , in the later specialized sense of cereal offering (see, further, for both terms, § 2 ), so that ‘sacrifice and offering’ came to denote the whole category of Altar offerings ( Psalms 40:6 , 1 Samuel 2:29 , Amos 5:25 also Isaiah 19:21 ‘sacrifice and oblation’). The results now reached may be thus summed up: ‘sacrifice’ is used as a convenient term for both kinds of OT Altar-offerings, but in the EV
(14) The last entry in this vocabulary of OT sacrifice is reserved for the obscure term ’azkârâh , memorial offering , applied especially to the handful of the cereal offering burnt by the priest upon the Altar ( Leviticus 2:2 ; Leviticus 2:9 ; Leviticus 2:16 etc. ...
As regards, first of all, the place of sacrifice , every village appears to have had its sanctuary or ‘high place’ with its Altar and other appurtenances of the cult, on which the recent excavations have thrown so much new and unexpected light (see High Place)
Mount Carmel - There was an Altar on it long before the prophet Elias's time, and he, and Eliseus after him, resided there
Benedict of Nursia, Saint - He died before the Altar after receiving Holy Communion
Carmel, Mount - There was an Altar on it long before the prophet Elias's time, and he, and Eliseus after him, resided there
Ebal - This mountain was also the site of the first great Altar erected to Jehovah (Deuteronomy 27:5-8 ; Joshua 8:30-35 )
Cemetery - As the martyrs were buried in these places, the Christians chose them for building churches on, when Constantine established their religion; and hence some derive the rule which still obtains in the church of Rome, never to consecrate an Altar without putting under it the relics of some saint
Araunah - (See Altar
Drink-Offering - Consisted of wine (Numbers 15:5 ; Hosea 9:4 ) poured around the Altar (Exodus 30:9 )
Nursia, Benedict of, Saint - He died before the Altar after receiving Holy Communion
Dedication, Feast of - Commemorating the purging of the temple and rebuilding of the Altar after Judas Maccabaeus had driven out the Syrians, 164 B
Preachers: to be Acquainted With Human Nature - Michael Angelo, when painting an Altar-piece in the conventual church, in Florence, in order that the figures might be as death-like as possible, obtained permission of the prior to have the coffins of the newly-buried opened and placed beside him during the night;: an appalling expedient, but successful in enabling him to reproduce with terrible effect, not the mortal pallor only, but the very anatomy of death
Shrine - ) Any sacred place, as an Altar, tromb, or the like
Frontal - ) A movable, decorative member in metal, carved wood, or, commonly, in rich stuff or in embroidery, covering the front of the Altar
Ammihud - He presented the tribe's offerings at the dedication of the Altar (Numbers 7:48 ) and led them in marching (Numbers 10:22 )
Abihu - They used strange, or common, fire, instead of the sacred fire which they were required to use from the Altar of burnt offering
Ebal, Mount - Thus the law and the curse were associated with the same mountain, Deuteronomy 11:29 ; Deuteronomy 27:4,13 ; but along with these Joshua also erected an Altar unto the Lord God of Israel, before the blessings on Gerizim and the curses on Ebal were rehearsed
Dedication, Feast of the, - the festival instituted to commemorate the purging of the temple and the rebuilding of the Altar after Judas Maccabbeus had driven out the Syrians, B
Jehozadak - ) It is suggestive that the names of the last king and of the representative of the high priesthood in the captivity both express that the suspension of the throne and of the priesthood was Jehovah's righteous judgment for Judah's sins; moreover Joshua or Jeshua, who restored the temple Altar, expresses salvation; as the former Joshua led the hitherto homeless Israelites into Canaan their inheritance; and as Jesus, the Antitype, saves us from our sins and leads us into the heavenly rest
Perfume - By His sacrifice on the Altar
Athens - Paul saw the Athenians were very religious and even had an Altar to an unknown God
Abomination - * Kohath, Kohathites - The Kohathites carried the 'most holy things' of the tabernacle — the ark, table of show bread, golden Altar, etc
Araunah - A Jebusite, it has been supposed of royal race, from whom David purchased a threshing-floor as a site for an Altar to the Lord
Zacharias - Son of Barachias, who, our Lord says, was slain by the Jews between the Altar and the temple
Ger'Izim - [1] According to the traditions of the Samaritans it was here that Abraham sacrificed Isaac, that Melchizedek met the patriarch, that Jacob built an Altar, and at its base dug a well, the ruins of which are still seen
Gib'Eonites, the, - the people of Gibeon, and perhaps also of the three cities associated with Gibeon, (Joshua 9:17 ) --Hivites; and who, on the discover of the stratagem by which they had obtained the protection of the Israelites, were condemned to be perpetual bondmen, hewers of wood and drawers of water for the congregation and for the house of God and Altar of Jehovah
Annunciation, the - The Church colorfor Altar and other hangings is white
Offertory, the - That portion of the Communion service during whichthe alms of the people, and the Bread and the Wine are receivedand solemnly presented on the Altar
Zacharias - While Zacharias ministered at the golden Altar of incense in the holy place, it was announced to him by the angel Gabriel that his wife Elisabeth, who was also of a priestly family, now stricken in years, would give birth to a son who was to be called John, and that he would be the forerunner of the long-expected Messiah (Luke 1:12-17 ). ...
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The "son of Barachias," mentioned as having been slain between the temple and the Altar (Matthew 23:35 ; Luke 11:51 )
Blood - ...
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The blood of sacrifices was caught by the priest in a basin, and then sprinkled seven times on the Altar; that of the passover on the doorposts and lintels of the houses (Exodus 12 ; Leviticus 4:5-7 ; 16:14-19 ). At the giving of the law (Exodus 24:8 ) the blood of the sacrifices was sprinkled on the people as well as on the Altar, and thus the people were consecrated to God, or entered into covenant with him, hence the blood of the covenant (Matthew 26:28 ; Hebrews 9:19,20 ; 10:29 ; 13:20 )
Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament - The consecrated Host, enclosed in the ostensorium, is placed on the Altar or in a niche above, and is incensed by the priest. At least twelve candles must be lighted on the Altar during the function
Basilica, Saint Peter's - It contains an Altar which marks the traditional spot of Saint Peter's crucifixion. The tomb of Saint Peter is in the center of the entire edifice which, in addition to the principal Altar, has 33 other Altars, under most of which repose bodies of the saints, including several apostles
Ahaz - Ahaz displaced the Altar of burnt offering by one made like an Altar he had seen at Damascus when on a visit to Tiglath-pileser
First-Fruits - on the 16th of Nisan, a sheaf of new corn was to be brought to the priest and waved before the Altar, in acknowledgment of the gift of fruitfulness. (Numbers 15:19,21 ) ...
The first-fruits of the land were to be brought in a basket to the holy place of God's choice, and there presented to the priest, who was to set the basket down before the Altar
Saint Peter's Basilica - It contains an Altar which marks the traditional spot of Saint Peter's crucifixion. The tomb of Saint Peter is in the center of the entire edifice which, in addition to the principal Altar, has 33 other Altars, under most of which repose bodies of the saints, including several apostles
Sacrifice - To offer to God in homage or worship, by killing and consuming, as victims on an Altar to immolate, either as an atonement for sin, or to procure favor, or to express thankfulness as, to sacrifice an ox or a lamb. An offering made to God by killing and burning some animal upon an Altar, as an acknowledgment of his power and providence, or to make atonement for sin, appease his wrath or conciliate his favor, or to express thankfulness for his benefits
Offerings - He assumes that they will bring their gifts to the Altar, and so far ‘He respects the practice,’ but He adds the all-important truth that the reconciliation of man to man must come before the Altar-offering
Mass - John the Baptist, at which are said three masses; that of the Innocents, at which the gloria in excelsis and hallelujah are omitted, and, it being a day of mourning, the Altar is of a violet colour. At these masses the Altar is put in mourning, and the only decorations are a cross in the middle of six yellow wax lights: the dress of the celebrant, and the very mass-book, are black; many parts of the office are omitted, and the people are dismissed without the benediction. The priest counts upon his fingers, the days of the ensuing week on which it is to be celebrated, and cuts off as many pieces of bread at the Altar as he is to say masses; and after having consecrated them, steeps them in wine, and puts them in a box; out of which, upon every occasion, he takes some of it with a spoon, and, putting it on a dish, sets it on the Altar
Ophrah - This was the place where Gideon saw the angel, erected an Altar, and where he was buried
Moriah - Here also, one thousand years after Abraham, David built an Altar and offered sacrifices to God
Moreh - Abram's first halting place in Canaan, near Shechem and Ebal and Gerizim mountains (Genesis 12:6); here he erected his first Altar
Christ: Trophies of His Power - These are supposed to represent the cures wrought by devotion at that Altar; the memorials of the healing power of the saint
Nadab - It is often suggested that ‘strange’ fire means fire taken from a common source instead of from the Altar (cf
Hubert Van Eyck - Hubert's authenticated works are few; his masterpiece, finished by his brother, is the Altar-piece of the cathedral of Saint Bavon in Ghent
Nadab - Possibly they did not use fire from the recognized Altar, perhaps offering to foreign gods (Numbers 3:4 )
Zacharias - Son of Barachias, who was slain between the temple and the Altar
Anoint - Thou shalt anoint the Altar, and sanctify it
Atonement - And Moses said to Aaron, go to the Altar, and offer thy sin-offering, and thy burnt-offering, and make an atonement for thyself and for the people
Salem - Hence when Gideon was visited by the angel under the oak at Ophrah, at the close of the interview he built an Altar unto the Lord, and called it Jehovah Shalom—that is, as the margin of the Bible renders it, the Lord send peace
Fashion - ) The make or form of anything; the style, shape, appearance, or mode of structure; pattern, model; as, the fashion of the ark, of a coat, of a house, of an Altar, etc
Dedicate - To set apart and consecrate to a divine Being, or to a sacred purpose to devote to a sacred use, by a solemn act, or by religious ceremonies as, to dedicate vessels, treasures, a temple, an Altar, or a church, to God or to a religious use
Gift - If thou bring thy gift to the Altar
Savour - ...
Ephesians 5:2 (a) The life of CHRIST was so perfect, so beautiful, and so pleasing to GOD that it is compared to the fragrant incense which ascended from the golden Altar in the holy place
Uriah - By the order of the king he built an Altar at Jerusalem after the fashion of one seen by Ahaz at Damascus, 2 Kings 16:10-16 , where he is called URIJAH
Escorial - The finest building is the Doric church; under the Altar is the royal mausoleum of the kings of Spain
Eyck, Hubert Van - Hubert's authenticated works are few; his masterpiece, finished by his brother, is the Altar-piece of the cathedral of Saint Bavon in Ghent
a'Riel - (Isaiah 29:1,2,7 ) We must understand by it either "lion of God," as the chief city, or "hearth of God," a synonym for the Altar of burnt offering
Nadab - Possibly they did not use fire from the recognized Altar, perhaps offering to foreign gods (Numbers 3:4 )
Murder - It prohibited compensation or reprieve of the murderer, or his protection if he took refuge in the refuge city, or even at the Altar of Jehovah
Canonization - The Saint is now entitled to the full honors of the Altar, though the Mass and Office may not be extended to the entire Church
Hallel - The Levites, standing before the Altar, chanted it verse by verse, the people responding by repeating the verses or by intoned hallelujahs
Hymn - The hymns or odes of the ancients generally consisted of three sorts of stanzas, one of which was sung by the band as they walked from east to west; another was performed as they returned from west to east; the third part was sung before the Altar
Nadab - He afterwards perished with Abihu for the sin of offering strange fire on the Altar of burnt-offering (Leviticus 10:1,2 ; Numbers 3:4 ; 26:60 )
Adonijah - Adonijah fled and took refuge at the Altar, and received pardon for his conduct from Solomon on the condition that he showed himself "a worthy man" (1Kings 1:5-53)
Zerubbabel - In the second year after the Return, he erected an Altar and laid the foundation of the temple on the ruins of that which had been destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar (3:8-13; ch
Eliab - He brought the tribe's offering at the dedication of the Altar (Numbers 7:24 )
Luz - A possible solution is that Luz was the name of the old Canaanite city, and Bethel the pillar and Altar of Jacob outside the city
Hosanna - Its origin is traced to the 117th Psalm, which was recited daily by a priest in the procession around the Altar during the Feast of Tabernacles, when the people were commanded to rejoice before the Lord (Leviticus 23), and on the seventh day it was recited in each of the seven processions
Moreh - There he built an Altar after God had appeared to him and entered into covenant (Genesis 12:6-7 )
Horns - On the Altar, the projections placed at its corners, on which the blood of the sacrifices was placed, and to which culprits clung for protection
Abel - He offered this lamb as a sacrifice, killing it and burning it upon the Altar whereby he proved his faith in the animal who died for him, and shed his blood for him
Blood - " The blood also maketh atonement for the soul: it must be poured out upon the Altar
Fat - This portion of the sacrifices was to be burned on the Altar
Abihu - , not with fire taken from the great brazen Altar (Leviticus 6:9 , etc
Pillar - Matstsêbâh is used in connection with the Altar built by Moses in Moriah - In the time of David it stood apart from the city, and was under cultivation; for here was the threshing floor of Araunah, the Jebusite, which David bought, on which to erect an Altar to God, 2 Samuel 24:15-25
Minister - ) One who serves at the Altar; one who performs sacerdotal duties; the pastor of a church duly authorized or licensed to preach the gospel and administer the sacraments
Laver - It stood in the court between the Altar and the door of the tabernacle
Ramah - The home of Elkanah, Samuel's father, 1 Samuel 1:19; 1 Samuel 2:11, the birthplace of Samuel himself, his home and official residence, the site of his Altar, 1 Sam,7:17; 8:4; 15:34; 16:13; 19:18, and finally his burial-place
Sanctuary - In catholic churches, that part of a church where the Altar is placed, encompassed with a balustrade
Luz - The most probable conclusion is that the two places were, during the times preceding the conquest, distinct, Luz being the city and Bethel the pillar and Altar of Jacob that after the destruction of Luz by the tribe of Ephraim the town of Bethel arose
Fire - (Isaiah 27:9 ) Fire for sacred purposes obtained elsewhere than from the Altar was called "strange fire," and for the use of such Nadab and Abihu were punished with death by fire from God
Gloria Patri - In accordance with the ancient usagethe Gloria is said with bowed head as an act of worship and offaith, and is also said facing the Altar or East
Corner, Corner-Stone - Examples will be found in the ideas associated with the corners of the Altar ( Zechariah 9:15 ), usually termed the ‘horns’ (Altar, § 7 ), the unreaped corners of the field ( Leviticus 19:9 ; Agriculture, § 3 ), the corners of the beard and head-hair ( Leviticus 19:27 ) and of the upper garment or cloak (Fringes)
Abomination of Desolation - In these passages the most natural reference is to the desecration of the Temple under Antiochus Epihanes, when an Altar to Olympian Zeus was erected on the Altar of burnt sacrifices
Likeness - ...
First, the word means “pattern,” in the sense of the specifications from which an actual item is made: “Now King Ahaz went to Damascus … and saw the Altar which was at Damascus; and King Ahaz sent to Urijah the priest the pattern of the Altar and its model, according to all its workmanship” (2 Kings 16:10, NASB)
Atone - Some of the blood was put on the horns of the Altar and the rest of the blood was poured at the base of the Altar of burnt offering. The fat of the bull was then burned on the Altar. During his vision-call experience, Isaiah’s lips were touched with a coal of fire taken from the Altar by one of the seraphim
Tabernacle, the - On entering the court by its one gate the first thing approached was the brazen Altar. This Altar was the place of approach for the people. The place of approach for the priestly family was the golden Altar in the holy (place); but the way into the holiest was not yet made manifest. ...
Between the brazen Altar and the holy (place) stood the laver , at which the priests washed their hands and feet whenever they drew near to minister. The holy (place) contained the table of showbread on the north, the golden candlestick on the south, and the Altar of incense 'before the vail' in the centre. ...
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PLAN OF THE TABERNACLE
Priest - Solomon went up to the brazen Altar that was at Gibeon, and there offered sacrifices, 2 Chronicles 1:5 . The priests, all of them with their bodies washed, and clad in their appropriate dress, assembled before the Altar, where a bullock, two rams, unleavened bread, and wafers of two kinds in baskets, were in readiness. He touched the horns of the Altar with the blood, poured the remainder of it round its base, and placed the parts which were to compose the sacrifice on its top. They in like manner placed their hands on the head of one of the rams, which was also slain by Moses for a whole burnt- offering, the blood was sprinkled around the Altar, and the parts of the ram were separated and burned upon it, Exodus 29:15-18 ; Leviticus 8:18-21 . The rest of the blood he sprinkled in part upon the bottom of the Altar, and a part he mingled with the consecrated oil, and sprinkled on the priests and their garments. All the parts which have been mentioned as being placed in the hands of the priests, were at last burned upon the Altar. ...
The ordinary priests served immediately at the Altar, offered sacrifices, killed and flayed them, and poured the blood at the foot of the Altar, 2 Chronicles 29:34 ; 2 Chronicles 35:11 . They kept a perpetual fire burning upon the Altar of burnt-sacrifices, and in the lamps of the golden candlestick that was in the sanctuary; they prepared the loaves of shew bread, baked them, and changed them every Sabbath day. Every day, night, and morning, a priest appointed by casting lots at the beginning of the week, brought into the sanctuary a smoking censer, and set it upon the golden table, otherwise called the Altar of perfumes, Luke 1:9 . The priests were not suffered to offer incense to the Lord with strange fire, Leviticus 10:1-2 ; that is, with any other fire than what should be taken from the Altar of burnt- sacrifices. The first-born of impure animals were redeemed or exchanged, but the clean animals were not redeemed; they were sacrificed to the Lord, their blood was sprinkled about the Altar, and all the rest belonged to the priest, Numbers 18:17-19
Jeroboam - Having appointed a solemn public festival to be observed on the fifteenth day of the eighth month, in order to dedicate his new Altar, and consecrate his golden calves, he assembled the people at Bethel, and himself went up to the Altar for the purpose of offering incense and sacrifices. At that instant a prophet, who had come, divinely directed, from Judah to Bethel, accosted Jeroboam and said, "O Altar, Altar, thus saith the Lord, A child shall be born to the house of David, Josiah by name; and upon thee shall he sacrifice the priests of the high places who now burn incense upon thee: he shall burn men's bones upon thee. " To confirm the truth of this threatening, the prophet also added a sign, namely, that the Altar should immediately be rent asunder, and the ashes and every thing upon it poured upon the earth. The Altar, too, was broken, and the ashes upon it fell to the ground according to the prediction of the prophet
Loaves of Proposition - It refers to twelve loaves of unleavened bread, made each of two-tenths of an epha (four-fifths of a peck) of the finest flour, set in two piles (Leviticus 24) upon an Altar-like table placed along the north wall of the holy place (3Kings 7)
First-Fruits - The law required, ...
That on the morrow after the Passover Sabbath a sheaf of new corn should be waved by the priest before the Altar (Leviticus 23:5,6,10,12 ; 2:12 )
Thumb - The action seems to have symbolized the consecration (or purification) of the whole man, the extremities only being touched, just as only the horns of the Altar were sprinkled with the blood
Injury - Physical injuries excluded priests from service at the Altar (Leviticus 21:19 )
Meonenim, the Oak of - That where under Jacob hid the strange gods and talisman earrings of his household was close by Shechem (Genesis 35:4), the same where Abram built his first Altar in Palestine (Genesis 12:6); here also Joshua, alluding to the patriarch Jacob's address and the original idolatry of Israel's forefathers, urges the people similarly to "put away the strange gods," etc
Fair Linen Cloth, Fair White Linen Cloth - By this is meant the long linen cloth the breadth of thetop of the Altar and falling over the ends eighteen or twentyinches
Athens - The Altar of which Paul there speaks as dedicated "to the [1] unknown God" (23) was probably one of several which bore the same inscription
Chapel - ) a room or recess in a church, containing an Altar
Uriah - High priest in Jerusalem Temple under King Ahaz who followed the king's instructions in setting up an Altar in the Temple according to a Syrian pattern (2 Kings 16:10-16 )
Basin - The largest basins were usually banquet bowls or mixing bowls for wine, although one of the largest was used in the sacrificial ritual at the great Altar of the Temple (Zechariah 9:15 )
Horn in the Bible - The projecting points on the Altar of the holocaust were called horns (Exodus 30), and were smeared with the blood of the sacrificial victim (Exodus 27; Leviticus 4)
Holy Place - Inside the holy place, just in front of the veil screening the entrance of the holy of holies, stood the Altar of incense; along the north wall stood the table of the shewbread, and the ten lamp-stands, five on the right side and five on the left, which seem to have superseded the seven-branched lamp-stand of the Tabernacle
Acceptance - They shall come up with acceptance on my Altar
Nethinim - The Gibeonites were made "hewers of wood and drawers of water for the congregation and for the Altar
Abomination - shows the idolatry that was carried on in secret, and the 'greater abomination,' of bringing it actually into the inner court of the Lord's house, between the porch and the Altar! The word is but seldom used in the N
Laver - It stood in the court between the Altar and the door of the tabernacle
Shewbread - It refers to twelve loaves of unleavened bread, made each of two-tenths of an epha (four-fifths of a peck) of the finest flour, set in two piles (Leviticus 24) upon an Altar-like table placed along the north wall of the holy place (3Kings 7)
Sanctuary - 1 ; sometimes of the "Holy place," where the Altar on incense, the golden candlestick, and the showbread stood, 2 Chronicles 26:18 Hebrews 9:2 ; and sometimes of the "Holy of Holies," the most secret and retired part of the temple, in which was the ark of the covenant, and where none but the high priest might enter, and he only once a year on the day of solemn expiation
Vanucci, Pietro - In 1491 he painted the elaborate Altar-piece, The Madonna adoring the Infant Christ, of the Villa Albani, Rome
Drunkenness - Hence the use of these was forbidden to the priests at the Altar, Leviticus 10:9 ; and all are cautioned to avoid them, Proverbs 20:1 23:20
Ebal - On this mountain Joshua built an Altar and erected a monument bearing the law of Moses ( Joshua 8:30 ); and the curses for breaches of the moral law were here proclaimed to the assembled Israelites on their formally taking possession of the Promised Land ( Deuteronomy 11:29 ; Deuteronomy 27:4 ; Deuteronomy 27:13 , Joshua 8:33 )
Naaman - He frankly yielded other evidence which probed that Jehovah was the living and true God; and took home with him two mule-loads of earth, for an Altar to the Lord, Exodus 20:24
Adonijah - Adonijah ran in fear to the horns of the Altar, but Solomon promised if he showed himself a worthy man he should not be hurt
Carmel - The spring is 250 feet below the steep rocky Altar plateau. An Altar of Jehovah had existed on Carmel before that Baal worship was introduced; Jezebel had east it down (1 Kings 28:30); this Elijah repaired and used as the Altar for his sacrifice. They and the 850 prophets of Baal stood close beneath the high place of the Altar, near the spring, in full view of Jezreel and Ahab's palace and Jezebel's temple in the distance. Tacitus mentions that ages afterward Vespasian went there to consult the oracle which was without image or temple, and with "only an Altar and reverential sanctity" attached to the place
Priests - ...
Functions Priesthood in the Old Testament primarily involved sacrificing at the Altar and worship in the shrine. On the mount, God told Moses to appoint Aaron and his four sons to serve as priests, that is, to serve at the Altar and in the sanctuary (Exodus 28:1 ,Exodus 28:1,28:41 )
Abomination - " Antiochus Epiphanes caused an Altar to be erected on the Altar of burnt-offering, on which sacrifices were offered to Jupiter Olympus
Bethel - There he built an Altar, and there he later returned after a time in Egypt (Genesis 12:8; Genesis 13:3). The idolatry of Bethel, which God’s prophets repeatedly denounced, was the reason why the Altar and the town were eventually destroyed (1 Kings 12:28-33; 1 Kings 13:1-3; 2 Kings 23:15-20; Jeremiah 48:13; Amos 3:14; Amos 4:4; Amos 5:5; Amos 7:10-13)
Unknown God - Wherever one of the animals rested, an Altar was erected, in the supposition that the sheep was pointing to the god whose shrine was situated nearest to that particular spot. But the chief objection to this theory is that the Altars are distinctly said to be ‘anonymous,’ which can only mean that they bore no inscription. Nor are we helped by Jerome, who states (on Titus 1:12) that the inscription actually read, ‘To the gods of Asia and Europe and Africa, to unknown and strange gods,’ for such an Altar could not possibly be that referred to by the Apostle. 4) says that on the road from the Phaleric port to the city he had noticed ‘altars of gods called unknown, and of heroes’ (βωμοὶ δὲ θεῶν τε ὀνομαζομένων ἀγνώστων καὶ ἡρώων), which may quite well mean that he saw several Altars bearing inscriptions similar to that mentioned by St. 6 he speaks again of ‘an Altar of unknown gods’ (πρὸς αὐτῷ δʼ ἐστὶν ἀγνώστων θεῶν βωμός). 3) says that at Athens are found ‘altars of unknown deities. ’ It is, therefore, impossible to say with certainty whether such Altars were erected ‘to an (or ‘the’) unknown god’ or ‘to unknown gods. 10), or that such an Altar might date from the period when writing was unknown, are quite fanciful and cannot be entertained
Temple - ’...
The remarkable persistence of sacred sites in the East is a phenomenon familiar to all students of religion, and there can be little doubt that the Chronicler is right in identifying the site of ‘the Altar of burnt-offering for Israel’ (1 Chronicles 22:1 ) with the spot ‘by the threshing-floor of Oman [3] the Jehusite,’ where the angel of the plague stayed his hand, and on which David by Divine command erected his Altar of commemoration (see, further, § 6 ( b )). The only possible alternative is to regard the rock as marking the site, not of the Altar of burnt-offering, but of ‘the holy of holies’ of the successive Temples a view beset with insuperable difficulties. ), the only article of Temple furniture is the Altar of cedar introduced in the composite text of 1 Kings 7:20-22 . As there are good grounds for believing that a special Altar of incense was first introduced into the second Temple (see § 9 ), the former is now identified by most writers with the table of shewbread (see Shewbread; and Tabernacle, § 6 ( a )). Altar. ...
( b ) The Altar of burnt-offering . In the opinion of most critics, this omission is due to the excision from the original narrative of the relative section by a much later editor, who assumed that, the brazen Altar of the Tabernacle accompanied the ark to the new sanctuary (but see Burney, Notes on Heb. or otherwise, tells us that Solomon’s Altar of burnt-offering ( 1 Kings 9:25 ) was of brass (cf. the ‘brazen Altar1 Kings 8:64 ), 20 cubits in length and breadth and 10 in height ( 2 Chronicles 4:1 ). Its position was on the site of the earlier Altar of David ( 2 Chronicles 3:1 ), which, it may be asserted with confidence, stood somewhere on the sacred rock still to be seen within the Mosque of Omar (see § 2 above). The precise position which the Altars of the first and second Temples occupied on the surface of the rock, which measures at least some 50 ft. Herod’s Altar was large enough almost to cover the rock (§ 11 ( c )). Solomon’s Altar was superseded in the reign of Ahaz by a larger Altar of more artistic construction, which this sovereign caused to be made after the model of one seen by him at Damascus ( 2 Kings 16:10-16 ). In the court, to the south of the line between the Altar and the Temple ( 1 Kings 7:39 ), stood one of the most striking of the creations of Solomon’s Phœnician artist, Huram-abi of Tyre
Sacrifice - The zebach was not like the burnt offering (‘olah), which was completely burnt on the Altar; and it was unlike the sin offering (chatta’t), where the meat was given to the priest, for most of the meat of the zebach was returned to the person who made the “sacrifice. ” The fat was burned on the Altar ( Altar (3:2)
Fire - The fire which came down from heaven, first upon the Altar in the tabernacle, and afterward descended anew upon the Altar in the temple of Solomon, at its consecration, was there constantly fed and maintained by the priests, day and night, in the same manner as it had been in the tabernacle. The Jews have a tradition, that Jeremiah, foreseeing the destruction of the temple, took this fire and hid it in a pit; but that at the rebuilding of the temple, being brought again from thence, it revived upon the Altar
Elishama - He presented the tribe's offerings at the dedication of the Altar (Numbers 7:48-53 )
Dedicate, Dedication - The things that were set apart included the Altar in the tabernacle (Numbers 7:10-88 ), images of pagan deities (Daniel 3:2-3 ), silver and gold (2 Samuel 8:11 ), Temple (1 Kings 8:63 ; Ezra 6:16-18 ), walls of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 12:27 ), and private dwellings (Deuteronomy 20:5 )
Maundy Thursday - On this day only one Mass may be celebrated in each church, at which an additional Host is consecrated and borne in procession to the Altar of Repose to be used at the Mass of the Presanctified on the following day. The ringing of bells ceases after the Gloria in the Mass until Holy Saturday, and after vespers the Altars are stripped, and were formerly washed with wine and water
Shew-Bread, - " Shew-bread was unleavened bread placed upon a table which stood in the sanctuary together with the seven-branched candlestick and the Altar of incense
Laver - It stood in the court between the Altar and the door of the tabernacle (30:19,21)
Birmingham, England, City of - The Cathedral of Saint Chad, designed by Pugin, was built 1840, and the relics of its patron, preserved at Lichfield until the Reformation, now repose over the high Altar
Nadab - Struck dead for kindling (probably under intoxication) the incense with "strange fire," not taken from the perpetual fire on the Altar (Leviticus 6:13; Leviticus 10:1-10)
Holocaust - On this account, the Jews, who would not allow the Gentiles to offer on their Altar any other sacrifices peculiarly enjoined by the law of Moses, admitted them by the Jewish priests to offer holocausts, because these were a sort of sacrifices prior to the law, and common to all nations
Deacon - " ADeacon may assist the Priest at the Altar and administer the cup
Low Saturday - After this the Altar is decked with lights and flowers and the Mass is celebrated in white, as a symbol of joy
Holy Saturday - After this the Altar is decked with lights and flowers and the Mass is celebrated in white, as a symbol of joy
Holy Thursday - On this day only one Mass may be celebrated in each church, at which an additional Host is consecrated and borne in procession to the Altar of Repose to be used at the Mass of the Presanctified on the following day. The ringing of bells ceases after the Gloria in the Mass until Holy Saturday, and after vespers the Altars are stripped, and were formerly washed with wine and water
Joab - After the death of David, Joab was slain at the Altar, whither he had fled for protection; and was buried in his own domain in the wilderness
Dedication, Feast of the - After the desecration of the Temple and Altar by Antiochus Epiphanes, Judas Maccabæus re-consecrated them in b
Great Sabbath - After this the Altar is decked with lights and flowers and the Mass is celebrated in white, as a symbol of joy
Giotto di Bondone - In Assisi are his frescoes representing "The Life of Saint Francis" painted from 1296 to 1320 in the upper and lower church of the Basilica; and the "Triumph of Saint Francis" which decorates the roof-groining above the high Altar
Ark of the Covenant Item - According to a tradition, the value of which is much discussed, the Ark, with the Tabernacle and the Altar of incense, was hidden by Jeremias before the siege of Jerusalem by Nabuchodonosor (2Machabees 2); however, the view that it was carried to Babylon as a trophy (4Esdas 10) seems to enjoy greater probability
Ahaz - He even placed an Altar made from a Syrian model in the Temple (2 Kings 16:11 )
Gospel in Liturgy - The Gospel is read or sung after the Epistle by the celebrant, standing at the left side of the Altar, as the people face it
Easter Eve - After this the Altar is decked with lights and flowers and the Mass is celebrated in white, as a symbol of joy
Easter Even - After this the Altar is decked with lights and flowers and the Mass is celebrated in white, as a symbol of joy
Eve, Easter - After this the Altar is decked with lights and flowers and the Mass is celebrated in white, as a symbol of joy
Even, Easter - After this the Altar is decked with lights and flowers and the Mass is celebrated in white, as a symbol of joy
Abihu - Strange fire; not the fire which was appointed, and which was always durning upon the Altar: and which typified Christ's fiery sufferings
Aaron - And when we consider, to what an high honour Aaron was called; to be the type of Him, who, in the everlasting nature of his office, was, and is, JEHOVAH'S High Priest; both the Altar, and the offering, the sacrifice, and the sacrificer, through whom alone, all offerings must be presented: surely, none taken from among men, could be more great and lofty in office than Aaron
Wonder - ...
Second, the word can represent a “sign” from God or a token of a future event: “This is the sign which the Lord hath spoken: Behold, the Altar shall be rent, and the ashes that are upon it shall be poured out” (1 Kings 13:3)
Sprinkle - ” Used 35 times in the text of the Hebrew Old Testament, in 26 of those times it expresses the “throwing” or “sprinkling” of blood against the sacrificial Altar or on the people
Court - ) The great courts belonging to the temple of Jerusalem were three; the first called the court of the Gentiles, because the Gentiles were allowed to enter so far, and no farther; the second was the court of Israel, because all the Israelites, provided they were purified, had a right of admission into it; the third was that of the priests, where the Altar of burnt-offerings stood, where the priests and Levites exercised their ministry
Renew - Asa renewed the Altar of the Lord
Sabbath, Great - After this the Altar is decked with lights and flowers and the Mass is celebrated in white, as a symbol of joy
Sabbatum Sanctum - After this the Altar is decked with lights and flowers and the Mass is celebrated in white, as a symbol of joy
Saturday, Black - After this the Altar is decked with lights and flowers and the Mass is celebrated in white, as a symbol of joy
Saturday, Holy - After this the Altar is decked with lights and flowers and the Mass is celebrated in white, as a symbol of joy
Saturday, Low - After this the Altar is decked with lights and flowers and the Mass is celebrated in white, as a symbol of joy
Saturday, White - After this the Altar is decked with lights and flowers and the Mass is celebrated in white, as a symbol of joy
White Saturday - After this the Altar is decked with lights and flowers and the Mass is celebrated in white, as a symbol of joy
Thursday, Holy - On this day only one Mass may be celebrated in each church, at which an additional Host is consecrated and borne in procession to the Altar of Repose to be used at the Mass of the Presanctified on the following day. The ringing of bells ceases after the Gloria in the Mass until Holy Saturday, and after vespers the Altars are stripped, and were formerly washed with wine and water
Thursday, Maundy - On this day only one Mass may be celebrated in each church, at which an additional Host is consecrated and borne in procession to the Altar of Repose to be used at the Mass of the Presanctified on the following day. The ringing of bells ceases after the Gloria in the Mass until Holy Saturday, and after vespers the Altars are stripped, and were formerly washed with wine and water
Thursday, Sheer - On this day only one Mass may be celebrated in each church, at which an additional Host is consecrated and borne in procession to the Altar of Repose to be used at the Mass of the Presanctified on the following day. The ringing of bells ceases after the Gloria in the Mass until Holy Saturday, and after vespers the Altars are stripped, and were formerly washed with wine and water
Shear Thursday - On this day only one Mass may be celebrated in each church, at which an additional Host is consecrated and borne in procession to the Altar of Repose to be used at the Mass of the Presanctified on the following day. The ringing of bells ceases after the Gloria in the Mass until Holy Saturday, and after vespers the Altars are stripped, and were formerly washed with wine and water
Zachari'as - ...
Son of Barachias, who, our Lord says, was slain by the Jews between the Altar and the temple
na'Dab - not taken from that which burned perpetually, (Leviticus 6:13 ) on the Altar
Urbanus, Bishop of Rome - Callistus of a broken stone (apparently once the mensa of an Altar-tomb), bearing the imperfect inscription OVRBANOC E
Jeroboam - It was while dedicating the Altar at Bethel that a prophet from Judah suddenly appeared, who denounced the Altar, and foretold its desecration by Josiah
Tithes - According to Numbers 18:21-24 the Levites were to receive this in lieu of the inheritance of land which fell to all the other tribes; but they received the tithe on behalf of Jahweh; stress is laid on this point in Numbers 18:24 : ‘For the tithe of the children of Israel, which they offer as an heave-offering unto the Lord, I have given to the Levites for an inheritance’; the ‘heaving’ of an offering towards the Altar was the substitute for the actual consuming of it upon the Altar
Noah - ...
Once out of the ark, Noah built an Altar and sacrificed clean animals as burnt offerings on the Altar
Gibeon - Retributively it was here also that Joab met his doom from Benaiah while clinging to the brazen Altar of the tabernacle at Gibeon (1 Kings 2:28-34; 1 Chronicles 16:39-41. David put the brazen Altar before the tabernacle (2 Chronicles 1:5) probably at the same time lie removed the ark to Zion and appointed the priests under Zadok to offer the daily sacrifices, and Heman and Jeduthun to direct the music (2 Chronicles 1:3)
Honey - It is probable, that it was is order to keep the Jews at a distance from the customs of the Heathen, who were used to offer honey in their sacrifices, that God forbade it to be offered to him, that is to say, burnt upon the Altar, Leviticus 2:11 ; but at the same time he commanded that the first-fruits of it should be presented. These first-fruits and offerings were designed for the support and sustenance of the priests, and were not consumed upon the Altar
Expiation - Then with the blood of the bullock, which he had offered for his own sins and those of all the priests, in which he dipped his finger, and sprinkled towards the veil of the tabernacle eight times; and having mixed it with the blood of the bullock, he sprinkled again towards horns of the Altar of incense seven times, and once above it towards the east; after which, having again left the sanctuary and taken with him the basins of blood, he poured out the whole on the floor of the Altar of burnt-offering
Joab - When Joab heard of the failure of Adonijah's cause, he saw his danger, fled to the tabernacle, and caught hold of the horns of the Altar. Refusing to leave when summoned, he was put to death at the Altar
Ahaz - He built a copy of their Altar of sacrifice to replace the existing Altar of sacrifice in the Jerusalem temple (2 Kings 16:10-16; 2 Chronicles 28:22-24), and built shrines for the foreign religions throughout the towns of Judah (2 Chronicles 28:25)
Fire - Ever burning on the Altar, first kindled, according to Jewish tradition, from heaven (Leviticus 6:9; Leviticus 6:13; Leviticus 9:24). But Scripture represents the Altar fire as lighted naturally before this. Knobel observes the rule Leviticus 1:7, "the sons of Aaron shall put fire upon the Altar, and lay the wood in order upon the fire," must refer to the first burnt offering; the rule afterwards was to be that in Leviticus 6:13; Exodus 40:29; Leviticus 8:16; Leviticus 8:21-28; Leviticus 9:10; Leviticus 9:13-14; Leviticus 9:17; Leviticus 9:20. The "strange fire" (Leviticus 10:1) is generally explained common fire, not taken from the holy fire of the Altar
Tabernacle - Within this area stood the Altar of burntofferings, and the laver with its foot or base. This Altar was placed in a line between the door of the court and the door of the tabernacle, but nearer the former, Exodus 40:6,29 ; the laver stood the Altar of burnt-offering and the door of the tabernacle, Exodus 38:8 . ...
In the Holy Place to which none but priests were admitted, Hebrews 9:6 , were three objects worthy of notice: namely, the Altar of incense, the table for the show-bread, and the candlestick for the showbread, and the candlestick for the lights, all of which have been described in their respective places. The Altar of incense was placed in the middle of the sanctuary, before the veil, Exodus 30:6-10 40:26-27 ; and on it the incense was burnt morning and evening, Exodus 30:7,8 . On the north side of the Altar of incense, that is, on the right hand of the priest as he entered, stood the table for the show-bread, Exodus 26:35 40:22,23 ; and on the south side of the Holy Place, the golden candlestick, Exodus 25:31-39 . The Altar of burnt offerings, especially, was sanctified by sacrifices during seven days, Exodus 29:37 ; while rich donations were given by the princes of the tribes for the service of the sanctuary, Numbers 7:1 . The priests, having filled a vessel of water from the fountain of Siloam, bore it through the water gate to the temple, and there, while the trumpets and horns were sounding, poured it upon the sacrifice arranged upon the Altar
Bethel - There the prophet from Judah foretold the overthrow of the calf Altar by Josiah. More Altars, besides the original one were erected. Josiah, as foretold, defiled the Altar with dead men's bones, but disturbed not the sepulchre of the prophet of Judab when he discerned its title. Abram doubtless built the Altar, and afterwards stood with Lot when giving him his choice of the land (Genesis 12:7; Genesis 13:10)
Partake, Partaker - ...
B — 6: συμμερίζω (Strong's #4829 — Verb — summerizo — soom-mer-id'-zom-ahee ) primarily, "to distribute in shares" (sun, "with," meros, "a part"), in the Middle Voice, "to have a share in," is used in 1 Corinthians 9:13 , AV, "are partakers with (the Altar)," RV, "have their portion with," i. , they feed with others on that which, having been sacrificed, has been placed upon an Altar; so the believer feeds upon Christ (who is the Altar in Hebrews 13:10 )
Sacrifice - The unpleasant task of killing the animal (which was carried out beside the Altar, not on it) reminded them of the horror of sin (Leviticus 1:11). Unused blood was poured out on the ground beside the Altar (Leviticus 1:5; Leviticus 4:7; Leviticus 16:14). The parts to be burnt were usually burnt on the Altar of sacrifice, though in some cases they were burnt in an isolated place away from the central camp (Leviticus 1:9; Leviticus 2:2; Leviticus 3:3-5; Leviticus 4:10-12; Job 42:8; Leviticus 7:5). ...
The burnt offering, so called because the whole animal was burnt upon the Altar, indicated the complete consecration, or self-dedication, of the offerer to God (Leviticus 1:9; cf. A burnt offering, offered on behalf of the entire nation, was kept burning on the Altar constantly, as a symbol of the nation’s unbroken dedication to God (Leviticus 6:26). The wine was poured over the animal sacrifice on the Altar, and a handful of cereal was burnt with it (Leviticus 2:4-10; Leviticus 23:13; Leviticus 23:18; Numbers 15:1-10). In cases of sin by priests or the nation as a whole, the priests sprinkled the animal’s blood inside the Holy Place, burnt parts of the animal on the Altar of sacrifice, and burnt the remainder outside the camp (Leviticus 4:7; Leviticus 4:10; Leviticus 4:12). In cases of sin by private citizens, the priests sprinkled the blood at the Altar of sacrifice, burnt parts of the animal on the Altar, and ate what remained (Leviticus 4:27-30; Leviticus 6:26; Leviticus 6:30)
Mass, Saints of the - Six times there is mention of All Saints, and once of the saints whose relics are in the Altar-stone
Iddo - Tradition identifies him with the "man of God" who denounced Jeroboam's calf Altar at Bethel (1 Kings 13), which 2 Chronicles 9:29 favors; also with Oded which resembles his name (2 Chronicles 15:1)
Eucharist - As to the manner of celebrating the eucharist among the ancient Christians, after the customary oblations were made, the deacon brought water to the bishops and presbyters standing round the table to wash their hands; according to that passage of the Psalmist, "I will wash my hands in innocency, and so will I compass thy Altar, O Lord
Horn - The Altar borns ( Exodus 27:2 ), to which fugitives seeking asylum clung ( 1 Kings 1:50 etc
Bells - An acolyte, ringing a bell, precedes a priest carrying the Blessed Sacrament from one Altar to another in a church or to the sick in a convent or in a Catholic hospital
Dial - As Ahaz copied the Altar at Damascus (2 Kings 16:7; 2 Kings 16:10) so he probably copied the sun dial 700 B
Firepan - ), for removing charcoal, and probably ashes also, from the Altar of burnt-offering
Elphinstone, William - He was buried beneath the first step of the high Altar in the college chapel
Threshing Floors - Thus, Gideon's floor, Judges 6:37 , appears to have been in the open air; as was likewise that of Araunah the Jebusite; else it would not have been a proper place for erecting an Altar and offering sacrifice
Rebecca, Rebekah - Abraham's servant conducted her to one, whom she had not before seen — to Isaac, who had in a figure been received back from the dead after having been offered to God on the Altar: beautiful type of the saints who form the bride of Christ being led by the Holy Spirit on their journey to be the 'wife' of the Risen One "whom having not seen they love," and to whom they can now be companions in spirit, being of His 'kindred,' whom He is not ashamed to own as brethren
Sanctuary - ...
(2) The space in the church reserved for the high Altar and the clergy
William Elphinstone - He was buried beneath the first step of the high Altar in the college chapel
Saints of the Mass - Six times there is mention of All Saints, and once of the saints whose relics are in the Altar-stone
Blood-Avenger - The law of Moses expressly forbade the acceptance of any ransom for a life thus forfeited, Numbers 35:31 ; but it interfered between an accused person and his pursuer, by providing a sanctuary-at the Altar of God and in the cities of refuge-where the accused might be safe until it was proved that he had committed the act, willfully or accidentally, Joshua 20:6,9
Stephanus i., Patriarch of Antioch - Barlaam in which he was celebrating the Eucharist, dragged him from the Altar, tortured him to death, and threw his body into the Orontes (Evagr
Bowing - Thus in regard to bowing towards the Altar, the 7th canon of theEnglish Church of 1640, which enjoins the custom, declares, "doingreverence and obeisance both at their coming in and going out ofchurches, chancels, or chapels was a most ancient custom of thePrimitive Church in the purest times
Woman's Auxiliary, the - It may be interesting to notethat the UNITED OFFERING placed on the Altar by the Woman'sAuxiliary at the Triennial meeting held in San Francisco duringthe General Convention of 1901, amounted to the handsome sum of$104,295
Tabernacle - The former was the holy place , or first tabernacle , ( Hebrews 9:2 ) containing the golden candlestick on one side, the table of shew-bread opposite, and between them in the centre the Altar of incense. The Altar of burnt offering and the brazen laver . [1] ...
In the holy place. The first sanctuary contained three objects: the Altar of incense in the centre, so as to be directly in front of the ark of the covenant ( 1 Kings 6:22 ) the table of shew-bread on its right or north side, and the golden candlestick on the left or south side. [2] ...
In the holy of holies, within the veil, and shrouded in darkness, there was but one object, the ark of the covenant, containing the two tables of stone, inscribed with the Ten Commandments. In the outer or east half of the court was placed the Altar of burnt offering, and between it and the tabernacle itself; the laver at which the priests washed their hands and feet on entering the temple. When the ark was recovered, it was removed to Jerusalem, and placed in a new tabernacle (2 Samuel 6:17 ; 1 Chronicles 15:1 ) but the old structure still had its hold on the veneration of the community and the old Altar still received their offerings. (4) The Altar of burnt offering, standing before the tabernacle was a perpetual symbol of the atonement,--the greatness of sin, deserving death, hard to be removed and yet forgiveness possible, and offered freely, but only through blood. (6) This Altar stood outside of the tabernacle, and must be passed before we come to the tabernacle itself; a type of the true religious life. (8) Having entered the holy place, we find the three great means and helps to true living, --the candlestick, the light of God's truth; the shew-bread, teaching that the soul must have its spiritual food and live in communion with God; and the Altar of incense, the symbol of prayer
Dove - ...
Since early medieval times the Holy Eucharist was reserved for the sick in a dove-shaped vessel suspended to the baldachino over the Altar; later the dove was enclosed in a tower upon the Altar
Jerobo'am - It was while dedicating the Altar at Bethel that a prophet from Judah suddenly appeared, who denounced the Altar, and foretold its desecration by Josiah, and violent overthrow
the Disobedient Prophet - Bethel was built on that very spot on which their father Jacob had slept and dreamed when he was on his lonely way to Padan-aram; and it is that very heaven out of which the ladder was let down on Jacob's pillow that is today to be darkened by the unclean incense of Jeroboam's Altar-fires. And, behold, there came a man of God out of Judah by the word of the Lord unto Bethel: and Jeroboam stood by the Altar to burn incense. And the man of God cried against the Altar of the Lord, and said, O Altar, Altar! And then he foretold the fall of the Altar, and with it the fall of him who stood in his royal robes that day ministering to his unclean gods at that Altar. He was wholly worthy thus far to have his name held up aloft along with the names of Samuel and Elijah themselves, for he stood up alone against Jeroboam and against all Israel and nailed the curse of God to Jeroboam's Altar under the king's own eyes. What a day it has been! And what a man of God we have seen! Till they told him all that we are told about Jeroboam, and his Altar, and the man of God from Judah, and his cry that shook down the Altar, and the king's withered hand, and the prayer of the man of God, and the king's hospitality, and the man of God's refusal of the king's hospitality. Who knows what good might have come of it had he, God's acknowledged prophet, been seen sitting in the place of honour at the royal table? Had he not been somewhat short, and sharp, and churlish after his great battle with Jeroboam's Altar? Stern men have often been known to soften and secretly repent of their too-ascetical self-denial
Priest - ...
The priests served immediately at the Altar. But all offerings upon the Altar, the sprinkling of blood included, were made by the priests alone. They kept up a perpetual fire on the Altar of burnt sacrifices, and in the lamps of the golden candlestick in the sanctuary; they kneaded the loaves of showbread, baked them, offered them on the golden Altar in the sanctuary, and changed them every Sabbath-day. Every day, night and morning, a priest appointed by casting of lots at the beginning of the week, brought into the sanctuary a smoking censer of incense, and set it on the golden table, otherwise called the Altar of incense, Luke 1:9 . In the peace offerings, they had the shoulder and the breast, Leviticus 7:33,34 ; in the sin offering, they burnt on the Altar the fat that covers the bowels, the liver, and the kidneys; the rest belonged to themselves, Leviticus 7:6,10
Water of Jealousy - " and having thrown the handful of meal on the Altar, "caused the woman to drink" the potion thus drugged, she moreover answering to the words of his imprecation, "Amen, amen
Jehovah Jireh - It is no valid objection that Abraham "saw the place afar off," whereas the temple mount is not conspicuous from a distance (whence Moriah is connected by some with Moreh and "the natural Altar on the top of Mount Gerizim", which the Samaritans make the place of the sacrifice); for what is meant in Genesis 22:4 is only that he saw it at some little distance, as far off as the place admitted
Earth - Naaman desired to have two mules' burden of earth of the Holy Land ('Εretz Ιsrael ), whether for an Altar or other sacred purpose (Exodus 20:24), a half-paganish nation that God would accept devotions in connection with that soil rather than with any other
Seraphim - ' In Isaiah 6:2-7 (the plural) the seraphim are exalted beings, but the only actions recorded there are that one brought a live coal from off the Altar and laid it upon the prophet's mouth, and said, "Thine iniquity is taken away, and thy sin purged
Feast - ...
In two passages, châg represents the “victim sacrificed to God” (perhaps during one of the three annual sacrifices): “… Bind the [1] sacrifice with cords, even unto the horns of the Altar” ( a'sa - He burnt the symbol of his grandmother Maachah's religion and deposed her from the dignity of "king's mother,") and renewed the great Altar which the idolatrous priests apparently had desecrated
Meat Offering - A portion of it, including all the frankincense, was to be burnt on the Altar as "a memorial;" the rest belonged to the priest; but the meat offerings offered by the priests themselves were to be wholly burnt
Blood - It was solemnly sprinkled upon the Altar and the mercy seat, "for it is the blood that maketh atonement for the soul," Leviticus 17:1-16 the life of the victim for the life of the sinner
Attend, Attendance, Attendant - A — 1: προσέχω (Strong's #4337 — Verb — prosecho — pros-ekh'-o ) "to take heed, give heed," is said of the priests who "gave attendance at the Altar," Hebrews 7:13
Gog - ...
Antiochus Epiphanes, the Old Testament antichrist, the "little horn" of the third world empire, who defiled Jehovah's temple and Altar with swine sacrifices and set up Jupiter's Altar there, prefigures the "king of fierce countenance" who, "when the transgressors shall come to the full, shall destroy the holy people" (Daniel 8:10-26); "the king of the N
Seraphim - ...
Besides praising God they are secondly the medium of imparting spiritual fire from God to His prophet; when Isaiah laments alike his own and the people's uncleanness of lips, in contrast to the seraphim chanting in alternate responses with pure lips God's praises, and (Isaiah 6:5-7) with a deep sense of the unfitness of his own lips to speak God's message to the people, one of the seraphim flew with a live coal which he took from off the Altar of burnt offering in the temple court, the fire on it being that which God at first had kindled (Leviticus 9:24), and laid it upon Isaiah's mouth, saying, "lo, this hath touched thy lips, and thine iniquity is taken away and thy sin purged. " Thus he was inaugurated in office, as the disciples were by the tongues of fire resting on them, the sign of their speaking of Jesus in various languages; his unfitness for the office, as well as his personal sin, were removed only by being brought into contact with the sacrificial Altar, of which Messiah is the antitype
Shewbread - Here was an ‘altar of cedar’ (1 Kings 6:20 ), which modern scholars regard as an Altar for the presentation of the offering of the shewbread. The same interchange of ‘altar’ and ‘table’ is found in Ezekiel 41:22 ; cf. unleavened, bread on the Altars of various deities (see Zimmern’s list in KAT Stone - In religious worship stones were employed in the forms of the pillar ( Genesis 28:18 ; Genesis 28:22 ; Genesis 31:45 ; Genesis 35:14 ) and the Altar. Pillar and Altar. ) and the inscribed stones of the Altar on Mt
Abomination, Abomination of Desolation - ...
Daniel 9:27 ; Daniel 11:31 ; and Daniel 12:11 give evidence of a heathen idol or Altar. “Abomination” ( shiqquts ) is used to describe an idol which would desecrate the holy Temple and/or Altar in Jerusalem. ...
In Daniel, the historical situation was apparently the building of an Altar of Zeus by Antiochus Epiphanes in Jerusalem in his attempt at complete hellenization of Israel in the second century B
Gideon - The first thing he was bid to do was to throw down the Altar of Baal, and erect an Altar to Jehovah, and offer an offering thereon. Alas, the man of faith, who had thrown down the Altar of Baal, was now led astray with a golden ephod! A memorial of God's intervention is not present faith in the God who has intervened
Destroy, Destruction - ...
Altars . Sacred pillars, asherim (Exodus 34:13 ), Altars, and cult centers were to be destroyed (2 Kings 21:3 ). According to the New Testament the Altar is a symbol of fellowship with the deity behind the Altar (1 Corinthians 10:18-22 ). According to Jesus the Altar represents both the sacrifice on it and the deity whose presence dwells there (Matthew 23:20-21 ). Paul refers to a pagan Altar as "the table of demons" (1 Corinthians 10:21 ). With child sacrifices, self-mutilation, and other despicable Acts being performed there, the Altars became centers of demonic presence (Psalm 106:37-39 ). ...
When the Lord split apart the Altar at Bethel it manifested the powerlessness of man-made religion (1 Kings 13:3-5 ). When Gideon destroyed the Altar of Baal, his father pointed out to its defenders Baal's inability to stop the desecration of a structure sacred to him (Judges 6:28-32 ). Apostate Israelites obviously wanted to make this demonstration about Yahweh by tearing down his Altar (1 Kings 18:30 ; 19:10,14 ). When Solomon dedicated Yahweh's Altar, the priests were unable to approach because of the fiery glory (Psalm 2:12 ). ...
God himself will personally destroy apostate high places along with their Altars (1 Corinthians 15:24-283 ; Ezekiel 6:4 ). Yahweh will reveal himself as the Most High God by actually standing next to the Altar when he gives the command to destroy their worship center (Amos 9:1 )
Pillar - ...
( c ) The third and most important class of mazzçbâhs comprises the pillar-stones which stood beside the Altar at every Canaanite sanctuary (see High Place). It will probably be found, on consideration of all the conditions to be satisfied, that the desire to appease the spirit of the dead lies at the beginning, while the conception of the pillar-stone as a representation of the deity, beside the Altar dedicated to his worship, comes at the end of a long process of evolution. What is the relation of the mazzçbâh to the Altar ? Shall we say, with the distinguished author of the Religion of the Semites 9 (p. 204), that ‘the Altar is a differentiated form of the primitive rude stone pillar, the nosb or massebah ; or, with the latest investigator, that ‘the massebah is nothing else than the artificial substitute for the sacrificial stone’ (Kittel, op. The pillar will then be a differentiated form of the most ancient Altar (Altar, §§ 1
Diptych - The contents of the diptychs were read aloud from the ambo or Altar, and traces of the fixed usage of the Church in the 5th century may still be found in the Canon of the Mass. Diptychs were also sculptured as devotional panels for Altars and church walls
Nazareth - The Franciscans built their church so that fifteen steps led down to the ancient Chapel of the Angel, and two to the grotto with its Altar of the Annunciation
Dominical Letter - Hangings of silk or other material placed at the back ofthe Altar as a decoration and to hide the bare wall
Gethsemane - Inside, windows of bluish alabaster veil the Altar of a naked rock by which Jesus is said to have knelt and prayed
Consecration - Parts of the ram were placed in the hands of Aaron and his sons, these were waved before the Lord, and then burnt on the Altar upon the burnt offering
Tabernacles Feast of - In later times, the priests went every morning during the festival, and drew water from the fountain of Siloam, and poured it out to the southwest of the Altar, the Levites, in the meanwhile, playing on instruments of music, and singing the Psalms 113:1-9; Psalms 114:1-8; Psalms 115:1-18; Psalms 116:1-19; Psalms 117:1-2; Psalms 118:1-29
Gentiles - Josephus says there was, in the court of the temple, a wall, or balustrade, breast-high, with pillars at particular distances, and inscriptions on them in Greek and Latin, importing that strangers were forbidden from entering farther; here their offerings were received, and sacrifices were offered for them, they standing at the barrier; but they were not allowed to approach to the Altar
Chemosh - To Chemosh Solomon erected an Altar upon the Mount of Olives, 1 Kings 11:7
Censer - In the daily offering, the censer was filled with coals from the perpetual fire, and placed on the Altar of incense, where the incense was thrown upon the coals, Exodus 30:1,7-10
Horn - ...
Ornamental horns projected from the four corners of the Altars of the tabernacle. Israelite law did not permit the widespread ancient practice of clinging to the horns of the Altar to escape punishment for murder (Exodus 21:14; 1 Kings 1:51; 1 Kings 2:29)
Leaven - ...
Nothing containing leaven was to be offered on the Altar of sacrifice. Leavened bread offered with the peace offering was not burnt on the Altar, but eaten in the meal that followed (Leviticus 7:11-14)
Theophilanthropists - Certain moral inscriptions; a simple Altar, on which they deposit, as a sign of gratitude for the benefits of the Creator, such flowers or fruits as the season afford; a tribune for the lectures and discourses, form the whole of the ornaments of their temples. The first inscription, placed above the Altar, recalls to remembrance the two religious dogmas which are the foundation of their moral. They dressed for him an Altar of earth; they offered him, in sign of their gratitude and of their submission, some of the productions which they held of his liberal hand
Burnt-Offering - The Altar stood in the court of the priests in front of (eastward of) the Temple building. The Altar on which burnt-offering was offered, from its great size, its frequent use, and its standing visibly in the court of the priests, was emphatically ‘the Altar,’ and it was before this that He directed the offending brother to leave his gift (Matthew 5:23)
Athens - " (See Altar; AREOPAGUS
Pace - ) A broad step or platform; any part of a floor slightly raised above the rest, as around an Altar, or at the upper end of a hall
Sign - ...
Third, The fire upon the Altar, which was always burning
Incense - This incense was to be burnt on the golden Altar morning and evening: "a perpetual incense before the Lord
Sprinkling - In the burnt offering, the blood was sprinkled round about upon the Altar; in the sin offering the blood was sprinkled seven times before the Lord before the vail of the sanctuary; and on the day of atonement the blood was sprinkled upon the mercy-seat eastward, and before the mercy-seat seven times
Sheaf - This sheaf was threshed in the court; and of the grain they took a full omer, and after it had been winnowed, parched, and bruised, they sprinkled oil over it, and added a handful of incense; then the priest who received the offering, waved it before the Lord to the four quarters of the world, crosswise; he cast part of it upon the Altar, and the rest was his own
Praetorium - The word at first denoted the headquarters in the Roman camp, a space within which stood the general’s tent, the camp Altar, the augurâle , and the tribûnâl ; then the military council meeting there
Laver - It and the Altar stood in the court of the tabernacle. In it the priests were bound to wash their hands and feet in approaching the Altar and entering the tabernacle, on pain of death
Tabernacle - The outer court contained the Altar of burnt offering (Exodus 27:1-8) and the bronze laver (Exodus 30:17-21). The holy place contained three things: first, a table on which was placed the shewbread, the bread of the presence (Exodus 25:23-30), second, a golden lampstand (Exodus 25:31-40) and third, an Altar of incense (Exodus 30:1-7)
Ai - (ay' i) a city located two miles from Bethel, was the site where Abram built an Altar, and Joshua and Achan suffered ruin. Several hundred years before Joshua, Abram built an Altar on a hill just west of Ai which was also near Bethel (Genesis 12:8 )
Mass - John the Baptist, at which are said three masses; that of the Innocents, at which the Gloria in excelsis and Hallelujah are omitted; and, it being a day of mourning, the Altar is of a violet colour. At these masses the Altar is put in mourning, and the only decorations are a cross in the middle of six yellow wax lights; the dress of the celebrant, and the very mass book, are black; many parts of the office are omitted, and the people are dismissed without the benediction
Refuge, Cities of - ...
Among most of the nations of antiquity, temples, and particularly the Altars within them, were regarded as proffering an asylum for fugitives from violence. Among the Hebrews we find indications of the custom on the part of the culprit of fleeing to the Lord's Altar. ...
There is an appointed city of refuge for sinners exposed to the second death, and an Altar of refuge sprinkled with atoning blood
Temple - The site was the threshing floor of Araunah the Jebusite, whereon David by Jehovah's command erected an Altar and offered burnt offerings and peace offerings (2 Samuel 24:18-25; 1 Chronicles 21:18-30; 1 Chronicles 22:1); Jehovah's signifying by fire His acceptance of the sacrifice David regarded as the divine designation of the area for the temple. ...
"This is the house of the Lord God, and this is the Altar . " Warren identifies the "dome of the rock" with Ornan's threshing floor and the temple Altar. The brazen Altar of burnt offering was four times as large as that of the tabernacle; 20 cubits on each side and in height, instead of five cubits (2 Chronicles 4:1). There were besides ten lavers, five on each side of the Altar, for washing the entrails; these were in the inner (1 Kings 7:36) or higher (Jeremiah 36:10) or priests' court, raised above the further off one by three rows of hewed stone and one of cedar beams (1 Kings 6:36; 2 Chronicles 4:9). near the Altar (Ezekiel 8:5), the higher gate of the house of Jehovah, built by Jotham (2 Kings 15:35), the gate of the foundation (2 Chronicles 23:5), Solomon's ascent up to the house of Jehovah (1 Kings 10:5; 2 Chronicles 9:11; 2 Kings 16:18). It was fixed to one temple and Altar, before the Shekinah. The golden and silver vessels taken by Nebuchadnezzar were restored; the Altar was first set up by Jeshua and Zerubbabel, then the foundations were laid (Ezra 3) amidst weeping in remembrance of the glorious former temple and joy at the restoration. ...
Its Altar was of stone, not brass (1 Maccabees 4:45), it had only one table of shewbread and one candlestick. Antiochus Epiphanes profaned this temple; afterward it was cleansed or dedicated, a new Altar of fresh stones made, and the feast of dedication thenceforward kept yearly (John 10:22). long leads to a flight of steps which rise to the surface in the court of the temple just at the gateway of the inner temple which led to the Altar; it is the one of the four gateways on the S. " Within this gateway was the Altar of burnt offering, 50 cubits square and 15 high, with an ascent to it by an inclined plane. angle of the Altar was the opening through which the victims' blood flowed W. A parapet one cubit high surrounding the temple and Altar separated the people from the officiating priests (Josephus, B
Offering - The “meat [1] offering” was to be burned, while the wine seems to have been poured out at the foot of the Altar like blood of the sacrificial animal. ” The inference seems to be that such “offerings” were raised high by the priest in some sort of motion as it was placed on the Altar. ...
Qorbân may be translated as “that which one brings near to God or the Altar. ...
In its first biblical occurrence ‛ôlâh identifies a kind of “offering” presented to God: “And Noah builded an Altar unto the Lord; and took of every clean beast, and of every clean fowl, and offered burnt offerings on the Altar” ( Altar), the priest took its blood, which was presented before the Lord prior to being sprinkled around the Altar. A bird was simply given to the priest, but he wrung its neck and allowed its blood to drain beside the Altar ( Altar ( Altar, and all of them involved burning to some degree. 29:18: “And thou shalt burn the whole ram upon the Altar: it is a burnt offering unto the Lord: it is a sweet savor, an offering made by fire unto the Lord. The priest sprinkled its blood around the Altar, burned the choice parts on the Altar, and received the rest as food ( Altar
Levi - They shall teach Jacob thy judgments, and Israel thy law; they shall put incense before thee, and whole burnt sacrifice upon thine Altar. Here, reader, is brought the pure incense, and that whole burnt sacrifice, Christ Jesus upon JEHOVAH'S Altar; even Christ himself, who is both the New Testament Altar of JEHOVAH, the high priest, and the sacrifice
Oath - Oaths were sometimes taken before the Altar, or by an appeal to Jehovah; "as the Lord liveth
Fourteen Holy Helpers - The earliest mention of the cult occurred in 1284 with reference to an Altar built in honor of the Fourteen Helpers at the parish church of Krems, Austria
Theatre - The inner part of the semicircle below the level of the stage had an Altar in the middle on which incense was burnt
Noah - On coming from the ark he built an Altar, made an offering, and received a promise that the world should never again be destroyed by a flood
Gad - Gad also brought David God's orders to build an Altar, apparently on the site of the future Temple (2 Samuel 24:18-19 )
Dung - The sacred law required that the dung, along with other parts of the animal, should not be burned on the Altar but should be burned outside the camp (Exodus 29:14 ; Leviticus 4:11-12 )
Scapegoat - ” This goat was slain as a sin offering, and its blood was sprinkled on the cultic objects to help cleanse the Altar, the sanctuary, and the tent of meeting from defilements of the past year
Money Changers - Syrian silver coins were the money of Jerusalem then, and worshipers used them to pay their Temple tax of a half shekel and to buy sacrifices for the Altar
Bathing - Priests washed clothes, hands, feet, or bodies before approaching the Altar for sacrifice
Ai - of Bethel (Beitin); its Arab name, et Tel, means "the heap," and it doubtless is the site of Ai, or Hai (on the east of Abraham's encampment and Altar, Genesis 12:8)
Ahaz - The result of the visit was the construction of a new Altar for the Temple at Jerusalem, and apparently the introduction of Assyrian divinities (2 Kings 16:10 ff
Basilica - The Altar was placed within or before the apse, and arches from nave, aisles, and apse opened into the transept, a cross hall of the same height as the nave interposed between nave and apse for practical purposes and for the symbolism of the cross
Architecture, Byzantine - At the eastern end was a projecting apse for the chancel and Altar separated from the nave by the iconostasis or screen; later a minor apse was placed at the eastern end of each aisle, and a narthex extended across the western front
Herd - ...
Bâqâr also refers to statues of oxen: “It [4] stood upon twelve oxen, three looking toward the north, and three looking toward the west, and three looking toward the south, and three looking toward the east …” (1 Kings 7:25)
Incense - (Exodus 30:7,8 ) When the priest entered the holy place with the incense, all the people were removed from the temple, and from between the porch and the Altar
Baal Peor - Chemosh, the abomination of Moab, to whom Solomon erected an Altar, 1 Kings 11:7 , is supposed to have been the same deity
Degrees - Others are of opinion, that these psalms were sung during the time of service, while the flesh, &c, were consuming on the Altar, and while the fume and smoke ascended toward heaven; and that the title Psalms of Ascent seems to favour this supposition
Sanctify - ...
So under the Jewish dispensation, to sanctify the Altar, the temple, the priests, &c
Earth - Thus adamah generally refers to the earth as ground or soil: the rain falleth on 'the earth,' Genesis 7:4 ; 'an Altar of earth,' Exodus 20:24 ; man 'returneth to his earth,' Psalm 146:4 ; but it often refers to the 'land ' of Israel: 'prolong your days upon the land;' 'dwell in the land;' 'live in the land;' 'the land which I sware unto their fathers
Refuge, Cities of - One who has treacherously sullied his hands with blood can find no refuge at the Altar of God; he may be taken from it to death ( Exodus 21:14 ), or he may even be struck down at the Altar, as was the fate of Joab ( 1 Kings 2:30-31 ; 1 Kings 2:34 ). ...
(1) Every Altar or sanctuary in the land could extend its protection to one who had without intention taken the life of another. It is not at all likely that Joab’s death was brought about at the Altar in Jerusalem because of some exceptional authority exercised over it by the king. ...
(2) When the provincial high places and Altars were suppressed by Josiah in b
Offerings - Not only the parts which were expressly destined for the Altar, but also the other parts of the victims, were burned. A libation of wine was poured out upon the Altar. The priest partially wrung or cut off the heads of the turtle doves and young pigeons, sprinkled the blood on the side of the Altar, plucked out the feathers and the crop, and cast them to the east of the Altar into the place for the reception of ashes, and placed the remainder, after having cleft or broken the wings, upon the fire, Leviticus 1:3-17
Tabernacle - ...
( b ) In the centre of the court is placed the Altar of burnt-offering ( Exodus 27:1-8 ), called also ‘ the brazen Altar ’ and ‘ the Altar ’ par excellence . When one considers the purpose it was intended to serve, one is surprised to find this Altar of burnt-offering consisting of a hollow chest of acacia wood (so RV
( c ) In proximity to the Altar must be placed the bronze laver ( Exodus 30:17-21 ), containing water for the ablutions of the priests. Coming now to the furniture of the dwelling, and proceeding as before from without inwards, we find the holy place provided with three articles of furniture: ( a ) the table of shewbread, or, more precisely, presence-bread ( Exodus 25:9 , Exodus 37:10-16 ); ( b ) the so-called golden candlestick, in reality a seven-branched lampstand ( Exodus 25:31-40 , Exodus 37:17-24 ) ( c ) the Altar of incense ( Exodus 30:1-7 , Exodus 37:25-28 ). ...
( c ) The passage containing the directions for the Altar of incense ( Exodus 30:1-7 ) forms part of a section (chs. The Altar is described as square in section, one cubit each way, and two cubits in height, with projecting horns
Atonement, Day of - Taking a censer with burning coals from the brazen Altar, and applying a handful of incense, he entered the holiest, where the mercy-seat became enveloped in the cloud of smoke from the incense. Going out from the holiest, the high priest purified, by sprinkling seven times with the bullock's and the gent's blood, the holy place and the golden Altar; and then outside he poured the rest of the blood round the Altar of burnt offering; the places defiled by the priest's and the nation's sins being thus made ceremonially and typically fit for the indwelling of God; compare as to the Antitype Hebrews 9:22-23. He also burnt upon the Altar the fat of the two sin offerings, while their flesh was being burned outside the camp. ...
The entire flesh of the burnt offering was burnt on the Altar; but that of the sin offerings, which ordinarily was counted most holy and eaten (type of Christ our holy sin offering, Hebrews 9:14), could not in this case be eaten by the priest properly, as it had been offered for the priests as well as for the people, and was therefore taken and burnt outside (Leviticus 6:25-27). The successive steps in the whole were: the high priest atoned...
(1) for himself and his family; then, being purified himself,...
(2) for the sanctuary and all in it; then...
(3) for the Altar of burnt offering outside;...
(4) for the whole people
Iddo - As early as Josephus, Iddo had been identified with the nameless prophet who spoke against the Altar of Bethel in 1 Kings 13:1
Libellatici - The lapsi were divided into three classes: ...
sacrificati, those who had actually offered a sacrifice to idols
thurificati, those who had burnt incense on the Altar of the gods
libellatici, those who had drawn up or had caused to be drawn up certificates (libelli, several of which are still preserved) stating that they had offered sacrifice without, however, having actually done so
Lapsi - The lapsi were divided into three classes: ...
sacrificati, those who had actually offered a sacrifice to idols
thurificati, those who had burnt incense on the Altar of the gods
libellatici, those who had drawn up or had caused to be drawn up certificates (libelli, several of which are still preserved) stating that they had offered sacrifice without, however, having actually done so
Feast of the Body of Christ - During this procession it is customary to halt at several Altars, and from one or two of these Benediction is solemnly given. Some country churches that have the cemetery close at hand always have two Altars within the confines of the cemetery for the purpose of these stops or halts in the Corpus Christi procession. Then the side-altars are used as stopping or halting places for the procession, and from each Benediction is given. Finally the solemnity is concluded with Benediction given, from the high Altar of the church
Feast of Corpus Chrisi - During this procession it is customary to halt at several Altars, and from one or two of these Benediction is solemnly given. Some country churches that have the cemetery close at hand always have two Altars within the confines of the cemetery for the purpose of these stops or halts in the Corpus Christi procession. Then the side-altars are used as stopping or halting places for the procession, and from each Benediction is given. Finally the solemnity is concluded with Benediction given, from the high Altar of the church
Metal-Work in the Service of the Church - The Altar and ciborium were adorned with gold and silver
Cardinal - The privileges of cardinals are as follows: precedence overall other ecclesiastical prelates, including primates and patriarchs; to wear the red, and cardinalitial robes and hat; almost all the privileges of bishops; to hear confessions, preach, celebrate Mass anywhere, bless religious articles, erect Stations of the Cross; a daily privileged Altar, etc
Sacrifice - (See Altar
Araunah - Be offered the area as a site for Jehovah's Altar, and only by constraint accepted David's pay (50 shekels of silver, 2 Samuel 24:18-24; 600 shekels of gold, 1 Chronicles 21:25
Gilgal - It was "beside the oaks of Moreh," near which Abraham erected his first Altar (Genesis 12:6,7 )
Tabernacles, Feast of - , (1) that of drawing water from the Pool of Siloam, and pouring it upon the Altar (John 7:2,37 ), as a memorial of the water from the rock in Horeb; and (2) of lighting the lamps at night, a memorial of the pillar of fire by night during their wanderings
Ekron - A horned Altar was also found during the excavations
Ablution - ...
Before the priests approached the Altar of God, they were required, on pain of death, to wash their hands and their feet to cleanse them from the soil of common life (Exodus 30:17-21 )
Zerubbabel - ...
According to Ezra 3:1 , Zerubbabel and Jeshua (or Joshua, the high priest) rebuilt the Altar and in their second year (538?) laid the foundation of the Temple, but their work was halted by opposition from persons who had remained in Palestine during the Exile (Ezra 4:1-6 ,Ezra 3:2:24 )
Crown - the word 'crown' represents the word zer , the borderor moulding placed round the top of the ark, the table of showbread, and the Altar of incense
Fellowship, - Thus in 1 Corinthians 10:16 , "The cup of blessing which we bless, is it not the communion of the blood of Christ? The bread which we break, is it not the communion of the body of Christ?" There is an allusion to the peace offering in 1 Corinthians 10:18 to show that those who ate the sacrifice were partakers of, had communion with, the Altar; hence to eat things offered to idols would be to have fellowship with demons
Asherah - Rather, God said, "But ye shall destroy their Altars, break their images, and cut down their groves [1] …" ( Exodus 34:13). Some scholars conclude that it was a sacred pole set up near an Altar to Baal. Thus her sacred objects (poles) were immediately beside Altars to Baal, and she was worshiped along with him
Offering, Offering up - Any Israelite could bring an offering, or offer a gift, or a sacrifice; but only the priest could offer up the sacrifice on the Altar to God
Fashion - King Ahaz sent to Urijah the priest the fashion of the Altar
Jeshua - He took a leading part in the erection of the Altar of burnt-offering and the laying of the foundations of the Temple ( Ezra 3:2 ff
Gibeon - It was near 'the great stone' in Gibeon that Joab treacherously slew Amasa; and in retribution it was to the same city he fled to lay hold on the horns of the Altar for protection, but where he was put to death
Flowers - From the Mishna we learn that at the Feast of Harvest (Exodus 23:16) the first crop of fruit offered at the Altar was decked with flowers (Bikkurim, ii
Gog - And let the reader judge for himself how suitable it was, and proper, that when the Lord Jesus came on earth to do away the sin and guilt of all nations, the solemn transaction of his "one all-sufficient sacrifice and obedience unto death" should be set forth in the center of the earth, that like the sun in the midway of the heavens which illumines both east and west; so Christ, the sun of righteousness, might extend the efficacy of his light, and life, and warmth in every direction to his people; and his blood, as from the high Altar of his own divine nature, flowing down, might wash away, from the morning of creation to the end of time, the whole of human transgression
Honey - " (Exodus 16:31) Notwithstanding this, it is somewhat remarkable, that the Lord forbade the offering of it upon the Altar
Ephod - 2:28) and priestly trainees wore less elaborate “ephods” made of linen whenever they appeared before the Altar
Murder - Money could not redeem his life: he was dragged away from the Altar, if he had there taken refuge
Nethinims - This number was but small in regard to the offices that were imposed on them; so that we find them afterward instituting a solemnity called Xylophoria, in which the people carried wood to the temple with great ceremony, to keep up the fire on the Altar of burnt sacrifices
Thurificati - The lapsi were divided into three classes: ...
sacrificati, those who had actually offered a sacrifice to idols
thurificati, those who had burnt incense on the Altar of the gods
libellatici, those who had drawn up or had caused to be drawn up certificates (libelli, several of which are still preserved) stating that they had offered sacrifice without, however, having actually done so
Sacrificati - The lapsi were divided into three classes: ...
sacrificati, those who had actually offered a sacrifice to idols
thurificati, those who had burnt incense on the Altar of the gods
libellatici, those who had drawn up or had caused to be drawn up certificates (libelli, several of which are still preserved) stating that they had offered sacrifice without, however, having actually done so
Phin'Ehas - (Numbers 31:6 ) Many years later he also headed the party which was despatched from Shiloh to remonstrate against the Altar which the transjordanic tribes were reported to have built near Jordan
Oath, - (Genesis 24:2 ; 47:29 ) ...
Oaths were sometimes taken before the Altar, or, as some understand the passage, if the persons were not in Jerusalem, in a position looking toward the temple
Damascus - The ungodly Judean king Ahaz worshipped the Syrian gods there, and built a copy of the Syrian Altar in Jerusalem (2 Kings 16:10-16; 2 Chronicles 28:22-24)
Valentinianus (2) - His name is celebrated in church history in connexion with two matters: (1) An attempt in 384 by the Roman Senate to restore the Altar of Victory and the pagan rites connected with the Senate
Tabernacles, Feast of - Such were the daily procession round the Altar, with its sevenfold repetition on the 7th day; the singing of special Psalms; the procession on each of the first 7 days to Siloam to fetch water, which was mixed with wine in a golden pitcher, and poured at the foot of the Altar while trumpets were blown (cf
Mass - The fixed or Ordinary part of the Mass consists of: ...
Confession at the foot of the Altar which is always the same, except at Passiontide and at Requiems, when Psalms 42 is omitted
the Introit, entrance or opening prayer, at the priest's right hand corner of the Altar, to the Offertory, all of which part is variable except the Gloria and Credo, which are not always said
the Offertory, which is fixed or Common, except for the Secret prayer and the Preface which is adapted for certain feasts
the Canon, which varies slightly on Easter and Pentecost Sundays
the Communion, always Proper, and the rest to the end Common as a rule, except the Postcommunion, the Ite Missa Est when the vestments are purple or black, and the Last Gospel in Lent, on vigils, and Sundays when a special Feast is celebrated
Zacharias - ...
"The Lord look upon it and requite it" was the martyr's dying sentence, which Jesus refers to as about to be executed on Israel; "that upon you may come all the righteous blood shed upon the earth from the blood of Zacharias, son of Barachias, whom ye slew between the temple and the Altar," i. in the interior court of the priests, in which was the Altar of burnt offerings
Tabernacle - In the tabernacle was the ark of the covenant, the table of shew bread, the golden candlestick, and the Altar of incense; and in the court opposite to the entrance of the tabernacle, or holy place, stood the Altar of burnt- offerings, and the laver or bason for the use of the priests
Reuben - of Jordan to help in the conquest of Canaan; subsequently they erected an Altar shaped like the tabernacle Altar, W. ...
Typical of there being only one sacrificial Altar, Christ, above; our earthly communion with His sacrifice being commemorative, spiritual, and real, not carnal and literal (Hebrews 13:10; Revelation 8:3)
Priest; Priesthood - ...
A “priest” is an authorized minister of deity who officiates at the Altar and in other cultic rites. After the Flood, for example, Noah built an Altar to the Lord ( Altars. The Lord told Aaron: “Therefore thou and thy sons with thee shall keep your priest’s office for every thing of the Altar, and within the veil; and ye shall serve …” ( Tabernacle - The first object encountered is the Altar. But the Altar raises its own questions: How can a bull or a sheep or a goat die in the place of a person who has been made just a little lower than God himself (Micah 6:6-8 )? For the Old Testament believer, the solution to this enigma was, in many ways, a mystery. Nevertheless, there is no other way to the Holy of Holies than past the Altar. ...
Behind the Altar is the laver. Directly in front of the worshiper at the far end of the space was the Altar of incense. ...
But this brings to the fore the question raised by the great Altar in the court outside. Oswalt...
See also Aaron ; Altar ; Ark ; Exodus, Theology of ; Hebrews, Theology of ; Israel ; Moses ; Offerings and Sacrifices ; Priest, Priesthood ; Temple ...
Bibliography
Tabernacle - Here were placed the table for the shewbread, the golden candlestick, and the golden Altar of incense. Within it were placed the Altar of burnt offering, which measured 7 1/2 feet in length and breadth and 4 1/2 feet high, with horns at the four corners, and the laver of brass (Exodus 30:18 ), which stood between the Altar and the tabernacle
Shewbread - ...
They represented the 12 tribes before Jehovah perpetually, (see Revelation 21:12) in token that He was always graciously accepting His people and their good works, for whom atonement had been made by the victims on the Altar outside. The frankincense as a memorial was probably cast upon the Altar fire as "an offering made by fire unto the Lord," when the bread was removed from the table on the Sabbath. The continued renewal every Sabbath testified to the design of that holy day to renew men afresh to self dedication as in God's immediate presence; as Israel by the candlestick appeared as a people of enlightenment, and by the incense Altar as a people of prayer
Go Down - Yârad is used to indicate “coming away from” the Altar: “And Aaron lifted up his hand toward the people, and blessed them, and came down from offering of the sin offering …” ( Altar, which is not just a physical movement from a lower to a higher plane but a spiritual ascent to a higher realm of reality. “To ascend” before God (represented by the Altar) is to go before Someone on a higher spiritual plane
Sackcloth - The putting of it upon cattle, however, as mentioned in Jonah 3:8 and Jdt 4:10 , and even upon an Altar ( Jdt 4:11 ), is, from the nature of the passages cited, rather a literary than a historical extravagance
Michelangelo Buonarroti - From 1534-1541 he was engaged on the painting of "The Last Judgment," on the Altar wall of the Sistine
Numbering of the People - ), where the destroying angel was arrested in his progress, David erected an Altar, and there offered up sacrifies to God (2 Chronicles 3:1 )
Joab - He was afterwards slain by Benaiah, by the command of Solomon, in accordance with his father's injunction (2 Samuel 3:29 ; 20:5-13 ), at the Altar to which he had fled for refuge
Table - Malachi 1:7 ,Malachi 1:7,1:12 describes the Altar itself as a table
Salt - Indispensable as salt is to ourselves, it was even more so to the Hebrews, being to them not only an appetizing condiment in the food both of man, (Job 11:6 ) and beset, (Isaiah 30:24 ) see margin, and a valuable antidote to the effects of the heat of the climate on animal food, but also entering largely into the religious services of the Jews as an accompaniment to the various offerings presented on the Altar
Degrees, Songs of - The sanctuary in Psalms 134:2 is the Altar erected at the return, 536 B
Minister - One who serves at the Altar one who performs sacerdotal duties the pastor of a church, duly authorized or licensed to preach the gospel and administer the sacraments
Calf - ...
Hosea 14:2 (b) From this we learn that the offering of praise, thanksgiving and worship from their lips would bring joy to the heart of GOD, as though Israel offered a calf on the Altar
Fire - When Aaron began his ministrations in the tabernacle fire came out "from before the Lord, and consumed upon the Altar the burnt offering and the fat
Jeroboam (1) - ...
A man of God came from Judah to cry against the Altar at Beth-el, and the king's hand, on being put forth to seize him, was dried up
Naaman - He asked for two mules' burden of Canaan's earth, no doubt with the thought of making an Altar therewith
Carmel - There Elijah repaired the Altar of the Lord: this may have been erected before the temple was built, and been broken down, but its moral bearing is obvious
Bosom - ...
Finally, chêyq means the “base of the Altar,” as described in Art - The only specimens yet discovered of ‘genuine Israelite’ sculpture (according to the discoverer, Professor Sellin) are the beardless human heads (cherubim?), foreparts of lions and other motifs that adorn the unique Altar of incense from Taanach (illust
Wash - The parts of a sacrificial animal usually “were washed” before they were burned on the Altar ( Laver - It was placed between the tabernacle and the brazen Altar, and the priests were required to wash their hands and their feet when they approached for any service
Gad - Gad also directed David to erect an Altar to the Lord, in the threshing floor of Ornan or Araunah, the Jebusite, 2 Samuel 24:13-19 ; and he wrote a history of David's life, cited in 1 Chronicles 29:29
Abominable - This was Daniel's prediction of the pollution of the temple at Jerusalem, by Antiochus Epiphanes, who set up in it the Altar and the statue of Jupiter Olympus: the daily sacrifice was taken away, and the abomination that maketh desolate drove ail the true worshippers of God from the temple
Abomination - This was Daniel's prediction of the pollution of the temple at Jerusalem, by Antiochus Epiphanes, who set up in it the Altar and the statue of Jupiter Olympus: the daily sacrifice was taken away, and the abomination that maketh desolate drove ail the true worshippers of God from the temple
Phinehas - He was the spokesman of the western tribes concerning the Altar which the eastern tribes had erected ( Joshua 22:13 ; Joshua 22:30-32 , See Ed
Murder - The Mosaic code reenacted it, Leviticus 24:17 ; and while providing for the unintentional homicide a safe retreat, declares that deliberate murder must be punished by death, from which neither the city of refuge nor the Altar of God could shield the criminal, Exodus 21:12-14 Numbers 35:9-34 Deuteronomy 19:1-13 1 Kings 2:5-6,28-34
Sanctify - Ub the Old Testament, sanctification frequently denotes the ceremonial or ritual consecration of any person or thing to God: thus the Hebrews as a people were holy unto the Lord, through the covenant with its rites and atoning sacrifices, Exodus 31:13 ; and the Jewish tabernacle, Altar, priest, etc
Upon - Resting or being on the top or surface as being upon a hill, or upon a rock upon a field upon a table upon a river upon the Altar upon the roof
ra'Mah - (Ezra 2:26 ; Nehemiah 7:30 ) ...
The home of Elkanah, Samuel's father, (1 Samuel 1:19 ; 2:11 ) the birthplace of Samuel himself, his home and official residence, the site of his Altar ch
Ascension Day - The services are usually brightened withspecial music; the Altar is decked with flowers and white hangingsas symbolical of the joy which characterizes the Celebration
Marinus, a Military Martyr - Placing him by the Altar, be raised his cloak, and pointing to the sword by his side, and presenting him with the book of the gospels, told him to choose which he wished
Good Friday - The Altar is entirelystripped of its hangings and ornaments, except the cross, and issometimes covered with black hangings
Temple, the Second - First they erected and dedicated the Altar of Jehovah on the exact spot where it had formerly stood, and they then cleared away the charred heaps of debris which occupied the site of the old temple; and in the second month of the second year (B. As in the tabernacle, there was in it only one golden lamp for the holy place, one table of shewbread, and the incense Altar, with golden censers, and many of the vessels of gold that had belonged to Solomon's temple that had been carried to Babylon but restored by Cyrus (Ezra 1:7-11 )
Fire - Fire was to be continually burning upon the Altar as a visible sign of the continuous worship of God. If fire was used for sacred purposes and obtained other than from the Altar, it was called “strange fire” (1618091925_3 ), for which use Nadab and Abihu, two sons of Aaron, were punished immediately by divine execution
Tiglath Pileser - " Probably it was an Assyrian Altar which Ahaz copied, as a formal recognition of the gods of the sovereign nation (which required subject kings to set up in their capital "the laws of Asshur"), and a token of submission: the visit of Ahaz to Damascus (where "he saw the Altar") "to meet king Tiglath Pileser" accords with Tiglath Pileser's inscription that before quitting Syria he held his court at Damascus, and there received submission and tribute from the neighbouring sovereigns, among whom he mentions Pekah and Jahu-Khaz (Ahaz) of Judah
Day of Atonement - He offered the priests’ sin offering at the Altar in the tabernacle courtyard, after which he took fire from the Altar, along with blood from the sacrifice, into the tabernacle-tent
Gideon - ...
His second revelation was in a dream, commanding him to overthrow his father's Altar to Baal and to erect an Altar to Jehovah and offer a burnt sacrifice with the wood of the Asherah ("grove") or idol goddess of nature, probably a wooden pillar (Deuteronomy 16:21). Gideon in gratitude built an Altar and called it "Jehovah Shalom," a pledge of "Jehovah" being now at "peace" with Israel again (Jeremiah 29:11; Jeremiah 33:16). Gideon with ten servants overthrew Baal's Altar and Asherah in the night, for he durst not do it in the day through fear of his family and townsmen. vindicate his own cause on the destroyer of his Altar; and as the Jews in contempt changed Baal in compounds to besheth, "Jerubbesheth," "Let the shameful idol light. Gideon "kept" it in his city Ophrah; wearing the breast-plate, he made it and the holy 'lot his means of obtaining revelations from Jehovah whom he worshipped at the Altar
Antiochus - He plundered the Temple of some of its treasures, including the seven-branch candlestick, the Altar of incense, and the table of shewbread. a pagan Altar, probably to Olympian Zeus, was erected on the Altar of burnt-offering, and the entire Jewish worship seemed threatened with extinction
Bethlehem - The convent is divided among the Greek, Roman, and Armenian Christians, to each of whom separate parts are assigned as places of worship and habitations for the monks, but, on certain days, all may perform their devotions at the Altars erected over the consecrated spots. Here is an Altar dedicated to the wise men of the east, at the foot of which is a marble star, corresponding, as the monks say, to the point of the heavens where the miraculous meteor became stationary, and directly over the spot where the Saviour was born in the subterranean church below! A flight of fifteen steps, and a long narrow passage, conduct to the sacred crypt or grotto of the nativity, which is thirty-seven feet six inches long, by eleven feet three inches in breadth, and nine feet high. ]'>[1] Over it is a marble table or Altar, which rests against the side of the rock, here cut into an arcade. The manager is at the distance of seven paces from the Altar; it is in a low recess hewn out of the rock, to which you descend by two steps, and consists of a block of marble, raised about a foot and a half above the floor, and hollowed out in the form of a manger. Before it is the Altar of the Magi. I have seen this inhabitant of the desert communicate at the Altar of the Magi, with a fervour, a piety, a devotion, unknown among the Christians of the west
Leprosy - In the early Christian era it was prevalent throughout Europe and strict regulations regarding lepers were adopted; they were prohibited from public meeting places and churches, although in some of the latter they were permitted to watch services celebrated on the main Altar by means of a hagioscope, or small opening in the chancel wall of the church
Horn - Horn-like projections were built onto the corners of the Altar of burnt offerings in the Temple and in tabernacles (Exodus 27:2 )
Consecration - He said it is “the Altar that sanctifieth the gift” (Matthew 23:19 )
French Revolution - An Altar was raised to the Goddess of Reason in Notre Dame, the goddess a woman of low character
Ammonite - ...
The national idol worshipped by this people was Molech or Milcom, at whose Altar they offered human sacrifices (1 Kings 11:5,7 )
Witness - (Genesis 21:30 ; 31:47,52 ) The tribes of Reuben and Gad raised an "altar" as a witness to the covenant between themselves and the rest of the nation
Horn - The "horns of the (See Altar" were simply projections from the four corners
Joash - Zechariah the priest, son of Jehoiada, warned him of his sin and danger; but as a reward of bis fidelity, he was, by order of Joash, stoned to death between the porch and the Altar, prophesying that God would avenge his death
Phinehas - Phinehas, as ambassador with ten princes, was delegated by Israel to remonstrate with the two and a half tribes as to the Altar the latter built at Jordan; these satisfied the delegates and Israel as to their intentions
Continuity - ” In many passages, tâmı̂yd bears the nuance of “regular repetition”: “Now this is that which thou shalt offer upon the Altar; two lambs of the first year day by day continually
Rock - ” in the sense of a rock large enough to serve as an Altar: “… There rose up fire out of the rock, and consumed the flesh and the unleavened cakes …” ( Revolution, French - An Altar was raised to the Goddess of Reason in Notre Dame, the goddess a woman of low character
jo'ab - Joab fled to the shelter of the Altar at Gibeon, and was here slain by Benaiah
Haggai - They readily set up the Altar and laid the foundation of the temple, but they just as readily lost their enthusiasm when local people began to oppose them
Incense - ...
Part of Israel’s religious ritual was to burn incense on the Altar inside the tabernacle in a symbolic offering of prayer to God (Exodus 30:1; Psalms 141:2; Revelation 8:3; cf
Macarius, Presbyter of Athanasius - Ischyras, recovering, fled to the Meletians, who invented the accusation that Macarius, by order of Athanasius, had forced the chapel of Ischyras, overthrown his Altar, broken the chalice, and burnt the sacred books (Athan
Meat - The latter loaves were leavened, and neither they nor the first fruits sheaf were burial upon the Altar (Leviticus 23:10-11; Leviticus 23:17; Leviticus 23:20). Each meat offering on the contrary was to be prepared without leaven, and a portion given by burning to Jehovah for a sweet savor upon the Altar
Priesthood of the Believer - The priests of the old covenant offered the sacrifice of animals upon the Altar. Christ, as High Priest, offered His own life upon the Altar of the cross
High Place - The bâmâh was a place of cult prostitution: "[7]5 pant after the dust of the earth on the head of the poor, and turn aside the way of the meek: and a man and his father will go in unto the same maid, to profane my holy name: And they lay themselves down upon clothes laid to pledge by every Altar, and they drink the wine of the condemned in the house of their god” (Amos 2:7-8). ...
The Septuagint gives the following translations: hupselos (“high; lofty; elevated”), bama (a transliteration of the Hebrew), bomos (“altar”), stele (“pillar”) and hupsos (“height; high place”)
Tabernacle - — In the most holy place, which the high priest alone entered, was the ark of the covenant; in the holy place, where the priests ministered—to the north the table of shew-bread, to the south the golden candlestick, in the centre the Altar of incense. Immediately opposite the entrance was the great Altar of burnt offering; and between that and the door of the tabernacle was the laver
Sanctify - The first use of qâdash in this stem focuses on the act: “And thou shalt take of the blood that is upon the Altar, and of the anointing oil, and sprinkle it upon Aaronand upon his garments, and upon his sons, and upon the garments of his sons with him: and he shall be hallowed, and his garments, and his sons, and his sons’ garments with him” ( Altar, and sanctify it, and it shall be an Altar most holy: whatsoever toucheth the Altar shall be holy. ” Thus, whatever touches the Altar enters into a new state. 26:33), and the Altar a most holy place
Elijah - The prophets of Baal prepared their Altar, sacrificed their bullock, placed it on the Altar, and called upon their gods. They leaped upon the Altar, and cut themselves after their manner, crying with all their might. " When midday was past, Elijah repaired the Altar of the Lord; and with twelve stones, in allusion to the twelve tribes of Israel, he built a new Altar. He then laid his bullock upon the wood, poured a great quantity of water three times upon the sacrifice and the wood, so that the water filled the trench which was dug round the Altar
Solomon - ...
Solomon, accompanied by his troops and all Israel, went up to Gibeon, where was then the brazen Altar, upon which he offered a thousand burnt- offerings. Solomon returned to Jerusalem, where he offered a great number of sacrifices on the Altar before the ark of the Lord, and made a great feast for his servants. Fire coming down from heaven consumed the victims and burnt sacrifices on the Altar, and the glory of the Lord filled the whole temple. And because the Altar of burnt-offerings was not sufficient for all these victims, the king consecrated the court of the people
Ahaz - What mock humility in one who scrupled not to use God's brazen Altar to divine with, and had substituted for God's Altar in God's worship the pattern, which pleased his aesthetic tastes, of the idol Altar at Damascus (2 Kings 16:11-15); perhaps the adoption of this pattern, an Assyrian one, was meant as a token of vassalage to Assyria, by adopting some of their religious usage's and idolatries; indeed Tiglath Pileser expressly records in the Assyrian monuments that he held his court at Damascus, and there received submission and tribute of both Pekah of Samaria and Ahaz of Judah. " Ahaz cut in pieces God's vessels, and shut up the doors of the temple, and made Altars in every grainer of Jerusalem, and burnt incense on high places in every several city of Judah. Ahaz seems to have practiced necromancy (Isaiah 8:19) as well as making his son pass through the fire to Moloch (2 Kings 16; 2 Kings 23:11-12; 2 Chronicles 28), and setting up Altars on his roof to adore the heavenly hosts
Blood - Forbidden to be eaten (Genesis 9:4) under the Old Testament, on the ground that "the life (soul) of the flesh (the soul which gives life to the flesh) is in the blood," and that "God gave it upon the Altar to make atonement with for men's souls" (Leviticus 17:11). " The blood, not in itself, but as the vehicle of the soul, atones, because the animal soul was offered to God on the Altar as a. ...
The blood of victims was caught by the priest in a basin, and sprinkled seven times (that of birds was squeezed out at once) on the Altar, its four corners or horns, on its side above and below the line running round it, or on the mercy-seat, according to the nature of the offering; the blood of the Passover lamb on the lintel and doorposts (Exodus 12; Leviticus 4:5-7; Leviticus 16:14-19)
Clean, To Be - On the Day of Atonement, for example, prescribed ceremonies were performed to “cleanse” the Altar from “the uncleanness of the children of Israel” and to “hallow it” ( Altar]'>[2] with his finger seven times, and cleanse it, and hallow it from the uncleanness of the children of Israel” ( Altar, and the porch of the temple were “overlaid with pure gold” ( Bethel - Here Jacob, on his way from Beersheba to Haran, had a vision of the angels of God ascending and descending on the ladder whose top reached unto heaven (28:10,19); and on his return he again visited this place, "where God talked with him" (35:1-15), and there he "built an Altar, and called the place El-beth-el" (q
Jeshua - He led in rebuilding the Altar and restoring sacrifice in Jerusalem (Ezra 3:2-6 )
Abomination That Causes Desolation, the - First Maccabees, quoting Daniel, refers these words to the sacrifice of swine's flesh on the Altar in Jerusalem by Antiochus IV, Epiphanes, in 168 b
Water of Jealousy - The husband brought the woman before the priest, bearing the tenth of an ephah of barley meal, which was thrown on the blazing Altar
Leaven - The further exclusion of leaven from the offerings placed upon the Altar of J″ Bull - It was used in connection with the consecration of the priests (Exodus 29:1-37 ); at the dedication of the Altar of the tabernacle (Numbers 7:1 ); for the purification of the Levites (Numbers 8:5-22 ); at the beginning of the month (New Moon [1]); the Feast of Weeks (Numbers 28:26-31 )
Boundary - The “border” of Ezekiel’s Altar is signified by gebûl ( Bowl - 122), and it is a familiar object in classical article In the Septuagint φιάλη denotes a bronze bowl or basin (מִזְרָק) used in the sacrificial ritual of Tabernacle or Temple (Exodus 27:3)-the vessel in which the priest caught the warm blood of the victim, to dash it upon the Altar
Fat - (Leviticus 2:9-16) And as it was uniformly connected with the blood of the Altar, it should seem to have been intended all along to mean Christ
Pollute - 21:4), or the ceremonial profaning of the sacred Altar by the use of tools in order to shape the stones ( Divine, Practice Divination - ...
The practice of divination might involve offering sacrifices to the deity on an Altar ( Libation - Libations among the Hebrews were poured on the victim after it was killed, and the several pieces of it were laid on the Altar, ready to be consumed by the flames, Leviticus 6:20 ; Leviticus 8:25-26 ; Leviticus 9:4 ; Leviticus 16:12 ; Leviticus 16:20
Sheep - A reference to this part is made in Exodus 29:22 ; Leviticus 3:9 ; where the fat and the tail were to be burnt on the Altar of sacrifice
Food - Certain portions of the fat of sacrifices were also forbidden, Leviticus 3:9-10, as being set apart for the Altar
Firstfruits - Over this was thrown a measure of olive oil and a handful of incense; and the priest, taking the offering, waved it before the Lord towards the four cardinal points, throwing a handful of it into the fire on the Altar, and keeping the rest
Deluge - At length he removed the covering of the ark, and found the flood had disappeared; he came forth from the ark, reared an Altar, and offered sacrifices to God, who appointed the rainbow as a pledge that he would no more destroy mankind with a fool
Gid'Eon - His call to be a deliverer, and his destruction of Baal's Altar, are related in Judges 6
Joshua the Son of Jehozadak - ...
Joint leadership...
Under the leadership of Zerubbabel and Joshua, the returned exiles set up the Altar soon after they arrived in Jerusalem (Ezra 3:1-2)
Inquisition - In Portugal they erect a theatre capable of holding three thousand persons, in which they place a rich Altar, and raise seats on each side, in the form of an amphitheatre. ...
The inquisitors, who are ecclesiastics, do not pronounce the sentence of death, but form and read an act, in which they say, that the criminal, being convicted of such a crime, by his own confession, is with much reluctance, delivered to the secular power, to be punished according to his demerits: and this writing they give to the seven judges, who attend at the right side of the Altar, and immediately pass sentence
Catholic Church Extension Society of England And w - In recent years the Guild has obtained permission from the different local authorities for the celebration of Mass on the site of the high Altar in a number of the ruined abbeys of England
Kishon River - beneath the Altar plateau
Gerizim And Ebal - Joshua built an Altar on Ebal (Joshua 8:30 )
Ramah - Samuel built an Altar to the Lord at Ramah
Honey - Although it formed part of the first-fruits presented at the sanctuary, honey was excluded from the Altar, owing to its liability to fermentation
Mysteries - The merit of faith consists in the fact that we sacrifice our intellect on the Altar of God's word
Jeduthun - end of the Altar, having cymbals, psalteries, and harps, at the dedication of Solomon's temple; and it was "when the trumpeters and singers were as one, to make one sound to be heard in praising and thanking the Lord," with trumpets, cymbals, and instruments accompanying the voices praising the Lord "for He is good, for His mercy endureth for ever," that the house of the Lord was filled with the cloud of glory (2 Chronicles 5:13-14; compare 2 Chronicles 20:21-22)
Carmel - An Altar of Jehovah existed here before Elijah ( 1 Kings 18:30 )
Requirement - ...
Mosaic ceremonial law required such things as Aaronic priests, offerings for supporting priests and Levites (Nehemiah 12:44 ; Ezekiel 20:40 ), and burnt offerings to be placed on the Altar (Ezra 3:4 )
Palace - This passage may refer to the Christian's mouth from which there pours forth worship, praise, adoration, and thanksgiving, which are compared to the fragrant, sweet incense of the golden Altar in the temple
Siloam - ...
On the last day of the Feast of Tabernacles, water from this fountain was poured on the Altar (Neubauer, Géog
Azariah - High priest in the reign of Uzziah ( 2 Chronicles 26:16-20 ); he withstood and denounced the king when he presumptuously attempted to usurp the priests’ office of burning incense upon the Altar
Guild of Our Lady of Ransom - In recent years the Guild has obtained permission from the different local authorities for the celebration of Mass on the site of the high Altar in a number of the ruined abbeys of England
Sacrifice - ...
The subject was more fully explained under the law: "The life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the Altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul
Zerubbabel - ...
An Altar was erected, and sacrifices offered; but the foundation of the temple was not laid till the second year
Ninevites - They had their 'sabbath' and their sacrifices, principally the bullock, part of which was burnt on the Altar, and part eaten by the offerer, or given to the priest
First-Fruits - Then the priest took this offering, waved it before the Lord toward the four parts of the world, threw a handful of it into the fire upon the Altar, and kept the rest
Pen'Tecost, - With the loaves two lambs were offered as a peace offering and all were waved before Jehovah and given to the priests; the leaves being leavened, could not be offered on the Altar
Food - (Leviticus 3:17 ; 7:26 ; 19:26 ; 12:16) Certain portions of the fat of sacrifices were also forbidden, (Leviticus 3:9,10 ) as being set apart for the Altar, (Leviticus 3:16 ; 7:25 ) In addition to the above, Christians were forbidden to eat the flesh of animals portions of which had been offered to idols
Wait - ...
8: πάρδαλις (Strong's #3917 — Noun Feminine — paredreuo — par'-dal-is ) "to sit constantly beside" (para, "beside," hedra, "a seat"), is used in the best texts in 1 Corinthians 9:13 , RV, "wait upon (AV, "at") (the Altar)
House - In 1 Kings 18:32 the “house of two seeds” is a container for seed: “And with the stones he built an Altar in the name of the Lord: and he made a trench about the Altar, as great as would contain [4] two measures of seed
Paulinus, Missionary to Northumbria - ...
At Donafeld, probably the modern Doncaster, amid the remains of the Roman camp, there was a Christian basilica with a stone Altar, which may be ascribed to Paulinus. Among the relics in York minster were a few of his bones and two teeth, but nothing else to commemorate his great work in the north, save an Altar which bore his name and that of Chad conjoined
Symmachus q. Aurelius - In 382 he headed a deputation in the name of the majority of the senate, to the emperor Gratian, to request the replacement of the Altar of Victory in the senate house and the restoration of their endowments to the vestals and the colleges of priests. Eugenius, at the instigation of Flavian and Arbogast, who had placed him on the throne, restored the Altar of Victory and the endowments of the priests (Paulin
Zacharias - Suddenly there stood in front of him, on the right side of the Altar of incense (Luke 1:11), where no mortal man should be, an angel of the Lord. Columba before the Altar at Iona, though for a different reason, Zacharias signed with his hand the blessing which he could not speak (Numbers 6:22). ]'>[2] ), though accepted by Baronius, that this Zacharias was slain by Herod between the Temple and the brazen Altar, has no historical basis; it is a mere guess to explain the difficulty, that whereas many of the prophets were martyred at a later date than Zechariah the son of Jehoiada (2 Chronicles 24:20), yet our Lord, summing up the list of such murders, begins with Abel and ends with Zechariah (Matthew 23:35)
High Place, Sanctuary - In the narrower sense ‘sanctuary’ is used of every recognized place of worship, provided with an Altar and other apparatus of the cult, the special designation of which in OT is bâmâh , EV Day of Atonement - The mixed blood of the bull and goat were applied to the horns of the Altar to make atonement for it (Leviticus 16:18 )
Nethinim - The Gibeonites similarly, having obtained by craft a covenant from Joshua (Joshua 9:9; Joshua 9:27), "because of the name" and "fame of Jehovah, Israel's God," were made "hewers of wood and drawers of water for the congregation and Altar
Easter Day - White hangings for the Altar and White vestments have always beenused at Easter in reference to the angel who brought the tidingsof the Resurrection, who appeared in "garments white as snow" and"his countenance was as lightning
Sinai - The cliff, rising like a huge Altar in front of the whole congregation, and visible against the sky in lonely grandeur from end to end of the whole plain, is the very image of the 'mount that might be touched,' and from which the voice of God might be heard far and wide over the plain below
Bloodguilt - See Genesis 42:22 ; Deuteronomy 19:10 ; Deuteronomy 22:8 ; Joshua 2:19 ); (4) a person was under bloodguilt if those for whom he was responsible committed murder (1Kings 2:5,1 Kings 2:31-33 ); and (5) the killing of a sacrifice at an unauthorized Altar imputed bloodguilt (Leviticus 17:4 )
Uri'ah - (Isaiah 8:2 ; 2 Kings 16:10-16 ) He is probably the same as Urijah the priest, who built the Altar for Ahaz
Murder - )...
Not even Jehovah's Altar could save Joab (1 Kings 2:5-6; 1 Kings 2:31)
Gaal - , he is son of the man who pulled down Baal's Altar at Shechem and restored Jehovah's worship, for which the Shechemites themselves had tried to slay him (Judges 6:27-32)
Continually - ...
Tâmı̂yd occurs most frequently of the daily rituals in the tabernacle and temple: “Now this is that which thou shalt offer upon the Altar; two lambs of the first year day by day continually” ( Doorway - ” Thus a pethachwas both a place to sit (a location) and an opening for entry (a passageway): “… And the incense Altar, and his staves, and the anointing oil, and the sweet incense, and the hanging for the door at the entering in of the tabernacle …” ( Naz'Arite, - (Numbers 6:17 ) He was to cut off the hair of "the head of his separation "(that is, the hair which had grown during the period of his consecration) at the door of the tabernacle, and to put it into the fire under the sacrifice on the Altar
Petrus, Bishop of Apamea - Clergy were violently dragged from the Altar by his emissaries and ruthlessly butchered if they refused to anathematize the Chalcedonian faith
Surpliced Choir - stood at the east endof the Altar
Levi - Then the Altar did not call for a consecrated servitor; but, as we see in the case of Micah, who had a private sanctuary in Ephraim, there existed apparently a preference for a Levite (Judges 17:1-13 ). For the Altar-service alone priests were not necessary, as we see in the case of Gideon and Manoah
Sanctuary - However, it is also used alone or in various combinations to distinguish between certain holy precincts within the sanctuary, specifically, the area of the court near the Altar sometimes referred to as "the holy place" (Leviticus 10:17-18 ), the outer "Holy Place" in the tabernacle or temple building itself (e. Averbeck...
See also Altar ; Offerings and Sacrifices ; Priest, Priesthood ; Tabernacle ; Temple ...
Bibliography
Magi - In all their temples they had fire continually burning upon their Altars, and in their own private houses. To procure the greater veneration for these sacred fires, he pretended to have received fire from heaven, which he placed on the Altar of the first fire- temple he erected, which was that of Xis, in Media, from whence they say it was propagated to all the rest. The Jews had their sacred fire which came down from heaven upon the Altar of burnt offerings, which they never suffered to go out, and with which all their sacrifices and oblations were made Zoroaster, in like manner, pretended to have brought his holy fire from heaven; and as the Jews had a Shekinah of the divine presence among them, resting over the mercy seat in the Holy of Holies, Zoroaster likewise told his Magians to look upon the sacred fire in their temples as a Shekinah, in which God especially dwelt
Remember - God gave the bronze plates covering the Altar ( Altar ( Temple - In the holy place, besides the Altar of incense, which was made of cedar overlaid with gold there were seven golden candlesticks in stead of one, and the table of shew-bread was replaced by ten golden tables, bearing, besides the shew bread, the innumerable golden vessels for the service of the sanctuary. The outer court there was a new Altar of burnt offering, much larger than the old one. [2] Instead of the brazen laver there was "a molten sea" of brass, a masterpiece of Hiram's skill for the ablution of the priests. " ( 2 Chronicles 3:9 ) Moreover, "the Altars on the top of the upper chamber," mentioned in the books of the Kings, (2 Kings 23:12 ) were apparently upon the temple. From this a double funnel nearly 200 feet in length, leads to a flight of steps which rise to the surface in the court of the temple, exactly at that gateway of the inner temple which led to the Altar, and is one of the four gateways on this side by which any one arriving from Ophel would naturally wish to enter the inner enclosure. immediately within this gateway stood the Altar of burnt offerings. Both the Altar and the temple were enclosed by a low parapet, one cubit in height, placed so as to keep the people separate from the priests while the latter were performing their functions
Elijah - He repaired Jehovah's Altar that was broken down, building it of twelve stones, according to the number of the tribes of Israel, he offered his sacrifice, deluged three times with water the Altar, wood, and victim, till the trench around the Altar was full; then offered up in the hearing of Israel an affecting prayer to the "Jehovah God of Abraham, Isaac, and of Israel," upon which the fire of the Lord fell, and all was consumed, the sacrifice, wood, stones, dust, and water
Shechem (1) - ...
Here first in Canaan God appeared to Abraham (Genesis 12:6), and here he pitched his tent and built an Altar under the oak or terebinth (not "plain") of Moreh; here too Jacob re-entered the promised land (Genesis 33:18-19), and "bought a parcel of a field where he had spread his tent," from the children of Hamor, Shechem's father, and bequeathed it subsequently to Joseph (Genesis 48:22; Joshua 24:32; John 4:5); a dwelling place, whereas Abraham's only purchase was a burial place. ...
(1) The ruins below the western peak of Gerizim are still called Lozeh or Luz, the old name of Bethel; a western spur of Ebal has a site Amad ed Din, (possibly Joshua's Altar on Ebal), bearing traces of the name Dan, and the hill is called Ras el Κady ("judgment" answering to the meaning of Dan). A small square of high walls surrounds a common tomb, placed diagonally to the walls; a rough pillar Altar is at the head, and another at the foot
Blood - And when the law was given to the children of Israel, we find the prohibition against the eating of blood still more explicitly enforced, both upon Jews and Gentiles, in the following words, "Whatsoever man there be of the house of Israel, or of the strangers that sojourn among you, that eateth any manner of blood; I will even set my face against that soul that eateth blood, and will cut him off from among his people: for the life of the flesh is in the blood; and I have given it to you upon the Altar to make atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul,"...
Leviticus 17:10-11 . When animals were granted to Noah for food, the blood was reserved; and when the same law was reenacted among the Israelites, the original prohibition is repeated, with an explanation which at once shows the original ground upon which it rested: "I have given it upon the Altar to make an atonement for your souls. Because the blood was the life, it was sprinkled upon, and poured out at, the Altar: and we have in the sacrifice of the paschal lamb, and the sprinkling of its blood, a sufficient proof that, before the giving of the law, not only was blood not eaten, but was appropriated to a sacred sacrificial purpose. Nor was this confined to the Jews; it was customary with the Romans and Greeks, who, in like manner, poured out and sprinkled the blood of victims at their Altars; a rite derived, probably, from the Egyptians, who deduced it, not from Moses, but from the sons of Noah
Joshua, Book of - An Altar was built unto Jehovah, and the law was written upon stones, the whole of it being read before all the congregation: cf. By the border of the Jordan they built a great Altar 'to see to;' which they afterwards described as a witness that they had part in Jehovah. The tribes on the west feared that the Altar had been built in separation from the worship of Jehovah, and sent princes with Phinehas the priest to protest against it, but on hearing the explanation given, they were satisfied that the tribes on the east were faithful in heart
Elijah - He repaired Jehovah's Altar that was broken down, building it of twelve stones, according to the number of the tribes of Israel, he offered his sacrifice, deluged three times with water the Altar, wood, and victim, till the trench around the Altar was full; then offered up in the hearing of Israel an affecting prayer to the "Jehovah God of Abraham, Isaac, and of Israel," upon which the fire of the Lord fell, and all was consumed, the sacrifice, wood, stones, dust, and water
ta'Bor - The Latin Christians have now an Altar here at which their priests from Nazareth perform an annual mass
Carnutum - The substructure of the building encloses a well and vault, which, according to tradition, the early Christians found surmounted by an Altar and statue of a woman seated with her child upon her knees, erected by the Druids
Chartres, France - The substructure of the building encloses a well and vault, which, according to tradition, the early Christians found surmounted by an Altar and statue of a woman seated with her child upon her knees, erected by the Druids
Gerizim - " Smith's Bible Dictionary identifies Gerazim with the mount on which Abraham offered Isaac, (see Moriah); it is objected to the temple mount being the site of Isaac's offering that "Abraham lifted up his eyes, and saw the place afar off," whereas the temple mount is not conspicuous from afar; also the Samaritans identify the site of the sacrifice with the natural Altar on Gerazim
Firstfruits - " The priest took the basket and set it down before the Altar of the Lord
Fravitta, Bishop of Constantinople - Our chief authority is Nicephorus Callistus, who relates that on the death of Acacius, the emperor Zeno placed on the Altar of the great church of Constantinople two sheets of paper
Autricum - The substructure of the building encloses a well and vault, which, according to tradition, the early Christians found surmounted by an Altar and statue of a woman seated with her child upon her knees, erected by the Druids
Part - This word is always used of a priestly garment or at least of a garment worn by one who appears before God or His Altar. The ark, Altars, and table of the Bread of the Presence were carried by staves passed through rings attached to these articles: “And thou shalt put the staves into the rings by the sides of the ark, that the ark may be borne with them” ( Sign - ...
An 'ôth can be a “warning sign”: “The censers of these sinners against their own souls, let them make them broad plates for a covering of the Altar: for they offered them before the Lord therefore they are hallowed: and they shall be a sign unto the children of Israel” ( Salt - It well-known preservative qualities, and its importance as a seasoning for food, Job 6:6 , are implied in most of the passages where it is mentioned in Scripture: as in the miraculous healing of a fountain, 2 Kings 2:21 ; in the sprinkling of salt over the sacrifices consumed on God's Altar, Leviticus 2:13 Ezekiel 43:24 Mark 9:49 ; and its use in the sacred incense, Exodus 30:35
ta'Bor - The Latin Christians have now an Altar here at which their priests from Nazareth perform an annual mass
Reu'Ben - This act was completely misunderstood and was construed into an attempt to set up a rival Altar to that of the sacred tent
Paphos - Fragments of marble cones and of an Altar have also been found, and the idea that the conical stone was anointed in the Semitic fashion is confirmed by an inscription which mentions a festival of the temple called ἐλαιοχρίστιον
Growth of the Church - To-day there is not aState or Territory where the Episcopal Church has not its Bishop orBishops and body of Clergy and faithful people; even in far awayAlaska the Altar and the Cross have been set up, and the rate of increase throughout the United States is larger than that of anyother religious body in this land
High Place - ...
Heathen Worship at the High Place The average high place would have an Altar (2 Kings 21:3 ; 2 Chronicles 14:3 ), a carved wooden pole that depicted the female goddess of fertility (Asherah), a stone pillar symbolizing the male deity (2 Kings 3:2 ), other idols (2 Kings 17:29 ; 2 Chronicles 33:19 ), and some type of building (1 Kings 12:31 ; 1 Kings 13:32 ; 1 Kings 16:32-33 ). David and Solomon worshiped the God of Israel at the high place at Gibeon where the tabernacle and the Altar of burnt offering were located (1Chronicles 16:1-4,1 Chronicles 16:37-40 ; 1 Chronicles 21:29 ; 2Chronicles 1:3-4,2 Jeremiah 19:3-51 )
Oil - The "will be" translation would mean that any person or thing that touched the Altar (or other anointed parts of the tabernacle) would contract holiness therefrom as if "holiness" were contagious. The "must be" translation would only suggest that it was forbidden for anything or anyone that was not "holy" to come into direct contact with the Altar (etc
Set On, Set Up - ...
Śı̂ym also means “to put down” in the sense of literally setting something on the ground, on a chair, or a flat surface: “… Abraham built an Altar there, and laid the wood in order, and bound Isaac his son, and laid him on the Altar upon the wood” ( Stand - Cultically (with reference to the formal worship activities) this verb is used of approaching the Altar to make a sacrifice. It describes the last stage of this approaching, “to stand finally and officially” before the Altar (before God; cf
Passover - ...
Moreover, the Passover lambs were to be slain at the sanctuary, and their blood sprinkled on the Altar, instead of on the lintel and doorposts (Deuteronomy 16:1-6). The subsequent command to burn the fat on the Altar, and that the pure alone should eat (Numbers 9:5-10; Numbers 18:11), and that the males alone should appear (Exodus 23:17; Deuteronomy 16:16), was unknown at the first celebration; nor was the Hallel sung as afterward (Isaiah 30:29); nor were there days of holy convocation; nor were the lambs slain at a consecrated place (Deuteronomy 16:2-7). ...
The fat was burned by the priests (Exodus 23:18; Exodus 34:25-26), and the blood sprinkled on the Altar (Mark 14:13-15; 2 Chronicles 30:16). Instead therefore of the father of the family slaying the lamb and handing the blood to the priest, to sprinkle on the Altar, the Levites did so; also at Josiah's Passover (2 Chronicles 35:6; 2 Chronicles 35:11). " They kept other seven days beside the first seven,...
(1) because Hezekiah had given so many beasts that there was more than they could use during the ordinary seven days;...
(2) so many priests bad sanctified themselves as to be able to carry on the Altar services with such numerous sacrifices. ...
It was offered in the holy place (1 Peter 2:92); the blood was sprinkled on the Altar, the fat burned (2 Chronicles 30:16; 2 Chronicles 35:11; Exodus 12:27; Exodus 23:18; Numbers 9:7; Deuteronomy 16:2; Deuteronomy 16:5; 1 Corinthians 5:7). ...
The fact that the blood sprinkled on the Altar was at the first celebration sprinkled on the lintel and doorposts of each house attested the sacredness of each family, the spiritual priesthood of its head, and the duty of family worship
Jephthah And His Daughter - ...
The Lord dwelt in those days at Mizpeh; The Lord had a house and an Altar at Mizpeh; and Jephthah opened all that was in his heart; past injury, present opportunity, and future surrender and service before the Lord at Mizpeh, This is what we mean by masterly writing, sacred or profane. ...
After all that, it does not at all upset me to read that Jephthah built an Altar and offered up his daughter. And it was a custom in Israel that the daughters of Israel went to that Altar once every year to lament the daughter of Jephthah the Gileadite four days in a year. And they came back from that Altar to be far better daughters than they went out. Weep not for me, Jephthah's daughter said to them from off her Altar and from out of heaven. Long ago, when Jephthah first uttered his words before the Lord at Mizpeh, he read these words on the wall of that Altar
Chronicles, Books of - Included, historically, would be the many forms in which we find the house of God, namely: the various Altars established by the patriarchs, the tabernacle of God erected by Moses, the Temple built by Solomon, the Temple rebuilt by Zerubbabel, the Temple refurbished by Herod, and the various church-houses throughout the ages. Basic is the necessity to come to God by way of the Altar of sacrifice as ministered by the Levitical priesthood. God in His merciful forgiveness of David revealed the place of the Altar of sacrifice to be in Jerusalem at the threshing floor of Ornan (1 Chronicles 21:18-22:1 ). There David erected the Altar and built the Temple according to God's directions. God's revelation in mercy of the site of the Temple and the place of the Altar of sacrifice (1 Chronicles 21:18-22:1 )...
III
Animal - " This prohibition is repeated by Moses to the Israelites, with this explanation:—"I have given it upon the Altar to make an atonement for your souls. The whole passage in Leviticus 17, is, "And thou shalt say to them, Whatsoever man there be of the house of Israel, or of the strangers that sojourn among you, that eateth any manner of blood, I will even set my face against that soul that eateth blood, and I will cut him off from among his people: FOR THE LIFE of the flesh is in the blood; and I...
have given it upon the Altar, to make atonement for your souls: for it is the BLOOD (or LIFE) that maketh atonement for the soul. Because the blood was the life, it was sprinkled upon, and poured out at, the Altar: and we have in the sacrifice of the paschal lamb, and the sprinkling of its blood, a sufficient proof, that, before the giving of the law, not only was blood not eaten, but was appropriated to a sacred sacrificial purpose. Nor was this confined to the Jews; it was customary with the Romans and Greeks, who, in like manner, poured out and sprinkled the blood of victims at their Altars, a rite derived, probably, from the Egyptians, as they derived it, not from Moses, but from the sons of Noah
Tomb, Grave, Sepulchre - The tomb of a saint became a shrine, and that of a Christian martyr was venerated as the memorial and Altar of a living sacrifice
Ram - Isaac was on the Altar ready to die, as we too are lost, sinful and on the way to the second death
Shechem - Here Abraham pitched his tent and built his first Altar in the Promised Land, and received the first divine promise (Genesis 12:6,7 )
Oath - ...
People could swear oaths before local judges or at the sanctuary Altar (Exodus 22:10-11; 1 Kings 8:31)
Oratory - Oratory is used among the Romanists for a closet, or little apartment near a bed-chamber, furnished with a little Altar, crucifix, &c
Olivet Discourse, the - by Antiochus Epiphanes, who built an Altar there to Zeus
Saints - All the items of worship are separated for the Lord's use: Altar ( Exodus 29:37 ), oil (Exodus 30:25 ), garments (Exodus 31:10 ), and even the people are to be holy (Exodus 22:31 )
Sin Offering - None of the blood was put on the Altar horns, as in the sin offering
Aaron - ...
Aaron, alas, had not the stability of his brother,* but at the request of the people, and apparently without a protest, made for them the golden calf: he also built an Altar before it, and made proclamation of a feast to Jehovah on the morrow
Athens - ) The inscription on the Altar, "to the unknown God," which St. Paul so appropriately made the text of his discourse, was adopted on the occasion of the city having been relieved from a pestilence; and they erected Altars to "the God unknown," either as not knowing to which of their divinities they were indebted for the favour, or, which is more probable, because there was something in the circumstances of this deliverance, which led them to refer it to a higher power than their own gods, even to the supreme God, who was not unfrequently styled, the "unknown," by the wiser Heathens. The existence of such Altars is expressly mentioned by Lucian
Gibeon - We neither know when, nor by whom, nor on what occasion, the tabernacle and Altar of burnt sacrifices, made by Moses in the wilderness, were removed to Gibeon; but this we certainly know, that, toward the end of David's reign, and in the beginning of Solomon's, they were there, ...
1 Chronicles 21:29-30
Samaria - The worship of Baal was set up in Samaria by Ahab, who built there an Altar and a temple to the idol-god, 1 Kings 16:32, which were destroyed by Jehu
Sheep - ...
The sheep or lamb was the common sacrifice under the Mosaic law; and it is to be remarked, that when the divine legislator speaks of this victim, he never omits to appoint that the rump or tail be laid whole on the fire of the Altar, Exodus 29:22 John 10:1-582
Pastor - The story is that Peter when at Rome dwelt in the house of the senator Pudens in the vicus Patricius and there held divine service his Altar being then the only one at Rome
Tabernacles, the Feast of - The parts of the victim were laid upon the Altar. As he entered the trumpets sounded, and he ascended the slope of the Altar
Antiochus - Then Antiochus ...
returned to his land with great riches: his heart was 'against the holy covenant,' and he...
entered Jerusalem and even into the sanctuary and took away the golden Altar, the ...
candlestick, the table of showbread, the censers of gold, and the other holy vessels ...
and departed. To ensure this ...
at Jerusalem with the few that still clung to the place, an image of Jupiter Olympius was...
erected in the temple and on an Altar sacrifices were offered to this god
Priest - They also carried out daily functions in relation to the Altar in the tabernacle courtyard (Leviticus 6:12; Leviticus 6:14) and the Altar and lamp inside the Holy Place (Exodus 27:20-21; Exodus 30:7-8)
She'Chem - Abraham, on his first migration to the land of promise, pitched his tent and built an Altar under the oak (or terebinth) of Moreh at Shechem. A rough pillar used as an Altar and black with the traces of fire is at the head and another at the foot of the tome
Fire - Having blessed the people, Moses and Aaron witnessed the appearance of the glory of the Lord, a striking manifestation of which was fire that "came out from the presence of the Lord" to consume the sacrifices already placed on the Altar (Leviticus 9:23-24 ). In both cases Yahweh is present in the person of the angel who touches the Altar, causing the sacrifices to erupt in flame
Idolatry - In the worship of Israel, to eat the sacrifices of the Altar is to have communion with the Altar
Covenant, Book of the - Exodus 20:24-26 deals with the construction of an Altar. § 57, thinks that this command is the product of a period of reaction in the time of the later monarchy, and that it was aimed at the brazen Altar which Solomon had made, and at the centralization of worship in Jerusalem
Gerizim - where ‘Gerizim’ is substituted for ‘Ebal’ of Massoretic Text) definitely prescribing that an Altar should be built there. It was near Shechem that Jacob purchased the parcel of land from the children of Hamor, on which he erected an Altar, and sank a well for his family and flocks
Jacob - He therefore bade Jacob go to Beth-el, and make an Altar there. He built an Altar and called it, 'El-beth-el;' 'the God of Bethel
Jacob - He therefore bade Jacob go to Beth-el, and make an Altar there. He built an Altar and called it, 'El-beth-el;' 'the God of Bethel
Goel - In most ages and countries, certain reputed sacred places enjoyed the privileges of being asylums; Moses, therefore, taking it for granted that the murderer would flee to the Altar, commanded that when the crime was deliberate and intentional, he should be torn even from the Altar, and put to death, Exodus 21:14
Temple of Jerusalem - David had acquired the Temple hill from Araunah the Jebusite at the advice of the prophet Gad to stay a pestilence from the Lord by building an Altar and offering sacrifices on the threshing floor (2 Samuel 24:18-25 ). The worshipers could gather for prayer and sacrifice in the Temple courtyard(s) where they could sing psalms as they saw their offerings presented to Yahweh on His great Altar. ...
The reader at this point expects an account of the bronze Altar, included in Chronicles (2 Chronicles 4:1 ), but only presumed in Kings (1Kings 8:22,1Ezra 6:1-6 Kings 8:64 ; 1 Kings 9:25 ). This Altar is large, thirty-feet square and fifteen-feet tall, presumably with steps. ...
The molten sea, which may have had some kind of cosmic symbolism, stood in the south-central quadrant of the inner courtyard opposite the bronze Altar. King Asa plundered his own Temple treasuries to buy a military ally, Ben-Hadad of Syria against Baasha, king of North Israel (1 Kings 15:18-19 ), though he had previously repaired the Temple Altar and carried out limited worship reforms (2 Chronicles 15:8-18 )
Noah - ...
On leaving the ark Noah's first act was to erect an Altar, the first of which there is any mention, and offer the sacrifices of adoring thanks and praise to God, who entered into a covenant with him, the first covenant between God and man, granting him possession of the earth by a new and special charter, which remains in force to the present time (Genesis 8:21-9:17 )
Sanctification, Sanctify - ...
B — 1: ἁγιάζω (Strong's #37 — Verb — hagiazo — hag-ee-ad'-zo ) "to sanctify," "is used of (a) the gold adorning the Temple and of the gift laid on the Altar, Matthew 23:17,19 ; (b) food, 1 Timothy 4:5 ; (c) the unbelieving spouse of a believer, 1 Corinthians 7:14 ; (d) the ceremonial cleansing of the Israelites, Hebrews 9:13 ; (e) the Father's Name, Luke 11:2 ; (f) the consecration of the Son by the Father, John 10:36 ; (g) the Lord Jesus devoting Himself to the redemption of His people, John 17:19 ; (h) the setting apart of the believer for God, Acts 20:32 ; cp
Crown - "Crown" is used in the sense of the projecting rim round the top of an Altar or a table (Exodus 25:25; Exodus 30:4; Exodus 37:27)
Gilgal - (gihl' gal) Place name meaning, “circle,” and probably referring to a circle of stones or a circular Altar
Heifer, Red - No part came on the Altar; even the blood was not sprinkled there, but before the tabernacle, and not by the high priest but by his son
Nazarites - After all this was sacrificed and offered to the Lord, the priest or some other person, shaved the head of the Nazarite at the door of the tabernacles, and burnt his hair, throwing it upon the fire of the Altar
Adonijah - Adonijah, at the tidings announced by Jonathan, Abiathar's son, fled for sanctuary, to the horns of the Altar
Oil - ...
The offering of oil on the Altar was the offerer's acknowledgment that all his spiritual gifts were from Jehovah
Temple - the fire upon the Altar, which never went out; 4
Answer - 35:3 Jacob tells his household, “And let us arise, and go up to Bethel; and I will make there an Altar unto God, who answered me in the day of my distress
Abijah - Wife of Ahaz, and mother of good Hezekiah; perhaps a descendant of the Zechariah slain between the temple and the Altar (2 Chronicles 24:21; 2 Chronicles 26:5; 2 Chronicles 29:1); certainly daughter of Zechariah, probably the one through whom Uzziah sought God
Pillars - The 12 pillars ranged as boundary stones round the consecrated enclosure represented the 12 tribes, as the "altar" represented Jehovah making covenant with them (Exodus 24:4; Isaiah 19:19)
Eusebius, Bishop of Pelusium - Such things induced many to leave Pelusium in disgust; "the Altar lacked ministers" (i
Nazarites - After all was sacrificed and offered, the priest, or some other, shaved the head of the Nazarite at the door of the tabernacle, and burned his hair on the fire of the Altar
Outcasts - And in that day there shall be an Altar to the Lord in the midst of the land of Egypt; and the Lord shall be known to Egypt, and the Egyptians shall know the Lord in that day
Jeroboam - Attempting to arrest the prophet for his bold words of defiance, his hand was "dried up," and the Altar before which he stood was rent asunder
Ark of the Covenant - ...
The Altar of burnt offering where the sacrifices were offered continued separate from it at Gibeon, the "great high place" (1 Kings 3:4) (in the tabernacle of the ark on Zion the service was song and praise alone) until the two were reunited in the temple of Solomon, a type of the gospel separation of the spiritual service of prayer and praise going on here below, from the priestly intercession being carried on above by our Lord Jesus. (See Altar. ) There must have been some substitute for it, on which to sprinkle the blood, in the holiest, on the great day of atonement; the Jews mention an Altar stone, slightly raised from the floor
Blood - “For the life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the Altar to make an atonement for your souls for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul” (Leviticus 17:11 ). This generation would be held accountable not only for their own sins but for “all the righteous blood shed upon the earth, from the blood of righteous Abel unto the blood of Zecharias son of Barachias, whom ye slew between the temple and the Altar” (Matthew 23:35 ; compare 2 Chronicles 24:20-21 ). Half of it he dashed upon the Altar and half he dashed upon the people (Exodus 24:6-8 )
Priest - " (Hebrews 10:14) And as the offering itself is a fulness of perfection, so the divine nature on which he offered it became the golden Altar of presentation to JEHOVAH The incense Jesus presents is his own merits, and presented also from off the golden censer of his divine nature. (See Revelation 8:3-4) So that the Lord Jesus is in one and the same moment every thing in himself which constitutes both priest and priesthood; for he is the Sacrifice, the Sacrificer, and the Altar on which alone all presentations are or can be made, and the only medium by which all can be offered. Hail! thou glorious, gracious, great High Priest of JEHOVAH and thy people! Be thou my New Testament Altar, my sacrifice, my offering, and do thou, Lord, graciously carry on thy high priestly office still in heaven for all thy church and people, until thou hast brought home thy redeemed, "that where thou art, there they may be also!"...
Having thus taken a short view of the Lord Jesus as JEHOVAH'S High Priest, and a Priest upon his throne, it may not be amiss to offer a short observation concerning the priesthood taken from among men
Expiation - For the life of the flesh is in the blood; and I have given it to you upon the Altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul. He laid his hands upon the head of the animal, the symbolical act of transferring punishment; then slew it with his own hand, and delivered it to the priest, who burned the fat and part of the animal upon the Altar; and, having sprinkled part of the blood upon the Altar, and, in some cases, upon the offerer himself, poured the rest at the bottom of the Altar. The sacrificial character of this offering is strongly marked; for it was an offering brought to the tabernacle; it was slain in the sanctuary; and the blood was sprinkled upon the Altar by the priests. After this, the high priest put some of the sacred fire of the Altar of burnt offerings into a censer, threw incense upon it, and entered with it, thus smoking, into the sanctuary. Then he came out a second time, and, beside the Altar of burnt offerings, killed the goat which the lot had determined to be the sacrifice. After this, the high priest came to the Altar of burnt offerings, wetted the four horns of it with the blood of the goat and young bullock, and sprinkled it seven times with the same blood. The sanctuary, the court, and the Altar, being thus purified, the high priest directed the goat which was set at liberty by the lot to be brought to him
Atonement - Atonement is provided for inanimate objects such as a mildewing house, the Altar in the temple, the sanctuary (i. Eleven of these passages refer to cleansing either the tent/temple, one of its rooms, or the Altar inside it. ...
Far more important are the references to the atonement of the Tent of Meeting, the temple, the holy place, the sanctuary, and the Altar. The need for cleansing the buildings, the Altar and the sanctuaries is due to the fact that these are the meeting places of the divine, Holy One with his people
Tabernacle - " The brazen Altar and the tabernacle were the two grand objects within the court. The Altar of burnt offering outside marks that only through shedding of blood can sinful man be admitted within His courts; and the mercy-seat within the veil, sprinkled with blood of the victim slain outside, typifies Christ, our propitiation or propitiatory within the heavenly holy of holies (Romans 3:25), who is the sinner's only meeting place with God. Once admitted within the courts by the propitiation of Christ, we as king priests can offer incense of prayer and praise, as the priests burnt incense with holy fire on the Altar of incense within (Psalms 141:2; Malachi 1:11). , set out between the first and second camp; but the holy of holies, the ark and Altar, did not set out until after the second camp
Priest, Priesthood - 5) both on the Altar (v. There is a striking similarity between this ritual in Exodus 24 and the consecration of the Aaronic priests by putting some of the blood of the ordination peace offering on the right ear, thumb, and big toe of Aaron and his sons, and afterwards splashing some of it around on the Altar ( Exodus 29:20 ; Leviticus 8:23-24 ). ...
On the other hand, although the Levites assisted the priests, it was the priests alone, Aaron and his descendants (no other Levites), who were responsible for dealing directly with the burnt offering Altar or anything inside the Holy Place or Holy of Holies (Numbers 18:1 b). Exodus 27:20-21 ), and keeping the fire continually burning on the burnt offering Altar as part of the regular morning and evening burnt offering rituals (Leviticus 6:12-13 ; cf
Purity-Purification - ...
The Altar for sacrifice was purified so that it would be prepared for worship (Leviticus 8:15 ; Ezekiel 43:26 ). Blood was used to cleanse the Altar and the holy place (Leviticus 16:14-19 )
Food - The cutting of flesh, with the blood, from the living animal (as has been practiced in Africa), and the eating of blood either apart from or in the flesh, were prohibited, because "the soul (nephesh ) of the flesh is in the blood, and I (Jehovah) have ordained it to you upon the Altar to make an atonement for your souls; for it is the blood which makes atonement by means of the soul" (Genesis 7:2). The portions of the victim not offered on the Altar belonged partly to the priests, and partly to the offerers
Temple, the - The candlesticks, tables of showbread, golden Altar, brazen Altar, and laver (with ten smaller ones in addition, see LAVER), were similar to those in the tabernacle
Nazareth - Behind the great Altar is a subterranean cavern, divided into small grottoes, where the virgin is said to have lived. In front of the Altar are two granite columns, each two feet one inch in diameter, and about three feet apart
Lebanon - Though the trembling sinner were to make choice of Lebanon for the Altar; were to cut down all its forests to form the pile; though the fragrance of this fuel, with all its odoriferous gums, were the incense; the wine of Lebanon pressed from all its vineyards, the libation; and all its beasts, the propitiatory sacrifice; all would prove insufficient to make atonement for the sins of men; would be regarded as nothing in the eyes of the supreme Judge for the expiation of even one transgression. The just and holy law of God requires a nobler Altar, a costlier sacrifice, and a sweeter perfume,—the obedience and death of a divine Person to atone for our sins, and the incense of his continual intercession to secure our acceptance with the Father of mercies, and admission into the mansions of eternal rest
Temple (2) - Other references to the Sanctuary are: Matthew 23:18-19; Matthew 23:35, which speak of the Altar; Matthew 27:5-6, the treasury (but see below); Luke 1:9, the Altar of incense (here the phrase ὁ ναὸς τοῦ κυρίου occurs for the only time); Matthew 27:51, the heavy veil between the Holy of Holies and the Holy Place (see also Mark 15:38, Luke 23:45). The ‘Holy Place’ is specifically referred to in Matthew 23:35 ‘between the sanctuary (ναός) and the Altar, i. the space between the outer veil (see below) and the Altar for burnt-offerings; in Matthew 24:15, ἐστὸς ἐν τὸπῳ ἁγίῳ, but in the parallel passage (Mark 13:14) the reading is ἑστηκότα ὅπου οὐ δεῖ. In this court there stood, in the centre, the great Altar for burnt-sacrifices, and close to it the brazen laver for the priestly ablutions. Its furniture consisted of the Altar of incense (see Luke 1:9), the table of the shewbread, and the seven-branched candlestick
Ascension of Jesus Christ - While the Old Testament contains stories of ascension that take place in dreams or visions ( Genesis 28:12 ), straightforward narratives like that of the angel of the Lord ascending in the flame of the Altar while Manoah and his wife look on (Judges 13:20 ), and particularly of Elijah ascending to heaven in a whirlwind (2 Kings 2:11-12 ), although not related directly in the New Testament to the ascension of Jesus, are rightly seen as fundamental to the New Testament understanding that Jesus physically came down from heaven and returned there. ...
Ascension and Atonement Particularly for the author of Hebrews, the ascension bridges the gap between the earthly work of Jesus Christ on the cross and his heavenly ministry as high priest, offering his sacrifice on the Altar before the throne of God. The author of Hebrews does not deny the significance of the historical crucifixion but argues that it is not complete until the blood is brought into the Most Holy Place and sprinkled in the appropriate way before the Altar of God
Antiochus - In his capture of Jerusalem, guided by Menelaus the high priest "against the holy covenant," he took away the golden Altar, candlestick, vessels of gold and silver from the temple, sacrificed swine on the Altar, and sprinkled swine broth through the temple; his spoils from it amounted 1800 talents. Antiochus "took away the daily sacrifice, and placed (on the 15th day of Cisleu, on Jehovah's Altar) the abomination (idol, Jupiter Olympius' image) that maketh desolate," i
Adultery - "...
After this, the priest filled a pitcher out of the brazen vessel, near the Altar of burnt offerings, cast some dust of the pavement into it, mingled something with it as bitter as wormwood, and then read the curses, and received her answer of Amen. This was stirred before the Lord, and part of it thrown into the fire of the Altar. Finally, the execration offering was taken out of her hand, and...
burnt upon the Altar
Shiloh - At Shiloh the congregation deliberated regarding the Altar built by the men of the eastern tribes in the Jordan Valley ( Joshua 22:12 ff
Dinah - "...
God made this tragedy the occasion of reviving Jacob's earnestness, which had declined into worldliness for a time through his settlement near Shechem (Genesis 33:17-20); reminding him of his vow to make an Altar at Bethel to God, who had appeared to him there in the day of his distress when fleeing from Esau
Night - The sinner is living in the dark and so the sacrifice is constantly being offered for him in order that he may be saved any time that he will came to the Altar to find the Saviour
Grave - Josiah broke into the tombs at Bethel and burned the bones of the idolatrous priests upon the Altar there to defile it (2 Kings 23:15-17 )
Reconciliation - If a person is about to offer a gift at the Altar and remembers that he has something against his brother he should leave his gift and be reconciled first to his brother and then come and offer his gift
Ammon - Solomon's Ammonite wives seduced him to rear an Altar to this "abomination," to his own hurt (Jeremiah 49:1; Jeremiah 49:3)
Games (2) - He was accused of neglecting the Altar for the palaestra
Incense - in NT); and θυμιατήριον, Hebrews 9:4 ‘censer,’ or ‘altar of incense
Idolatry - When the golden calf was made Aaron built an Altar before it, and said, "To-morrow is a feast to Jehovah;" but the people said, "These be thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of the land of Egypt
Propitiation - Jesus I my full, my glorious, my complete, and all-sufficient Saviour! be thou my daily object of unceasing delight, my mercy-seat, propitiation, high priest, Altar, sacrifice, and sacrificer; yea, my all in all: I need no more in time, and to all eternity! See Mercy-Seat
Solomon - ...
Solomon loved the Lord, and worshipped Him at the Altar at Gibeon, and there the Lord appeared to him in a dream, and said, "Ask what I shall give thee
Malachi - The answer is that they brought to the Lord that which was torn, the lame, and the sick, and had offered polluted bread upon Jehovah's Altar: in effect saying, "The table of the Lord is polluted; and the fruit thereof, even his meat, is contemptible
Joash - Father of Gideon: he defended his son when he had thrown down the Altar of Baal, saying, If Baal "be a god, let him plead for himself
Josiah - He burnt the bones of the false prophets on their Altar, after which he destroyed it (2 Kings 23:15-20; cf
Mouth Lips - Isaiah’s lips were purged of their uncleanness by the coal from the Altar (Isaiah 6:6-7); with this we may compare the command of the high priest to smite St
Incense - in NT); and θυμιατήριον, Hebrews 9:4 ‘censer,’ or ‘altar of incense
Macedonius ii, Patriarch of Constantinople - Macedonius refused, sealed it up, and hid it under the Altar of the great church
Jeroboam - ) He thus violated God's command that there should be only one Altar, namely, that at Jerusalem; still worse, he violated the second commandment by worshipping Jehovah, who is a spirit, under the form of images somewhat like the two cherubim. ...
While Jeroboam stood in person to burn incense, or rather to burn the sacrificial portions of the flesh, upon the Altar of Bethel, usurping the priest's office, a man of God out of Judah, impelled by (1 Kings 13:2; Hebrew in; Haggai 1:13) the word of Jehovah, Iddo according to Josephus ( Altar: "behold, a child born unto the house of David, Josiah, upon thee shall offer the priests of the high places that burn incense (burn sacrifices) upon thee (retribution in kind), and men's bones shall be burnt upon thee," to defile thee. He gave also a sign of the future fulfillment of his prophecy; "the Altar shall be rent, and the ashes . poured out" (implying the Altar's destruction and the desecration of the sacrificial service)
Elijah - The priests of the Tyrian deity, termed ‘prophets’ because they practised the mantic art, select a bullock and lay it upon an Altar without kindling the wood. ’ Towards evening a dismantled Altar of Jehovah is repaired, and a trench is dug round it. After the sacrificial animal has been prepared, and laid upon the wood, water is poured over it, until every thing about the Altar is thoroughly soaked and the trench is full. Elijah takes refuge in a cave, perhaps the same in which Moses hid ( Exodus 33:22 ), and hears the voice of Jehovah, ‘What doest thou here, Elijah?’ The prophet replies, ‘I have been very jealous for Jehovah, God of Hosts; for the children of Israel have forsaken thy covenant thrown down thine Altars, and slain thy prophets with the sword; and I, even I only, am left; and they seek my life, to take it away
Salt - "An Altar of earth shall thou make unto me: and if thou wilt make me an Altar of stone, thou shall not build it of hewn stone, for if thou lift up thy tool upon it thou hast polluted it. This is beautifully explained, Leviticus 9:24 "And there came a fire out from before the Lord, and consumed upon the Altar the burnt offering and the fat, which when all the people saw they shouted and fell on their faces
Abomination of Desolation - The original reference is clearly to the desecration of the Temple by the soldiers of Antiochus Epiphanes, the ceasing of the daily burnt-offering, and the election of an idol-altar upon the great Altar of Sacrifice in b
Abercius, Bishop of Hierapolis - But the epitaph which the Acts incorporate, placed, according to the story, on the Altar brought from Rome by the demon whom the saint had driven out of the emperor's daughter, is of great value, and the discovery of some of the actual fragments of the inscription may well be called "a romance of archaeology. Ramsay's attention being drawn to the earlier epitaph, he collected various topographical notices in the Life of the saint, which pointed to Hier o polis, near Synnada (not Hiera polis on the Maeander), and he further established the case for the former by finding, in 1883, in the bath-room at some hot springs near Hiero polis, a small portion of the epitaph of Abercius himself on the fragment of an Altar-shaped tomb; the hot springs in their position near the city exactly correspond with the position of the hot springs described in the Life
Nebuchadnezzar - In the worship of Merodach, my god, I did not sing his praise, nor did I provide his Altar with sacrifices, nor clean the canals
Aaron - " Aaron then set up an Altar and proceeded to lead the people in worshiping the calf
Zechariah, Book of - Soon they had set up the Altar and laid the foundation of the temple, but when local people began persecuting them, they became discouraged and stopped work (Ezra 4:1-5; Ezra 4:24)
Salt - A necessary accompaniment of the various Altar offerings, bloody and unbloody (Leviticus 2:13, "the salt of the covenant of thy God"; Ezekiel 43:24; Mark 9:49-50)
Manasseh - He worshipped the host of heaven and built Altars for them in the courts of the house of the Lord. He removed the idols, repaired the Altar of the Lord, and sacrificed to Him
Soul; Self; Life - 17:11: “For the life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the Altar to make an atonement for [1]
Adversary (2) - ), where Christ says that reconciliation with an offended brother must go before the offering of a gift at God’s Altar
Noah - His first act on the cleansed earth was to build an Altar to the Lord, and offer burnt offerings of all the clean animals and fowls
Naaman - He also requested the prophet, that he might have two mules' load of earth to carry home with him from the land of Israel, most probably intending to build an Altar with it in his own country; which seems, indeed, to be implied in the reason with which he enforces his request: "Shall there not, I pray thee, be given to thy servant two mules' burden of earth; for thy servant will henceforth offer neither burnt-offering nor sacrifice to other gods but unto Jehovah
Noah - His first act on the cleansed earth was to build an Altar to the Lord, and offer burnt offerings of all the clean animals and fowls
Samaritans - In consequence of this refusal, and the subsequent state of enmity, the Samaritans not only took occasion to calumniate the Jews before the Persian kings, Ezra 4:4 Nehemiah 4:1-23 , but also, recurring to the directions of Moses, Deuteronomy 27:11-13 , that on entering the promised land half of the people should stand on Mount Gerizim to respond Amen to the covenant pronounced by the Levites, they erected a temple on that mountain, and instituted sacrifices according to the prescriptions of the Mosaic law, although the original Altar, according to the Hebrew Scriptures, stood on Mount Ebal, Deuteronomy 27:4 Joshua 8:30-35
Table - The Altar of burnt-offering
Atonement, the Day of - Going out from the holy of holies he purified the holy place, sprinkling some of the blood of both the victims on the Altar of incense
Festivals - They could not be eaten until after this ceremony (Leviticus 23:14 ; Joshua 5:10-11 ), and none of this bread was placed on the Altar because of the leaven content. First, it was to be a “holy convocation,” drawing the focus of the people to the Altar of divine mercy. After filling his censer with live coals from the Altar, he entered the holy of holies where he placed incense on the coals
Atonement - Atonement was made upon the horns of the Altar: the force is 'atonement for. ' With the Altar of incense atonement was not made upon it, but for it; so for the holy place, and for or about Aaron and his house: the preposition is al. In either case the difficulty arises from the fact that in English for presents the interested person to the mind; on is merely the place where it was done, as on an Altar; whereas the al refers to the clearing away by the kaphar what was upon the thing al which the atoning rite was performed
Samuel, First Book of - He resided at Ramah, and erected an Altar there. The days of Samuel were exceptional: he was not a priest, but he offered sacrifices, and had this Altar without either the tabernacle or the ark. He raised an Altar unto God, and then enquired of God, and would have put Jonathan to death for eating the honey had not the people prevented it
Lot - Where Abraham built an Altar, Lot either offered at that Altar or he built another like it for himself. Then Abraham removed his tent, and came and dwelt in the land of Mamre, and built there an Altar to the Lord. ' With all that, then, which is it to be with you? The plain of Jordan with Lot, or the plain of Mamre with Abraham? A family Altar with the father of the faithful, or a seat at sunset in the gate of Sodom with Lot?...
Lot was not long in getting a lesson that would have brought a less besotted sinner to his senses
Leviticus, Theology of - In that context, "the glory of the Lord appeared to all the people, " and "fire came out from the presence of the Lord and consumed the burnt offering and the fat portions on the Altar" ( Leviticus 9:23-24 ). Just as fire had come out from the "presence" of the Lord and consumed the Altar offerings in 9:23-24, a few verses later "fire came out from the presence of the Lord and consumed them, and they died before the Lord" (10:2). It will be recalled that according to verse 19 the sin offering blood both "cleansed" the Altar and "consecrated" it. , made holy) the tabernacle Altar
Atonement, Day of - After slaying the bullock of the sin-offering, he took a censer filled with live charcoal from the Altar of burnt-offering and a handful of incense, and entered the Most Holy Place. , to ‘cleanse and hallow’ the Altar of burnt-offering, which stood in the outer court
Communion - When he says that the Jews by eating the sacrifices have communion with the Altar, he means spiritual communion with God whose representative is the Altar (note that the phrase ‘communion with God’ is avoided-a true mark of Rabbinism); and when he says that to partake of a supper connected with a heathen sacrifice brings men into communion with demons, he does not accept the popular idea that the food itself was quasi-infected by demonic influence (he declares formally that to eat such flesh unconsciously does not harm a Christian); but he says; ‘ye cannot drink the cup of the Lord and the cup of devils: ye cannot partake of the table of the Lord and of the table of devils,’ because partaking of the table constitutes a spiritual and moral communion which is exclusive in its effect
Head - ...
Used substantively, the word can mean “first fruits”: “As for the oblation of the first fruits, ye shall offer them unto the Lord: but they shall not be burnt on the Altar for a sweet savor” ( Altar, which he had made there at the first …” ( Temple, Herod's - " Over this rock the Altar of burnt-offerings stood
Levi - They shall teach Jacob Thy judgments and Israel Thy law (Leviticus 10:11), they shall present incense before Thee (in the holy place) and whole burnt offering upon Thine Altar (in the court)
Tabernacle - ...
The center of attention in the wilderness narratives is the tabernacle with rich decorations, curtains, bread of the presence, ark, lights, and Altar
Atonement, Day of - Atonement was made for the holy place, for the tabernacle, and for the Altar, because of the uncleanness of the children of Israel
Abiathar - Abiathar had the first place, with the ephod, Urim and Thummim, and the ark, in the tent pitched by David at Jerusalem Zadok officiated before the tabernacle and brazen Altar made by Moses and Bezaleel in the wilderness, which were now in Gibeon (1 Chronicles 16:1-7; 1 Chronicles 16:37; 1 Chronicles 16:39-40; 1 Chronicles 27:38; 1 Chronicles 27:34; 2 Chronicles 1:3-5)
Smoke - ...
Isaiah 6:4 (b) As the incense from the golden Altar filled the temple with fragrance, so the worship of GOD's people ascends to the Throne of GOD and is as perfume to Him
Archangel - For arch-angel signifies the first, or prince of the order of angels, consequently, there cannot be many firsts, without making it necessary to Altar the term
Nose - Yet, speaking figuratively, it may be said: “They shall teach Jacob thy judgments, and Israel thy law: they shall put incense before thee [3], and whole burnt sacrifice upon thine Altar” ( Fill - 43:26, where no literal hand is filled with anything, but the phrase is a technical term for “consecration”: “Seven days shall they [2]8 the Altar and purify it; and they shall consecrate themselves
Prepare - ” This noun occurs 25 times; it means “proper place” in Ezra 3:3: “And they set the Altar upon his bases
Passover - While the temple was in existence, the Jews brought their lambs thither, and there sacrificed them; and they offered their blood to the priest, who poured it out at the foot of the Altar
Jeshua - Came from Babylon in Cyrus' first year; took part in rebuilding the temple; first of all restored the Altar and daily sacrifice, then in the second month of the second year of the return from Babylon laid the foundation of the temple (Ezra 3)
Christ in Art - a Cross is carried, and candles, in a 5th cent, ivory, at Trèves): it was not till later that the processional Cross came to be taken from its staff and placed on the Altar during service time; indeed, the use of an Altar-Cross continued to be far from universal throughout the Middle Ages. Vitale at Ravenna, where Abel with a lamb and Melchizedek with a loaf stand as types of Christ on either side of the Christian Altar,—which is draped and has on it a two-handled chalice and two loaves,—and the 7th cent. Apollinare in Classe, where Abel, Melchizedek, and Abraham leading Isaac stand round a similar Altar. Lucina two sheep stand by an Altar on which lie a milk-pail and a crook. ’ None the less, although the positive object of the decree was attained, the representation of the Agnus Dei was one of the most common symbols of the Middle Ages, in sculpture, in glass, in metal work and embroidery, and sometimes in painting, as in the culminating example of the Van Eycks’ great picture at Ghent (circa (about) 1430), where the Lamb stands wounded upon an Altar, the blood flowing into a chalice, surrounded by a great company of angels and saints
Priest - Translated 2 Chronicles 19:8-10 "they who offer sacrifices live of the temple, and they who wait at the Altar are partakers with the Altar," a part going to the service of the Altar, the rest being shared by the priests. The priests' duty was to keep the Altar fire ever burning (Leviticus 6:12-13), symbolizing Jehovah's never ceasing worship; not like the idol Vesta's sacred fire, but connected with sacrifices
Temple - The utensils for the sacred service were the same; excepting that several of them, as the Altar, candlestick, &c, were larger, in proportion to the more spacious edifice to which they belonged. 163, who caused the daily sacrifices to be discontinued, and erected the image of Jupiter Olympus on the Altar of burnt-offering. ...
The temple erected by Solomon was more splendid and magnificent than the second temple, which was deficient in five remarkable things that constituted the chief glory of the first: these were, the ark and the mercy seat: the shechinah, or manifestation of the divine presence, in the holy of holies; the sacred fire on the Altar, which had been first kindled from heaven; the urim and thummim; and the spirit of prophecy. This enclosure surrounded the Altar of burnt- offerings, and to it the people brought their oblations and sacrifices; but the priests alone were permitted to enter it
Psalms of Solomon - -Foreigners have shattered the walls of Jerusalem with a battering-ram, and treated God’s Altar profanely. and following years); and in the profanation of the Altar to which Psalms 2 refers it is tempting at first to see an allusion to Antiochus Epiphanes’ act in setting up on the Altar the ‘abomination of desolation’ (5 and 10:4-180). Their commander, ‘who is from the end of the earth, who smiteth mightily’ (8:16), who is met by the Jewish princes and at first invited by them to Jerusalem, but ultimately has to capture the fortresses and the walls of Jerusalem by force (8:18-21), by bringing battering-rams to play upon them (2:1), who allows his soldiers profanely to trample upon the Altar (2:2), who carries his captives to the West (17:14), and whose end was a dishonoured death ‘on the mountains of Egypt’ (2:30, 31) is Pompey
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - This temple was constructed with the help of Tyrian artisans, along with an Altar on which to offer sacrifices and a "sacred pole" (NRSV) or "wooden image" (NKJV). Cultic features included the following: small clay figurines (1 Kings 11:1-4 ; Micah 5:13 ); "sacred pillars" (1 Kings 14:23 ); an "incense Altar" (2 Chronicles 30:14 ); an Altar for offering the whole burnt offering (2 Kings 21:5 ) and "priests" and "priestesses
Sepulchre - It was there that Abram first settled when he came into Canaan; there he built an Altar to Jahweh (Genesis 12:6-7); and it is only reasonable to suppose that he also purchased the ground on which it stood; otherwise it would have been exposed to desecration and destruction. ‘The purchase of the ground on which an Altar stood would therefore seem to follow as a kind of corollary from the erection of an Altar on that ground’ (cf
Abraham - Here therefore he built his first Altar to God. The unfriendly attitude of the Canaanites induced him next to move to the mountain country between Bethel and Ai, where also he built an Altar to Jehovah, whose worship was fast passing into oblivion in the world. On his return his first visit was to the Altar which he had erected to Jehovah before his fall (compare Genesis 13:4 with Hosea 2:7; Revelation 2:5)
Numbers, Book of - The brazen Altar was covered with purple; the table of showbread was covered with scarlet (Israel's glory), and the ark alone had blue on the outside (Christ exhibiting the heavenly). ...
Numbers 7 : Here are given the offerings of the princes at the dedication of the tabernacle and of the Altar, each tribe having its appointed day. He had access to the mercy-seat and received his directions from thence, while the place of approach for the people was at the brazen Altar
Prudentius, Marcus (?) Aurelius Clemens Prudentius - 598) and the Altar ( Perist. for the restitution of the Altar of Victory in the senate-house, which had been removed by Gratian, and also of the incomes of the vestal virgins. In 392 the Altar was restored by Eugenius; in 394 again removed by Theodosius, After his death the heathen party, encouraged by the invasion of the Goths, which they attributed to the neglect of heathenism, again attempted to have it restored by Arcadius and Honorius
Bread - Since part of the frankincense put upon the bread was to be burnt on the Altar for a memorial, even an offering made by fire unto the Lord; and since Aaron and his sons were to eat it in the holy place, Leviticus 24:5-9 , it is probable that this bread typified Christ, first presented as a sacrifice to Jehovah, and then becoming spiritual food to such as in and through him are spiritual priests to God, even his Father, Revelation 1:6 ; Revelation 5:10 ; Revelation 20:6 ; 1 Peter 2:5 . It appears, from some places in Scripture, (see Exodus 29:32 , and Numbers 6:15 :) that there was always near the Altar a basket full of bread, in order to be offered together with the ordinary sacrifices
Bethlehem - ...
A rich Altar is over the supposed site of the Savior's birth, and a star of silver inlaid in white marble, with the inscription "Ηie de virgine Μaria Jesus Christus natus est
Funeral, Rites - It is said, that the faces of deceased laymen must be turned towards the Altar when they are placed in the church, and those of the clergy towards the people
Gibeon - To the Altar of burnt-offering which was at Gibeon, Joab (1 Kings 2:28-34 ), who had taken the side of Adonijah, fled for sanctuary in the beginning of Solomon's reign, and was there also slain by the hand of Benaiah
Reform - ...
Jesus cannot be claimed with any justice as a victim on the Altar of political reform
Calf, Golden - ]'>[2] ’ was proclaimed for the following day, and an Altar erected on which sacrifice was offered
Barachiah - The reckoning from Abel to Zechariah is Jewish in character, the ‘of Barachiah’ may be due to Jewish tradition, and the ‘between the temple and the Altar’ is perhaps also due to current Jewish speculation or tradition
Floor - Thus Gideon's floor appears to have been in the open air, Judges 6:37 ; and also that of Araunah the Jebusite, 2 Samuel 24, otherwise it would not have been a proper place for erecting an Altar, and offering sacrifices
Adoration - ...
Adoration properly is paid only to the pope when placed on the Altar, in which posture the cardinals, conclavists, alone are admitted to kiss his feet
Asa - After this exhortation, Asa, being animated with new courage, destroyed the idols of Judah, Benjamin, and Mount Ephraim; repaired the Altar of burnt-offerings; and assembled Judah and Benjamin, with many from the tribes of Simeon, Ephraim, and Manasseh, and on the third day, in the fifteenth year of his reign, celebrated a solemn festival
Barrenness - I see that nothing is great or little before Him who can bend to his purposes whatever he willeth, and convert the light-hearted and thoughtless mockery of an aged woman into an instrument of his glory, effectual as the tongue of the seer which he touched with living coals from the Altar
High Priest - Again, according to (Leviticus 21:17-21 ) no one that had a blemish could officiate at the Altar
Abraham - Soon after this, for some reason not mentioned, he removed his tent to the mountain district between Bethel, then called Luz, and Ai, towns about two miles apart, where he built an Altar to "Jehovah. He proceeded in a spirit of unhesitating obedience to carry out the command; and when about to slay his son, whom he had laid on the Altar, his uplifted hand was arrested by the angel of Jehovah, and a ram, which was entangled in a thicket near at hand, was seized and offered in his stead
Redeem - We find the priests’ smearing of blood on the Altar during the “sin offering” (chatta’t) described as “atonement” (Exod. The priest at the Altar represents God Himself, bringing the requisite offering before God; sacrifice is not essentially man’s action, but God’s own act of pardoning mercy
Aaron - Aaron immediately offered sacrifice and blessed the people, and the divine acceptance was marked by fire from the Lord consuming upon the Altar the burnt offering and the fat, so that the people shouted at the sight and fell on their faces. ...
Nadab and Abihu, probably (see 1618091925_63) under the effects of wine taken when about to be consecrated, instead of taking the sacred fire from the brazen Altar, burned the incense on the golden Altar with common fire; or, as Knobel and Speaker's Commentary think, they offered the incense in accompaniment of the people's shouts, not at the due time of morning or evening sacrifice, but in their own self-willed manner and at their own time
Pentateuch - ...
The Altar built (Joshua 8:30-31; Exodus 20:25) is "as Moses commanded . The Altar, incense, ephod are mentioned; also the "burnt offering" ('owlah ), the "whole burnt offering" (kalil ), "peace offerings" (shelamim ): 1 Samuel 10:8; 1 Samuel 11:15; 1 Samuel 13:9; Leviticus 19:35-36. Whoever might slay it, the priest alone sprinkled the blood on the Altar
Elijah - After the false prophets failed to hear from their gods, Elijah wet the wood on his Altar to the true God by pouring four jars of water over it three times
Sun - We gather from Ezekiel 8:16 that this sun-worship actually took place in the inner court at the door of the Temple, between the porch and the Altar; the worshippers turned their backs upon the Temple itself, and worshipped the sun towards the east
Symbol - From the Tabernacle and Temple were taken high priest, Altar, sacrifice, veil, peace-offering, lamb, atonement
Consecration - After this came the sermon, then the sacrament, which the bishop consecrated and administered in the following manner:...
As he approached the Altar, he made five or six low bows; and coming up to the side of it, where the bread and wine were covered, he bowed seven times
Heaven - The "altar" (Revelation 6:9) and the "censer," etc
Cock-Crowing - ]'>[1] But while the domestic fowl was quite familiar to the Jews of our Lord’s time, both the Mishna and the Midrash state that, so long as the Temple stood, the breeding or keeping of cocks in Jerusalem was forbidden, on the ground that by scratching in the earth they dug up unclean things, thus spreading the contagion of Levitical uncleanness, and even contaminating the sacrifices of the Altar
Asherah - In the remaining passages of OT the asherah is the name of a prominent, if not indispensable, object associated with the Altar and the mazzçbah (see Pillar) in the worship of the Canaanite high places
Haggai - The Jews, on returning to Palestine in the first year of Cyrus (536), at once set up the Altar of the Lord (Ezra 3:3 ), and in the following year laid the foundation of the Temple ( Ezra 3:8-10 )
Stretch Out - “To stretch out” one’s limbs full length is to recline: “And they lay themselves down upon clothes laid to pledge by every Altar …” (Amos 2:8)
Theodotus, Martyr at Ancyra - In the cave Theodotus found certain brethren who had overturned the Altar of Diana, and were being carried by their relations for judgment to the prefect when Theodotus had bribed the accusers to let them off
Genseric, King of the Vandals - When they refused, they were seized by force and the Altar-cloths made into shirts for the soldiers. The reader was killed in the pulpit by an arrow, and many worshippers slain on the Altar-steps
King - Jeroboam sacrifices in person before the Altar in Bethel ( 1 Kings 12:32-33 ), and Ahaz orders a special Altar to be made, and offers in person on it ( 2 Kings 16:12 )
Augustus (2) - 13–9, belongs the famous ‘Altar of Peace,’ whose actual site has been laid bare within very recent years (1903–1904) under the Via in Lucina, a little way off from the Corso, the old Flaminian Way. The very same year in which Augustus became Pontifex Maximus owing to the death of his former co-triumvir Lepidus, the Senate decreed the erection of an ‘Altar of Peace,’ which at first was to have been set up in the Senate-house, but was afterwards placed on the edge of the Campus Martius. Within the walls of a massive marble screen there was placed the Altar on an elevated base, pyramidal, and having marble steps leading up to it. ...
The Altar was a splendid tribute to Peace, but it was a peace after many and bloody victories, reminding us of the saying, ‘where they make a desert they call it peace’ (Tac. Yet there the Altar stood on the field of Mars, as the reign of the ‘Prince of Peace’ was ushered in, and became for ages thereafter a witness to the Pax Romana of the Augustan age. At crossways and street corners three hundred small shrines were set up, whose Altars were adorned twice a year with flowers
Rock - In Judges 6:20 ; Judges 13:16 the rock is a natural monolithic Altar; in Judges 6:26 tr
Tiglath-Pileser - It was in Damascus that Ahaz made homage to the conqueror, and seeing there an Altar which took his fancy, had one made like it
Nethinim - The chopping of wood, lighting of fires, sharpening of knives, drawing of water, the cleansing not only of the Altar and its surroundings and utensils, but of the whole of the Temple precincts, and the performance of many menial offices for the priests, required a large staff of servants
Bread - These unleavened cakes were termed mazzoth and were alone permitted for the Altar and during Passover and the immediately following Feast of Unleavened Cakes ( Mazzoth )
Amos - Amos 7:1-9:10; Amos's visions of grasshoppers devouring the grass, and fire the land and deep, both removed by his intercession; the plumb line marking the buildings for destruction; Amaziah's interruption at Bethel, and foretold doom; the basket of summer fruits marking Israel's end by the year's end; the Lord standing upon the Altar, and commanding the lintel to be smitten, symbolizing Israel's destruction as a kingdom, but individually not one righteous man shall perish
Zechariah - ) The other witness was Uriah, or Urijah, a priest, whom Urijah used as his tool in copying the Damascus Altar
Maronites - Their priests do not say mass singly, but all say it together, standing round the Altar
Think, Devise - When an Israelite killed a sacrifice in any place except an appointed Altar, the blood was “imputed” to that man; the substitute sacrifice would not atone for the offerer at all, and the offerer would bear his own guilt ( Episcopacy - They were, in fact, for a considerable time, considered as one with the original church: the bishop sent to them the elements of the Lord's Supper as the pledge of unity; and we find it asserted by ancient writers, that there was one Altar and one bishop
Supper - After the blood was poured under the Altar by the priests, the lambs were carried home to be eaten by the people in their tents or houses at a domestic feast, where every master of a family took the cup of thanksgiving, and gave thanks with his family to the God of Israel
Zechari'ah - He is probably the same as the "Zacharias son of Barachias" who was slain between the temple and the Altar
Punishments - The murderer was to be put to death, even if he should have taken refuge at God's Altar or in a refuge city, and the same principle was to be carried out even in the case of an animal
Temple - Within this court stood the brazen Altar on which the sacrifices were consumed, the molten sea in which the priests washed, and the ten brazen lavers for washing the sacrifices; also the various utensils and instruments for sacrificing, which are enumerated in 2 Chronicles 4:1-22 . It wanted the five principal things which could invest it with this: namely, the ark and mercy seat, the divine presence or visible glory, the holy fire on the Altar, the urim and thummin, and the Spirit of prophecy. 163, this temple was plundered and profaned by Antiochus Epiphanes, who ordered the discontinuance of the daily sacrifice, offered swine's flesh upon the Altar, and completely suspended the worship of Jehovah
Passover (i.) - It stood in two lines which ended at the Altar, one row holding silver, the other golden bowls. When the bowl was received by the priest nearest to the Altar, he cast it with one jet at the base. The sacrifices were then skinned, the portions appointed for sacrificial use (Leviticus 3:1-5) were removed and cleansed, the fat separated and placed on a dish and then offered with incense on the Altar
Jerusalem - at Shethem and Shiloh, then Gibeah and Nob (whence the tabernacle and Altar were moved to Gibeon). Jewish tradition placed the Altars and sanctuary in Benjamin, the courts of the temple in Judah. The Altar too was transferred in Solomon's reign from the tabernacle of Gibeon to the permanent temple. The preparation for this transference was made by David's sacrificing in the threshing floor of Araunah the Jebusite, where he saw the Angel of Jehovah after the plague, and where he was directed by God to rear an Altar (2 Samuel 24:16-25; 1 Chronicles 21; 1 Chronicles 22:1; 2 Chronicles 3:1; Psalms 76:1-2; Psalms 132:13-18). Asa also rebuilt Jehovah's Altar before the porch (2 Chronicles 15:8)
Asia Minor, Cities of - Located on the Upper Acropolis were a large theater, library, agora, palace, barracks, and Altar of Zeus. The large Altar area may be that referred to by John as the “throne of Satan” ( Revelation 2:13 )
no'ah - --Noah's great act after he left the ark was to build an Altar and to offer sacrifices. This is the first Altar of which we read in Scripture, and the first burnt sacrifice
no'ah - --Noah's great act after he left the ark was to build an Altar and to offer sacrifices. This is the first Altar of which we read in Scripture, and the first burnt sacrifice
Jephthah - "...
Jephthah accepted the terms, and "uttered all his words (repeated the conditions and obligations under which he accepted the headship) before Jehovah (as in His presence; not that the ark or any Altar of Jehovah was there; simply Jephthah confirmed his engagement by an oath as before Jehovah) in Mizpeh," where the people were met in assembly, Ramoth Mizpeh in Gilead, now Salt. Moreover literal burnt offerings could only be offered at the Altar of the tabernacle
Dan - The extent to which the Baal cult influenced Northern Israel is seen in the reign of Jehu, who did not destroy the Altars at Dan and Bethel, despite eradicating the Baal priests from the land (2 Kings 10:32 ). Excavations at Dan have uncovered the “high place” of Jeroboam along with a small horned Altar, the city gate (with royal throne) and walls (12 feet thick), hundreds of pottery vessels, buildings, and inscribed objects
Samuel - The religious life of Israel now centred on Samuel, who set up an Altar of sacrifice in Ramah (for the Philistines had destroyed the tabernacle; Psalms 78:60-61; Jeremiah 7:14)
Tabernacles, Feast of - Jesus alludes to the custom of drawing water from Siloam in a golden goblet and pouring it into one of the two silver basins adjoining the western side of the Altar, and wine into the other, while the words of Isaiah 12:3 were repeated, in commemoration of the water drawn from the rock in the desert; the choir sang the great hallel , and waved palms at different parts of Psalm 118, namely, Psalms 118:1-25; Psalms 118:29
Liberality - The gift is to be brought to the Altar only after reconciliation to an offended brother (Matthew 5:23-24); outward liberality being thus shown to be unacceptable to God unless the heart be filled with the spirit of love
Georgius, Arian Bishop of Alexandria - The shout arose, "Away with George!" and "in a moment," says the Fragmentist, they threw him into prison, with Diodorus and Dracontius, the master of the mint, who had overthrown a pagan Altar which he found standing there (Ammian
Samuel, Second Book of - David bought the threshing floor of Araunah and his oxen, erected an Altar, and offered up burnt offerings and peace offerings, and the plague was stayed
Ezra, Book of - 3 describes how in October 537 the Altar of burnt-offering was re-erected on its ancient site, the foundation-stone of the Temple laid (May 536), and the work of re-building begun
Borrow - (Exodus 3:22)...
And might there not be somewhat typical in the thing itself, in reference to the future call (as was all along intended) of the Gentile church? I beg the reader to read that sweet passage of the prophet Isaiah 19:18-25; and see the rich promises of the call of Egypt with Assyria, when the Lord shall set up the New Testament Altar, even the Lord Jesus Christ, in the midst of the land of Egypt; and five cities shall speak the language of Canaan, even the gospel language of salvation by the blood and righteousness of the Lord Jesus Christ
Land - A further variation of this nuance refers to the actual soil itself: “Shall there not then, I pray thee, be given to thy servant two mules’ burden of earth [3]?” (2 Kings 5:17)
Oath - Among the Greeks and Romans, the form varied with the subject and occasion of the oath; in private contracts, the parties took hold of each other's hands, while they swore to the performance; or they touched the Altar of the god by whose divinity they swore: upon more solemn occasions, it was the custom to slay a victim; and the beast being struck down with certain ceremonies and invocations, gave birth to the expression, ferire pactum; and to our English phrase, translated from this, of "striking a bargain
Baal - ...
The temples and Altars of Baal were generally placed on eminences: they were places inclosed by walls, within which was maintained a perpetual fire; and some of them had statues or images, called in Scripture, "Chamanim. Baal had his prophets and his priests in great numbers; accordingly, we read of four hundred and fifty of them that were fed at the table of Jezebel only; and they conducted the worship of this deity, by offering sacrifices, by dancing round his Altar with violent gesticulations and exclamations, by cutting their bodies with knives and lancets, and by raving and pretending to prophesy, as if they were possessed by some invisible power
Abram - Abraham, leading his tribe, first settled at Sechem, a valley between the mountains Ebal and Gerizim, where God appeared to him and promised to give him the land of Canaan, and where, as in other places in which he remained any time, he built an Altar to the Lord. After the famine Abraham returned to Canaan, and pitched his tents between Bethel and Hai, where he had previously raised an Altar. Here Abraham planted a grove, built an Altar, and for some time resided Genesis 21:21 . Wherever he sojourned he built his Altars to the true God, and publicly celebrated his worship; and, as we learn from St. " This could be a figure of nothing but the resurrection of our Lord; and, if so, Isaac's being laid upon the Altar was a figure of his sacrificial death, scenically and most impressively represented to Abraham
Solomon - ...
The Holy Child Himself never dreamed a better dream than that dream was which Solomon dreamed after that day of a thousand burnt-offerings on the Altar of Gibeon. But the dedication prayer that Solomon offered on the opening day before the Altar is a far better prayer to us today than it was that day on which it first fell from Solomon's lips. Thousands have been my sins, and ten thousand my transgressions; but Thy sanctifications have remained with me, and my heart, through Thy grace, hath been an unquenched coal upon Thy Altar
Nehemiah, Theology of - ...
This consecration of the city reminds us of dedication of the Altar in Ezra 3:8-13 . Piety is not to be restricted to the Altar site, but encompasses everything within the walls of the city
the Man Who Had Not on a Wedding Arment - One of our own elders on the Sabbath before one communion heard a sermon on the text, "Leave there thy gift before the Altar, and go thy way: first be reconciled to thy brother, and then come and offer thy gift. And this: Then will I to thine Altar go
Damascus - Damascus had one last influence on Judah; for when Ahaz went to Damascus to pay tribute to Tiglath-pileser, he liked the Altar he saw there and had a copy made for the Jerusalem Temple (2 Kings 16:10-16 )
Temple, Solomon's - It contained the Altar of burnt-offering (2 Chronicles 15:8 ), the brazen sea (4:2-5,10), and ten lavers (1 Kings 7:38,39 )
Propitiation - It is used of the ram offered at the consecration of the high priest, Exodus 29:33 , and of the blood which God gave upon the Altar to make "propitiation" for the souls of the people, and that because "the life of the flesh is in the blood," Leviticus 17:11 , and "it is the blood that maketh atonement by reason of the life" (RV)
Nazarite - ...
His shorn hair was put on the fire of the Altar, in order that, although human blood must not be offered, something of the Nazarite's body, and that representing his manly strength, should be offered
Oath - Amongst the Greeks and Romans, the form varied with the subject and occasion of the oath: in private contracts, the parties took hold of each other's hand, whilst they swore to the performance; or they touched the Altar of the god by whose divinity they swore
Gad - ...
GAD is entitled ‘the seer’ ( 1 Chronicles 29:29 ), ‘David’s’ or ‘the king’s seer’ ( 1 Chronicles 21:9 , 2 Chronicles 29:25 , 2 Samuel 24:11 ), or ‘the prophet’ ( 1 Samuel 22:5 , 2 Samuel 24:11 ), He is represented as having announced the Divine condemnation on the royal census, and as having advised the erection of an Altar on Araunah’s threshing-floor ( 2 Samuel 24:11 ff
Ointment - Onycha, an ingredient derived from mollusks found in the Red Sea, was used in the mixture to be burned on the Altar of incense
Land, Ground - ...
In the Old Testament, an Altar was important in worshiping the Lord. Exodus 20:24-25 shows Altars made of two materials—ground or earth ( Exodus 20:24 ) and stones (Exodus 20:25 ). The stone Altars were not to be hewn, that is cut with a tool. The passage seems to favor Altars made of ground
Piety - He enters the temple; but it is as a sanctuary; it is only to take hold of the horns of the Altar; it is a refuge, not a place of devotion he seeks
Zerubbabel - He and Jeshua in the seventh month (wherein they kept the feast of tabernacles less formal than the celebration, Nehemiah 8), first built the Altar of burnt offering, the nucleus and central point of the temple
Gideon - ]'>[2] command he destroys the Altar of Baal in Ophrah and builds one to Jahweh, to whom he also offers sacrifice
Idolatry, - The terebinth (oak) at Mamre, beneath which Abraham built an Altar, (Genesis 12:7 ; 13:18 ) and the memorial grove planted by him at Beersheba, (Genesis 21:33 ) were intimately connected with patriarchal worship
Isaac - Isaac submitted, as it should seem, without resistance, to be bound and laid on the Altar, exposing his body to the knife that was lifted up to destroy him
Maccabees - The second book of the Maccabees begins with two epistles sent from the Jews of Jerusalem to the Jews of Egypt and Alexandria, to exhort them to observe the feast of the dedication of the new Altar erected by Judas, on his purifying the temple
Propitiation - The blood of an unblemished victim, obtained by slaughter, was sprinkled on the Altar, or otherwise presented to Jehovah (cf
Altar - From the time of Noah there are biblical records of people who erected Altars, usually to commemorate special religious experiences that people had with God. Some stories record the offering of sacrifices on these Altars (Genesis 8:20; Joshua 8:30-31; Genesis 13:18; Genesis 22:9; Genesis 26:25; Genesis 33:20; Genesis 35:3; Exodus 17:15). ...
Even after the establishment of the tabernacle with its specially appointed bronze Altar of sacrifice, Israelites at times erected Altars to commemorate important events (Deuteronomy 27:5; Genesis 12:7; Joshua 22:10; Judges 6:24-26; 2 Samuel 24:18-25; 1 Kings 18:30). But these Altars were not to be permanent or lavish. The Altars were not to be so high that they required steps, in order to avoid any immodesty which might occur if a priest lifted up his robes while climbing the steps (Exodus 20:24-26)
Feasts - He then defiled the Jewish temple by setting up an Altar in honour of the pagan gods and sacrificing animals that the Jews considered unclean
Blood - Therefore, they poured out the animal’s blood (representing the life that had been taken) either on the Altar or on the ground
Widows - 4), who speaks of widows as a θυσιαστήριον, ‘altar of sacrifice,’ on which Christians should lavish their offerings as of old worshippers of Jahweh placed their gifts on the Altar in the Temple
Day of Atonement - He next sprinkled the blood of each animal on the Altar of incense in the Holy Place; and, lastly, he sprinkled the mingled blood of bullock and goat on the brazen Altar in the outer court
Korah - Fire from Jehovah (probably from the Altar, Leviticus 10:1-7) consumed Korah and the 250 incense offerers who were apart "at the door of the tabernacle" (Numbers 16:18-19; Numbers 16:33-35)
Sacrifice - An offering made to God on an Altar, by means of a regular minister: as an acknowledgment of his power, and a payment of homage
Leviticus - In Leviticus 17:11 translated "the soul (nephesh ) of the flesh is in the blood, and I have given it to you upon the Altar to make atonement for your souls; for it is the blood which makes atonement by means of the soul
Nazirite - The fat was then salted and burned on the Altar, and the breast and the foreleg were eaten by the priests, who also ate the waved cake and the boiled shoulder; the rest of the bread and meat belonged to the offerer (Maimonides, Hilchoth Maase ha-Corbanoth , ix
Unclean And Clean - Swine are liable to disease from foul feeding, and in Palestine are not very wholesome food; so also fat and blood; but the spiritual reason of prohibition was the main one, the swine's uncleanness of feeding typifying moral impurity, and the fat and the blood being God's exclusive perquisite for sacrifice on the Altar
Vine - The "fence" may represent the law, the "stones" gathered out Jerome thinks are the idols; the "tower" the temple "in the midst" of Judaea; the "winepress," generally hewn out of the rocky soil, the Altar
Philosophists - This royal adept was one of the most zealous of Voltaire's condjutors, til he discovered that the philosophists were waging war with the throne as well as with the Altar
Refuge - And so exact was the law to be regarded, that on the poor fugitive's arrival at the suburbs of either of those cities, the congregation was to proceed on the subject of enquiry; and if any malice pretense was found in the mind towards the person he had murdered, the law enjoined that he should be taken even from the Altar, and put to death
Columba (1) Columcille - Columba was the first to enter the oratory, and when the brethren followed with lights they found the saint prostrate before the Altar, and he soon passed away, with a sweet smile upon his face, as though he had merely fallen into a gentle sleep
Antioch - The Altar of the god was deserted, the oracle was silenced, and the sacred grove itself defiled by the interment of Christians
Feasts - At the beginning of the feast, two vessels of silver were carried in a ceremonious manner to the temple, one full of water, the other of wine, which were poured at the foot of the Altar of burnt offerings, always on the seventh day of this festival
Shechem - It is first mentioned in the history of Abraham, who here erected his first Altar in Canaan, and took possession of the country in the name of Jehovah, Genesis 12:6 33:18,19 35:4
Miracle - ...
The Altar rent, 1 Kings 13:5
Music - They were ranged in order about the Altar of burnt-sacrifices
Jacob - ), 33:18; but at length, under divine directions, he moved to Bethel, where he made an Altar unto God (35:6,7), and where God appeared to him and renewed the Abrahamic covenant
Priest - --The chief duties of the priests were to watch over the fire on the Altar of burnt offering, and to keep it burning evermore both by day and night, ( Leviticus 6:12 ; 2 Chronicles 13:11 ) to feed the golden lamp outside the vail with oil (Exodus 27:20,21 ; Leviticus 24:2 ) to offer the morning and evening sacrifices, each accompanied with a meet offering and a drink offering, at the door of the tabernacle
Law (2) - In His great indictment of the scribes and Pharisees He rebukes them for their ruling that an oath by the temple or by the Altar counts for nothing, while an oath by the gold of the temple, or a gift at the Altar, is binding. The temple is greater than its gold, and makes it holy; and similarly it is by the Altar that the gift is sanctified. To swear by the Altar is to swear not only by it, but by the offering placed upon it; while to swear by the temple is to swear not only by it and all that it contains, but by Him who dwells therein (Matthew 23:16 ff
Ambrosius of Milan - ) are addressed to the emperor Valentinian, after the death of Gratian, to exhort him not to comply with a request of Symmachus, prefect of the city, that he would replace the Altar of Victory in the Senate House, and restore the funds for certain heathen ceremonies. Ambrogio), and deposited beneath the Altar in a place which Ambrose had designed for his own remains. After this he went up to the Altar; "but I should not have gone," adds Ambrose, "unless he had given me his full promise" ( Ep. Shortly after this withdrawal, he wrote a respectful letter to Eugenius, explaining that the reason why he had refused to hold intercourse with him was that he had given permission, though himself a Christian, that the Altar of Victory should be restored—the boon which Symmachus had begged for in vain being yielded to the power of Arbogastes
Donatus And Donatism - The Donatists treated the churches as places which had been profaned, washed the walls and Altars, tore the vestments to pieces, threw the holy vessels outside and the sacred elements to the dogs. The Donatists of Carthage, now divided into Primianists and Maximianists, had, in their turn, to experience the misery of Altar set up against Altar. They allowed returning Donatist clergy to retain their clerical position and functions, if they had not rebaptized, and if they brought their congregations with them; and decided that children of Donatists, even if they had received Donatist baptism, should not be excluded from the service of the Altar. Husband and wife, who—in their married life—know no division, separate themselves at the Altar of Christ! Children live with their parents in the same dwelling, but that dwelling is not also God's dwelling. Once again fire and sword levelled churches and destroyed Altars
Covenant - The people accepted this responsibility in a solemn ceremony in which covenant law was read from the “book of the covenant” and “the blood of the covenant” was sprinkled on the Altar and on the people (Exodus 24:3-8 ). The bread of the Altar also symbolized Israel's everlasting covenant (Leviticus 24:8 )
Testimony - The Transjordan tribes of Reuben, Gad, and Manasseh built a replica of the Lord's Altar near the Jordan, not for burnt offerings and sacrifices, but as testimony to Israel that they would remain faithful to God's law given to Moses and that they had a continuing legal right to worship at the Lord's tabernacle even though living outside of the promised land (Joshua 22:27-28 ). The prophet Isaiah apparently takes up the Altar and memorial ideas of Joshua 22 in describing a significant future conversion of Egyptians to the Lord
Malachi - The Jews were now in Jerusalem (Malachi 2:11); the Persian "governor" (pechah , pasha' ; Malachi 1:8) was there, the Altar (Malachi 1:7) and temple rebuilt (Malachi 2:13; Malachi 3:1), the sacrifices and feasts celebrated (Malachi 1:13-14; Malachi 2:3)
Samuel - He established regular services at Shiloh, where he built an Altar; and at Ramah he gathered a company of young men around him and established a school of the prophets
Relics - Mabillon, a Benedictine, justly complains, the Altars were loaded with suspected relics; numerous spurious ones being every were offered to the piety and devotion of the faithful. ...
Relics were, and still are, preserved on the Altars whereon mass is celebrated; a square hole being made in the middle of the Altar big enough to receive the hand; and herein is the relic deposited, being first wrapped in red silk, and enclosed in a leaden box. ...
This reverence, however, gradually exceeded all reasonable bounds; and those prayers and religious services were thought to have a peculiar sanctity and virtue which were performed over their tombs: hence the practice which afterwards obtained of depositing relics of saints and martyrs under the Altars in all churches. Ambrose would not consecrate a church because it had no relics; and the council of Constantinople in Trullo ordained, that those Altars should be demolished under which there were found no relics
Furniture - Lovingly detailed accounts of the ark of the covenant, the Altar of incense, and other furnishings are so clear that we can easily visualize and reconstruct them in the form of models
Death - It was the hour when that great sacrifice was offered up, the efficacy of which reaches back to the first transgression of man, and extends forward to the end of time: the hour, when, from the cross, as from an high Altar, the blood was flowing which washed away the guilt of the nations. Altars on which the fire had blazed for ages were now to smoke no more
Sign - The covering of the Altar served as a reminder of the danger of usurping the role of God's priests (Numbers 17:10 )
Feet - It may mean also that as the feet of the calf lead it to the Altar for sacrifice, so the feet of the Lord JESUS led Him to Calvary to die for us
Fire - " (Exodus 13:21) Yea, the unceasing representation of the Lord on the Altar, was by the "holy fire that never went out
Decius, Emperor - The seats of the magistrates were thronged with apostates some rushing eagerly to be conspicuous among the first to offer sacrifice and sprinkle incense on the Altar; some pale and trembling as if about to be themselves sacrificial victims
Ark - Lucian speaks of Deucalion's going forth from the ark, and raising an Altar to God
Petrus, Saint, Archbaptist of Alexandria - (5) Those who to evade trial of their constancy feigned epilepsy promised conformity in writing or put forward pagans to throw incense on the Altar in their stead must do penance for six months more although some of them had already been received to communion by some of the steadfast confessors
Noah - ...
I poured out a libation, I built an Altar on the peak of the "mountain" (Μizir , the Ararat of the Bible; in Assyrian geography the precipitous range overlooking the valley of the Tigris N. of the Tigris, he quitted it, built an Altar, and sacrificed to the gods and disappeared. ...
(7) The building of the Altar afterward, in the Babylonian and the Greek account
Sacrifices - Thus Christ acknowledged the one class (sin-offering) when He bade the leper ‘offer for thy cleansing what Moses commanded’ (Mark 1:44); and the other class (peace-offering) when He said, ‘Leave there thy gift before the Altar’ (Matthew 5:24). The place where it was consumed by fire was made a holy Altar by it
Jacob - Again Jacob’s stay must not be measured by days; for he erected an Altar ( 2 Chronicles 33:20 ) and dug a well ( John 4:6 ; John 4:12 ), and was detained by domestic troubles, if not of his own original intention. Arrived at Bethel, he added an Altar ( Genesis 35:7 ) to the monolith he had erected on his previous visit, and received in a theophany, for which in mood he was well prepared, a renewal of the promise of regal prosperity
Entry Into Jerusalem - Psalms 118:25-26, the festal cry amidst which the Altar of burnt-offering was solemnly compassed on the first six days of the Feast of Tabernacles, and on the last day seven times). So does ‘the priest after the order of Melchizedek’ (Psalms 110:4) proceed, metaphorically speaking, to ‘bind the sacrifice with cords unto the horns of the Altar’ (Psalms 118:27)
Gratianus, Emperor - Ambrose is shewn by the ecclesiastical laws (see infra ), and in the removal of the Altar of Victory from the senate-house at Rome in a. The heathen senators, though in the minority, were accustomed to offer incense on this Altar, and to touch it in taking solemn oaths (Ambr
Jehoiachin - Now he cut the gold off (not "cut in pieces," 2 Kings 24:13) the larger vessels which were plated, the Altar of burnt offering, the table of shewbread, and the ark, so that at the third conquest of Jerusalem under Zedekiah there were only the large brazen vessels of the court remaining, beside a few gold and silver basins and firepans (2 Kings 25:13-17)
Jehoiada - Mattan the Baal priest alone was slain by the people when breaking Baal's images and Altars. " Jehoiada then took a chest, with a hole made in the lid, and set it against the outer wall beside the burnt offering Altar on the right, by the S
Home (2) - A Talmudic saying is significant—‘The Altar itself weeps over the man who puts away his wife’ (Gittin 10b, Sanhed
Samuel - His home and judicial center was Ramah, where he built an Altar
Blood - According to the Epistle to the Hebrews, while the animal sacrifices as such were irrational, destitute of personal consent, intermittent, incapable of purifying, spiritual efficacy (Hebrews 10:4), this lack was more than set off by the blood of Christ, (b) As in the Old Dispensation all persons ministering at the Altar, utensils of service and worship, and means of approach to God were cleansed with blood as a medium of purification (cf
Abraham - Abraham built an Altar, and called upon the name of Jehovah
Judah, Kingdom of - Hosea (Hosea 3:4-5) vividly depicts Israel's state for ages, clinging to the law yet without "altar, priest, or sacrifice," which the law ordains, yet not relapsing into idolatry to which they were so prone in his day, "without teraphim" and "without a king"; then finally "seeking the Lord and David their king
Josiah - He defiled Tophot in the valley of the children of Hinnom, where the people used to make their children pass through the fire to Moloch; and burned the chariots of the sun, and took away the stored horses, and destroyed Ahaz' Altars on the housetop. ) He fulfilled on the Bethel calf Altar the prophecy of the man of God to Jeroboam, given three centuries before, and declaring his very name (as Isaiah did that of Cyrus ages before), but respected the prophet's sepulchre (1 Kings 13)
Blood - According to the Epistle to the Hebrews, while the animal sacrifices as such were irrational, destitute of personal consent, intermittent, incapable of purifying, spiritual efficacy (Hebrews 9:12-14,), this lack was more than set off by the blood of Christ, (b) As in the Old Dispensation all persons ministering at the Altar, utensils of service and worship, and means of approach to God were cleansed with blood as a medium of purification (cf
Petrus ii., Archbaptist of Alexandria - Peter was commanded to withdraw; he refused; the church doors were forced, and the brutal orgies described in Athanasius's Encyclical were repeated: a youth in female dress danced upon the Altar; another sat naked on the throne, and delivered a mock sermon in praise of vice (cf
Prudence - (2) It was necessary also that the Lord of man’s life should lay bare in judgment the evil of Pharisaism, the master sin which dwells in the Temple, serving the very Altar (see Perfection of Jesus, p
John the Baptist - Zacharias was old, and Elisabeth barren, when, as he was burning incense at the golden Altar, Gabriel announced the answer to his prayers (not directly for a son, but, as Israel's representative, for Messiah the Hope of Israel) in the coming birth of a son, the appointed forerunner of Messiah; John (Jehovah's gift) was to he his name, because his supernatural birth was a pledge of the Lord's grace, long looked for, now visiting again His people to their joy (Luke 1)
Covenant - After the flood had removed corrupt society and then receded, Noah the covenant man worshiped; he built an Altar and sacrificed. The ceremony consisted of the building of an Altar to serve as the actual intimate meeting place of Yahweh and the people. Blood had been collected and half of it was sprinkled on the Altar
Eucharist - The table of the Lord is contrasted with the table of demons ( 1 Corinthians 10:21 ) through the medium of the sacrificial system of the OT, of which it is a fundamental principle that to eat of the offerings is to have communion with the Altar ( 1 Corinthians 10:18 ). The words ‘Lord’s table’ and ‘altar’ are found as synonyms in Malachi ( Malachi 1:7 ; Malachi 1:12 )
Fire - That fire was taken from off the Altar of incense for that fire came down from GOD, and was holy fire. Aaron took his censer, placed the holy incense in it, and put the holy fire from off the Altar in it
Lord's Supper - No sacrifice was offered by Christ at the institution: for:...
(1) it was no place of sacrifice,...
(2) there was no Altar of sacrifice,...
(3) it was not the hour of sacrifice,...
(4) the posture of the recipients, reclining, was not that of sacrifice
Family - The common longing to love and to serve God was the base of the family affection and unity from patriarchal times when the head of each family would offer sacrifice upon his own Altar, until the hour in which Mary’s Son asked in tender surprise of her and Joseph: ‘Wist ye not that I must he in my Father’s house?’ (Luke 2:49 )
Priest, Christ as - A physical deformity or disability disqualified them from approaching the Altar of God (Leviticus 21:16-23 ; cf
Ahab - Ahab built an Altar and temple to Baal in Samaria, and "made a grove," i
Gaudentius, Bishop of Brescia - , the beggars at the church door; the dread of the barbarian invasions, the landowner who leaves his labourers to be supported by the church, the horses and mules adorned with gold and silver, the heathen Altar allowed to remain on a Christian man's estate)
Priest - bids us offer to God the sacrifice of praise ( Hebrews 13:15 ), or declares that God is well pleased with such sacrifices as kindly deeds and gifts of Christian liberality ( Hebrews 13:16 ); and the seer of the Apocalypse speaks of the prayers of all the saints as rising up like incense from the golden Altar before the throne ( Revelation 8:3 )
Gods, Pagan - Asherah was often worshiped in connection with Baal (Judges 3:7 ; 2 Kings 17:16 ), her object appearing alongside the latter's Altar (Judges 6:25 , Judges 6:30 ). A huge Altar to Zeus at Pergamum is probably the “Satan's throne” of Revelation 2:13
Worship - Irenaeus has the “heavenly Altar” (iv. Hasten to come together all of you, as to one temple, even God; as to one Altar; even to one Jesus Christ, who came forth from One Father, and is with One and departed unto One
Unity (2) - The worst form of schism was held to be the violation of this rule, as it produced sect within the same area, and led to the setting up of ‘altar against Altar’—a greater evil than interruption of communion between one local Church and another, as civil war is a greater evil than war between State and State
Eli - Both his high priesthood at the Altar, and his chief judgeship at the gate, and his sole fatherhood in his own house; both God's house and his own house, and the whole house of Israel, went to wreck and ruin under overladen Eli. What! not know the Lord, and they born and brought up within the very precincts of the Lord's house! Were not the first sounds they heard the praises of God in His sanctuary? Were not the first sights they saw their father in his robes beside the Altar with all the tables, and the bread, and the sacrifices, and the incense round about him? And yet, there it is in black and white; there it is in blood and tears-'The sons of Eli were sons of Belial; they knew not the Lord
Benedictus of Nursia, Abbott of Monte Cassino - 9, 10) is not necessary to explain how the missionary spirit of Benedict and his monks overthrew the image and Altar of Apollo, and reared shrines of St
Sacrifice - The idea of expiation seems not to have been absent from it, for the blood was sprinkled round about the Altar of sacrifice; but the main idea is the offering of the whole victim to God, representing as the laying of the hand on its head shows, the devotion of the sacrificer, body and soul
Church - The desk and pulpit were the chief furniture in both, but no Altar
Uniqueness - From the standpoint of that teaching no man is a fit subject to bring a gift to God’s Altar until he has done his utmost to establish right relations with his fellows (Matthew 5:23 f
Vessels And Utensils - A generic word for bowl designates the silver vessels used in the dedication of the Altar ( Numbers 7:84 ; NAS, “dishes”; NRSV, NIV, “plates”)
Confession (of Sin) - In Matthew 5:23-24 confession to a justly offended brother is directly enjoined; and more than that, it is implied that the very gifts laid on God’s Altar are shorn of their value if such confession has not first been made
Synagogue - The structure, though essentially different from the temple (for it had neither Altar nor sacrifice), resembled in some degree that of the temple: the ark at the far end contained the law in both; the lid was called the kopereth or "mercy-seat"; a veil hung before it
Serve - Those not of the family of Aaron, though chosen “to minister unto him forever,” acted as assistants to the priests, performing such physical tasks as keeping the gates, slaughtering the burnt offering, caring for the Altars and the utensils of the sanctuary ( Altar of the Lord, according to the commandment of King Josiah” ( Caecilia, Saint, Roman Lady - Cimabue painted an Altar-piece, representing different episodes in the life of the saint for the church dedicated to her at Florence
Euric, King of Toulouse - Euric was now sovereign from the Loire to the Straits of Gibraltar, and appears as the protector of the neighbouring barbarian races against the encroaching Franks (Cass. " The churches were crumbling; thorns filled the open doorways; cattle browsed in the porches and on the grass round the Altar
Reconciliation - " When the Philistines suspected that David would appease the anger of Saul, by becoming their adversary, they said, "Wherewith should he reconcile himself to his master? Should it not be with the heads of these men?" not, surely, How shall he remove his own anger against his master? but, how shall he remove his master's anger against him? How shall he restore himself to his master's favour? "If thou bring thy gift to the Altar, and there rememberest that thy brother hath aught against thee," not, that thou hast aught against thy brother, "first be reconciled to thy brother; that is, appease and conciliate him; so that the words, in fact, import, "See that thy brother be reconciled to thee," since that which goes before is, not that he hath done thee an injury, but thou him
Passover And Feast of Unleavened Bread - It was slain in relays at the Temple, and the blood thrown before the Altar by the priests
Pilate - To these incidents we must add the massacre of some Galilæans at the very Altar of sacrifice, referred to in Luke 13:1 , but not otherwise explained
Jerusalem - Here he built an Altar to the Lord on the threshing-floor of Araunah the Jebusite (2 Samuel 24:15-25 ), and thither he brought up the ark of the covenant and placed it in the new tabernacle which he had prepared for it
Pass'Over, - The head of the family slew the lamb in his own house, not in the holy place; the blood was sprinkled on the doorway, not on the Altar
Joab - But the true character soon showed itself again, and even the worldly sagacity which heretofore had kept him on the winning side in the end forsook him, for with Abiathar Joab joined in Adonijah's rebellion, and Solomon, by David's dying charge, had him slain at the Altar of Gibeon where he had fled for sanctuary, but which afforded no protection to a treacherous murderer (Exodus 21:14)
Covenant - Half the blood was thrown against the Altar (representing God) and half sprinkled on the people (Exodus 24:3-8)
Jews - The first care of the Jews, after their arrival in Judea, was to build an Altar for burnt-offerings to God: they then collected materials for rebuilding the temple; and all necessary preparations being made, in the beginning of the second year after their return under Zerubbabel, they began to build it upon the old foundations. Though this second temple, or, as it is sometimes called, the temple of Zerubbabel, who was at that time governor of the Jews, was of the same size and dimensions as the first, or Solomon's temple, yet it was very inferior to it in splendour and magnificence; and the ark of the covenant, the Shechinah, the holy fire upon the Altar, the Urim and Thummim, and the spirit of prophecy, were all wanting to this temple of the remnant of the people. The lesson appointed for the Sabbath is divided into seven parts, and read to seven persons at the Altar
Type - In 1 Peter 1:2, again, the sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ upon the elect is evidently an antitype of the action of Moses in sprinkling blood first on the Altar and then on the people for the inauguration of the covenant (Exodus 24:6-8). Romans 3:25, Ephesians 5:2), the Temple and the Christian Church (1 Corinthians 3:16, 2 Corinthians 6:16), the ministry of the Altar and the ministry of the gospel (1 Corinthians 9:13), circumcision and baptism (Colossians 2:11-12), the sacrificial communion of Judaism and communion at the Lord’s Table in the body and blood of Christ (1 Corinthians 10:16; 1 Corinthians 10:18)-these are particular instances he gives of the fact that the institutions of the old dispensation were anticipative and symbolic of the new
High Priest - ...
On the other hand the priests truckled to the idolatrous Manasseh; the high priest Urijah was Ahaz' ready tool in copying the Damascus Altar, supplanting Jehovah's brazen Altar (2 Kings 16:10-16)
Assumption of Moses - They are divided as to the truth, and pollute the Altar with their non-Aaronic priests, ‘not priests but slaves, sons of slaves’ (Jason and Menelaus). The Altar is polluted only by injustice (5:4)
High Priest - Phinehas served as the major figure in the resolution of the conflict over the “commemorative” Altar the tribes east of the Jordan built (Joshua 22:13 ,Joshua 22:13,22:31-32 )
Isaac - Philo Byblius preserves from Sanchouiatho the Phoenician tradition, "Cronus, whom the Phoenicians call Israel, being king, having an only son by a nymph, Anobret, called Jahoud (Hebrew: Yahid), even now the Phoenician name for only begotten, when perils from wars were impending, having clothed his son in royal apparel, offered him upon an Altar which he built" (Eusebius, Praep
Episcopacy - It is allowed that Ignatius in many places distinguishes between bishops and presbyters, and requires obedience to bishops from the whole church, but as he often supposes each of the churches to which he wrote to meet in one place, and represents them as breaking one loaf, and surrounding one Altar, and charges the bishop to know all his flock by name, it is most evident that he much speak of a parochial and not a diocesan bishop
Captivity - , who set up the Altar and began the temple
Jehoshaphat - " All that depended on him he did, but the people could not yet rise up to his spirituality so as to worship Jehovah without any visible Altar save the one at Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 20:32-33)
Names of God - This was the name of the Altar that Gideon built at Ophrah signifying that God brings well-being not death to His people
Sermon on the Mount - Laying gifts before the Altar (5:23-24) and swearing by Jerusalem (5:35) reflect a time when Christians were still involved in Jewish cultic life (cf
Pope - Every cardinal, on entering into the chapel, goes to the Altar, and puts his paper into a large chalice
Intercession - 3), who teaches our need of cheerfulness and maintains that the intercession of a sad man hath never at any time power to ascend to the Altar of God
Corinthians, Epistles to the - Their fellowship with the death of Christ at the Lord's table is introduced, showing that it signifies communion with the body and blood of Christ (as in the Peace Offering, in which part was burnt on the Altar; part eaten by the priest; and part by the offerer): hence they could not also have communion with idolatry
Money - Moses ordered that the weight of five hundred shekels of myrrh, and two hundred and fifty shekels of cinnamon, of the weight of the sanctuary, should be taken, to make the perfume which was to be burnt to the Lord on the golden Altar, Exodus 30:24
Deluge - He then sent the animals to the four winds, and offered sacrifice on an Altar at the top of the mountain
Optatus, Bishop of Milevis - The Donatists add a sixth gift the "umbilicus" of Son_7:2 which they regard as the Altar; but this being an essential part of the body cannot be a separate gift. he repeats some previous charges and adds others how they destroyed Altars the "seats of Christ's Body and Blood," at which they themselves must have offered
New Moon - The constant petition that God will ‘establish a new Altar on Zion’ so that ‘the burnt-offering of the New Moon’ may again be offered, is arrestive and may even seem pathetic to a Christian mind
Intercession - 3), who teaches our need of cheerfulness and maintains that the intercession of a sad man hath never at any time power to ascend to the Altar of God
Atonement - Leviticus 16:21 ); the blood, after the victim was killed, was sprinkled on and about the Altar: on the Day of Atonement it was taken also within the veil. The theory comes short in not recognizing that, in any case, there is in the act the acknowledgment of God’s righteous sentence upon sin else why bring sacrifice of atonement at all? It is true that the blood represents the life, but it is surely not as life simply, but as life taken life given up in death that the blood is presented on the Altar as a covering for sin
Joshua - Still, just as Joshua put the Gibeonites to hew wood and draw water for the Altar of the Lord when he could not root them out, so we may turn the remnants of our pride, and envy, and ill-will, and gluttony, and sloth to this same good use. ' And the children of the Gibeonites, while thorns in their eyes and scourges in their sides, and snares and traps to them, were at the same time hewers of wood and drawers of water for the congregation, and for the Altar of the Lord to this day, in the place which the Lord shall choose
Priest (2) - Besides, there was no Altar in the Holy of Holies, and there could therefore be no real sacrificial offering. Christ is not now at an Altar or a mercy-seat, but on the throne
Jacob - ...
From Succoth, Jacob traveled to Shechem, where he built an Altar to God
Atonement - ...
On the great day of atonement the high priest made "atonement for the sanctuary, the tabernacle, and the Altar" also, as well as for the priests and all the people; but it was the people's sin that defiled the places so as to make them unfit for the presence of the Holy One
Nebuchadnezzar - In the worship of Merodach my lord I did not sing his praises, I did not furnish his Altar with victims, nor clear out the canals" (Rawlinson, Herodotus, ii
Leviticus - The entire animal was burned on the Altar (Leviticus 1:3-17 )
Joshua, Theology of - 7); the erection of an Altar east of the Jordan in order to remember the lordship of Israel's God (22:26- 27); and the establishment of a memorial stone at Shechem after the ceremony of covenant renewal (24:26-27)
Sabbath - ...
The "holy convocation" on it (1618091925_8) was probably a meeting for prayer, meditation, and hearing the law in the court of the tabernacle before the Altar at the hour of morning and evening sacrifice (Leviticus 19:30; Ezekiel 23:38)
Patriarchs, the - His experience of God at Bethel caused him to dedicate the site to the Lord, and on his return he erected an Altar there (Genesis 35:6-15 )
Jordan - The great Altar built by the latter was the witness of the oneness of the two sections (Joshua 22:10-29)
Theodosius i., the Great - In 382 Gratian issued an order abolishing the Altar of Victory, as hitherto retained in the senate house, and the other traces of paganism which still remained
John the Apostle - The book of Revelation in its temple imagery shows the deep impression which the Altar, the incense, the priestly robes, and the liturgy had made on him
Lord's Supper (ii) - A sacrifice was offered by the slaughter of oxen and the sprinkling of part of the blood of the victims on the Altar. In the LXX Septuagint ἐκχέω is often used both of the shedding of blood in slaughter and of the pouring out of the blood of slain victims at the Altar
Revelation, the - Under the Altar are seen the souls of the martyrs (especially those slain during the first half of Daniel's seventieth week: cf. ...
In Revelation 11 John is told to measure the temple and the Altar and the worshippers, that is, all that is real
Cooking And Heating - Since the main Altar at Temple and tabernacle was a kind of barbecue in which the carcass was laid on a grill above a fire, it would be unusual if similar arrangements were not sometimes used domestically
Wine And Strong Drink - ]'>[3] : ‘He stretched out his hand to the cup, and poured of the blood of the grape … at the foot of the Altar’)
Family Life And Relations - Rather than seeing infractions as isolated incidents, a violator endangered his group by bringing upon them guilt, whether it be upon an entire people (as the Gileadite Altar, Joshua 22:19-20 ) or the succeeding generations (as in the sin of idolatry, Exodus 20:5 ; 34:7 ; Numbers 14:18 ; Deuteronomy 5:9 )
Jerusalem - 2 Chronicles 3:1 understood Moriah to be where Solomon built the temple ( 2 Chronicles 3:1 ) on the former threshingfloor of Araunah that David had purchased for an Altar to God (2 Samuel 24:18 )
Dominicans - the little images, that on these days are set on the Altars, were made use of for angels, which, being tied to a cord that passed through a pulley over Jetzer's head, rose up and down, and danced about the pretended Virgin to increase the delusion. He was, in this state, exposed to the admiring multitude on the principal Altar of the convent, to the great mortification of the Franciscans
Census - When David, after the plague sent for numbering the people, sacrificed upon an Altar of burnt offering on the threshing floor of Araunah on mount Moriah, Jehovah by fire from heaven consecrated the place as "the house of God," even before the actual building of the temple (compare 1 Chronicles 22:1-2 with Genesis 28:17-19)
Heart - It was His dominant idea that on the disposition of the heart the spiritual value of worship depends (John 4:24), and He had strong warnings to utter against the offerings at the Altar when sinister feelings were nursed within (Matthew 5:23), and the ascription of honour to God with the lips while the heart was far from Him (Matthew 15:8)
Hosanna - Among the Jews, however, the word came to designate not alone the cry, but also the of palms, myrtle, or willow which on their joyous feast of Tabernacles, and especially on its seventh day, the people were accustomed—for the Law did not enjoin this ceremony—to carry in procession with the priests to the fountain of Shiloah and thence again to the Temple, where these ‘hosannas’ were piled up and beaten against the Altar
Laughter - : Welldon, Fire Upon the Altar, 105; G
Arts - ), and even Altar and throne
Marriage - When the time for solemnizing the marriage arrived, the elder daughter, who was not so beautiful, was conducted by the parents to the Altar, and the young man was unconsciously married to her
David - The pestilence broke forth, and 70,000 men fell, and as the angel was about to smite Jerusalem, Jehovah stayed his hand; and David erected an Altar on the spot, and offered burnt offerings and peace offerings
Sea - Compare Ezekiel 47:8-10 , where the healing of this deadly sea, and its abounding in fish, as well as the new fertility and beauty of the dreary wilderness between it and Jerusalemby means of the healing power of the Kidron flowing from beside that Altar of Godforcibly illustrate the healing and renovating power of gospel grace
Heart - It was His dominant idea that on the disposition of the heart the spiritual value of worship depends (John 4:24), and He had strong warnings to utter against the offerings at the Altar when sinister feelings were nursed within (Matthew 5:23), and the ascription of honour to God with the lips while the heart was far from Him (Matthew 15:8)
Elijah - )...
Amidst Elijah's ironical jeers they cried, and gashed themselves, in vain repetitions praying from morning until noon for fire from their god Baal, the sun god and god of fire (!), and leaped upon (or up and down at) the Altar. Repairing Jehovah's ruined Altar (the former sanctity of which was seemingly the reason for his choice of Carmel) with 12 stones to represent the tribes of all Israel, and calling upon the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, to let it be known that He is the Lord God, he brought down by prayer fire from heaven consuming the sacrifice, wood, stones, and dust, and licking up the water in the trench
Rome And the Roman Empire - John may refer to emperor worship in Pergamum, where the first Asian temple to a Roman emperor was erected, in his references to the place “where Satan's throne is” (perhaps meaning the Altar of Zeus; Revelation 2:13 NRSV)
Exodus, the - The awful and lengthened approach as to some natural sanctuary, the plain not shut in but presenting a long retiring sweep against which the people could remove and stand afar off; the cliff rising suddenly and steeply so that it could easily be marked off by 'bounds' like a huge Altar in front of the whole congregation, and visible against the sky in lonely grandeur from end to end of the whole plain, the very image of the 'mount that might be touched,' and from which the 'voice of God' might be heard far and wide over the stillness of the plain below, widened at that point to the utmost extent by the confluence of all the contiguous valleys; the adytum (shrine) withdrawn as if in the end of the world from all the stir and confusion of earthly things" (Stanley, in Cook's essay, vol
Lots - çÅé may mean the bosom of (α) a person; (β) a garment; (γ) a thing, as a chariot or Altar, hence might possibly mean an urn (Smith’s DB ii
Hilarius Arelatensis, Saint, Bishop of Arles - Persons juridically deposed were known to be serving the Altar in Rome
Prayer - ...
(3) Prayer "set in order" ("direct," 'atak ), as the wood upon the Altar, the shewbread on the table (Psalms 5:1-3; Genesis 22:9)
Apocrypha - Daniel had ashes sprinkled on the floor of the temple and food placed on Bel's Altar before sealing the temple door
Joseph And Mary - But all this, and all that they had passed through since the angel came to Zacharias at the Altar, only made the re-betrothal of Joseph and Mary the sweeter and the holier, with the aged priest acting more than the part of a father, and Elizabeth acting more than the part of a mother
Basilius, Bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia - Basil was at the Altar celebrating the Eucharistic sacrifice, standing, according to the primitive custom, behind the Altar with his face to the assembled people, supported on either hand by the semicircle of his attendant clergy
Art - He meets Celsus’ charge that ‘we shrink from raising Altars, statues, and temples,’ by saying that Celsus ‘does not perceive that we regard the spirit of every good man as an Altar,’ and that Christ is ‘the most excellent image in all creation,’ and ‘that we do refuse to build lifeless temples to the Giver of all life, let anyone who chooses learn how we are taught that our bodies are the temple of God. Origen is not concerned with the question of art: he merely denies ‘altars, statues, and temples’ in the heathen sense. Now, the Greek and Roman temples were constructed for a worship in which both the Altar and the worshippers stood outside
Judges, Theology of - And his obedience, when it does come, is not exactly courageous: he does tear down the Baal Altar and the Asherah pole in his community as God commanded—but still a bit the coward and skeptic, he does it at night (6:25-27)
Nehemiah - Nehemiah comforted them when weeping at the words of the law: "weep not, for the joy of the Lord is your strength" (Isaiah 61:3; Matthew 5:4; Psalms 51:12-13); "send portions unto them for whom nothing is prepared" (Luke 14:13); and the keeping of the feast of tabernacles more formally according to the law than the earlier one in Ezra 3:4 at the setting up of the Altar, indeed with greater enthusiasm of all as one man (not excepting 1 Kings 8:2; 1 Kings 8:65) than had been since Joshua's days, reading the law not merely the first and eighth days (as enjoined in Leviticus 23:35-36), but every day of the feast (Nehemiah 8:18)
Assur - Ahaz' idolatrous Altar set up from a pattern at Damascus, where lie had just given his submission to Tiglath Pileser, may have been required as a token of allegiance, for the inscriptions say that wherever they established their supremacy they set up "the laws of Asshur," and "altars to the great gods
Ezra, the Book of - Ezra 3:2-6:22 is drawn from some contemporary of Zerubbabel and eyewitness of his setting up the Altar, etc
Law - No satisfaction was allowed for murder; the murderer had no asylum, but could be dragged from the Altar (Exodus 21:14; 1 Kings 2:28-34)
Temple - Petrotta...
See also Altar ; Israel ; Offerings and Sacrifices ; Priest, Priesthood ; Tabernacle ...
Bibliography
Law of God - And then, as if still further to emphasize the point that the Law is not satisfied by negative or formal obedience, Jesus shows that brethren at variance must give effect to the positive law of love before they can render acceptable worship at God’s Altar (