What does Ahab mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
אַחְאָ֖ב king of Israel 15
אַחְאָ֔ב king of Israel 13
אַחְאָ֑ב king of Israel 13
אַחְאָב֙ king of Israel 11
אַחְאָ֗ב king of Israel 5
אַחְאָ֣ב king of Israel 5
אַחְאָ֜ב king of Israel 4
לְאַחְאָב֙ king of Israel 3
אַחְאָ֥ב king of Israel 3
אַחְאָֽב king of Israel 2
אַחְאָ֛ב king of Israel 2
אַחְאָ֨ב king of Israel 2
לְאַחְאָ֛ב king of Israel 2
אַחְאָ֞ב king of Israel 1
וּכְאֶחָ֔ב king of Israel 1
אַחְאָ֤ב king of Israel 1
אַחְאָ֕ב king of Israel 1
וּלְאַחְאָ֛ב king of Israel 1
לְאַחְאָ֖ב king of Israel 1
לְאַחְאָֽב king of Israel 1
כְאַחְאָ֔ב king of Israel 1
אַחְאָ֧ב king of Israel 1
וְאַחְאָ֣ב king of Israel 1
אַחְאָב֒ king of Israel 1
לְאַחְאָ֔ב king of Israel 1
וַאֲנִ֖י I (first pers. 1

Definitions Related to Ahab

H256


   1 king of Israel, son of Omri, husband of Jezebel.
   2 false prophet executed by Nebuchadrezzar, time of Jeremiah.
   Additional Information: Ahab = “father’s brother”.
   

Frequency of Ahab (original languages)

Frequency of Ahab (English)

Dictionary

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ahab
1. The sixth king of Israel, succeeded his father Omri B. C. 918, and reigned twenty-two years. His wife was Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal king of Tyre; an ambitious and passionate idolatress, through whose influence the worship of Baal and Ashtoreth was introduced in Israel. Ahab erected in Samaria a house of Baal, and set up images of Baal and Ashtoreth; idolatry and wickedness became fearfully prevalent, and the king "did more to provoke the Lord to anger than all the kings that were before him." In the midst of this great apostasy, God visited the land with three years of drought and famine; and then, at Mount Carmel, reproved idolatry by fire from heaven, and by the destruction of four hundred and fifty prophets of Baal. About six years later, Ben-hadad, king of Syria, invaded Israel with a great army, but was ignominiously defeated; and still more disastrously the year after, when Ahab took him captive, but soon released him, and thus incurred the displeasure of God. In spite of the warnings and mercies of Providence, Ahab went on in sin; and at length, after the murder of Naboth, his crimes and abominable idolatries were such that God sent Elijah to denounce judgments upon him and his seed. These were in part deferred, however, by his apparent humiliation. Soon after, having gone with Jehoshaphat, king of Judah, to regain Ramoth-gilead from the Syrians, and joined battle with them in defiance of Jehovah, he was slain, and dogs licked up his blood at the pool of Samaria, 1 Kings 16:29-22:40 .
2. A false prophet, who seduced the Israelites at Babylon, and was denounced by Jeremiah, Jeremiah 29:21,22 .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ahab
Father's brother.
The son of Omri, whom he succeeded as the seventh king of Israel. His history is recorded in 1Kings 1622-22. His wife was Jezebel (q.v.), who exercised a very evil influence over him. To the calf-worship introduced by Jeroboam he added the worship of Baal. He was severely admonished by Elijah (q.v.) for his wickedness. His anger was on this account kindled against the prophet, and he sought to kill him. He undertook three campaigns against Ben-hadad II., king of Damascus. In the first two, which were defensive, he gained a complete victory over Ben-hadad, who fell into his hands, and was afterwards released on the condition of his restoring all the cities of Israel he then held, and granting certain other concessions to Ahab. After three years of peace, for some cause Ahab renewed war (1Kings 22:3) with Ben-hadad by assaulting the city of Ramoth-gilead, although the prophet Micaiah warned him that he would not succeed, and that the 400 false prophets who encouraged him were only leading him to his ruin. Micaiah was imprisoned for thus venturing to dissuade Ahab from his purpose. Ahab went into the battle disguised, that he might if possible escape the notice of his enemies; but an arrow from a bow "drawn at a venture" pierced him, and though stayed up in his chariot for a time he died towards evening, and Elijah's prophecy (1Kings 21:19) was fulfilled. He reigned twenty-three years. Because of his idolatry, lust, and covetousness, Ahab is referred to as pre-eminently the type of a wicked king (2Kings 8:18; 2 Chronicles 22:3 ; Micah 6:16 ).
A false prophet referred to by Jeremiah (Jeremiah 29:21 ), of whom nothing further is known.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Ahab
Uncle
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Ahab
1. Son of Omri; seventh king of the northern kingdom of Israel, second of his dynasty; reigned 28 years, from 919 to 897 B.C. Having occasional good impulses (1 Kings 21:27), but weak and misled by his bad wife Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal, king of Zidon, i.e. Phoenicia in general. The Tyrian historians, Dius and Menander, mention Eithobalus as priest of Ashtoreth. Having murdered Pheles, he became king of Tyre. Menander mentions a drought in Phoenicia; compare 1 Kings 17. He makes him sixth king after Hiram of Tyre, the interval being 50 years, and Eithobalus' reign 32; thus he would be exactly contemporary with Ahab (Josephus c. Apion, 1:18.) Ahab, under Jezebel's influence, introduced the impure worship of the sun-god Baal, adding other gods besides Jehovah, a violation of the first commandment, an awful addition to Jeroboam's sin of the golden calves, which at Dan and Bethel (like Aaron's calves) were designed (for state policy) as images of the one true God, in violation of the second commandment; compare 2 Kings 17:9; "the children of Israel did secretly things Hebrew covered words that were not right Hebrew so against the Lord," i.e., veiled their real idolatry with flimsy pretexts, as the church of Rome does in its image veneration.
The close relation of the northern kingdom with Tyre in David's and Solomon's time, and the temporal advantage of commercial intercourse with that great mart of the nations, led to an intimacy which, as too often happens in amalgamation between the church and the world, ended in Phoenicia seducing Israel to Baal and Astarte, instead of Israel drawing Phoenicia to Jehovah; compare 2 Corinthians 6:14-18. Ahab built an altar and temple to Baal in Samaria, and "made a grove," i.e. a sacred symbolic tree (asheerah ), the symbol of Ashtoreth (the idol to whom his wife's father was priest), the moon-goddess, female of Baal; else Venus, the Assyrian Ishtar (our "star".) Jehovah worship was scarcely tolerated; but the public mind seems to have been in a halting state of indecision between the two, Jehovah and Baal, excepting 7000 alone who resolutely rejected the idol; or they thought to form a compromise by uniting the worship of Baal with that of Jehovah. Compare Hosea 2:16; Amos 5:25-27; Amos 5:1 Kings 18; 19. Jezebel cut off Jehovah's prophets, except 100 saved by Obadiah.
So prevalent was idolatry that Baal had 450 prophets, and Asherah ("the groves") had 400, whom Jezebel entertained at her own table. God chastised Israel with drought and famine, in answer to Elijah's prayer which he offered in jealousy for the honor of God, and in desire for the repentance of his people (1 Kings 17; James 5:17-18). When softened by the visitation, the people were ripe for the issue to which Elijah put the conflicting claims to Jehovah and Baal at Carmel, and on the fire from heaven consuming the prophet's sacrifice, fell on their faces and exclaimed with one voice, "Jehovah, He is the God; Jehovah, He is the God." Baal's prophets were slain at the brook Kishon, and the national judgment, through Elijah's prayers, was withdrawn, upon the nation's repentance. Ahab reported all to Jezebel, and she threatened immediate death to Elijah. Ahab was pre-eminent for luxurious tastes; his elaborately ornamented ivory palace (1 Corinthians 1:27-295; Amos 3:15), the many cities he built or restored, as Jericho (then belonging to Israel, not Judah) in defiance of Joshua's curse (1 Kings 16:34), his palace and park at Jezreel (now Zerin), in the plain of Esdraelon, his beautiful residence while Samaria was the capital, all show his magnificence.
But much would have more, and his coveting Naboth's vineyard to add to his gardens led to an awful display of Jezebel's unscrupulous wickedness and his selfish weakness. "Dost thou now govern the kingdom of Israel? ... I will give thee the vineyard." By false witness suborned at her direction, Naboth and his sons (after he had refused to sell his inheritance to Ahab, Leviticus 25:23) were stoned; and Ahab at Jezebel's bidding went down to take possession (1 Kings 21; 2 Kings 9:26). This was the turning point whereat his doom was sealed. Elijah with awful majesty denounces his sentence, "in the place where dogs licked Naboth's blood, shall dogs lick thine" (fulfilled to the letter on Joram his offspring, 2 Kings 9, primarily also on Ahab himself, but not "in the place" where Naboth's blood was shed); while the king abjectly cowers before him with the cry, "Hast thou found me, O mine enemy?" All his male posterity were to be cut off, as Jeroboam's and Baasha's, the two previous dynasties, successively had been (See ELIJAH). Execution was stayed owing to Ahab's partial and temporary repentance; for he seems to have been capable of serious impressions at times (1 Kings 20:43); so exceedingly gracious is God at the first dawning of sorrow for sin.
Ahab fought three campaigns against Benhadad II., king of Damascus. The arrogance of the Syrian king, who besieged Samaria, not content with the claim to Ahab's silver, gold, wives, and children being conceded, but also threatening to send his servants to search the Israelite houses for every pleasant thing, brought on him God's wrath. A prophet told Ahab that Jehovah should deliver to him by the young men of the princes of the provinces (compare 1618416854_5) the Syrian multitude of which Benhadad vaunted, "The gods do so to me and more also, if the dust of Samaria shall suffice for handfuls for all the people that follow me" (1 Kings 20). "Drinking himself drunk" with his 32 vassal princes, he and his force were utterly routed. Compare for the spiritual application 1 Thessalonians 5:2-8. Again Benhadad, according to the prevalent idea of local gods, thinking Jehovah a god of the hills (His temple being on mount Zion and Samaria being on a hill) and not of the plains, ventured a battle on the plains at Aphek, E. of Jordan, with an army equal to his previous one.
He was defeated and taken prisoner, but released, on condition of restoring to Ahab all the cities of Israel which he held, and making streets for Ahab in Damascus, as his father had made in Samaria (i.e. of assigning an Israelites' quarter in Damascus, where their judges should have paramount authority, for the benefit of Israelites resident there for commerce and political objects). A prophet invested with the divine commission ("in the word of the Lord": Haggai 1:13) requested his neighbor to smite him; refusing, he was slain by a lion. Another, at his request, smote and wounded him. By this symbolic act, and by a parable of his having suffered an enemy committed to him to escape, the prophet intimated that Ahab's life should pay the forfeit of his having suffered to escape with life one appointed by God to destruction. This disobedience, like Saul's in the case of Amalek, owing to his preferring his own will to God's, coupled with his treacherous and covetous murder of Naboth, brought on him his doom in his third campaign against Benhadad three years subsequently.
With Jehoshaphat, in spite of the prophet Micaiah's warning, and urged on by an evil spirit in the false prophets, he tried to recover Ramoth Gilead (1 Kings 22). Benhadad's chief aim was to slay Ahab, probably from personal hostility owing to the gratuitousness of the attack. Conscience made Ahab a coward, and selfishness made him reckless of his professed friendship to Jehoshaphat. Compare 2 Chronicles 18:2; feasting and a display of hospitality often seduce the godly. So he disguised himself, and urged his friend to wear the royal robes. The same Benhadad whom duty to God ought to have led him to execute as a blasphemer, drunkard, and murderer, was in retribution made the instrument of his own destruction (1 Kings 20:10; 1 Kings 20:16; 1 Kings 20:42). That false friendship which the godly king of Judah ought never to have formed (2 Chronicles 19:2; 1 Corinthians 15:33) would have cost him his life but for God's interposition (2 Chronicles 18:31) "moving them to depart from him." Ahab's treachery did not secure his escape, an arrow "at a venture" humanly speaking, but guided by God really, wounded him fatally; and the dogs licked up his blood, according to the Lord's word of which Joram's case in 2 Kings 9:25 was a literal fulfillment (1 Kings 21:19), on the very spot, while his chariot and armor were being washed (1 Kings 22:38).
The Assyrian Black Obelisk mentions "Ahab of Jezreel," his ordinary residence, and that he furnished the confederacy, including Benhadad, against, Assyria 10,000 footmen and 2000 chariots, and that they were defeated. At first sight this seemingly contradicts Scripture, which makes Benhadad Ahab's enemy. But an interval of peace of three years occurred between Ahab's two Syrian wars (1 Kings 22:1). In it Ahab doubtless allied himself to Benhadad against the Assyrians. Fear of them was probably among his reasons for granting Benhadad easy terms when in his power (Jeremiah 29:21-22). When the Assyrians came in the interval that followed, Ahab was confederate with Benhadad. Hence arose his exasperation at the terms granted to Benhadad, whereby he gained life and liberty, being violated in disregard of honor and gratitude (1 Kings 22:3). The Moabite stone mentions Omri's son; "He also said, I will oppress Moab," confirming Scripture that it was not until after Ahab's death that Moab rebelled (2 Kings 1:1; 2 Kings 3:4-5). (See DIBON.)
2. A false prophet, who deceived with flattering prophecies of an immediate return the Jews in Babylon, and was burnt to death by Nebuchadnezzar (1 Kings 20:34). The names of him and Zedekiah, his fellow deceiver, were doomed to be a byword for a curse.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ahab
AHAB . 1 . Son of Omri, and the most noted member of his dynasty, king of Israel from about 875 to about 853 b.c. The account of him in our Book of Kings is drawn from two separate sources, one of which views him more favourably than the other. From the secular point of view he was an able and energetic prince; from the religious point of view he was a dangerous innovator, and a patron of foreign gods. His alliance with the Phœnicians was cemented by his marriage with Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal, king of Tyre ( 1 Kings 16:31 ), who was also, if we may trust Josephus, priest of Astarte. At a later date Ahab entered into alliance with Judah, giving his daughter Athaliab in marriage to Jehoram, son of Jehoshaphat ( 2 Kings 8:18 ). His wealth is indicated by the ivory palace which he built ( 1 Kings 21:1 ; 1 Kings 22:39 ).
The reign of Ahab was marked by frequent wars with the Syrian kingdom of Damascus. Benhadad, the king of that country, was so successful that he claimed suzerainty over Israel a claim which Ahab was at first disposed to admit (1 Kings 20:2 ff.). But when Benhadad went so far as to threaten Samaria with indiscriminate plunder, Ahab resisted. In two campaigns he defeated the invaders, even taking their haughty leader prisoner. Contrary to the advice of the prophetic party, he treated his captive magnanimously, and concluded an alliance with him, stipulating only that the cities formerly taken from Israel should be restored. The alliance was one for trade and commerce, each party having bazaars assigned him in the capital of the other ( 1 Kings 20:34 ). It is not improbable also that common measures of defence were planned against the Assyrians, who were showing hostile intentions in the region of the Lebanon. In the battle of Karkar, which was fought against these invaders in the year 854, Ahab was present with ten thousand troops. This we learn from the Assyrian inscriptions.
The religious innovation for which Ahab is held responsible by the Hebrew writers, was the introduction of the Phœnician Baal as one of the gods of Israel. It is clear that Ahab had no idea of displacing Jahweh altogether, for he gave his children names which indicated his devotion to Him. But to please his wife he allowed her to introduce and foster the worship of her own divinities. Her thought was that with the religion of her own country she would introduce its more advanced civilization. The champion of Jahweh’s exclusive right to the worship of Israel was Elijah. This prophet, by his bold challenge to the priests of Baal, roused the anger of Jezebel, and was obliged to flee the country (1 Kings 17:1-24 ; 1 Kings 18:1-46 ; 1 Kings 19:1-21 ). Other prophets do not seem to have been disturbed, for we find them at the court of Ahab in the last year of his life ( 1 Kings 22:6 ). These, however, were subservient to the crown, while Elijah was not only a protestant against religious changes, but the champion of the common people, whose rights were so signally violated in the case of Naboth.
Ahab died fighting for his people. The Syrian war had again broken out apparently because Benhadad had not kept his agreement. Ahab therefore tried to recover Ramoth-gilead, being assisted by Jehoshaphat of Judah. In the first encounter Ahab was slain, his reputation for courage being vindicated by the direction of his adversary to his soldiers ‘Fight neither with small nor with great, but only with the king of Israel’ (1 Kings 22:31 ).
2 . A false prophet ‘roasted in the fire’ by the king of Babylon ( Jeremiah 29:21 f.).
H. P. Smith.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Ahab
(ay' hab) Personal name meaning, “father's brother.” 1. The seventh king of Israel's Northern Kingdom, married a foreigner, Jezebel, and incited God's anger more than any of Israel's previous kings. Ahab, was the son and successor of Omri. His 22-year reign (874-853 B.C.), while enjoying some political and military success, was marred by spiritual compromise and failure (1 Kings 16:30 ).
His wife, Jezebel, was the daughter of Ethbaal, priest-king of Tyre (1 Kings 16:31 ). She was a devotee to the Tyrian god Melqart and gave open endorsement to the worship of Baal in Israel by supporting 450 Baal prophets and 400 prophets of the goddess Asherah (1 Kings 18:19 ). Following Ahab's death, she continued to be a significant force in Israel for ten years as queen mother.
Ahab's marriage to a Phoenician princess had both commercial and political benefits. Commercially, it brought desired goods to Samaria and opened the way for expanded sea trade. Politically, it removed any military threat from Phoenicia.
During Ahab's days, Israel enjoyed peace with Judah, largely as a result of a marriage he arranged between princess Athaliah and Joram, the crown prince of Judah. The resulting alliance produced cooperative efforts in sea trade (1 Kings 22:48 ; 2 Chronicles 20:35-37 ) and a joint military campaign to recapture Ramoth-gilead, which had fallen under Aramean control (1 Kings 22:2-40 ).
During his reign, effective control was maintained over Moab, producing revenue extracted by tribute, a tax the Moabite king paid to maintain his position (2 Kings 3:4 ). The oppression of Moab under Ahab and his father Omri finds expression in the famous Moabite Stone. In this inscription Mesha, king of Moab, observed that his land was under Israelite control for a period of 40 years. Mesha also claimed to have gained independence from Ahab's Israel.
Ahab was successful in two major campaigns against the Syrian king, Ben-hadad, but was mortally wounded in the third. His participation in the great battle of Qarqar (853 B.C.), though not mentioned in the Bible, is recorded on an inscription of Shalmanezer III of Assyria. According to Shalmanezer, Ahab committed 2,000 chariots and 10,000 men to the battle.
The days of Ahab in Samaria were days of growing wealth and spiritual apostasy. According to 1 Kings 22:39 , he built an “ivory house” for Jezebel, the remains of which were discovered in the Harvard excavations at the site. Rooms and furniture were decorated with ivory inlay which in many cases featured Egyptian deities. His surrender to the influences of idolatry is illustrated by the construction of a temple for Baal (1 Kings 16:32 ), the massacre of the Lord's prophets (1Kings 18:4,1 Kings 18:19 ), and seizure of an Israelite's property (1 Kings 21:1 ).
Ahab appears to have been a worshiper of Yahweh, God of Israel, but probably along with other deities. He frequently consulted with Yahweh's prophets (1Kings 20:13-14,1Kings 20:22,1 Kings 20:28 ; 1Kings 22:8,1 Kings 22:16 ), used the divine name in naming his children (Ahaziah, Jehoram, and Athaliah) and did not interfere with the execution of the priests of Baal after the contest on Mt. Carmel (1 Kings 18:40 ). The influence of Jezebel in his life, however, overshadowed any significant influence the prophets of the Lord had in his life. He became a prime example of evil (Micah 6:16 ).
The death of Jezebel was surrounded with the arrogance that so characterized her life. She painted her eyes and adorned herself just for the occasion of issuing verbal taunts at Jehu from the palace window. She was pushed out of that window and died and, as prophesied (1 Kings 21:23 ), was eaten by dogs (2 Kings 9:30-37 ).
2. A false prophet living in Babylon who prophesied lies and faced Jeremiah's condemnation (Jeremiah 29:20-23 ).
John J. Davis
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ahab
1. Sonand successor of Omri, king of Israel. He married Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal king of the Zidonians, and under her influence became an idolater, and led Israel into the worship of Baal. Of him it is said, there was none like him in very abominably following idols. It was chiefly in his reign that Elijah the Tishbite laboured, and he testified for Jehovah against the apostasy and corruption of the king. The trial of fire from heaven is an especial instance of this, which was followed by the death of 450 of the prophets of Baal, 1 Kings 18:19-40 , but there was no repentance in the king. Ahab made two attacks on Benhadad king of Syria and was helped by God so that he obtained the victory; on the second occasion instead of destroying Benhadad (whom the Lord had doomed to destruction) he made a treaty with him.
Ahab coveted the vineyard of Naboth, but on his refusal to part with the inheritance given by God to his fathers, Jezebel caused his death and bade Ahab take possession of the vineyard. Elijah met him there and declared that dogs should lick his blood where they had licked the blood of Naboth. The dogs should also eat Jezebel, and Ahab's house should be cut off. Ahab humbled himself before God, and the full end of his house was delayed till his son's days. After this Ahab made another attack upon Syria, and his 400 prophets foretold that he would be successful; and he, though warned of his danger by the prophet Micaiah, went into battle accompanied by Jehoshaphat king of Judah, his ally. He disguised himself, but an arrow, shot at a venture, smote him between the joints of his armour, and he was wounded to death, and the prediction of Elijah came literally to pass. 1 Kings 21,22 . Grace had lingered over this poor idolater, for he was an Israelite; but he died impenitent, and his whole house was soon to perish. 2 Kings 9:7-10 . The judgement of God fell on the apostate king who had seized the inheritance of God's people.
2. A false prophet among the captives of Babylon who prophesied a lie, and was roasted in the fire by Nebuchadnezzar. Jeremiah 29:21,22 .
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Ahab
the son and successor of Omri. He began his reign over Israel, A.M. 3086, and reigned 22 years. In impiety he far exceeded all the kings of Israel. He married Jezebel, the daughter of Ethbaal, king of Zidon, who introduced the whole abominations and idols of her country, Baal and Ashtaroth.
2. AHAB the son of Kolaiah, and Zedekiah the son of Maaseiah, were two false prophets, who, about A.M. 3406, seduced the Jewish captives at Babylon with hopes of a speedy deliverance, and stirred them up against Jeremiah. The Lord threatened them with a public and ignominious death, before such as they had deceived; and that their names should become a curse; men wishing that their foes might be made like Ahab and Zedekiah, whom Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon roasted in the fire, Jeremiah 29:21-22 .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Ahab
Ahab (â'hăb), father's brother. 1. The sixth king of Israel, the son and successor of Omri. His reign lasted 22 years, 918-897 b.c. He was the weakest and one of the most impious of all the Israelitish monarchs. He has the miserable character given him of doing "evil in the sight of the Lord above all that were before him." He not only maintained the worship of the calves set up by Jeroboam, but, having married Jezebel, daughter of Eth-baal, king of the Zidonians, he yielded himself to her evil influence, and introduced the worship of Baal into Samaria. A persecution of the prophets of the Lord followed—many of them being destroyed by Jezebel. As a judgment, a drought was sent upon the land; and then came the solemn vindication of Jehovah's authority by the prophet Elijah before Ahab and the assembled people, and the punishment, according to the law of Moses, of the idolatrous prophets. 1 Kings 17:18. Jezebel was irritated to madness at the news of this catastrophe, and resolved to sacrifice Elijah; while Ahab was either unable or unwilling to interfere.
Afterwards his wicked queen led him into one of his worst crimes. He seems to have had a cultivated taste. He built cities, and erected an ivory palace, 1 Kings 22:39, the walls being probably inlaid with ivory, and had pleasure grounds by his house in Jezreel, which he wished to enlarge by the addition of a vineyard belonging to Naboth. Naboth, however, refused either to sell or to exchange his hereditary property; and Ahab, disappointed, manifested the temper of a spoiled child. The unscrupulous Jezebel then put him in possession of the coveted plot of ground by the judicial murder of Naboth; and Ahab went to view it, but was met by Elijah, who denounced on him a fearful judgment. On bis repentance, superficial though it was, this sentence was partially revoked, and delayed till the days of Ahab's son. In two wars with Syria, this prince was successful, but he improperly spared Ben-hadad, the Syrian king. In a third campaign, having attempted, in alliance with Jehoshaphat, to retake Ramoth-gilead, still occupied by the Syrians, Ahab, though he disguised himself, was mortally wounded; and the dogs licked up the blood washed from his chariot in the pool of Samaria. Weak and unstable, Ahab let himself be made the tool of his wife; and his history is an instructive warning against such subserviency to a dangerous influence. 1 Kings 21:2. A false prophet in Babylon. Jeremiah 29:20-23.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Ahab
Ahab reigned over the kingdom of Israel (the northern part of the divided Israelite state) from about 874 to 852 BC. Before coming to Israel’s throne, he had married Jezebel, daughter of the king-priest of Phoenicia, in a political alliance that had disastrous consequences for Israel.
Besides accepting the Baal worship that Jezebel brought with her from Phoenicia, Ahab gave it official status in Israel by building a Baal temple in his capital city (1 Kings 16:29-33). Israel’s long-established practice of mixing the worship of God (Yahweh) with the worship of Baal was bad enough, but Jezebel’s intention was far worse. She wanted to remove the worship of God from Israel entirely and replace it with the worship of Baal. The Baalism promoted by Ahab and Jezebel was a threat to Israel’s existence as God’s people, and for this reason God sent the prophets Elijah and Elisha to oppose it. (For details of this aspect of Ahab’s reign see BAAL; ELIJAH.)
God used Elijah to tell Ahab of a drought that he was about to send as punishment on the ungodly kingdom (1 Kings 17:1). Three years later he used Elijah to announce the end of the drought, but that end came in such a way as should have convinced Ahab that he could not serve both God and Baal (1 Kings 18:1-2; 1 Kings 18:17-18; 1 Kings 18:21; 1 Kings 18:41-46).
Ahab, however, continued to try to serve two gods. He allowed the queen to try to kill the prophet who opposed her Baalism (1 Kings 19:1-2), but at the same time he looked to another of God’s prophets for directions that would bring him military victory against Syria (1 Kings 20:13-14; 1 Kings 20:22). Ahab won a decisive victory (1 Kings 20:20-21), and the next year won another victory, again at the direction of one of God’s prophets (1 Kings 20:22).
The victories should have convinced Ahab that God’s power was not, like Baal’s, limited to only certain places (1 Kings 20:28). When Ahab agreed to spare the enemy kings because of trade advantages he could win for himself, another of God’s prophets condemned his actions (1 Kings 20:34-43).
Not only were Ahab’s religious, military and trade policies contrary to God’s purposes, but his administration in general was full of injustice. This was clearly shown in the way he gained Naboth’s vineyard for himself. People could be easily bribed, local officials were corrupt, and no one upheld the law on behalf of ordinary citizens (1 Kings 21:1-16). The prophet Elijah announced a horrible judgment on Ahab, and particularly on his murderous wife Jezebel (1 Kings 21:17-26).
God’s judgment fell on Ahab in another battle with Syria. Most of the court prophets were corrupt, and gave Ahab whatever advice they thought would please him. The prophet Micaiah, by contrast, had consistently told Ahab the truth. When he told Ahab that the coming war would bring defeat, Ahab threw him into prison (1 Kings 22:1-28). Ahab ignored the message from God, and as a result met the dreadful death that Elijah had earlier announced (1 Kings 22:29-38).
Ahab’s sons continued the evil of their father’s reign (1 Kings 22:51-53; 2 Kings 3:1-3). The dynasty came to a bloody end through a revolution led by the ruthless Jehu (2 Kings 9:7-10; 2 Kings 10:1-11; 2 Kings 10:17).

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Ahab - Ahab reigned over the kingdom of Israel (the northern part of the divided Israelite state) from about 874 to 852 BC. ...
Besides accepting the Baal worship that Jezebel brought with her from Phoenicia, Ahab gave it official status in Israel by building a Baal temple in his capital city (1 Kings 16:29-33). The Baalism promoted by Ahab and Jezebel was a threat to Israel’s existence as God’s people, and for this reason God sent the prophets Elijah and Elisha to oppose it. (For details of this aspect of Ahab’s reign see BAAL; ELIJAH. )...
God used Elijah to tell Ahab of a drought that he was about to send as punishment on the ungodly kingdom (1 Kings 17:1). Three years later he used Elijah to announce the end of the drought, but that end came in such a way as should have convinced Ahab that he could not serve both God and Baal (1 Kings 18:1-2; 1 Kings 18:17-18; 1 Kings 18:21; 1 Kings 18:41-46). ...
Ahab, however, continued to try to serve two gods. Ahab won a decisive victory (1 Kings 20:20-21), and the next year won another victory, again at the direction of one of God’s prophets (1 Kings 20:22). ...
The victories should have convinced Ahab that God’s power was not, like Baal’s, limited to only certain places (1 Kings 20:28). When Ahab agreed to spare the enemy kings because of trade advantages he could win for himself, another of God’s prophets condemned his actions (1 Kings 20:34-43). ...
Not only were Ahab’s religious, military and trade policies contrary to God’s purposes, but his administration in general was full of injustice. The prophet Elijah announced a horrible judgment on Ahab, and particularly on his murderous wife Jezebel (1 Kings 21:17-26). ...
God’s judgment fell on Ahab in another battle with Syria. Most of the court prophets were corrupt, and gave Ahab whatever advice they thought would please him. The prophet Micaiah, by contrast, had consistently told Ahab the truth. When he told Ahab that the coming war would bring defeat, Ahab threw him into prison (1 Kings 22:1-28). Ahab ignored the message from God, and as a result met the dreadful death that Elijah had earlier announced (1 Kings 22:29-38). ...
Ahab’s sons continued the evil of their father’s reign (1 Kings 22:51-53; 2 Kings 3:1-3)
Naboth - an Israelite of the city of Jezreel, who lived under Ahab, king of the ten tribes, and had a fine vineyard near the king's palace. Ahab coveted his property; but Naboth, according to the law, Leviticus 25:23-24 , refused to sell it: and beside, it was a disgrace for a Hebrew to alienate the inheritance of his ancestors. Ahab, returning into his house, threw himself on his bed, and refused to eat, when Jezebel, his wife, took upon herself to procure the vineyard. She wrote letters in Ahab's name, and sealed them with the king's seal, and sent them to the elders of Jezreel, directing them to publish a fast, to place Naboth among the chief of the people, suborn against him two sons of Belial, or two false witnesses, who might depose, that Naboth had blasphemed God and the king. Accordingly, Naboth was condemned and stoned for the supposed crime, which brought upon Ahab and Jezebel the severest maledictions, 1 Kings 21. See Ahab
Naboth - An Israelite of Jezreel who owned a vineyard adjoining the palace of king Ahab. So Jezebel, the wife of Ahab, made a wicked plan to have Naboth condemned to death on a fake charge of blasphemy, and thus allow the king to seize upon the vineyard. The murder was avenged by the doom immediately passed upon Ahab and Jezebel, the royal murderers
Naboth - It was a vineyard, and lay "hard by the palace of Ahab" (1 Kings 21:1,2 ), who greatly coveted it. Jezebel, Ahab's wife, was grievously offended at Naboth's refusal to part with his vineyard. She then came to Ahab and said, "Arise, take possession of the vineyard; for Naboth is not alive, but dead. " Ahab arose and went forth into the garden which had so treacherously and cruelly been acquired, seemingly enjoying his new possession, when, lo, Elijah suddenly appeared before him and pronounced against him a fearful doom (1 Kings 21:17-24 ). Jehu and Bidcar were with Ahab at this time, and so deeply were the words of Elijah imprinted on Jehu's memory that many years afterwards he refers to them (2 Kings 9:26 ), and he was the chief instrument in inflicting this sentence on Ahab and Jezebel and all their house (9:30-37). The house of Ahab was extinguished by him. Ahab humbled himself at Elijah's words (1 Kings 21:28,29 ), and therefore the prophecy was fulfilled not in his fate but in that of his son Joram (2 Kings 9:25 ). ...
The history of Naboth, compared with that of Ahab and Jezebel, furnishes a remarkable illustration of the law of a retributive providence, a law which runs through all history (Compare Psalm 109:17,18 )
Joram - the son and successor of Ahab, king of Israel
Bidkar - An officer of Ahab and afterwards of Jehu ( 2 Kings 9:25 )
Ethbaal - King of Sidon, and father of Jezebel wife of Ahab
Micah - He lived in the time of King Ahab of Israel, and Ahab hated him. Whereas the other court prophets said only those things that pleased Ahab, Micaiah spoke the truth, whether Ahab liked it or not (1 Kings 22:5-9). When he told Ahab that a coming battle would bring defeat, Ahab threw him into prison
Ahab - Ahab . At a later date Ahab entered into alliance with Judah, giving his daughter Athaliab in marriage to Jehoram, son of Jehoshaphat ( 2 Kings 8:18 ). ...
The reign of Ahab was marked by frequent wars with the Syrian kingdom of Damascus. Benhadad, the king of that country, was so successful that he claimed suzerainty over Israel a claim which Ahab was at first disposed to admit (1 Kings 20:2 ff. But when Benhadad went so far as to threaten Samaria with indiscriminate plunder, Ahab resisted. In the battle of Karkar, which was fought against these invaders in the year 854, Ahab was present with ten thousand troops. ...
The religious innovation for which Ahab is held responsible by the Hebrew writers, was the introduction of the Phœnician Baal as one of the gods of Israel. It is clear that Ahab had no idea of displacing Jahweh altogether, for he gave his children names which indicated his devotion to Him. Other prophets do not seem to have been disturbed, for we find them at the court of Ahab in the last year of his life ( 1 Kings 22:6 ). ...
Ahab died fighting for his people. Ahab therefore tried to recover Ramoth-gilead, being assisted by Jehoshaphat of Judah. In the first encounter Ahab was slain, his reputation for courage being vindicated by the direction of his adversary to his soldiers ‘Fight neither with small nor with great, but only with the king of Israel’ (1 Kings 22:31 )
Eth-Baal - 940-908), father of Jezebel, who was the wife of Ahab (1 Kings 16:31 ). This marriage of Ahab was most fatal to both Israel and Judah
Micaiah - Consulted by Ahab at Jehoshaphat's request when undertaking the joint expedition against Ramoth Gilead, which Benhadad had engaged to restore (1 Kings 20:34). The 400 prophets whom Ahab gathered together to "inquire the word of Jehovah" (1 Kings 22:5) were prophets of Jeroboam's symbolic calf worship of Jehovah not of Baal. Ahab mentioned Micaiah, adding "I hate him, for he doth not prophesy good concerning me but evil" (compare 1 Kings 21:20; Jeremiah 36:28). ...
Ahab had Micaiah already in prison, as 1 Kings 22:26 implies, "carry him back . 6) says that it was Micaiah who predicted ("in the word of Jehovah," Haggai 1:13) death by a lion to the neighbor who would not smite him, and who, disguised with ashes, under the parable of one letting go a prisoner entrusted to him made Ahab in his hour of triumph, when the mortification would be the greater, condemn himself out of his own mouth, to lose his life for letting Benhadad escape (1 Kings 20:35-43). Zedekiah, one of the 400, at the gate of Samaria where the two kings sat in state, symbolically putting horns or iron spikes on his head, foretold the transfer of Ephraim's blessing (Deuteronomy 33:17) to Ahab; "with the horns of the buffalo (or wild ox, reem ) he shall push the people. Ironically and in parody he repeated at first their parrot-like cry, "go and prosper," to show Ahab how easy such prophesying is if worldly interest were one's aim. as sheep that have no shepherd (quoted by the Lord Jesus Himself, Matthew 9:36, as it is previously the basis of Ezekiel 34:5; Zechariah 10:2), and Jehovah said, these have no master (Ahab falling), let them return every man to his house. " Instead of Moses' blessing on Ephraim awaiting Ahab, as Zedekiah had said, Moses' picture of what Israel would be at his death, "Jehovah's congregation as sheep having no shepherd," if no successor were appointed, would be realized (Numbers 27:17). Ahab, though he had asked Micaiah to speak the truth, attributed it when spoken to Micaiah's ill will. ...
Micaiah therefore revealed the source unseen of the 400 prophets' falsehood; Jehovah, seen in real vision on His throne amidst His hosts, asked, who shall persuade Ahab to go up and fall at Ramoth Gilead? A lying spirit undertook to influence the 400 to Ahab's ruin (Zechariah 13:2; 1 John 4:6). ...
God does not will or tempt to evil (James 1:13); but, as Ahab would not heed the true prophet, gives him over to the false (Romans 1:24-28; Romans 9:17-23; Exodus 7:3; Exodus 7:13; Exodus 14:4; Exodus 14:17; Exodus 10:20; Exodus 10:27). The words "thou shalt persuade and prevail also" show that the human will was left free; God makes one stage in the sinner's downward course the sequel and punishment of the foregoing one; Ahab might have resisted the tempter. ...
Ahab commanded, "take Micaiah back unto Amon . " Micaiah replied: "if thou return at all in peace Jehovah hath not spoken by me; hearken, O nations, every one of you"; appealing not only to Israel but to the Gentile world, to which Ahab had conformed, and which may heed, since Israel will not, so as when the event should come to pass to discern the truth of Jehovah (Micah 1:2)
Jezreel, Blood of - The murder perpetrated here by Ahab and Jehu (Hosea 1:4 ; Compare 1 Kings 18:4 ; 2 Kings 9:6-10 )
Micaiah - When Ahab was joined by Jehoshaphat, and all Ahab's prophets foretold his success against Ramoth-gilead, Jehoshaphat asked if there was not yet another prophet of Jehovah of whom they could inquire. Then Micaiah was sent for, though Ahab said that he hated him, for he always prophesied evil unto him. " The way in which this was said apparently convinced Ahab that it was spoken in irony, for he said, "How many times shall I adjure thee that thou say nothing but the truth to me in the name of the Lord?" Micaiah at once said that he saw all Israel scattered, having no shepherd. ...
Then he relates that he had seen, probably in a vision, Jehovah sitting on His throne, and asking who would persuade Ahab to go to Ramoth-gilead and fall there. A spirit volunteered to accomplish it by being a lying spirit in the mouth of all Ahab's prophets. Zedekiah, one of Ahab's prophets, struck Micaiah on the cheek, and said, "Which way went the Spirit of the Lord from me to speak unto thee?" Micaiah replied, "Behold, thou shalt see on that day when thou shalt go into an inner chamber to hide thyself. " Ahab disguised himself, but was wounded by an arrow and died. Ahab's four hundred prophets, and Jehovah's one prophet are an instance of the conflict of spirits , which the Christian is now called upon to try
Bid'Kar - e, one who stabs ), Jehu's "captain," originally his fellow officer, ( 2 Kings 9:25 ) who completed the sentence on Jehoram, son of Ahab
Ethbaal - King of the Sidonians, and father of Jezebel, wife of Ahab king of Israel ( 1 Kings 16:31 )
Harness - Ahab was wounded by an arrow that entered at the joints of his armour
Imla - ]'>[1] in the days of Ahab
Kolaiah - Father of Ahab the false prophet 'whom the king of Babylon roasted in the fire
Ahab - In the first two, which were defensive, he gained a complete victory over Ben-hadad, who fell into his hands, and was afterwards released on the condition of his restoring all the cities of Israel he then held, and granting certain other concessions to Ahab. After three years of peace, for some cause Ahab renewed war (1Kings 22:3) with Ben-hadad by assaulting the city of Ramoth-gilead, although the prophet Micaiah warned him that he would not succeed, and that the 400 false prophets who encouraged him were only leading him to his ruin. Micaiah was imprisoned for thus venturing to dissuade Ahab from his purpose. Ahab went into the battle disguised, that he might if possible escape the notice of his enemies; but an arrow from a bow "drawn at a venture" pierced him, and though stayed up in his chariot for a time he died towards evening, and Elijah's prophecy (1Kings 21:19) was fulfilled. Because of his idolatry, lust, and covetousness, Ahab is referred to as pre-eminently the type of a wicked king (2Kings 8:18; 2 Chronicles 22:3 ; Micah 6:16 )
Ahab - Ahab (â'hăb), father's brother. As a judgment, a drought was sent upon the land; and then came the solemn vindication of Jehovah's authority by the prophet Elijah before Ahab and the assembled people, and the punishment, according to the law of Moses, of the idolatrous prophets. Jezebel was irritated to madness at the news of this catastrophe, and resolved to sacrifice Elijah; while Ahab was either unable or unwilling to interfere. Naboth, however, refused either to sell or to exchange his hereditary property; and Ahab, disappointed, manifested the temper of a spoiled child. The unscrupulous Jezebel then put him in possession of the coveted plot of ground by the judicial murder of Naboth; and Ahab went to view it, but was met by Elijah, who denounced on him a fearful judgment. On bis repentance, superficial though it was, this sentence was partially revoked, and delayed till the days of Ahab's son. In a third campaign, having attempted, in alliance with Jehoshaphat, to retake Ramoth-gilead, still occupied by the Syrians, Ahab, though he disguised himself, was mortally wounded; and the dogs licked up the blood washed from his chariot in the pool of Samaria. Weak and unstable, Ahab let himself be made the tool of his wife; and his history is an instructive warning against such subserviency to a dangerous influence
Chenaanah - The father of Zedekiah the false prophet in the reign of Ahab ( 1 Kings 22:11 , 2 Chronicles 18:10 )
Kolaiah - The father of the false prophet Ahab ( Jeremiah 29:21 )
Bidkar - Fellow officer and afterwards Jehu's captain; he executed the sentence on Joram, or Jehoram, son of Ahab, by casting him into the field of Naboth
Joram - He was the son of Ahab
Bazaar - Benhadad of Damascus gave Ahab permission to set up bazaars in Damascus as Ben-hadad's father had done in Samaria (1 Kings 20:34 )
Naboth - An Israelite at Jezreel, who declined selling his ancestral vineyard to Ahab, Leviticus 25:23,24 ; and was in consequence murdered, on a false charge of blasphemy contrived by Jezebel the queen. Ahab took immediate possession of the coveted vineyardperhaps as being legally for forfeited to the government, construing blasphemy as treason; or it may be, that the heirs were deterred from asserting their claim by a dread of the unscrupulous arts of Jezebel
Kolaiah - The father of the false prophet, Ahab (Jeremiah 29:21-23 )
Cherith, Brook of - (chee' rihth) The place where God instructed Elijah to hide after the prophet had declared the coming of a drought to Ahab, the king of Israel (1 Kings 17:3 )
hi'el - (God liveth ), a native of Bethel, who rebuilt Jericho in the reign of Ahab, ( 1 Kings 16:34 ) (B
Jezebel - daughter of Ethbaal, King of the Zidonians, and wife of Ahab, king of Israel, 1 Kings 16:31 . ...
Jezebel was so zealous, that she fed at her own table four hundred prophets belonging to the goddess Astarte; and her husband Ahab, in like manner, kept four hundred of Baal's prophets, as ministers of his false gods
Athaliah - When Athaliah, daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, married Jehoram of Judah, the Baalism that Ahab and Jezebel had established in Israel spread to Judah
Footmen or Runners - So Elijah ran before Ahab, 1 Kings 18:46
Micaiah - The son of Imlah, whom Ahab hated, (1 Kings 22:8) His name is the same in derivation as the former
Ben-Hadad - King Ahab of Israel (874-853 B. Another prophetic word led Ahab to victory when Ben-hadad attacked Israel at Aphek (1 Kings 20:22-30 ). Then Ben-hadad got covenant agreement with Ahab, bringing prophetic judgment on Ahab (1 Kings 20:31-43 ). Hadad-ezer who joined Ahab and other Syrian kings fighting Shalmaneser III of Assyria at Qarqar in 853 B
Kola'Iah - ) ...
The father of Ahab the false prophet, who was burnt by the king of Babylon
Mica'Iah - Micahiah, the son of Imlah, was a prophet of Samaria, who in the last year of the reign of Ahab king of Israel predicted his defeat and death, B
Naboth - ” Owner of a vineyard in the Jezreel Valley adjacent to the country palace of King Ahab, who desired the property for a vegetable garden. Naboth's murder evoked God's judgment on Ahab and his family (1 Kings 21:17-24 )
Naboth - ” Owner of a vineyard in the Jezreel Valley adjacent to the country palace of King Ahab, who desired the property for a vegetable garden. Naboth's murder evoked God's judgment on Ahab and his family (1 Kings 21:17-24 )
Mesha - A king of Moab, who paid an enormous tribute to Ahab king of Israel, but revolted at his death, 2 Kings 1:1 ; 3:4-27 . Joram the son of Ahab, with the aid of Judah and Edom, made war upon him, and besieged him in his capital
Ahaziah - Son and successor of Ahab, king of Israel, 1 Kings 22:51 2 Kings 1:1-18 . Ahaziah imitated Ahab's impiety, and worshipped Baal and Astarte, whose rites had been introduced into Israel by Jezebel his mother. He followed the house of Ahab, to which he was allied by his mother, and did evil. He met his death at the hand of Jehu, while in company with Joram, son of Ahab
Jezebel - The daughter of Ethbaal, king of Tyre, and wife of Ahab, king of Israel, infamous for her idolatry, wickedness and cruel persecution of the prophets of Jehovah. Jezebel planned and executed the murder of Naboth, using the authority and name of the king, and showing her remarkable influence over the wicked Ahab and over the leading men in the kingdom. For even after Ahab's death she maintained the ascendency over her son Joram. See Ahab. A symbolical name of a woman in the church at Thyatira, who corrupted the people; so called in allusion to Ahab's idolatrous wife
Bidkar - Bidkar and Jehu had originally served as chariot officers for Ahab, Joram's father
Naboth - (8th century BCE) Owned a vineyard in Jezereel, which King Ahab desired. As punishment, Ahab's family was annihilated and Jezebel's flesh eaten by dogs
Ahab - Ahab made two attacks on Benhadad king of Syria and was helped by God so that he obtained the victory; on the second occasion instead of destroying Benhadad (whom the Lord had doomed to destruction) he made a treaty with him. ...
Ahab coveted the vineyard of Naboth, but on his refusal to part with the inheritance given by God to his fathers, Jezebel caused his death and bade Ahab take possession of the vineyard. The dogs should also eat Jezebel, and Ahab's house should be cut off. Ahab humbled himself before God, and the full end of his house was delayed till his son's days. After this Ahab made another attack upon Syria, and his 400 prophets foretold that he would be successful; and he, though warned of his danger by the prophet Micaiah, went into battle accompanied by Jehoshaphat king of Judah, his ally
Naboth - A man of Jezreel, owner of a vineyard adjoining the palace of Ahab ( 1 Kings 21:1 ). ’ Jezebel, Ahab’s wife, by using the royal authority with the elders of the city, had Naboth accused of treason and blasphemy, and stoned to death. As Ahab went to take possession of the vineyard, he was met by Elijah, the prophet, who pronounced doom on him and his house
Prophets, False - These, at various periods in the history of Israel, appeared in large numbers: Ahab had 'about four hundred' of them. There were three that opposed Jeremiah to his face — Hananiah, Ahab, and Zedekiah
Ahab - Ahab the son of Kolaiah, and Zedekiah the son of Maaseiah, were two false prophets, who, about A. The Lord threatened them with a public and ignominious death, before such as they had deceived; and that their names should become a curse; men wishing that their foes might be made like Ahab and Zedekiah, whom Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon roasted in the fire, Jeremiah 29:21-22
Jehu - He fulfilled the divine purpose in extirpating the family of the impious Ahab, and zealously destroyed the priests of Baal and many other friends of Ahab
Ahazi'ah -
Son of Ahab and Jezebel eighth king of Israel, reigned B. After the battle of Ramoth in Gilead, in which Ahab perished [1], the vassal king of Moab refused his yearly tribute; comp. (1 Kings 22:49-53 ; 2 Kings 1:1 ; 2 Chronicles 20:35-37 ) ...
Fifth king of Judah, son of Jehoram and Athaliah (daughter of Ahab), and therefore nephew of the preceding Ahaziah, reigned one year, B
Hiel - The name of a certain Bethelite who in the days of Ahab fortified Jericho, and possibly sacrificed his two sons to appease the gods of the disturbed earth ( 1 Kings 16:34 )
Pediment - NRSV term for the stone base upon which Ahab set the bronze sea after removing it from the twelve bronze oxen (2 Kings 16:17 ). Ahab's changes in the Temple equipment were an attempt to gain favor with the Assyrians
Jehon'Adab - When Jehu was advancing, after the slaughter of Betheked, on the city of Samaria, he was suddenly met by Jehonadab, who joined with him in "slaying all that remained unto Ahab
Obadiah -
An Israelite who was chief in the household of King Ahab (1 Kings 18:3 ). Ahab seems to have held Obadiah in great honour, although he had no sympathy with his piety (5,6,7). The last notice of him is his bringing back tidings to Ahab that Elijah, whom he had so long sought for, was at hand (9-16)
Jezebel - ” Wife of King Ahab of Israel (874-853 B. When Ahab wanted Naboth's vineyard, Jezebel connived with the leaders of the city who falsely accused and convicted Naboth, stoning him to death. Elijah then prophesied Jezebel's death, she being the one who had “stirred up” Ahab to wickedness (1 Kings 21:1 )
Jez'Ebel - (chaste ), wife of Ahab king of Israel. ( 1 Kings 21:25 ) The first effect of her influence was the immediate establishment of the Phoenician worship on a grand scale in the court of Ahab. When she found her husband east down by his disappointment at being thwarted by Naboth, (1 Kings 21:7 ) she wrote a warrant in Ahab's name, and sealed it with his seal. To her, and not to Ahab, was sent the announcement that the royal wishes were accomplished, (1 Kings 21:14 ) and on her accordingly fell the prophet's curse, as well as on her husband, (1 Kings 21:23 ) a curse fulfilled so literally by Jehu, whose chariot-horses trampled out her life
na'Both - (fruits ), the victim of Ahab and Jezebel, was the owner of a small vineyard at Jezreel, close to the royal palace of Shab. " Ahab was cowed by this reply; but the proud spirit of Jezebel was aroused. For the signal retribution taken on this judicial murder --a remarkable proof of the high regard paid in the old dispensation to the claims of justice and independence --see Ahab ; JEHU ; JEZEBEL
Naboth - (See Ahab; ELIJAH. ) Septuagint (1 Kings 21:1) omit "which was in Jezreel," and read instead of "the palace" "the threshing floor of Ahab king of Samaria. David's offer to Araunah (2 Samuel 24:21-24) and Omri's purchase from Shemer illustrate Ahab's offer to Naboth. Ahab's blood in retribution was washed from the chariot in the pool of Samaria, where harlots were bathing (so translated instead of "and they washed the armour"), while dogs licked up the rest of the blood (1 Kings 22:38); the further retribution was on his seed Joram (2 Kings 9)
Hiel - Native of Bethel who rebuilt Jericho in the reign of Ahab
Joash - A son of Ahab ( 1 Kings 22:26 )
Jezebel - 706 BCE) A Zidonite princess, wife of King Ahab
Shear Jashub - ") Isaiah's son who accompanied him in meeting Ahab
Baal - The Israelites worshiped Baal in the days of King Achab or Ahab (4Kings, 3,10)
Baale - The Israelites worshiped Baal in the days of King Achab or Ahab (4Kings, 3,10)
Baalim - The Israelites worshiped Baal in the days of King Achab or Ahab (4Kings, 3,10)
Baaloth - The Israelites worshiped Baal in the days of King Achab or Ahab (4Kings, 3,10)
Jezreel - Here Elijah met Ahab, Jehu, and Bidkar; and here Jehu executed his dreadful commission against the house of Ahab (2 Kings 9:14-37 ; 10:1-11 )
Micaiah - Three years after the great battle with Ben-hadad (20:29-34), Ahab proposed to Jehoshaphat, king of Judah, that they should go up against Ramoth-Gilead to do battle again with Ben-hadad. " Ahab's prophets approved of the expedition; but Jehoshaphat, still dissatisfied, asked if there was no other prophet besides the four hundred that had appeared, and was informed of this Micaiah. He was sent for from prison, where he had been confined, probably on account of some prediction disagreeable to Ahab; and he condemned the expedition, and prophesied that it would end, as it did, in disaster
Omri - 929 to 918, and was succeeded by his son Ahab. In Micah 6:16 it is said "the statutes of Omri are kept:" they with "all the works of the house of Ahab," were kept in remembrance for punishment
Naboth - A Jezreelite, owner of a vineyard adjoining the property of Ahab, king of Israel. Ahab desired to purchase this vineyard, or exchange it for another; but Naboth refused to part with it, because it was the inheritance of his fathers. Jezebel, Ahab's wife, observing her husband's vexation on account of this refusal, wrote to the elders and nobles of the city where Naboth lived, telling them to proclaim a fast, to set Naboth in a prominent place, to get two sons of Belial to charge him with blaspheming God and the king, and then to stone him to death
Ahab - He makes him sixth king after Hiram of Tyre, the interval being 50 years, and Eithobalus' reign 32; thus he would be exactly contemporary with Ahab (Josephus c. ) Ahab, under Jezebel's influence, introduced the impure worship of the sun-god Baal, adding other gods besides Jehovah, a violation of the first commandment, an awful addition to Jeroboam's sin of the golden calves, which at Dan and Bethel (like Aaron's calves) were designed (for state policy) as images of the one true God, in violation of the second commandment; compare 2 Kings 17:9; "the children of Israel did secretly things Hebrew covered words that were not right Hebrew so against the Lord," i. Ahab built an altar and temple to Baal in Samaria, and "made a grove," i. Ahab reported all to Jezebel, and she threatened immediate death to Elijah. Ahab was pre-eminent for luxurious tastes; his elaborately ornamented ivory palace (1 Kings 22:39; Amos 3:15), the many cities he built or restored, as Jericho (then belonging to Israel, not Judah) in defiance of Joshua's curse (1 Kings 16:34), his palace and park at Jezreel (now Zerin), in the plain of Esdraelon, his beautiful residence while Samaria was the capital, all show his magnificence. " By false witness suborned at her direction, Naboth and his sons (after he had refused to sell his inheritance to Ahab, Leviticus 25:23) were stoned; and Ahab at Jezebel's bidding went down to take possession (1 Kings 21; 2 Kings 9:26). Elijah with awful majesty denounces his sentence, "in the place where dogs licked Naboth's blood, shall dogs lick thine" (fulfilled to the letter on Joram his offspring, 2 Kings 9, primarily also on Ahab himself, but not "in the place" where Naboth's blood was shed); while the king abjectly cowers before him with the cry, "Hast thou found me, O mine enemy?" All his male posterity were to be cut off, as Jeroboam's and Baasha's, the two previous dynasties, successively had been (See ELIJAH). Execution was stayed owing to Ahab's partial and temporary repentance; for he seems to have been capable of serious impressions at times (1 Kings 20:43); so exceedingly gracious is God at the first dawning of sorrow for sin. ...
Ahab fought three campaigns against Benhadad II. The arrogance of the Syrian king, who besieged Samaria, not content with the claim to Ahab's silver, gold, wives, and children being conceded, but also threatening to send his servants to search the Israelite houses for every pleasant thing, brought on him God's wrath. A prophet told Ahab that Jehovah should deliver to him by the young men of the princes of the provinces (compare 1 Corinthians 1:27-29) the Syrian multitude of which Benhadad vaunted, "The gods do so to me and more also, if the dust of Samaria shall suffice for handfuls for all the people that follow me" (1 Kings 20). ...
He was defeated and taken prisoner, but released, on condition of restoring to Ahab all the cities of Israel which he held, and making streets for Ahab in Damascus, as his father had made in Samaria (i. By this symbolic act, and by a parable of his having suffered an enemy committed to him to escape, the prophet intimated that Ahab's life should pay the forfeit of his having suffered to escape with life one appointed by God to destruction. Benhadad's chief aim was to slay Ahab, probably from personal hostility owing to the gratuitousness of the attack. Conscience made Ahab a coward, and selfishness made him reckless of his professed friendship to Jehoshaphat. " Ahab's treachery did not secure his escape, an arrow "at a venture" humanly speaking, but guided by God really, wounded him fatally; and the dogs licked up his blood, according to the Lord's word of which Joram's case in 2 Kings 9:25 was a literal fulfillment (1 Kings 21:19), on the very spot, while his chariot and armor were being washed (1 Kings 22:38). ...
The Assyrian Black Obelisk mentions "Ahab of Jezreel," his ordinary residence, and that he furnished the confederacy, including Benhadad, against, Assyria 10,000 footmen and 2000 chariots, and that they were defeated. At first sight this seemingly contradicts Scripture, which makes Benhadad Ahab's enemy. But an interval of peace of three years occurred between Ahab's two Syrian wars (1 Kings 22:1). In it Ahab doubtless allied himself to Benhadad against the Assyrians. When the Assyrians came in the interval that followed, Ahab was confederate with Benhadad. The Moabite stone mentions Omri's son; "He also said, I will oppress Moab," confirming Scripture that it was not until after Ahab's death that Moab rebelled (2 Kings 1:1; 2 Kings 3:4-5)
Mattan - She probably had brought him from Samaria to introduce the Baal worship of her father Ahab into the court of Jehoram her husband, Jehoshaphat's son (2 Chronicles 21:6; 2 Chronicles 21:13)
Kir-Haraseth - After the death of Ahab, Mesha, king of Moab (see 2 Kings 3:20-27 )
Jezreel - Ahab chose it for his chief residence. The palace of Ahab, 1 Kings 21:1, probably containing his "ivory house," 1 Kings 22:39, was on the eastern side of the city. After the fall of the house of Ahab, Jezreel also fell into a decline
Ben-Hadad - In two successive years he raised large armies, and made war upon Ahab king of Israel. Ahab spared him, contrary to the command of God and gave him conditions of peace. These do not seem to have been fulfilled, for three years after, Ahab renewed the war and was slain, 1 Kings 22:1-53 After about nine years, Ben-hadad again invaded Israel, and the prophet Elisha was instrumental in frustrating his plans, 2 Kings 6:8-23
Athaliah - Daughter of Jezebel and Ahab, and granddaughter of Omri (cf. He having been slain by Jehu when he was executing judgement on the house of Ahab, Athaliah usurped the throne and endeavoured to destroy all the seed royal
City of Palm Trees - Jericho itself lay in ruins from the time of the conquest until the time of Ahab
Ahab - Ahab erected in Samaria a house of Baal, and set up images of Baal and Ashtoreth; idolatry and wickedness became fearfully prevalent, and the king "did more to provoke the Lord to anger than all the kings that were before him. About six years later, Ben-hadad, king of Syria, invaded Israel with a great army, but was ignominiously defeated; and still more disastrously the year after, when Ahab took him captive, but soon released him, and thus incurred the displeasure of God. In spite of the warnings and mercies of Providence, Ahab went on in sin; and at length, after the murder of Naboth, his crimes and abominable idolatries were such that God sent Elijah to denounce judgments upon him and his seed
Obadiah - The governor of Ahab's house. He feared the Lord greatly, and had the boldness, in spite of Ahab and Jezebel, to hide a hundred of the prophets of Jehovah, and feed them with bread and water, when Jezebel was cutting off the prophets. When Elijah sent Obadiah to tell Ahab that he was there, he feared that the Spirit of the Lord would catch away Elijah, and he would be slain; but he obeyed, and Elijah met the king . His false position may account for his dwelling upon his own work for the Lord, and his fear for his life before Ahab
Joram or Jehoram - Son of Ahab king of Israel, succeeded his older brother Ahaziah in the throne, B. His body was thrown into the field of Naboth at Jezreel, and with him perished the race of Ahab, 1 Kings 21. Unhappily he was married to Athaliah, daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, whose evil influence did much to render his reign a curse to the land
Jezebel - Daughter of Ethbaal king of the Zidonians, wife of Ahab king of Israel, and mother of Ahaziah, Joram, and Athaliah. When Ahab longed for the vineyard which Naboth refused to sell, Jezebel caused Naboth to be falsely accused and stoned to death, and then told her husband to go and take possession. Elijah was soon on the spot to tell Ahab his doom, and of his wife he said, "The dogs shall eat Jezebel by the wall of Jezreel
Ahab - Ahab, was the son and successor of Omri. Following Ahab's death, she continued to be a significant force in Israel for ten years as queen mother. ...
Ahab's marriage to a Phoenician princess had both commercial and political benefits. ...
During Ahab's days, Israel enjoyed peace with Judah, largely as a result of a marriage he arranged between princess Athaliah and Joram, the crown prince of Judah. The oppression of Moab under Ahab and his father Omri finds expression in the famous Moabite Stone. Mesha also claimed to have gained independence from Ahab's Israel. ...
Ahab was successful in two major campaigns against the Syrian king, Ben-hadad, but was mortally wounded in the third. According to Shalmanezer, Ahab committed 2,000 chariots and 10,000 men to the battle. ...
The days of Ahab in Samaria were days of growing wealth and spiritual apostasy. ...
Ahab appears to have been a worshiper of Yahweh, God of Israel, but probably along with other deities
Obadiah - Of the remainder, the best known is the manager of Ahab’s royal household. He protected God’s prophets from Jezebel’s violence, and on one occasion carried a message from Elijah to Ahab (1 Kings 18:1-16)
Micaiah - A faithful prophet who predicted in vain to Ahab the fatal termination of his expedition against Ramoth-gilead
Ahaziah - the son of Ahab, king of Israel. Ahaziah reigned two years, partly alone, and partly with his father Ahab, who appointed him his associate in the kingdom a year before his death. The Moabites, who had been always obedient to the kings of the ten tribes, ever since their separation from the kingdom of Judah, revolted after the death of Ahab, and refused to pay the ordinary tribute. He walked in the ways of Ahab's house, to which he was related, his mother being of that family. In the meantime, Jehu, the son of Nimshi, whom Joram had left besieging the fortress of Ramoth, rebelled against his master, and set out with a design of extirpating the house of Ahab, according to the commandment of the Lord, 2 Kings 9
jo'Ram -
Son of Ahab king of Israel
Ramoth Gilead - Keenly fought for by the Israelites and their enemies the Syrians under Ahab and Joram (1 Kings 22:4; it had been seized by Benhadad I from Omri; Josephus Ahab fell in attempting to recover it)
Ahaziah - Ahaziah of Israel was the son of Ahab, and ruled after him only two years or parts of years. Under the influence of his mother, who was a daughter of Ahah and Jezehel, it is not surprising to read that he walked in the ways of Ahab
Jehoshaphat - The great error of his life was an entangling alliance with the wicked Ahab, whose infamous daughter Athaliah early began to afflict the kingdom of Judah, of which she was afterwards the queen. Jehoshaphat was beguiled by Ahab into an unsuccessful war with the Syrians, but soon resumed his labors in behalf of religion and justice
Amon (2) - Governor of the city under Ahab (1 Kings 22:26)
Micaiah - A faithful and fearless prophet, consulted by King Ahab at the demand of Jehoshaphat as to the issue of their proposed campaign against the Syrians. Ahab's conduct in this matter displays the amazing folly of sins against light
Adjuration - A solemn charge by one in authority to another to speak the truth under the obligation of an oath, as when Ahab adjured Micaiah, 1 Kings 22:16 , and when the high priest adjured our Lord
Micaiah - Son of Imlah and prophet of Yahweh who predicted the death of Ahab and the scattering of Israel's forces at Ramoth-Gilead (1 Kings 22:7-28 ). Having witnessed Yahweh's heavenly council, Micaiah was certain Ahab's 400 prophets were possessed by a lying spirit
Rechab - Father or ancestor of J[1]onadab, a supporter of Jehu's purge of the family of Ahab and other worshipers of Baal (2Kings 10:15,2 Kings 10:23 )
Urijah - Chief priest who complied with Ahab's order to build an Assyrian-style altar for the Jerusalem Temple (2 Kings 16:10-16 ). Ahab likely hoped the incorporation of foreign elements into Israel's worship would impress the Assyrian king Tiglath-Pileser with his loyalty
Athaliah - She was either the daughter of Ahab and Jezebel of Israel (2 Kings 8:18 ) or of Omri, king of Israel (2 Kings 8:26 ; according to a literal reading of text as in KJV; an interpretation of text extends Hebrew word for daughter to mean female descendant and thus “granddaughter as in NAS; NIV; RSV). Some have suggested Omri was her father, but her brother Ahab raised her at court and thus functioned as her father
Joram, Jehoram - He, as of the seed of David, formed an unholy alliance by marrying Athaliah, daughter of Ahab and Jezebel. Son of Ahab and Jezebel. ...
The time however was approaching for God's judgement on the house of Ahab. In the meantime a prophet, sent by Elisha, visited the camp and anointed Jehu to be king of Israel, with instructions to smite the house of Ahab totally
Jehu - After Jezebel of Phoenicia had married King Ahab of Israel, she set about establishing her Phoenician Baalism as Israel’s official religion. ...
Some years later, when Ahab’s son had become king and Jehu had risen in rank to become Israel’s army commander, a prophet anointed Jehu and declared him the new king (2 Kings 9:1-10). ...
Joram’s mother Jezebel was with him at Jezreel; so was Judah’s king Ahaziah, who was a grandson of Ahab and Jezebel and a nephew of Joram. He ordered the execution of seventy other descendants of Ahab, and displayed their heads as a warning that the wrath of God would fall on any who opposed him (2 Kings 10:1-11). ...
In wiping out the dynasty of Ahab, Jehu was driven more by his desire for power than by his devotion to God; for he himself still worshipped at the idol shrines that Jeroboam had earlier set up (2 Kings 10:29; 2 Kings 10:31)
Resen - The Larissa of Xenophon (Ahab
Amon - The governor of Samaria in the time of Ahab
Ben-Hadad - 854 he had Ahab of Israel as one of his chief allies. But Ahab was more fortunate in the campaigns of 856 and 855, which were followed by a treaty of peace with concessions to Israel ( 1 Kings 20:1-43 )
Chariots - The military strength of Israel under Ahab was noteworthy because of the number of chariots available for use. According to Assyrian records, Ahab brought 2,000 chariots into the Battle of Qarqar in 853 B
Brother - 1 Kings 20:33 (b) The ungodly enemy king took the place of being a relative of Ahab, the King of Samaria. Ahab accepted the suggestion. GOD cursed Ahab for his action in this matter
a'Hab - See (1 Kings 18:19 ) One of Ahab's chief tastes was for splendid architecture which he showed by building an ivory house and several cities. Desiring to add to his pleasure-grounds at Jezreel the vineyard of his neighbor Naboth, he proposed to buy it or give land in exchange for it; and when this was refused by Naboth in accordance with the Levitical law, (Leviticus 25:23 ) a false accusation of blasphemy was brought against him, and he was murdered, and Ahab took possession of the coveted fields. (2 Kings 9:26 ) Thereupon Elijah declared that the entire extirpation of Ahab's house was the penalty appointed for his long course of wickedness. [1] The execution, however, of the sentence was delayed in consequence of Ahab's deep repentance. Ahab undertook three campaigns against Ben-hadad II. (1 Kings 20:1-21 ) Next year Ben-hadad again invaded Israel by way of Aphek, on the east of Jordan; yet Ahab's victory was so complete that Ben-hadad himself fell into his hands, but was released contrary to God's will, (1 Kings 20:22-34 ) on condition of restoring the cities of Israel, and admitting Hebrew commissioners into Damascus. After this great success Ahab enjoyed peace for three years, when he attacked Ramoth in Gilead, on the east of Jordan, in conjunction with Jehoshaphat king of Judah, which town he claimed as belonging to Israel
Confiscation - Ahab exercised this royal right when he confiscated the property of a person (Naboth) executed by the state (1 Kings 21:15-16 ), but he had to bear God's punishment for his act (1 Kings 21:18-19 )
Pethor - of Circesium, and Bethauna (Ptolemy, 5:18, section 6), corruptions of Pethor, answer to Ahab, meaning the same in Arabic (Anatha, Ammian
Ben-Hadad - The second fought with the Israelite kings Ahab and Joram (or Jehoram)
me'Sha - (Genesis 10:30 ) ...
The king of Moab who was tributary to Ahab, (2 Kings 3:4 ) but when Ahab fell at Ramoth-gilead, Mesha refused to pay tribute to his successor, Jehoram
je'hu - During this siege he was anointed by Elisha's servant, and told that he was appointed to be king of Israel and destroyer of the house of Ahab. All the descendants of Ahab that remained in Jezreel, together with the officers of the court and the hierarchy of Eastward, were swept away. The vast temple raised by Ahab, (1 Kings 16:32 ) was crowded from end to end. He first denounced Baasha, (1 Kings 16:1,7 ) and then, after an interval of thirty years, reappeared to denounce Jehoshaphat for his alliance with Ahab
Jezebel - Wife of Ahab who became a puppet in her hands for working all wickedness in the sight of Jehovah (1 Kings 21:25). (See Ahab. Like Clytemnestra or Lady Macbeth, she taunted Ahab with lack of kingly spirit in not taking what he wished, Naboth's vineyard (1 Kings 21:7; 1 Kings 21:14; 1 Kings 21:23): "dost thou govern Israel? I (the real monarch) will give thee the vineyard of Naboth. " So she wrote in Ahab's name to the Jezreelite elders, and sealed the letters with his seal; and to her it was that they wrote the announcement that they had stoned Naboth for blasphemy. She survived Ahab 14 years, and still as queen mother exercised an evil influence in the courts of her sons Ahaziah and Joram of Israel, and in that of her daughter Athaliah's husband Jehoram (2 Chronicles 21:6; 2 Chronicles 22:2)
Earthquake - The first earthquake in Palestine of which we have any record happened in the reign of Ahab (1 Kings 19:11,12 )
Hadadezer - under the more Aramaic form Adadidri , as the equivalent of Benhadad of Damascus, who led the great combination, including Ahab of Israel, against the Assyrians in b
Mesha - He was tributary to Ahab, but rebelled and suffered an entire defeat from Jehoram, Jehoshaphat, and the king of Edom
Jehonadab - ” Son of Rechab who supported Jehu in the latter's bloody purge of the house of Ahab (2 Kings 10:15 )
Orontes - Cities of the Orontes valley include Antioch (Acts 11:19 ; Acts 13:1 ), Hamath (2 Samuel 8:9 ; 2 Kings 17:24 ; 2 Chronicles 8:4 ; Isaiah 11:11 ), Qarqar, where King Ahab of Israel joined a coalition of Syrian kings warring against Shalmaneser III, and Riblah (2 Kings 23:33 ; 2Kings 25:6,2 Kings 25:21 )
Ahaziah - Son of Ahab and Jezebel. Son of Jehoram and Athaliah, daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, therefore nephew of the above. Ahaziah afterwards went to visit Joram, and God caused his death by Jehu when he cut off the house of Ahab
Ahaziah - Ahaziah of Israel was the son of Ahab and Jezebel, and during his brief two-year reign (853-852 BC) he continued to promote his parents’ Baal worship (1 Kings 22:51-53). Through the Judean Jehoram and his wife Athaliah, the Baalism of Ahab and Jezebel spread to Judah
Obadiah - Over Ahab's house. As there were saints in Nero's palace (Philippians 1:13; Philippians 4:22), so they were in wicked Ahab's palace. Had not his value as a servant made him necessary to Ahab, his piety would have destroyed him. The pressure of the drought in the third year was such that Ahab could trust none so well as Obadiah to search throughout the land for water to preserve his "beasts," his stud of "horses and mules. " Ahab cared more for these than for his perishing subjects! In a corrupt court, in spite of the persecuting idolatrous queen Jezebel, "Obadiah feared Jehovah," not merely a little but "greatly. Ahab went in one direction in search of water, Obadiah another by himself. Elijah told him to tell Ahab of his presence. Obadiah in distrustful fear (for Scripture records the failings as well as the graces of its heroes, for our learning) regarded the message as tantamount to his destruction, supposing the Spirit would carry Elijah elsewhere and so Ahab, disappointed of his victim, would wreak his vengeance on Obadiah. Elijah's assurance that he would show himself to Ahab sufficed to dispel his fears and to re-establish his faith. After his return to Ahab we hear of him no more
Jehoshaphat - ...
The Scripture reproaches Jehoshaphat for his alliance with Ahab, king of Israel, 1 Kings 20; 2 Chronicles 18. Some time after, he went to visit Ahab in Samaria; and Ahab invited him to march with him against Ramoth- Gilead. Afterward, he went into the battle in his robe, and the enemy supposed him to be Ahab; but he crying out, they discovered their mistake, and Jehoshaphat returned in peace to Jerusalem. The Prophet Jehu reproved him for assisting Ahab, 2 Chronicles 19:1-3
Zedekiah - Son of Chenaanah, and one of Ahab’s four hundred court prophets ( 1 Kings 22:11 ; 1 Kings 22:24-25 , 2 Chronicles 18:10 ; 2 Chronicles 18:23-24 ). He and another, named Ahab , are denounced by Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 29:21-23 ) for gross immorality as well as for falsely prophesying a speedy restoration from Babylon
Zedekiah - Son of Chenaanah, and one of Ahab’s four hundred court prophets ( 1 Kings 22:11 ; 1 Kings 22:24-25 , 2 Chronicles 18:10 ; 2 Chronicles 18:23-24 ). He and another, named Ahab , are denounced by Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 29:21-23 ) for gross immorality as well as for falsely prophesying a speedy restoration from Babylon
Jehoram - Jehoram of Israel was a son of Ahab ( 2 Kings 3:1 ), and came to the throne after the brief reign of his brother Ahaziah. He was married to Athaliah, daughter of Ahab and Jezebel
Jehu - Haying been proclaimed king in the presence of the whole army, he proceeded towards Jezreel, and executed the predicted judgments upon the house of Ahab. Jehu then secured possession of Samaria, and slew all that remained unto Ahab, till he had extirpated him, according to the word of the Lord
Benhadad - Another king of Syria in the time of Ahab. Ahab called him 'brother,' and spared his life, for which he was rebuked by a prophet: God had devoted Ben-hadad to death and Ahab's life should go for his life
Jehoram - He married Athaliah, daughter of the Israelite king Ahab and his Baalist wife Jezebel, and introduced the Baalism of Jezebel into Judah (2 Kings 8:16-18; 2 Chronicles 21:4-6). He was the second son of Ahab and Jezebel, and became king when his older brother Ahaziah died as a result of an accident (1 Kings 22:51; 2 Kings 1:2; 2 Kings 1:17; 2 Kings 3:1)
Jehu - It is evident that a considerable party in Israel bad long been dissatisfied with the house of Ahab. Jehu, when in attendance upon Ahab, had heard Elijah’s denunciation of the murder of Naboth ( 2 Kings 9:25 f. ...
The extermination of Ahab’s house was a foregone conclusion. The extermination of the royal house in Judah seems uncalled for, but was perhaps excused by the times on account of the close relationship with the family of Ahab
Jehu - On retiring into the house he anointed Jehu to be king over Israel, with instructions to smite the whole house of Ahab. His body was thrown into the field of Naboth the Jezreelite, which Ahab had gained by murder: cf. Jehu then caused the death of seventy of the sons of Jehoram and forty-two of the 'brethren of Ahaziah' who came to salute the royal family; and slew all that remained to Ahab, his great men and his priests. ...
Jehu was commended for carrying out the will of God in exterminating the house of Ahab, and Jehovah said to him that his children to the fourth generation should sit upon the throne
Ivory - (1 Kings 10:22 ) The "ivory house" of Ahab, (1 Kings 22:39 ) was probably a palace, the walls of which were panelled with ivory, like the palace of Menelaus described by Homer
Elijah - He was raised up by God, to be set like a wall of brass, in opposition to idolatry, and particularly to the worship of Baal, which Jezebel and Ahab supported in Israel. The Scripture introduces Elijah saying to Ahab, 1 Kings 17:1-2 , A. Suppose that Elijah was concealed from Ahab in some rocky or mountainous spot, where travellers never came; and that here a number of voracious birds had built their nests upon the trees which grew around it, or upon a projecting rock, &c. After three years of drought, the Lord commanded Elijah to show himself to Ahab. The famine being great in Samaria, Ahab sent the people throughout the country, to inquire after places where they might find forage for the cattle. Obadiah, an officer of the king's household, being thus employed, Elijah presented himself, and directed him to tell Ahab, "Behold, Elijah is here!" Ahab came to meet the prophet, and reproached him as the cause of the famine. Elijah retorted the charge upon the king, and his iniquities, and challenged Ahab to gather the people together, and the prophets of Baal, that it might be determined by a sign from heaven, the falling of fire upon the sacrifice, who was the true God. In this the prophet obeyed the impulse of the Spirit of God; and Ahab, either under an influence of which he was not conscious, or blindly confident in the cause of idolatry, followed Elijah's direction, and convened the people of Israel, and four hundred prophets of Baal. " Elijah then, having excited the people to slay the false prophets of Baal, said to Ahab, "Go home, eat and drink, for I hear the sound of abundance of rain;" which long-expected blessing descended from heaven according to his prediction, and gave additional proof to the truth of his mission from the only living and true God. Jezebel, the wife of Ahab, threatened Elijah for having slain her prophets. Some years after, Ahab having seized Naboth's vineyard, the Lord commanded Elijah to reprove Ahab for the crime he had committed. By these fearful miracles he was accredited to this successor of Ahab as a prophet of the true God, and the destruction of these companies of armed men, was a demonstration of God's anger against the people at large
Esdraelon - He later slaughtered all the men of Ahab and Azariah and all the prophets of Baal there (2 Kings 10:1 ). Jezebel and Ahab wanted to buy the vineyard, but Naboth refused because it had been handed down to him from his ancestors (1 Kings 21:3 ). Jezebel arranged Naboth's murder so Ahab could take possession of the vineyard (1 Kings 21:5-16 )
Jezreel - Ahab had here a palace; and this city became famous on account of his seizure of Naboth's vineyard, 1 Kings 21:1-29 ; and the vengeance executed on Ahab, 2 Kings 9:10,14-37 10:1-11 . Across this plain, from Carmel to Jezreel, Elijah ran before the chariot of Ahab, 1 Kings 18:46
Jehoram - ...
...
The son of Ahab and Jezebel, and successor to his brother Ahaziah on the throne of Israel. Jehoram was pierced by an arrow from Jehu's bow on the piece of ground at Jezreel which Ahab had taken from Naboth, and there he died (2 Kings 9:21-29 ). His wife was Athaliah, the daughter of Ahab and Jezebel
Jehoshaphat - King Ahab of Israel was so impressed that he persuaded Jehoshaphat to join him in a battle against Syria (1 Kings 22:1-4). Jehoshaphat, however, did not trust Ahab’s court prophets, who seemed more concerned with pleasing Ahab than with telling him God’s will. Only the prophet Micaiah told the truth (namely, that Israel would be defeated), but Ahab ignored his advice, went to war and was killed (1 Kings 22:5-36). ...
Later, Jehoshaphat joined with Ahab’s equally corrupt son in a commercial partnership involving a fleet of ships
Athaliah - A granddaughter of Omri, 2 Chronicles 22:2 , and daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, 2 Kings 11:1
Ramoth-Gilead - Here Ahab, who joined Jehoshaphat in an endeavour to rescue it from the hands of the king of Syria, was mortally wounded (1 Kings 22:1-36 )
Ramoth-Gilead - Ahab attempted to retake the city but was mortally wounded in the battle (1 Kings 22:29-40 )
Rechabites - (ree' ka bitess) Descendants of Jehonadab ben Rechab, who supported Jehu when he overthrew the house of Ahab (2 Kings 10:15-17 )
Manger - Archaeologists have discovered stone mangers in the horse stables of Ahab at Megiddo
Bezer - 27), as being in ruins in his day, and as having been rebuilt by him, after his revolt from Ahab, and expulsion of the Israelites from the territory N
Jehu - the son of Jehoshaphat, and grandson of Nimshi, captain of the troops of Joram the king of Israel, was appointed by God to reign over Israel, and to avenge the sins committed by the house of Ahab, 1 Kings 19:16 . Jehu was then at the siege of Ramoth-Gilead, commanding the army of Joram, the king of Israel, when a young prophet appeared, who took him aside from the officers of the army, in the midst of whom he was sitting, and, when alone in a chamber, poured oil on his head, and said to him, "Thus saith the Lord, I have anointed thee king over Israel; thou shalt smite the house of Ahab, and avenge the blood of the prophets which hath been shed by Jezebel. For the whole house of Ahab shall perish, and I will make it as that of Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, and that of Baasha, the son of Ahijah. After this, Jehu sent to inform the inhabitants of Samaria, who had the bringing up of Ahab's seventy children, that they might select which of them they thought proper to place upon the throne of Israel. Jehu also caused to be put to death all Ahab's relatives and friends, the officers of his court, and the priests whom he had entertained at Jezreel, 2 Kings 10:1-11 . After this, Jehu proceeded to Samaria, and on his way thither met the friends of Ahaziah king of Judah, who were going to Jezreel to salute the children of Ahab's family, with the death of whom they were as yet unacquainted. " And when he was come to Samaria he extirpated every remaining branch of Ahab's family, without sparing an individual. Then convening the people of Samaria, he said, "Ahab paid some honours to Baal, but I will pay him greater. ...
Such were the sanguinary exploits of Jehu toward the idolatrous house of Ahab; but he acted agreeably to divine direction, and the Lord in these instances so far approved his conduct, as to promise him that his children should sit upon the throne of Israel to the fourth generation. Yet, though Jehu had been the instrument in the hand of God for taking vengeance on the profane house of Ahab, we find him accused in Scripture of not entirely forsaking the sins of Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, who made Israel to sin in worshipping the golden calves, 2 Kings 10:29 ; 2 Kings 10:31 . It appears also that, in executing the divine indignation on the wicked house of Ahab, he was actuated more by the spirit of ambition and animosity than the fear of God, or a regard to the purity of his worship
Samaria - Ahab here built a Baal temple ( 1 Kings 16:32 ) and a palace of ivory ( 1 Kings 22:39 ). here besieged Ahab, but unsuccessfully, and was obliged to reverse the terms his father had exacted from Omri. Jehoram attempted a feeble and half-hearted reform, destroying Ahab’s Baal-pillar, though retaining the calf-worship ( 2 Kings 3:2 ) and the ashçrah ( 2 Kings 13:5 )
Jezreel - Ahab, in particular, is known to have made this his residence: near to whose palace was the vineyard of the unfortunate Naboth
Ramoth Gilead - Ahab lost his life in trying to recover it
Elijah - His bold faithfulness provoked the wrath of Ahab and Jezebel, especially when he threatened several years of drought and famine as a punishment for the sins of Israel, B. Returning to King Ahab, he procured the great assembling at mount Carmel, where God "answered by fire," and the prophets of Baal were destroyed. Six years later he denounces Ahab and Jezebel for their crimes in the matter of Naboth; and afterwards again is seen foretelling the death of king Ahaziah, and calling fire from heaven upon two bands of guards sent to arrest him
Elijah - A contemporary of the Israelite kings Ahab and Ahaziah (874-852 b. He challenged Ahab, whose policies were designed to replace the Israelite idea of kingship with the ancient Near Eastern concept of monarchy and royal law. The cycle was incorporated into the theological history of Israel and Judah, without which our knowledge for the reign of Ahab would be almost unknown. Elijah appeared to vindicate the distinctive character of the people of God when their identification was threatened by Ahab's liberal policies. ...
Elijah appeared on the scene without warning, introduction, or genealogy (1 Kings 17:1 ) to deliver an oracle to Ahab announcing a drought, presumably a punishment for defection to the Baal cult. God then chose a Gentile believer (the Phoenician woman of Zarephath) to shame his people and to rebuke Jezebel, Ahab's Phoenician queen, showing that there was a Yahwistic believer in her own country. The Baal priests were not completely destroyed; they actually continued on past the end of the Ahab dynasty, until the time of Athaliah of Judah (who was related to Ahab's royal house). Ahab was not wholly Baalist; his family bore Yahwistic names, and he consulted with Yahweh after the encounter with Elijah (1 Kings 20:13-15,22,28 ). By appropriating Naboth's land as crown property, Ahab was out of his jurisdiction. Elijah, whom Ahab saw as a blood avenger (v. 20), is introduced with dramatic suddenness only at the end of this section, confronting Ahab for taking possession of the vineyard. The curse concerning Ahab was not literally executed on him, however, but on his successor. Ahab's dynasty ended because of the Naboth incident, not because of the Baal struggle
Jehoram - He married Athahah, the daughter of Ahab and Jezebel; and, through her influence, all the brothers of the king were murdered, and the gross idolatries of the Phœnicians were introduced into the kingdom of Judah
Aphek - The place where Ahab defeated Benhadad ( 1 Kings 20:26 ; 1 Kings 20:30 ), in the Mîshôr , probably the modern Fîq , or Afîq , on the brow of the plateau, overlooking the Sea of Galilee
Athali'ah - (afflicted of the Lord ) daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, married Jehoram the son of Jehoshaphat king of Judah and introduced into that kingdom the worship of Baal
Hazael - God told the prophet Elijah that Hazael of Syria would be God’s instrument to punish Israel for its Baal worship during the reign of Ahab (1 Kings 19:15-17). ...
Hazael began his brutal attacks on Israel during the reign of Ahab’s son Joram (2 Kings 8:28-29)
Omri - (See Ahab. ) For the same end his son Ahab married the Sidonian king Ethbaal's daughter Jezebel, which issued in the introduction of Baal worship into Israel
Elijah - He first appears as a messenger from God to Ahab, the wicked king of Israel, probably in the tenth year of his reign. After the famine had lasted the predicted period, Elijah encountered Ahab, and then ensued the magnificent display of divine power and of human trust upon the ridge of Carmel. See Ahab
Ahaziah - Son of Ahab and Jezebel; king of Israel; a worshipper of Jeroboam's calves, and of his mother's idols, Baal and Ashtoreth. At first viceroy during his father's sickness, then king of Judah, son of Jehoram of Judah and Athaliah, Ahab's cruel daughter (2 Kings 9:29, compare 2 Kings 8:25). ...
Ahaziah walked in all the idolatries of Ahab his maternal grandfather, his mother being his counselor to do wickedly. He allied himself with Jehoram of Israel, brother of the former Ahaziah (in spite of the warning God gave him in the fatal issue of the alliance of godly Jehoshaphat, his paternal grandfather, with wicked Ahab), against Hazael of Syria at Ramoth Gilead. Akin to Ahab in character, as in blood, he might have overspread Judah with the same idolatry as Israel, but for God's intervention
Joram - He married the daughter of Ahab of Israel and brought Baal worship to Judah
Cherith - But if the prophet's interview with Ahab was in Samaria, and he thence journeyed toward the east, it is probable that he crossed Jordan and found refuge in some of the ravines of Gilead
Ahaziah - The son and successor of Ahab as king of Israel (1 Kings 22:40 )
Jezebel - Daughter of Ethbaal king of Tyre and Zidon, and wife of Ahab king of Israel, 1 Kings 16:31
ra'Moth-Gil'Ead - The incidents of Ahab's expedition are well known. [1] Later it was taken by Israel, and held in spite of all the efforts of Hazael who was now on the throne of Damascus, to regain it
Zedekiah - Son of Chenaanah: he was a false prophet, and an adviser of Ahab. Son of Maaseiah: he was a false prophet in Babylon among the captives: with Ahab he was burnt to death
Alliance - The policy of alliance between Israel and Phœnicia was continued by Omri and Ahab ( 1 Kings 16:31 ); Amos 1:9 speaks of it as a ‘covenant of brethren’; it rested, no doubt, on reciprocal commercial interests (cf. Asa and Baasha contended for alliance with Benhadad ( 1 Kings 15:19 ), and Judah and Israel themselves are allied during the reigns of Jehoshaphat and Ahab
Jezreel - But the chief interest of the town’s history centres in the time of the reign of Ahab, who established here a royal residence, to which he retired when the three years’ drought came to an end ( 1 Kings 21:1 ; 1 Kings 18:45 ), and whence he saw and coveted the vineyard of Naboth (21). 9), as well as all that remained of the house of Ahab (ch
Zedeki'ah - ...
Son of Chenaanah, a false prophet at the court of Ahab, head, or, if not head, virtual leader, of the college. as spokesman when the prophets are consulted by Ahab on the result of his proposed expedition to Ramoth-gilead. Zedekiah had prepared himself for the interview with a pair of iron horns, with which he illustrated the manner in which Ahab should drive the Syrians before him. (Jeremiah 29:21,22 ) He was denounced in the letter of Jeremiah for having, with Ahab the son of Kolaiah, buoyed up the people with false hopes, not for profane and flagitious conduct
Jeho'Ram -
Son of Ahab king of Israel, who succeeded his brother Ahaziah B. Jehoram, going out to meet him, fell pierced by an arrow from Jehu's bow on the very plot of ground which Ahab had wrested from Naboth the Jezreelite; thus fulfilling to the letter the prophecy of Elijah. He then, probably at the instance of his wife Athaliah the daughter of Ahab, proceeded to establish the worship of Baal
Jehu - A well-known king in Israel, raised up in this office to punish the house of Ahab
Sackcloth - Ahab rent his clothes, put on a shirt of haircloth next to his skin, fasted, and lay upon sackcloth, 1 Kings 21:27
Athaliah - The daughter of Ahab by Jezebel
Jezreel - Ahab later expanded this palace by unjustly seizing the adjoining property belonging to Naboth (1 Kings 21:1-2; 1 Kings 21:16). Ahab’s wife Jezebel, their son Joram and others of the royal household were killed at Jezreel in Jehu’s bloody revolution (2 Kings 8:29; 2 Kings 9:16-37; 2 Kings 10:11; Hosea 1:4-5)
Elijah - ...
Miracles His first miracle was associated with his prophecy before King Ahab (1 Kings 17:1 ) in which he said there would be no rain or dew apart from his declaration. Ahab was told to flee before the storm. Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal, king of Sidon and Tyre (1 Kings 16:31 ), was Ahab's wife and Israel's queen. She brought the worship of her god Baal into Ahab's kingdom. Even “Ahab served Baal a little” (2 Kings 10:18 ). His prophetic confrontations involved King Ahab and later his son Ahaziah
Jezreel - The northern city of Jezreel, which guarded the corridor to Beth-shan, was the site of the royal residence of Omri and Ahab where the incident of Naboth's vineyard occurred (1 Kings 21:1 )
Ahaziah -
The son and successor of Ahab
Ivory - Ivories have been found at Samaria that are thought to be from the time of Ahab, who reigned in Israel from about 869 to 850 B
Omri - He was succeeded by his son, Ahab. ” Micah accused Jerusalem of following Omri's actions and also his son Ahab's
Anah - ) "Aholibamah, daughter of Ahab, daughter of Zibeon," is tantamount to granddaughter, i
Adjuration - And Ahab adjured Micaiah to tell the truth, which elicited from him the real result of the approaching battle, after a previous ironical reply
Athaliah - She was the daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, and was married to Jehoram, son of Jehoshaphat
Jehoshaphat - The alliance was cemented by the marriage of the crown prince Jehoram to Ahab’s daughter Athaliah ( 2 Kings 8:18 ). Jehoshaphat appears as the ally of Ahab against Syria, and himself went into the battle of Ramoth-gilead ( 1 Kings 22:1-53 ). He also assisted Ahab’s son against the Moabites ( 2 Kings 3:1-27 )
ha'Math - In the Assyrian inscriptions of the time of Ahab (B
Elijah - This remarkable prophet is introduced abruptly in scripture in the midst of the apostasy of the kingdom of Israel, which was brought to a head in the reign of Ahab. ...
He is called "Elijah the Tishbite who was of the inhabitants of Gilead" (1 Kings 17:1 ), and with no further introduction he delivered a message to Ahab of fearful import to Israel, that there should be no rain or dew these years but according to his word. Elijah under the full direction of the Lord came forth from his mysterious retreat, and showed himself to Obadiah, the governor of Ahab's house, who was engaged in searching the land for provender. Assured by Elijah that he was ready to show himself to Ahab (though this latter had in vain sought him in many kingdoms to wreak vengeance on him for the prolonged drought), he reported Elijah's appearance, and the prophet and king were soon face to face. Charged with troubling Israel, the prophet in the power of God rejoined that the guilt of this lay on Ahab and on his house, in forsaking Jehovah for Baal. Upon this he told Ahab that there was a sound of abundance of rain, while he himself retired to the top of Carmel to note the first indications of the approaching blessing; and then, still in the power of God, he ran before Ahab's chariot to the entrance of Jezreel. ...
For a time Elijah was in retirement, but he again reappeared on the occasion of Naboth's murder, and with the old energy of faith prophetically announced the doom of Ahab and Jezebel to Ahab's face. Once more the prophet is seen, confronting Ahab's successor and son Ahaziah, who, following closely in his parents' steps, had sent messengers to Baalzebub the god of Ekron to inquire whether he should recover from his sickness
Elijah - This remarkable prophet is introduced abruptly in scripture in the midst of the apostasy of the kingdom of Israel, which was brought to a head in the reign of Ahab. ...
He is called "Elijah the Tishbite who was of the inhabitants of Gilead" (1 Kings 17:1 ), and with no further introduction he delivered a message to Ahab of fearful import to Israel, that there should be no rain or dew these years but according to his word. Elijah under the full direction of the Lord came forth from his mysterious retreat, and showed himself to Obadiah, the governor of Ahab's house, who was engaged in searching the land for provender. Assured by Elijah that he was ready to show himself to Ahab (though this latter had in vain sought him in many kingdoms to wreak vengeance on him for the prolonged drought), he reported Elijah's appearance, and the prophet and king were soon face to face. Charged with troubling Israel, the prophet in the power of God rejoined that the guilt of this lay on Ahab and on his house, in forsaking Jehovah for Baal. Upon this he told Ahab that there was a sound of abundance of rain, while he himself retired to the top of Carmel to note the first indications of the approaching blessing; and then, still in the power of God, he ran before Ahab's chariot to the entrance of Jezreel. ...
For a time Elijah was in retirement, but he again reappeared on the occasion of Naboth's murder, and with the old energy of faith prophetically announced the doom of Ahab and Jezebel to Ahab's face. Once more the prophet is seen, confronting Ahab's successor and son Ahaziah, who, following closely in his parents' steps, had sent messengers to Baalzebub the god of Ekron to inquire whether he should recover from his sickness
Basket - A fourth term refers to a larger basket used for heavy burdens such as clay for bricks or even the heads of the seventy sons of Ahab delivered to Jehu (2 Kings 10:7 )
Persecution - The first great persecution for religious opinion of which we have any record was that which broke out against the worshippers of God among the Jews in the days of Ahab, when that king, at the instigation of his wife Jezebel, "a woman in whom, with the reckless and licentious habits of an Oriental queen, were united the fiercest and sternest qualities inherent in the old Semitic race", sought in the most relentless manner to extirpate the worship of Jehovah and substitute in its place the worship of Ashtoreth and Baal. Ahab's example in this respect was followed by Manasseh, who "shed innocent blood very much, till he had filled Jerusalem from one end to another" (2 Kings 21:16 ; Compare 24:4)
Himself - ...
Ahab went one way by himself,and Obadiah went another way by himself
Table of Kings And Prophets in Israel And Judah - ...
929...
Omri,...
918...
Ahab,...
Elijah
Dog - It was the dogs who ate the body of Jezebel, and licked up the blood of Naboth and of Ahab
Province -
In the Old Testament this word appears in connection with the wars between Ahab and Ben-hadad
Jehu - Along the way, he was responsible for the deaths of Joram, king of Israel; Ahaziah, king of Judah; Jezebel, still powerful former queen of Israel, and some 70 surviving members of the household of Israel's late King Ahab
Ben-ha'Dad - Some time after the death of Ahab, Benhadad renewed the war with Israel, attacked Samaria a second time, and pressed the siege so closely that there was a terrible famine in the city
Mesha - After the death of Ahab at Ramoth-Gilead, Mesha shook off the yoke of Israel; but on the ascension of Jehoram to the throne of Israel, that king sought the help of Jehoshaphat in an attempt to reduce the Moabites again to their former condition
Naaman - 8:15, section 5) with the archer (1 Kings 22:34) who drew his bow at a venture, and wounding Ahab mortally was Jehovah's instrument in "giving deliverance to Syria
Obadiah - Person in charge of Ahab's palace. He was the go-between for Elijah and Ahab (1 Kings 18:3-16 )
Zedekiah - False prophet who advised King Ahab to fight against Ramoth-gilead, assuring the king of victory (1 Kings 22:1 )
Jehoshaphat - He erred, however, in making alliance with idolatrous Israel, and in allowing his son to marry Athaliah, the daughter of Ahab and Jezebel. He went with Ahab to war against Ramoth-gilead, and nearly lost his life, but God delivered him
Samaria - The worship of Baal was set up in Samaria by Ahab, who built there an altar and a temple to the idol-god, 1 Kings 16:32, which were destroyed by Jehu. Samaria was unsuccessfully besieged by the Syrians in the reigns of Ahab and Joram
Elijah - This idolatry had been introduced by Ahab and his idolatrous wife, Ethbaal's daughter Jezebel (in violation of the first, commandment), as if the past sin of Israel were not enough, and as if it were "a light thing to walk in the sins of Jeroboam," namely, the worship of Jehovah under the symbol of a calf, in violation of the second commandment. (See Ahab; AARON. )...
Ahab and his party represented Baal and Jehovah as essentially the same God, in order to reconcile the people to this further and extreme step in idolatry; compare 1 Kings 18:21; Hosea 2:16. Therefore, he suddenly comes forth before Ahab, the apostate king, announcing in Jehovah's name "As the Lord God of Israel liveth (as contrasted with the dead idols which Israel worshipped) before whom I stand, there shall not be dew nor rain these years, but according to my word. After delivering his bold message to Ahab, by God's warning, he fled to his hiding place at Cherith, a torrent bed E. of Jordan (or else, as many think, the wady Kelt near Jericho), beyond Ahab's reach, where the ravens miraculously fed him with "bread and flesh in the morning . " Toward the close of the three and a half years of famine, when it attacked Samaria the capital, Ahab directed his governor of the palace, the Godfearing Obadiah who had saved and fed a hundred prophets in a cave, to go in one direction and seek some grass to save if possible the horses and mules, while he himself went in the opposite direction for the same purpose. It was at this juncture, after upward of two years' sojourn at Zarephath, Elijah by God's command goes to show himself to Ahab. Overcoming the awestruck Obadiah's fear, lest, when he should tell the king, Behold Elijah is here, meanwhile the Spirit should carry him away, Elijah, whom Ahab's servants had been seeking everywhere in vain for three years, now suddenly stands before Ahab with stern dignity. Ahab rides in his chariot across the plain 16 miles to Jezreel, in haste lest the rainflood of the Kishon should make the Esdraelon or Jezreel plain impassable with mud; Elijah, with Spirit-imparted strength from "the hand of the Lord upon" him, running before, but no further than the entrance of the city, for he shrank from the contamination of the court and its luxuries. ...
His not having heretofore moved to the neighboring land of godly Jehoshaphat, and his now fleeing to its most southerly town, farthest from Ahab's dominion, and thence into the desert, at first sight seems strange. But upon closer search into Scripture it is an undesigned propriety that he avoids the land of the king whose one grand error was his marrying his son Jehoram to Athaliah, Ahab's and Jezebel's daughter, at least as early as the sixth or seventh year of Jehoshaphat and the tenth or eleventh of Ahab (Blunt's Undesigned Coincidences); thereby he became so closely allied to the ungodly Ahab that at the Ramoth Gilead expedition he said to the latter, "I am as thou art, my people as thy people" (1 Kings 22:4). It was the same wilderness which received Moses fleeing from Pharaoh, and Elijah now fleeing from Ahab, and lastly Paul escaping from the Judaic bondage of ritualism. Puffed up with the success of his war with Syria, and forgetting the Lord who had given him victory (1 Kings 20), Ahab by Jezebel's wicked hardihood, after vainly trying to get from Naboth the inheritance of his fathers, had him and his sons (2 Kings 9:26, compare Joshua 7:24) slain for falsely alleged blasphemy, and seized his property as that of a criminal forfeited to the crown; the elders of Jezreel lending themselves to be Jezebel's ready instruments. The dogs should lick his blood "in the place" where they licked Naboth's (fulfilled on his son Jehoram, Ahab's repentance causing judgment to be deferred); Jezebel and Ahab's posterity should be (what Orientals regard with especial horror) the food of dogs and birds (1 Kings 21:19-24). ...
Three years later, part of the judgment foretold came to pass upon Ahab, whose blood, after his fall in the battle of Ramoth Gilead, the dogs licked up while his chariot was being washed in the pool of Samaria. This was his last interview with the house of Ahab, and his last witness against Baal worship. the house of Ahab, and hast slain (Elijah writes foreseeing the murder, for his translation was before Jehoshaphat's death, 2 Kings 3:11, after which was the murder) the brethren of thy father's house which were better than thyself, behold with a great plague will the Lord smite thy people, thy children, thy wives, and all thy goods, and thou shalt have great sickness . ...
Already in Elijah's lifetime Joram had begun to reign jointly with his father Jehoshaphat (2 Kings 8:16; Revelation 11:4-5,) and had betrayed his evil spirit which was fostered by Athaliah his wife, Ahab's daughter. " But Elijah discerned in Joram the covetous and murderous spirit which would frustrate all Jehoshaphat's forethought, the fatal result of the latter's carnal policy in forming marriage alliance with wicked Ahab
Elijah - Jezebel was daughter of the king-priest of Philistia and had married King Ahab of Israel. ...
After three years of drought, Elijah challenged Ahab to gather Baal’s prophets to Mt Carmel for a public contest to show who was the true God, Yahweh or Baal (1 Kings 18:19-21). ...
Ministry fulfilled...
In addition to opposing Ahab and Jezebel because of their Baalism, Elijah opposed them because of their greed and injustice. Ahab’s son Ahaziah, who came to the throne after Ahab’s death, continued the worship of Baal and likewise met opposition from Elijah
Elijah - Elijah, the weirdest figure among the prophets of Israel, steps across the threshold of history when Ahab is on the throne ( c
Such was the situation, when Elijah suddenly appears before Ahab as the champion of Jehovah. The hearts of Ahab’s subjects have been mellowed, and many are ready to return to their old allegiance. Ahab and his chief steward, Obadiah, a devoted follower of the true God, are traversing the land in different directions in search of grass for the royal stables, when the latter encounters the strange figure of Jehovah’s relentless champion. Elijah, in spite of his dignified position, runs before the chariot of Ahab, indicating that he is willing to serve the king as well as lead Jehovah’s people ( 1 Kings 18:41-46 ). For Ahab’s sins, every male child of his house will be swept off by an awful fate ( 1 Kings 21:19 ; 1 Kings 21:21 ; 1 Kings 21:24 ). These predictions, although delayed for a time on account of the repentance of Ahab, were all fulfilled ( 1 Kings 22:38 , 2Ki 9:25 f. ...
Ahaziah is a true son of Ahab and Jezebel
Moabite Stone - ...
This ancient monument, recording the heroic struggles of King Mesha with Omri and Ahab, was erected about B
Omri - ), where he died, and was succeeded by his son Ahab
Baal - It was known to the Israelites as Baal-peor (Numbers 25:3 ; Deuteronomy 4:3 ), was worshipped till the time of Samuel (1 Samuel 7:4 ), and was afterwards the religion of the ten tribes in the time of Ahab (1 Kings 16:31-33 ; 18:19,22 )
Omri (1) - The alliance was cemented by the marriage of Ahab and Jezebel, so important for the later history
Murder - We have instances of this kind of murder in Ahab, 1 Kings 22:9
Jehoshaphat - He was contemporary with Ahab, Ahaziah, and Jehoram. He became Ahab's ally in the great battle of Ramoth-gilead, for which he was severely reproved by Jehu
Ashtaroth - ...
Solomon, seduced by his foreign wives, introduced the worship of Ashtaroth into Israel; but Jezebel, daughter of the king of Tyre, and wife to Ahab, principally established her worship
Ahaziah - The eighth king of Israel; he was the son and successor of Ahab
Jehoshaphat - Nevertheless, he did one thing that ultimately proved to be disastrous: he made an alliance with Ahab, king of Israel. But, the alliance involved a marriage between Jehoshaphat's son Jehoram and Ahab's daughter Athaliah
Remnant - ' In every crisis in the history of Israel there has been a remnant: this was seen in the time of Ahab (1 Kings 19:18 ), and so too in the introduction of Christianity (Luke 2:38 ), and that it will be so in the future is abundantly evident from the testimony of the prophets
Athaliah - Daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, married Jehoshaphat's son Jehoram, king of Judah. By her influence Jehoram was led to walk in the way of the kings of Israel, like as did the house of Ahab (2 Chronicles 21:6)
Moab, Moabites - During Ahab's reign they were again tributary, but at his death they threw off their allegiance, but were completely subdued by the united forces of Israel, Judah and Edom. The son of Omri would be Ahab; and in 2 Kings 3:5 it says that on the death of Ahab the king of Moab rebelled against the king of Israel. Ahaziah succeeded Ahab, but it was not he that attacked Moab: his reign (called two years) and the beginning of the reign of Jehoram, would give Mesha time to strengthen himself against Israel and attack some of the outlying cities
Benhadad - BENHADAD, king of Syria, son of the preceding, made war upon Ahab, king of Israel, but was defeated. In the following year, however, he came with a most powerful army to Aphek, where Ahab again engaged him, killed a hundred thousand of his men, and the remainder endeavouring to take refuge in Aphek, the walls of the city fell upon them, and killed twenty-seven thousand more. 3115, Benhadad declared war against Jehoram, the son and successor of Ahab, 2 Kings 6:8 ; but his designs were made known to Jehoram by the Prophet Elisha, and they were accordingly frustrated
Zedekiah - A false prophet in the reign of Ahab
Sidon And Tyre - , Ahab married Jezebel, the daughter of the Phoenician king, bringing Baal worship to Israel's court
Gilead - ...
In the days of Ahab Ramoth-gilead was in possession of the Syrians, which was followed by all Gilead and Moab falling into their hands
Benbadad - Some time after the death of Ahab, Benhadad renewed the war with Israel, attacked Samaria a second time, and pressed the siege so closely that there was a Terrible famine in the city
Gilead - ...
In the days of Ahab Ramoth-gilead was in possession of the Syrians, which was followed by all Gilead and Moab falling into their hands
Elijah -
"The Tishbite," the "Elias" of the New Testament, is suddenly introduced to our notice in 1 Kings 17:1 as delivering a message from the Lord to Ahab. Having delivered his message to Ahab, he retired at the command of God to a hiding-place by the brook Cherith, beyond Jordan, where he was fed by ravens. At the close of this period of retirement and of preparation for his work (Compare Galatians 1:17,18 ) Elijah met Obadiah, one of Ahab's officers, whom he had sent out to seek for pasturage for the cattle, and bade him go and tell his master that Elijah was there. ...
Some six years after this he warned Ahab and Jezebel of the violent deaths they would die (1 Kings 21:19-24 ; 22:38 ). ), who had succeeded his father Ahab, of his approaching death (2 Kings 1:1-16 )
lo-Ammi - "Jezreel" symbolised the coming destruction of Jehu's line, as Jehu had destroyed that of Ahab of Jezreel; also that as Jezreel means both God sows and God scatters, so God will yet sow Israel whom He now scatters (Hosea 1:4-6; Hosea 1:9-10; Hosea 1:11), "great shall be the day of Jezreel," i
Fort, Fortification - Similar, but smaller four-chambered gates were used later in the time of Ahab and Jeroboam II, attached to offsets-insets solid walls
Ekron - Ahaziah, the son of King Ahab of Israel, called on the god of Ekron, Baal-zebub, when he was sick (2 Kings 1:2-16 )
Queen - As queen mother, Jezebel continued as a negative force after the death of Ahab (1 Kings 22:52 ; 2Kings 3:2,2 Kings 3:13 ; 2 Kings 9:22 )
Accept - 3:12, where râtsâh is paralleled with ‛ahab “to love”: “… for whom the Lord loveth he correcteth; even as a father the son in whom he delighteth
Jezebel - Daughter of Ethbaal, king of Tyre and previously high priest of the Tyrian Baal; wife of Ahab, king of Israel, of the dynasty of Omri. Jezebel’s evil influence in the land of Israel, especially in combating the religion of Jahweh in the Interests of Baal-worship, was exercised not only during the twenty-two years of Ahab’s reign, but also during the thirteen years of the rule of her two sons, Ahaziah and Joram; moreover, this influence extended, though in a less degree, to the Southern Kingdom of Judah, where Athaliah, the daughter of Jezebel, seems to have followed in the footsteps of her mother ( 2 Kings 8:18 )
Load - Maśśâ' means “utterance” or “oracle”: “For remember, when you and I rode side by side behind Ahab his father, how the Lord uttered this oracle against him” (2 Kings 9:25, RSV)
Dew - On this account ‘dew and rain’ are associated in the imprecation called down by David on the mountains of Gilboa ( 2 Samuel 1:21 ); and in the curse pronounced on Ahab and his kingdom by Elijah ( 1 Kings 17:1 ), as also by the prophet Haggai on the Jews after the Restoration ( Haggai 1:10 ) owing to their unwillingness to rebuild the Temple
Elisha - Elisha accepted the call thus given (about four years before the death of Ahab), and for some seven or eight years became the close attendant on Elijah till he was parted from him and taken up into heaven. ...
We then find Elisha at Damascus, to carry out the command given to his master to anoint Hazael king over Syria (2 Kings 8:7-15 ); thereafter he directs one of the sons of the prophets to anoint Jehu, the son of Jehoshaphat, king of Israel, instead of Ahab
Ben-Hadad - ...
Ben-Hadad II, son of Ben-Hadad I; 32 vassal kings accompanied him in his first siege of Samaria (1 Kings 20:1) (See Ahab. ) After Ahab's death, Moab having revolted from Ahaziah and Jehoram, successive kings of Israel (2 Kings 1:1; 2 Kings 1:6-7), Ben-Hadad took advantage of Israel's consequent weakness, and after having been baffled several times by Elisha besieged Samaria a second time so straitly that mothers gave their own sons to be eaten, a horror similar to what occurred in later times in Titus' siege of Jerusalem. But instead of smiting the ground repeatedly he only smote thrice from want of faith; so, instead of destroying the Syrians as he might have done, he only was to smite them thrice, which he did in Aphek (2 Kings 13:14-19) in the Esdraelon plain, where Ahab had defeated Ben-Hadad I (1 Kings 20:26); compare Amos 1:3-4, which foretells Ben-Hadad's overthrow
Adjure - Ahab to Micaiah, 1 Kings 22:16) And still higher than both, when Christ was adjured by the high priest
Medeba - 8, took Mehedeba , and Israel held it forty years, till Mesha recovered it and rebuilt the cities held by Omri and Ahab
Raven - Ravens fed Elijah at the brook Cherith (1 Kings 17:4; 1 Kings 17:6) when cut off from intercourse with men, who might have betrayed him to Ahab
Baal, Baalim - ...
The children of Israel were soon led away to the worship of Baal, Judges 2:11,13 ; Judges 3:7 ; Judges 6:31,32 ; Judges 8:33 ; Judges 10:6,10 ; and though under Samuel they relinquished it, 1 Samuel 7:4 ; 1 Samuel 12:10 , yet after the division of the kingdom it was by Ahab fully established in Israel
Samaria - Ben-hadad, king of Syria, besieged Samaria in the reign of Ahab, but by the intervention of God it was not taken
Jezebel - The wife of Ahab, king of Israel
Join - Now Jehoshaphat had riches and honor in abundance, and joined affinity with Ahab
Jezreel - City in Issachar, the abode of Ahab and Jezebel, and principally connected with their history
Samaria - In the days of Ahab, Benhadad II. A second time, next year, he assailed it; but was again utterly routed, and was compelled to surrender to Ahab (20:28-34), whose army, as compared with that of Benhadad, was no more than "two little flocks of kids
Hamath - King Irhuleni of Hamath joined a coalition including Ben-hadad II of Damascus and Ahab of Israel which successfully thwarted the advance of Shalmaneser II of Assyria into northern Syria
Heshbon - Certain of the stronger Israelite kings (David, Omri, and Ahab) were able to control all of that area
Moabite - ...
During the one hundred and fifty years which followed the defeat of the Moabites, after the death of Ahab (see Isaiah 15:1 ) delivered his "burden of Moab," predicting the coming of judgment on that land (Compare 2 Kings 17:3 ; 18:9 ; 1 Chronicles 5:25,26 )
Joash - In 1 Kings 22:26 , a son of Ahab, the king of Israel, and one of those to whom Micaiah the prophet was handed over
Zedekiah - ...
...
...
The son of Chenaanah, a false prophet in the days of Ahab (1 Kings 22:11,24 ; 2 Chronicles 18:10,23 )
Tribute - Later, Moab payed a tribute of 100,000 lambs and the wool of 100,000 rams to Ahab of Israel (2 Kings 3:3-4 )
Joash - A son of Ahab, king of Israel
Zedekiah - A false prophet, exposed by Micaiah when urging Ahab to fight with the Syrians, 1 Kings 22:11-37
na'Aman - ) A Jewish tradition at least as old as the time of Josephus, and which may very well be a genuine one identifies him with the archer whose arrow, whether at random or not, struck Ahab with his mortal wound, and thus "gave deliverance to Syria
Obadi'ah - ...
An officer of high rank in the court of Ahab
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - The most explicit passage disclosing the close relationship between the two comes from the narrative about Ahab and Jezebel's confrontation with Elijah (1 Kings 18:1-19:18 ). In fact, Jezebel went so far as to insist that Ahab provide for the worship of her Phoenician deities. This, as mentioned above, was promoted by Ahab (869-850 b. Because of this apostasy, judgment was poured out on Ahab and Jezebel. During the time of Ahab and Jezebel Baal was declared the official national deity. Ahab agreed with her to make Baal worship the royal religion of the northern kingdom (1 Kings 16:29-31 )
Ammonites - The proximity of the Ammonites to Gilead likewise destined them to be constant enemies of the Israelites, who made claims to Gilead and actually controlled it during the reigns of certain strong kings such as David, Omri, Ahab, and Jeroboam II. We know from the latter, for example, that an Ammonite king named Ba'sha, along with Ahab of Israel and other kings of the region, defended Syria-Palestine against Shalmaneser III in 853 B. The coalition of Syro-Palestinian kings, which included Ba'sha of Ammon and Ahab of Israel, halted the Assyrian king, Shalmaneser's march in 853 B
Kings, Books of - ...
When Omri’s son and successor Ahab married Jezebel of Phoenicia, the Baalism of Phoenicia threatened to become Israel’s national religion. Through Elijah’s help, Ahab saved Israel from a Syrian attack (20:1-43), but he was doomed to suffer God’s judgment (21:1-29). ...
An army commander named Jehu led a revolt against the ruling house of Ahab and Jezebel, which resulted in the removal of Jezebel’s Baalism from Israel (9:11-10:36)
Mesha - 2 Kings 1:1 suggests the revolt followed immediately on Ahab's death (850 B. If Omri's son is taken literally, the Moabite stone places the revolt in the reign of Ahab (869-850 B
Mesha - 880; (2) the expulsion of the Hebrews by Mesha in the time of Ahab Mesha - 2 Kings 1:1 suggests the revolt followed immediately on Ahab's death (850 B. If Omri's son is taken literally, the Moabite stone places the revolt in the reign of Ahab (869-850 B
Jehosh'Aphat - His history is to be found among the events recorded in (1 Kings 15:24 ; 2 Kings 8:16 ) or in a continuous narrative in (2 Chronicles 17:1 ; 2 Chronicles 21:3 ) He was contemporary with Ahab, Ahaziah and Jehoram. 898, when he became Ahab's ally in the great battle of Ramoth-gilead, for which he was severely reproved by Jehu
Inherit - 31:14: “And Rachel and Leah answered and said unto him, Is there yet any portion or inheritance for us in our father’s house?”...
The basic translation of nachălâh is “inheritance”: “And Naboth said to Ahab, The Lord forbid it me, that I should give the inheritance of my fathers unto thee” (1 Kings 21:3). For this reason Naboth could not give his rights over to Ahab (1 Kings 21:3-4)
Rechabites - Of this family was Jehonadab, the son of Rechab, a man of eminent zeal for the pure worship of God against idolatry, who assisted King Jehu in destroying the house of Ahab, and the worshippers of Baal, 2 Kings 10:15-16 ; 2 Kings 10:23 , &c
Demoniacs - Ahab was to be enticed to go to war, and a spirit said he would accomplish it
Jehoash - This woman, Athaliah, the daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, then established her parents’ Baalism in Judah
Baal (1) - Ahab, king of Israel, under Jezebel's influence (daughter of Ethbaal, priest of Baal and king of Zidon), established the worship of Baal and Asherah ("the groves"): 1 Kings 16:31-33; 1 Kings 18:19-22. It was laid aside for Jeroboam's calves, under Jehoram, Ahab's son (2 Kings 3:2), and under Jehu (2 Kings 10:28); but for the most part prevailed until the Lord in vengeance removed the ten tribes from their land (2 Kings 17:16). Manasseh sought to bring Judah to the same state of Baal worship as Israel had been under Ahab (2 Kings 21:3; compare Micah 6:16)
Israel - Baasha murdered Jeroboam's son and successor; and his own son and successor was slain by Zimri; Zimri was killed by Omri, and after a civil war of four years with Tibni, Omri became king and reigned with his successors forty-five years, ending with Jehoram the son of Ahab. He and the survivors of the house of Ahab were slain by Jehu directly or indirectly, and Jehu began the 5th dynasty, B
Jehoshaphat - ; and his son Jehoram married Athaliah, the daughter of Ahab and Jezebel (2 Chronicles 22:2-3; 2 Chronicles 22:7-8; 2 Chronicles 22:10). ) A fatal union (1 Corinthians 15:33)! Many facts attest the intimacy between the two dynasties; (See ELIJAH'S avoiding Judah when fleeing from Ahab; the same names given in the two families; Jehovah's name compounded in names of Ahab's idolatrous children; Jehoshaphat's readiness to go with (See Ahab to battle at Ramoth Gilead. Ahab's demonstrative hospitality was the bait to entice him (2 Chronicles 18:1-3). There he would have paid with life for his dangerous alliance with cowardly Ahab, who sought to save his own life by exposing his magnanimous ally, but for God's interposition
Moab - Soon after the death of Ahab they began to revolt, 2 Kings 3:4-5; Isaiah 16:1-2, and were subsequently engaged in wars with the Hebrews
Thyatira - ) Some self-styled prophetess, or collection of prophets (the feminine in Hebrew idiom expressing a multitude), closely attached to and influencing the Thyatira church and its presiding bishop or "angel" (the Alexandrinus and Vaticanus manuscripts read "thy wife" for "that woman") as Jezebel did her weak husband Ahab
Jezebel - By her marriage to King Ahab of Israel, Jezebel helped to join Phoenicia and Israel together in a political and religious alliance. Ahab cooperated in the plan and built a royal Baal temple in Israel’s capital, Samaria (1 Kings 16:29-33)
Idolatry - Under the reign of Ahab, idolatry reached its greatest height; and the impious Jezebel endeavored to destroy the worship of Jehovah
Carmel - " From it Ahab "went up" to the sides of Carmel to take part in the sacrificial feast; Elijah went up to "the top" of the mountain to pray for rain: while Gehazi seven times climbed the highest point from whence the Mediterranean is to be fully seen over the W. Hence, as being a sacred spot, he had convened Israel and Ahab there. They and the 850 prophets of Baal stood close beneath the high place of the altar, near the spring, in full view of Jezreel and Ahab's palace and Jezebel's temple in the distance
Samaria, Samaritans - ...
When Ahab, Omri's son, became king of Israel, he built an ivory palace at Samaria. Jezebel influenced Ahab, her husband, to make the city the center for Baal worship (1 Kings 16:29-33 ). Later, Jehu killed Ahab's seventy sons in Samaria (2 Kings 10:1 )
Letter - ...
Jezebel sent letters in Ahab's name ordering Naboth's death. She sealed the letters with Ahab's seal (1 Kings 21:8-11 ). Jehu sent letters to the guardians of the sons of Ahab, ordering that the sons of Ahab be killed (2 Kings 10:1-7 )
Chronology of the Old Testament - For example, we learn that Jehoshaphat of Judah came to the throne in the fourth year of Ahab of Israel; also that Ahab reigned 22 years. Yet we are told that Ahaziah, who followed Ahab after his death, came to the throne in the seventeenth year of Jehoshaphat, and in addition that Ahaziah’s brother Jehoram, who could be crowned only after the two years’ reign assigned to the latter, succeeded in the eighteenth of Jehoshaphat (1 Kings 22:41 ; 1 Kings 22:51 , 2 Kings 3:1 )
Rechab, Rechabites - Jehonadab , the son of Rechab, appears in 2 Kings 10:15-28 as a fervent supporter of Jehu’s attack on the house of Ahab and his endeavour to root out the idolatrous worship which that dynasty had allowed
Asherah - Jezebel of Tyre apparently installed Asherah worship in the north when she married King Ahab (1 Kings 18:18-19 )
Israel, Kingdom of - War, with varying success, was carried on between the two kingdoms for about sixty years, till Jehoshaphat entered into an alliance with the house of Ahab
jo'Ash - ) ...
Apparently a younger son of Ahab, who held a subordinate jurisdiction in the lifetime of his father
Moab And the Moabite Stone - Ahab continued Omri's policies. King Mesha ascended the throne of Moab approximately midway during Ahab's reign, however, and eventually succeeded in throwing off the Israelite yoke. Mesha apparently began the struggle for Moabite independence during the turbulent years following Ahab's death (2 Kings 1:1 ). Ahaziah, who succeeded Ahab to the throne of Israel, was unable to respond to Mesha's challenge because of an accident which led to his premature death (2 Kings 1:1 )
Urim And Thummim - The oracles of the Lord were thenceforth delivered by the prophets; as by Ahijah to Jeroboam 1 Kings 11:29 ; by Shemaiah to Rehoboam, 1 Kings 12:22 ; by Elijah to Ahab, 1 Kings 17:1 ; 1 Kings 21:17-29 ; by Michaiah to Ahab and Jehoshaphat, 1 Kings 22:7 ; by Elisha to Jehoshaphat and Jehoram, 2 Kings 3:11-14 ; by Isaiah to Hezekiah, 2 Kings 19:6-34 ; 2 Kings 20:1-11 ; by Huldah to Josiah, 2 Kings 22:13-20 ; by Jeremiah to Zedekiah, Jeremiah 32:3-5 , &c
Elisha - Through her husband, King Ahab of Israel, Jezebel had tried to establish Phoenician Baalism as the official religion of Israel (1 Kings 16:30-33). Jehu’s job was to remove Jezebel’s Baalism from Israel’s leadership by destroying Ahab, Jezebel and all their Baal-worshipping family (2 Kings 9:1-10; cf. ...
Elisha lived to see the divine judgment carried out, first on Ahab’s family and then on Israel as a whole
Calf Worship - "...
Jehu's worship of the calves is markedly distinguished from the Baal worship of Ahab which he overthrew (2 Kings 10:18-29)
Repentance - An External repentance, or an outward humiliation for sin, as in the case of Ahab
Sama'Ria - Ahab built a temple to Baal there
Zedekiah - Others who bore the name Zedekiah were a prophet in the court of Ahab (1 Kings 2:11; 1 Kings 2:24), an administrator in the government of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 36:12), a son of Jehoiakim (1 Chronicles 3:16) and a false prophet among the Jewish captives in Babylon (Jeremiah 29:21-23)
Baal - ...
Baal Worship in Israel The Northern Kingdom of Israel, under the leadership of Ahab of the household of Omri, was led to worship Baal as the state god (1 Kings 16:31 )
Elijah - Ahab and Jezebel and the false prophets had triumphed; it was all over with the cause of righteousness and truth for which he had laboured
Alliances - When pagans renounced idolatry for Israel's God, Israelites might lawfully wed them, as Rahab, Ruth, Zipporah. ...
Jehoshaphat's alliance with ungodly Ahab and Ahaziah his son was the only blot on his character, and involved him in loss and reproof from God (2 Chronicles 18; 2 Chronicles 19:2; 2 Chronicles 20:35-37). Jehoshaphat's son Jehoram's marriage with Ahab's daughter, Athaliah, was fatal to him and to Ahaziah and his other sons except Joash (2 Chronicles 21; 22)
Throne - ” Micaiah said in the presence of Ahab and Jehoshaphat: “Hear thou therefore the word of the Lord: I saw the Lord sitting on his throne, and all the host of heaven standing by him on his right hand and on his left” (1 Kings 22:19)
Jehu - At "the shearing-house" (2 Kings 10:12-14 ) other forty-two connected with the house of Ahab were put to death (2 Kings 10:14 )
King - Gilboa, 1 Samuel 31:2 ; Ahab at Ramoth-gilead, 1 Kings 22:29 ff. Nathan and David, Elijah and Ahab). Naboth can refuse to sell his vineyard to Ahab, and the king is unable to compel him, or to appropriate it till Naboth has been regularly condemned before a judicial tribunal ( 1 Kings 21:1 ff
Brotherly Love - ...
Old Testament Two words in the Old Testament cover the full range of ideas associated with “love,” the Hebrew Ahab and hesed , though the latter is often associated with covenant love
Temple - The hekal with its 15 usages as “palace” refers to the palaces of Ahab (1 Kings 21:1), of the king of Babylon (2 Kings 20:18), and of Nineveh ( Samaria - Ahab built there a palace of ivory, 1 Kings 22:39 , and also a temple of Baal, 1 Kings 16:32,33 , which Jehu destroyed, 2 Kings 10:18-28
Baal - This continued under David and Solomon; but under Ahab, whose wife Jezebel was a daughter of the Zidonian king Ethbaal, the worship of Baal was restored with great pomp, 1 Kings 16:31
mo'ab - At the death of Ahab the Moabites refused to pay tribute and asserted their independence, making war upon the kingdom of Judah
Jehoshaphat - " The great mistake of his reign was his entering into an alliance with Ahab, the king of Israel, which involved him in much disgrace, and brought disaster on his kingdom (1 Kings 22:1-33 )
Joash - Son of Ahab king of Israel
Persecution - Ahab had married the daughter of the king of Tyre, and proceeded to strengthen the alliance between Israel and Tyre by introducing the worship of Melkarth, the presiding deity of Tyre. The conflict between Elijah and Ahab was not simply whether one god or another should be worshipped-Jahweh of Israel or Melkarth of Tyre. It is probable that Ahab would have recommended the worship of both deities. It is not always easy to decide whether Elijah or Ahab is the persecutor, for both believed in violence as the only means to the end which they had in view. Ahab’s policy may seem to suggest breadth of mind, whilst Elijah’s attitude betokens theological narrowness; but in this case the narrow way was the way of life, whilst the broad way was also the way of death. ...
But Elijah came into still closer grips with Ahab. Elijah had the courage to denounce Ahab for his treatment of Naboth, and the prophet did so, not as a statesman or economist, but as a theologian. Ahab might worship Baal and steal his subject’s private property. Ahab’s conduct was not larceny, but sacrilege
Bethel - Under Ahab the Baal worship at Samaria and Jezreel drew off attention from the calf worship at Bethel
Fasting - Ahab, when he was threatened with ruin, 1 Kings 12:27
Oaths - ‘… saying, The Lord make thee like Zedekiah and like Ahab, whom the king of Babylon roasted in the fire’ … ( Jeremiah 29:22 ; cf
Micah, Micaiah - Micaiah, the son of Imlah ; a prophet of Jahweh who is called by Ahab, at the request of Jehoshaphat, king of Judah, to prophesy concerning the result of a projected expedition against the Syrians
Baal, Master - 6:25-32) and of King Ahab
Evil Spirits - Micaiah evidently considered Zedekiah as used by God in order to entice Ahab to his merited doom
Dispersion - It appears from 1 Kings 20:34 that an Israelltish colony was established in Damascus in the reign of Ahab
Jehoram - Son of Ahab, king of Israel. There was a close alliance between Judah and Israel, begun by Ahab his father with Jehoshaphat and continued by himself. But Jehu, with characteristic haste, immediately after Elisha had anointed him, set out for Jezreel and with an arrow slew Jehoram and threw his body on the very plot of ground which by falsehood and murder Ahab had dispossessed Naboth of, fulfilling Elijah's prophecy (1 Kings 21:19; 1 Kings 21:22). Three years were then added, to Ahab's reign to make the whole number of years of the kings of Israel tally with the whole number of the years of the kings of Judah, unduly lengthened by the three added to Jehoshaphat's reign. Married Athaliah, Ahab's daughter, the reflex of her wicked mother Jezebel; he yielded himself up to the evil influences of his wife instead of following the example of his pious father
Elijah - Yes; we all have passions enough to make us not Elijahs and Ahabs only, but angels in heaven, or devils in hell. All the difference between Elijah and Ahab was in the subjection of their passions. Elijah was a man of immensely stronger passions than poor Ahab ever was; only Elijah's powerful passions all swept him up to heaven, whereas all Ahab's contemptible passions shouldered And shovelled and sucked him down to hell. Queen Jezebel, also, Ahab's wife, when she was still a woman-child, her passions were as sweet and pure and good and subject as were the passions of the Virgin Mary herself. The whole difference between Elijah and Ahab, and between Jezebel and the mother of our Lord was in their hearts' desires, till their hearts' desires grew up into all-consuming passions
Samaria - ...
Called from its Baal worship, introduced by Ahab, "the city of the house of Ahab" (1 Kings 16:32-33; 2 Kings 10:25)
Judah, Kingdom of - Judah's armies progressively augmented, Israel's decreased; under Ahab against Syria Israel's forces were "like two little flocks of kids"; under Jehoahaz "50 horsemen" (1 Kings 20:27; 2 Kings 13:7). In spite of his pious efforts for the instruction of his people through the princes, Levites, and priests, in God's law (2 Chronicles 17), and for the administration of justice in the fear of Jehovah (2 Chronicles 19), his affinity with Ahab and Ahaziah nearly cost him his life at Ramoth Gilead (2 Chronicles 18), and again in the wilderness of Edom (2 Kings 3:8-11), and caused the loss of his ships in Ezion Geber (2 Chronicles 20:36-37). ...
He was reproved by the Lord's prophet Jehu, after his escape at Ramoth Gilead (2 Chronicles 19:2-3); then when he renewed the alliance with Ahab's son Ahaziah, by Eliezer; at last he saw the fatal effects of alliance with the ungodly (1 Corinthians 15:33), and would not let Ahaziah's servants go in his ships (1 Kings 22:48). The alliance bore deadly fruit under his murderous son Jehoram, his grandson Ahaziah, and the bloody queen mother Athaliah, Ahab's daughter and Jehoram's wife (2 Chronicles 21-22)
John the Baptist - The worthless Ahab reappears in Herod with similar germs of good struggling with evil. As Ahab in spite of himself respected Elijah, so Herod John; but in both cases the bad woman counteracted the good
Fertility Cult - Under Ahab, Baalism had become the state religion (1 Kings 16:31 )
Giants - Moreover nephilim is applied to the giant in the report of the spies (Numbers 13:33); compare on the Anakim ("longnecked") about Hebron, Debir, Ahab, and the mountains of Judah and Israel, Deuteronomy 2:10; Deuteronomy 2:21; Deuteronomy 9:2
Transgress - First, the whole process of rebellion has independence in view: “Then Moab rebelled against Israel after the death of Ahab” (2 Kings 1:1)
Court Systems - She and Ahab, however, were punished by God for having Naboth executed on trumped-up charges even though Ahab was king (1 Kings 21-22 )
Samaria - Ahab built there a palace of ivory, 1 Kings 22:39 ; that is, in which there were many ivory ornaments; and, according to Amos 3:15 ; Amos 4:1-2 , it became the seat of luxury and effeminacy. His son Benhadad besieged this place under the reign of Ahab, 1 Kings 20, A
Assyria - In the reign of Ahab, king of Israel, Shalmaneser II. This led to Ahab's casting off the yoke of Damascus and allying himself with Judah
Foreknowledge - Micaiah accurately predicted that Ahab would die in an upcoming battle (1 Kings 22:17 )
Damascus - besieged Samaria; but God wrought for their deliverance, and Ben-hadad was taken prisoner; but Ahab called him 'brother' and released him, for which he was rebuked by a prophet
Moab - The Ammonites and the Moabites continued in subjection to the kings of Israel to the death of Ahab. Presently after the death of Ahab the Moabites began to revolt, 2 Kings 3:4-5 . The reign of Ahaziah was too short to make war with them; but Jehoram, son of Ahab, and brother to Ahaziah, having ascended the throne, thought of reducing them to obedience
Angel - , we read that Ben-hadad sent messengers with the terms of surrender: “He sent messengers to Ahab king of Israel into the city, and said unto him, Thus saith Benhadad …” (1 Kings 20:2)
Asherah - There is therefore good warrant for seeing in the asherah which Ahab set up in the temple of Baal at Samaria (cf
Lie - Israel’s spies lodged with Rahab: “And they went, and came into a harlot’s house, named Rahab, and lodged there” (1 Kings 22:40 suggests, can refer to the state of being dead (“so Ahab slept with his fathers”), since v
Israel, Kingdom of - The adoption of Baal-worship led to a reaction in the nation, to the moral triumph of the prophets in the person of Elijah, and to extinction of the house of Ahab in obedience to the bidding of Elisha
Oracles - Other examples, although the word oracle is not used, include Elijah's word to Ahab ( 1 Kings 21:17-19 ) and Elisha's word to Jehoram (2 Kings 3:13-20 ). Others, who heard oracles they had neither sought nor welcomed, may not have been as quick to accept the pronouncement (consider Elijah's words to Ahab, 1 Kings 21:20-24 ). When Jehu killed Joram (2 Kings 9:25 ), he had the body taken to Naboth's vineyard in order that an oracle pronounced in Ahab's day might be fulfilled
Prison, Prisoners - Asa of Judah (2 Chronicles 16:10 ) and Ahab of Israel (1 Kings 22:26-27 ) made use of prisons, probably associated with the palace
Jehoahaz - His persevering in his father's sin, namely, the worship of Jeroboam's calves, and his leaving the Asherah still standing in Samaria from the time of Ahab (1 Kings 16:33), brought on Israel Jehovah's anger more than in Jehu's time; for the longer sin is persevered in, the heavier the final reckoning, an accumulated entail of guilt descends (Exodus 20:5)
House - (Jeremiah 36:22 ; Amos 3:15 ) The ivory house of Ahab was probably a palace largely ornamented with inlaid ivory
Phoenicia, phNicians - ...
For some reason Sidon so excelled the other cities in the eyes of Israelites and Greeks, that in the OT and Homer the Phœnicians are frequently called ‘Sidonians,’ even when, as in the case of Ahab’s marriage, Tyrians are really referred to (cf. In the following century king Ahab of Israel married Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal, king of Tyre. ...
Shortly before the time of Ahab, the Assyrian king Ashur-nasir-pal (b
Hazor - Prior to the Assyrian invasion, Hazor had been greatly enlarged and strengthened by King Ahab of Israel in anticipation of the attack
Devote, Devoted - (Some of the seventy sons of Ahab were half-Phoenician
Spirit - Ahab was dispirited and sullen because of Naboth's unwillingness to sell his vineyard (1 Kings 21:4 )
Covenant - ...
Ahab defeated the Syrians: “So he made a covenant with [2], and sent him away” (1 Kings 20:34)
Dog - " This account illustrates also the readiness of the dogs to lick the blood of Ahab, 1 Kings 22:38 ; in conformity to which is the expression of the Prophet Jeremiah, Jeremiah 15:3 , "I will appoint over them the sword to slay, and the dogs to tear
Arms And Armor - At least four Israelite kings were severely or fatally wounded by enemy arrows: Saul (1 Samuel 31:3 ), Ahab (1 Kings 22:34 ), Joram (2 Kings 9:24 ), and Josiah (2 Chronicles 35:23 ). While in a chariot, Ahab was hit and killed by an arrow exactly where the mail was least protective—at the seam where the sleeve and breast of the coat met (Psalm 7:12-13 )
Idolatry - Under the reign of Ahab, this disorder was at its height, occasioned by Jezebel, the wife of Ahab, who did all she could to destroy the worship of the true God, by driving away and persecuting his prophets
Damascus - Ahab agreed to a covenant treaty with the defeated Syrian king, for which he met a prophet's strong judgment (1 Kings 20:35-43 )
Transjordan - David, Omri, Ahab, and Jeroboam II were the more successful ones
False Worship - Carmel in the time of Ahab and Jezebel (1 Kings 18:20-46 ), the prophet of the Lord addressed the assembled people
Oracle - ) that he saw the Almighty, sitting upon his throne, and all the host of heaven round about him; and the Lord said, Who shall tempt Ahab, king of Israel, that he may go to war with Ramoth Gilead, and fall in the battle? One answered after one manner, and another in another
Damascus - His son, Benhadad II, who besieged Ahab (1 Kings 20:1), is the Ben-idri of the Assyrian inscriptions
Idolatry, - (Exodus 32:1 ) The successors of Jeroboam followed in his steps, till Ahab
Ravels - That Ahab sought Elijah with avidity, and took an oath of every people, no doubt, also, in his dominions, that he was not concealed among its inhabitants; his situation, therefore, required the utmost privacy, even to solitude
Idol, Idolatry - Under the reign of Ahab, idolatry reached its height
Forgiveness - In spite of all the evil Ahab had done, God did not kill Ahab, which was the required penalty for his sin of complicity in the murder of Naboth. Because Ahab repented God did not even bring punishment on Ahab's house (1 Kings 21:27-29 ), as he had originally planned
Micah - Micah 5:12-14; Micah 6:16, "the statutes of Omri are kept and all the works of the house of Ahab," accord with the reign of Ahaz who "walked in the way of the kings of Israel" (2 Kings 16:3)
Dibon - As this tribute seems enormous for so small a country it was probably imposed temporarily as compensation for damages sustained in the revolt of Moab after Ahab's death. The 40 years would be the round number for the 36 during which Omri, Ahab, and Ahaziah reigned
Kill, Killing - 1 Kings 19:10 ); Zechariah was stoned during the reign of Joash (2 Chronicles 24:21 ); Abimelech killed his seventy brothers (Judges 9:5 ); Athaliah killed her family and was herself killed (2 Kings 11:16 ; 2 Chronicles 23:15 ); and Jehu destroyed the line of Ahab (2 Chronicles 22:8 )
Damascus - Hostilities continued between Syria and Israel till the days of Ahab: Ahab’s sparing of Ben-hadad after the battle of Aphek and his making a truce with him, were the cause of a prophetic denunciation ( 1 Kings 20:42 )
Ammon, Ammonites - ...
In the reign of Ahab, Ba’sa, son of Rehob, the Ammonite, was a member of the confederacy which opposed the progress of Shalmaneser into the West (cf
Evil - However, in 1 Kings 22:8 and its parallel ( 2 Chronicles 18:12 ) the king of Israel (Ahab) answers Jehoshaphat of Judah, declaring that there is indeed a prophet of Yahweh about, adding peevishly, "But I hate him because he never prophesies anything good about me, but always bad [8]. " That neither moral nor objective evil is intended is clear when the prophecy unfolds as a prediction of Ahab's death. The prophecy is evil to Ahab, for whom it bodes personal harm and by whom it must be subjectively received. Ahab recognizes this, and confirms this as what he intended when he had predicted an evil prophecy (22:18)
Moab, Moabites - Mesha states that Omri, king of Israel, conquered Moab, and that Moab continued subject to Israel till the middle of the reign of Ahab, when Chemosh enabled him (Mesha) to win victories over Israel, which secured Moabitish independence, and which he describes in detail. , Jehoram, Ahab’s successor, undertook, with the aid of Jehoshaphat and the king of Edom, to reduce Moab once more, and almost succeeded, The country was overrun, the capital besieged and reduced to great extremity, when the king of Moab sacrificed to Chemosh his firstborn son on the city wall in sight of both armies ( 2 Kings 3:27 )
Phoenice - , and the people's halting between Jehovah and Baal under Ahab
Elisha - This change of attitude on the part of the prophet may be due to the fact that Jehoram attempted to do away with Baal worship ( 2 Kings 3:2 ); but Elisha has not forgotten the doom pronounced upon the house of Ahab by Elijah
Statute, Ordinance - ...
The “statutes” of people are to be understood as the practices contrary to God’s expectations: “For the statutes of Omri are kept, and all the works of the home of Ahab, and ye walk in their counsels, that I should make thee a desolation, and the inhabitants thereof a hissing: therefore ye shall bear the reproach of my people” ( Lay - ...
When Ahab heard these words, he rent his clothes, and put sackcloth upon his head, and fasted and lay in sackcloth
Chronology of the Biblical Period - ...
SIGNIFICANT DATES IN OLD TESTAMENT BIBLE HISTORY...
Periods of History...
Critical...
Traditional...
Patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob)...
1700-1500...
2000...
Exodus...
1290...
1450...
Conquest...
1250...
1400...
Judges...
1200-1025...
1360-1025...
Kings...
...
...
Kings of United Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Saul...
1025-1005...
1020-1004...
David...
1005-965...
1004-965...
Solomon...
965-925...
965-931...
Kings of the Divided Kingdom...
Judah...
Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Rehoboam...
...
924-907...
931-913...
...
Jeroboam...
924-903...
926-909...
Abijam (Abijah)...
...
907-906...
913-910...
Asa...
...
905-874...
910-869...
...
Nadab...
903-902...
909-908...
...
Baasha...
902-886...
908-886...
...
Elah...
886-885...
886-885...
...
Zimri...
885...
885...
...
(Tibni, 1 Kings 16:21 )...
885-881...
885-880...
...
Omri...
885-873...
885-874...
Jehoshaphat...
...
874-850...
873-848...
...
Ahab...
873-851...
874-853...
...
Ahaziah...
851-849...
853-852...
Jehoram (Joram)...
...
850-843...
853-841...
...
Jehoram...
849-843...
852-841...
Ahaziah...
...
843...
841...
Athaliah...
...
843-837...
841-835...
...
Jehu...
843-816...
841-814...
Joash (Jehoash)...
...
837-796...
835-796...
...
Jehoahaz...
816-800...
814-798...
Amaziah...
...
798-767...
796-767...
...
Joash (Jehoash)...
800-785...
798-782...
Uzziah (Azariah)...
...
791-740...
792-740...
...
Jeroboam II...
785-745...
793-753...
Jotham...
...
750-742...
750-732...
...
Zechariah...
745...
753-752...
...
Shallum...
745...
752...
...
Menahem...
745-736...
752-742...
Jehoahaz I (Ahaz)...
...
742-727...
735-715...
...
Pekahiah...
736-735...
742-740...
...
Pekah...
735-732...
752-732...
...
Hoshea...
732-723...
732-723...
Hezekiah...
...
727-698...
715-686...
...
Fall of Samaria ...
722 ...
723/722 ...
Manasseh...
...
697-642...
696-642...
Amon...
...
642-640...
642-640...
Josiah...
...
639-606...
640-609...
Jehoahaz II...
...
609...
609...
Jehoiakim...
...
608-598...
609-597...
Jehoiachin...
...
598-597...
597...
Zedekiah...
...
597-586...
597-586...
Fall of Jerusalem ...
...
586 ...
586 ...
BABYLONIAN EXILE AND RESTORATION UNDER PERSIAN RULE...
Jehoiachin and leaders exiled to Babylon including Ezekiel...
597...
Jerusalem destroyed, remaining leaders exiled to Babylon...
586...
Gedaliah set over Judea...
58...
Gedaliah assassinated...
581 (?)...
Jeremiah taken with other Judeans to Egypt...
581 (?)...
Judeans deported to Babylon...
581...
Cyrus, king of Persia...
559-530...
Babylon captured...
539...
Edict allowing Jews to return to Jerusalem under Zerubbabel...
538...
Temple restoration begun but quickly halted...
538...
Cambysses, king of Persia...
530-522...
Darius, king of Persia...
522-486...
Haggai and Zechariah lead rebuilding of Temple...
520-515...
Temple completed and rededicated...
515...
Xerxes, king of Persia...
486-465...
Artaxerxes I, king of Persia...
465-424...
Ezra returns to Jerusalem and teaches the law...
458...
Nehemiah returns to Jerusalem and rebuilds the walls...
445...
NOTE: Overlapping dates of kings such as between Uzziah and Jotham result from coregencies, that is, a father installing his son as king during the father's lifetime and allowing the son to exercise royal power
Violence - Although none of the terms under examination is used by the narrator, the Ahab/Naboth incident appears to offer a classic narrative illustration of the Micah situation in the extreme. The violence of murder was Ahab's means of "grasping a field" (1 Kings 21 )
King - Even Ahab did not seize at once Naboth's vineyard, but did it with the show of a trial
Manasseh - The record ( 2 Kings 21:2-9 ) is that he built again the altars which Hezekiah had destroyed, and erected altars for Baal, and made an ashçrah , as Ahab king of Israel had done, and that he worshipped the host of heaven and served them
Jehoiachin - This accounts for the Babylonian king inflicting so terrible a punishment (compare Daniel 3), roasting to death Ahab (Jeremiah 29:4-9; Jeremiah 29:21-23; Jeremiah 29:27-32)
Satan - Hence he enticeth them to sin, as he did Ahab, when he became a lying spirit in the mouth of all his prophets
Zedekiah - 8:15, section 3) that Zedekiah denounced Micaiah as contradicting Elijah, who foretold that dogs should lick up Ahab's blood in the vineyard of Naboth of Jezreel; and defied Micaiah to wither the hand with which he smote his cheek, as the prophet from Judah had done to Jeroboam. A proverbial formula of cursing should be taken up by all the captives, "Jehovah make thee like Zedekiah and like Ahab whom the king of Babylon roasted in the fire!" (Isaiah 65:15
Kings, Books of - Ahab appears very differently in the Elijah sections and in the chapters which treat of the Syrian wars. A complete example is the following: ‘Jehoshaphat reigned over Judah in the fourth year of Ahab, king of Israel
War, Holy War - Jehu was authorized by Yahweh to end Ahab's dynasty, but his violence went far beyond his objectives. ...
Practices of Jezebel, Ahab's wife from Sidon, shows what happens when just one Canaanite occupies a place of authority. She has Naboth killed so Ahab can possess his vineyard. Ahab grew up in a society where the Ten Commandments were an important standard
Preaching - Shemaiah preached to Rehoboam, the princes, and all the people at Jerusalem, 2 Chronicles 12:5 ; Azariah and Hanani preached to Asa and his army, 2 Chronicles 15:1 ; 2 Chronicles 16:7 ; Micaiah, to Ahab. Jezebel, an idolatress, had four hundred prophets of Baal; and Ahab, a pretended worshipper of Jehovah, had as many pretended prophets of his own profession, 2 Chronicles 18:5
Tyre - At length Eth-baal, by the murder of his brother, seized the throne, and married his daughter Jezebel to Ahab (1 Kings 16:31 )
Issachar - Here Ahab had his palace, selecting the site doubtless for its beauty
Remnant - Historically, an illustration of remnant are the seven thousand in Israel who in times of apostasy of the Ahab/Jezebel era had not defected from the Lord (1 Kings 19:9-18 )
Agriculture - ...
Compare Isaiah's "woe" to them who "add field to field," clearing away families (1 Kings 21) to absorb all, as Ahab did to Naboth
Assyria - If the names are correctly interpreted he mentions as allied against him Benhadad king of Syria and Ahab king of Israel
Elisha - Elisha sent one of the sons of the prophets to anoint Jehu to be king over Israel: he was to execute God's judgement on the house of Ahab and on Jezebel, which had been prophesied by Elijah
Kings, the Books of - The second period (1 Kings 12:1-2 Kings 10) comprises three stages:...
(1) the enmity at first between Judah and Israel from Jeroboam to Omri, 1 Kings 12:1-16:28;...
(2) the intermarriage between the royal houses of Israel and of Judah, under Ahab, down to the destruction of both kings, Joram of Israel and Ahaziah of Judah, by Jehu, 1 Kings 16:29-2 Kings 10;...
(3) the renewal of hostilities, from Jehu's accession in Israel and Athaliah's usurpation in Judah to Israel's captivity in Hezekiah's sixth year, 1 Kings 11-17. But in Israel their agency was more continuous and prominent, because of the absence of Jehovah's ordinary ministers the priests and Levites, and because of the state idolatry of the calves, to which Ahab added Baal worship
Idolatry - Solomon and Ahab by their marriage alliances introduced and promoted idol cults
Assyria - encounters Benhadad of Damascus, and probably Ahab of Israel
End - ...
Third, related to the previous meaning but quite distinct, is the connotation “farthest extremity of,” such as the “end of a given period of time”: “And after certain years [5] he went down to Ahab to Samaria …” ( Arms - Between the joints of this harness, as it is termed in 1 Kings 22:4 , the profligate Ahab was mortally wounded by an arrow, shot at a venture
Herod - Herod stood to John Baptist in the same relation that Ahab did to Elijah. ...
Herod "feared" John at first (compare Ahab's fear of Elisha, 1 Kings 21:20), "knowing that he was a just man and an holy, and observed him (preserved him from Herodias, or else respected, regarded him); and when he heard him he did many things and heard him gladly. Cruel yet cunning, like his father (Luke 13:32), he was the very type of an oriental despot, sensual, capricious, yet with a sense of honour and having a respect for piety in others; but like Ahab too weak to resist a bad woman's influence, under which false scrupulosity outweighed right conscientiousness, to be succeeded by superstitious terrors
Preaching - Micaiah to Ahab. Jezebel, an idolatress, had four hundred prophets of Baal; and Ahab, a pretended worshipper of Jehovah, had as many pretended prophets of his own profession, 2 Chronicles 18:5
Name, Names - A few, of peculiarly difficult interpretation, point to family relationships: Ahab = ‘father’s brother,’ but the question is whether it signifies ‘uncle’ or whether it is an indication that the child closely resembles his father or is to be as a brother to him
Government - As long as he was successful and strong, and retained the allegiance of his immediate followers, his will was absolute (David, Ahab, Jehu; cf
Elisha - of Ahab and Jezebel, 1 Kings 18:4; 1 Kings 18:21) hath sent to take away my head"; "hold the messenger fast at the door," "his master's feet (are) behind him," namely, hastening to revoke his hasty order for Elisha's execution. There Elisha anointed Jehu, by the hand of one of the children of the prophets, to take vengeance on Ahab's guilty seed, having been witness of that monarch's wicked seizure of Naboth's vineyard and of Elijah's awful sentence on him (2 Kings 9:26). In Herod and Herodias Ahab and Jezebel are reproduced, as in John the Baptist Elijah is reproduced; as Elijah, the representative of the law, foreruns the gentler Elisha, so John the greatest prophet of the law foreruns Jesus the gracious Savior
Zebedee - Little Hermon—the Hill of Moreh—and Gideon’s fountain (Judges 7:1) would recall the ‘day of Midian’; while Gilboa would bring thoughts of Israel’s darker days, and Jezreel memories of sad declension in the time of Ahab
Constantius ii, Son of Constantius - The Christian writers were naturally not partial to an emperor who leaned so constantly towards Arianism and was such a bitter persecutor of the Nicene faith, and did not scruple to call him Ahab, Pilate, and Judas
Dwelling - The ivory house of Ahab was probably a palace largely ornamented with inlaid ivory
Destroy, Destruction - ...
Wicked Ahab could humble himself and be granted a postponement of his dynasty's destruction (1 Kings 21:27-29 ; 2 Kings 9:8 )
Kings, First And Second, Theology of - Jeroboam and Ahab sinfully influenced Israel so that the people copied attributes of supplanted peoples (2 Kings 17:8,11 ), served other gods (2 Kings 17:12 ), and seduced surrounding peoples (2 Kings 17:15 )
Galilee (2) - It was ravaged by Ben-hadad (1 Kings 15:20), probably won back by Ahab, taken again by the Aramaeans under Hazael (2 Kings 12:18; 2 Kings 13:22), and recovered by Jeroboam ii
Assyria, History And Religion of - , at Qarqar in north Syria, Shalmaneser fought a coalition of twelve kings including Hadad-ezer (Ben-Hadad, 1Kings 20:26,1 Kings 20:34 ) of Aram-Damascus and Ahab of Israel
Parable - So also with Ahab and the 'escaped captive
Assur - Among them inscriptions mention 2000 chariots and 10,000 footmen of Ahab of Israel
Satan (2) - Similarly the deception of the ‘lying spirit’ who lured Ahab to his destruction (1 Kings 22:19-23) is said to have had the express sanction of God
Wealth - Later kings more consistently abuse the privileges their wealth grants them, among whom Ahab is probably the worst (1 Kings 21 )
Sin - During the vigorous and successful reign of Ahab and Jezebel, the seeds of national decay were sown, and the historian neglects not to point out the source to which the later mournful decline may be traced ( 1 Kings 16:31 )
Economic Life - The tradition was so strong that Naboth could refuse King Ahab's request to purchase his vineyard saying he could not give him “the inheritance of my fathers” (1 Kings 21:3 ). 1 Kings 22:10 (NAS, NIV) portrays Kings Ahab and Jehoshaphat sitting enthroned before the gates of Samaria on a threshing floor as they judge the statements of the prophet Micaiah
Number - inscriptions the Moabite Stone (rather later than Ahab), and the Siloam inscription (usually ascribed to the time of Hezekiah)
Canaan, History And Religion of - ...
During the Omrid Dynasty, Ahab (869-850 B
Leadership - But others fared worse, for example, Elijah with Ahab and Jezebel, Amos with Jeroboam and Amaziah, priest of the Bethel calf cult, and Jeremiah with Josiah's three reigning sons and grandson
Prophet - The prophets so commissioned were the national poets (so David the psalmist was also a prophet, Acts 2:30), annalists (2 Chronicles 32:32), theocratic patriots (Psalm 48; Exodus 3:2,), promoters of spiritual religion (Isaiah 1), extraordinarily authorized expounders of the spirit of the law (Genesis 20:7; Ezekiel 18; Micah 6:6-8; Hosea 6:6; Amos 5:21) which so many sacrificed to the letter, official pastors, and a religious counterpoise to kingly despotism and idolatry, as Elijah was to Ahab
Angels (2) - We have then, doubtless, a very primitive conception of angels in the words of Micaiah to Ahab, in 1 Kings 22:19 ‘I saw Jahweh sitting on his throne, and all the host of heaven standing by him, on his right hand and on his left
Israel, History of - This issue was addressed particularly during the reign of King Ahab (869-850) and under the auspices of the prophet Elijah (1 Kings 18-19 )
Idol - ...
Israel, foremost in the offense under Jeroboam and then Ahab, is first to have prophets sent as censors and seers to counteract the evil, but proving refractory is the first to be carried into captivity
Gods, Pagan - ” Baalism reached its peak in the northern nation of Israel under King Ahab and his wife Jezebel who aggressively sponsored worship of Baal in Samaria (1 Kings 16:31-33 )
Faith - During the siege of Samaria, Ahab, who blamed his troubles on the Lord, showed a lack of faith when he asked, "Why should I wait for the Lord any longer?" (2 Kings 6:33 )
Magic, Divination, And Sorcery - the worship of the Phœnician Baal, fostered by Ahab), and by its favouring the introduction of methods of magic and divination in use among their neighbours (cf
Sin - Sometimes they served the Baals with singleness of purpose, filling Jerusalem with idols, and lawlessness reigned (Ahab, Ahaz, and Manasseh)
Palestine - Scantiness of the rainfall, however, is invariably succeeded by poverty or even destruction of the crops, and the rain is watched for as anxiously now as it was in the time of Ahab
Jeremiah - ...
Even among the captives at Babylon were false prophets, Ahab, Zedekiah, and Shemaiah (the writer to Zephaniah at Jerusalem that he should imprison Jeremiah as "mad"), who held out delusive hopes of a speedy return
Prophet - Thus Micaiah foretells the death of Ahab (1 Kings 22), and Jeremiah the death of Hananiah (Jeremiah 28:16)
Archaeology And Biblical Study - The city was built by the Hebrew Kings Omri and his son Ahab in the first half of the ninth century B