What does Adonis mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Adonis
(1):
(n.) A youth beloved by Venus for his beauty. He was killed in the chase by a wild boar.
(2):
(n.) A preeminently beautiful young man; a dandy.
(3):
(n.) A genus of plants of the family Ranunculaceae, containing the pheasant's eye (Adonis autumnalis); - named from Adonis, whose blood was fabled to have stained the flower.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Adonis
ADONIS . The phrase rendered by EV [1] ‘pleasant plants,’ and by RVm [2] ‘plantings of Adonis’ ( Isaiah 17:10 ), alludes to the miniature gardens whose rapid decline symbolized the death of this god, or rather the spring verdure of which he is a personification. This phase of the myth, which the Greeks obtained from the Semitic Tammuz cult, through the Phœnicians, where the god was worshipped under the title of Adon (‘lord’), is used by Isaiah to depict the fading hope of Israel. See Tammuz.
N. Koenig.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Adonis
(uh doh' nihss) God of vegetation and fertility with Syrian name meaning, “lord.” Worshiped in Greece and Syria. Rites seem to include the planting of seeds which quickly produced plants and that just as quickly wilted in the sun. These were used to symbolize the dying and rising of the god and to bring blessing upon crops. Similar rites were celebrated for Osiris in Egypt and possibly for Tammuz in Babylon. REB translates Isaiah 17:10 as “your gardens in honour of Adonis.” The Hebrew term appears only here in the Bible, being related to the personal name Naaman and to the Hebrew word meaning, “lovely, pleasant, agreeable.” Other translations read, “finest plants” (NIV), “pleasant plants” (KJV), “delightful plants” (NAS), “sacred gardens” (TEV), “pleasant plants” (NRSV).
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Adonis
The text of the Vulgate in Ezekiel 8:14 , says, that the Prophet saw women sitting in the temple, and weeping for Adonis; but according to the reading of the Hebrew text, they are said to weep for Thamuz, or Tammuz, the hidden one. Among the Egyptians Adonis was adored under the name of Osiris, the husband of Isis. But he was sometimes called by the name of Ammuz, or Tammuz, the concealed, probably to denote his death or burial. The Hebrews, in derision, sometimes call him the dead, Psalms 106:28 ; Leviticus 19:28 ; because they wept for him, and represented him as dead in his coffin; and at other times they denominate him the image of jealousy, Ezekiel 8:3 ; Ezekiel 8:5 , because he was the object of the jealousy of Mars. The Syrians, Phoenicians, and Cyprians, called him Adonis; and Calmet is of opinion that the Ammonites and Moabites designated him by the name of Baal- peor.
The manner in which they celebrated the festival of this false deity was as follows: They represented him as lying dead in his coffin, wept for him, bemoaned themselves, and sought for him with great eagerness and inquietude. After this, they pretended that they had found him again, and that he was still living. At this good news they exhibited marks of the most extravagant joy, and were guilty of a thousand lewd practices, to convince Venus how much they congratulated her on the return and revival of her favourite, as they had before condoled with her on his death. The Hebrew women, of whom the Prophet Ezekiel speaks, celebrated the feasts of Tammuz, or Adonis, in Jerusalem; and God showed the Prophet these women weeping for this infamous god, even in his temple.
Fabulous history gives the following account of Adonis: He was a beautiful young shepherd, the son of Cyniras, king of Cyprus, by his own daughter Myrrha. The goddess Venus fell in love with this youth, and frequently met him on mount Libanus. Mars, who envied this rival, transformed himself into a wild boar, and, as Adonis was hunting, struck him in the groin and killed him. Venus lamented the death of Adonis in an inconsolable manner. The eastern people, in imitation of her mourning, generally established some solemn days for the bewailing of Adonis. After his death, Venus went to the shades, and obtained from Proserpine, that Adonis might be with her six months in the year, and continue the other six in the infernal regions. Upon this were founded those public rejoicings, which succeeded the lamentations of his death. Some say that Adonis was a native of Syria; some, of Cyprus; and others, of Egypt.

Sentence search

Adonean - ) Pertaining to Adonis; Adonic
Adonis - ) A genus of plants of the family Ranunculaceae, containing the pheasant's eye (Adonis autumnalis); - named from Adonis, whose blood was fabled to have stained the flower
Adonis - The text of the Vulgate in Ezekiel 8:14 , says, that the Prophet saw women sitting in the temple, and weeping for Adonis; but according to the reading of the Hebrew text, they are said to weep for Thamuz, or Tammuz, the hidden one. Among the Egyptians Adonis was adored under the name of Osiris, the husband of Isis. The Syrians, Phoenicians, and Cyprians, called him Adonis; and Calmet is of opinion that the Ammonites and Moabites designated him by the name of Baal- peor. The Hebrew women, of whom the Prophet Ezekiel speaks, celebrated the feasts of Tammuz, or Adonis, in Jerusalem; and God showed the Prophet these women weeping for this infamous god, even in his temple. ...
Fabulous history gives the following account of Adonis: He was a beautiful young shepherd, the son of Cyniras, king of Cyprus, by his own daughter Myrrha. Mars, who envied this rival, transformed himself into a wild boar, and, as Adonis was hunting, struck him in the groin and killed him. Venus lamented the death of Adonis in an inconsolable manner. The eastern people, in imitation of her mourning, generally established some solemn days for the bewailing of Adonis. After his death, Venus went to the shades, and obtained from Proserpine, that Adonis might be with her six months in the year, and continue the other six in the infernal regions. Some say that Adonis was a native of Syria; some, of Cyprus; and others, of Egypt
Adonic - ) Relating to Adonis, famed for his beauty
Tammuz - It is generally supposed that Tammuz was the same deity as the Phoenician Adonis, and perhaps the Egyptian Osiris. The fabled death and restoration of Adonis, supposed to symbolize the departure and return of the sun, were celebrated at the summer solstice first with lamentation, and then with rejoicing and obscene revels
Adonis - Adonis . ]'>[2] ‘plantings of Adonis’ ( Isaiah 17:10 ), alludes to the miniature gardens whose rapid decline symbolized the death of this god, or rather the spring verdure of which he is a personification
Arbonai - It cannot be represented by the modern Nahr Ibrahîm , since the ancient name of that river was the Adonis
Tammuz - From tamzuwz , "melted down," referring to the river Adonis fed by the melted snows of Lebanon, also to the sun's decreasing heat in winter, and to Venus' melting lamentations for Adonis. Tammuz was the Syrian Adonis (Jerome), Venus' paramour, killed by a wild boar, and according to mythology permitted to spend half the year on earth and obliged to spend the other half in the lower world. The idea fabled was spring's beauties and the river's waters destroyed by summer heat (the river Adonis or nahr Ibrahim in spring becomes discolored with the heavy rains swelling the streams from Lebanon, which discoloration superstition attributed to Tammuz' blood); or else the earth clothed with beauty in the half year while the sun is in the upper hemisphere, and losing it when he descends to the lower (Ezekiel 8:14). Isis' relation to Osiris in Egypt was the same as that of Venus to Adonis
Tammuz - A Phoenician idol, supposed by some to be the same as the Greek Adonis, as in the Vulgate
Tam'Muz - ( Ezekiel 8:14 ) Jerome identifies Tammuz with Adonis, of Grecian mythology, who was fabled to have lost his wife while hunting, by a wound from the tusk of a wild boar. A festival in honor of Adonis was celebrated at Byblus in Phoenicia and in most of the Grecian cities, and even by the Jews when they degenerated into idolatry
Tammuz - This deity has been conjectured to be the same with the Phoenician Adon, or Adonis
Bird's-Eye - ) A plant with a small bright flower, as the Adonis or pheasant's eye, the mealy primrose (Primula farinosa), and species of Veronica, Geranium, etc
Giblites - (But Biblus was the seat of worship of the Syrian Adonis, Tammuz, which the Jews were seduced to worship (Ezekiel 8:14)
Plant - ” The NEB (much like the JB) translates more specifically: “Plant them, if you will, your gardens in honor of Adonis” (Adonis was the god of vegetation)
Tammuz - A corruption of Dumuzi, the Accadian sun-god (the Adonis of the Greeks), the husband of the goddess Ishtar
Gebal - Identified with Jebeil, the ancient Byblus, near the mouth of the river Adonis, 34 8' N
Naaman - NAAMAN (the word means ‘pleasantness,’ or, as an epithet, as is probable, of Adonis or Tammuz, ‘darling’; cf. the Adonis plantations referred to in Isaiah 17:10 Baal Peor - Baal Peor has been farther supposed by some to have been Priapus; by others, Saturn: by others, Pluto; and by others again, Adonis. Faber agrees with Calmet in making Baal Peor the same with Adonis; a part of whose worship consisted in bewailing him with funeral rites, as one lost or dead, and afterward welcoming, with extravagant joy, his fictitious return to life
Adonis - REB translates Isaiah 17:10 as “your gardens in honour of Adonis
Tammuz - His Canaanite name Adonai gave rise to the Greek Adonis , and he was later identified with the Egyptian Osiris
Aphik - The ruins of the temple, "magnificent ruins" in a "spot of strange wildness and beauty", are still seen at Afka, on the north-west slopes of Lebanon, near the source of the river Adonis (now Nahr Ibrahim), 12 miles east of Gebal
Lebanon - Another famous valley is the Valley of Adonis, through which the River of Adonis flows; and to where the pilgrimage of Adonis took place in the spring of the year
Felicitas, Martyr at Rome - , Bedae, Adonis, Usuardi)
Chemosh - Jerom and most interpreters consider Chemosh and Peor as the same deity; but some think that Baal-Peor was Tammuz, or Adonis
Gebal - of the river Adonis, afterwards a Christian see
Phoenicia - Later, Baal's Greek counterpart Adonis (“my lord”) was worshiped in similar fashion to Tammuz
Felix (174), Bishop of Tubzoca - Bedae, Adonis, Usuardi; Baronius, Annal
Mourning - If the Pauline version of the eucharist has been influenced by the mysteries, the mourning customs for Attis and Adonis (‘weeping for Tammuz,’ see J. Frazer’s Adonis, Attis, Osiris3, 1914) may not be without significance for the study of this feature of the Lord’s Supper
Lily - ...
Of the true "floral glories of Palestine" the pheasant's eye (Adonis Palestina), the ranunuculus (R
Shepherds - Adonis, the son of Cinyras, a king of Cyprus, fed his flocks by the streaming rivers:...
Et formosus oves ad flumina pavit Adonis. ...
"Along the streams his flock Adonis fed
Lebanon - ...
The river Adonis (nahr Ibrahim) springs from a cave beneath the high peak Sunnin
Jephthah - Among such rites was that known as ‘the Weeping for Tammuz’ (= Adonis), cf
Lebanon - as the more important: Nahr ez-Zaherani, Nahr el-‘Auwali (Bostrenus), Nahr Beirût (Magoras), Nahr el-Kelb (Lycus), Nahr Ibrahîm (Adonis), and the Nahr Qadîsha or ‘holy river,’ near Tripoli
Hadrianus, Publius Aelius, Emperor - Trees and statues were placed on the platform of the temple and a grove to Adonis near the cave of the nativity at Bethlehem
Idolatry - Related to such nature-worship perhaps was the mourning for Tammuz [3] ( Ezekiel 8:14 , Isaiah 17:10 RVm Hosanna - This Psalm was sung, and this verse of it used as a refrain by the people, at the feast of Tabernacles; and the refrain was abbreviated, through constant popular repetition, into Hôshaʽnâ, just as the old Canaanitish cry Hoi Dod (= ‘Ho Adonis’) was turned into a common interjection, Hedad
Ezekiel - ...
(3) A year and two months later a vision of the temple polluted by Tammuz or Adonis worship; God's consequent scattering of fire over the city, and forsaking the temple to reveal Himself to an inquiring people in exile; purer, happier times follow: Ezekiel 8-11
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - The Greeks adopted Tammuz as one of their prominent deities, changing his name to Adonis
the Man Who Cast Seed Into the Round And it Grew up he Knew Not How - If the seed produces the fruit before the jointed stem, it is a product of the garden of Adonis
Canaanites - Their chief deity was the sun, whom they worshipped, together with the Baalim, under the titles of Ourchol, Adonis, or Thamuz
Idol - The Phoenician Adon or Adonis, the Ammonite Moloch or Milcom, the Moabite Chemosh, the Assyrian and Babylonian Bel, and the Syrian Hadad, the Egyptian Ra, are essentially the same sun god
Gods, Pagan - Perhaps related is the myth of the vegetation god Adonis (fromfjcr pbadon, “lord”) of the Phoenicians, whose death was mourned much like that of Tammuz
Deluge - By the celebrated Ogdoas of the Egyptians, consisting of eight persons sailing together in the sacred baris or ark, they imagine the family of Noah, which was precisely eight in number, to have been designated; and in the rites of Adonis or Thammuz, in particular, they point out many circumstances which seem to possess a distinct reference to the events recorded in the sixth and seventh chapters of Genesis
Bethlehem - 117–138), in his zeal to extirpate the very remembrance of Christ, caused a grove sacred to Adonis to be planted over the grotto of the Nativity, as he caused a temple to Venus to be erected over the site of the sepulchre of our Lord
Inspiration And Revelation - At the bottom of most of the pagan cults that prevailed over the East-as, for instance, in the wide-spread worship under the names of Osiris, Adonis, Attis-was the celebration of seed-time and harvest
Hellenism - But it was not the plain Egyptian cult of Isis, or the Phœnician cult of Adonis, or the Phrygian cult of the Magna Mater and Attis, or the Persian cult of Mithra that made so many proselytes among the Greeks and Romans: on their way to the West these cults had been transformed into Greek Mysteries, and it was in this form that they proved so attractive