What does Adam mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἀδὰμ Adam 7
אָדָ֑ם man 2
הָֽאָדָ֛ם man 2
הָֽאָדָ֜ם man 2
אָדָ֗ם first man. 2
אָדָ֥ם first man. 2
וְהָ֣אָדָ֔ם man 1
כְאָדָ֣ם first man. 1
אָדָם֙ first man. 1
וּלְאָדָ֣ם first man. 1
הָֽאָדָ֑ם man 1
לְאָדָ֧ם man 1
ἀδάμ Adam 1
הָֽאָדָם֒ man 1
הָאָדָ֖ם man 1
וּלְאָדָ֕ם man 1
הָ֣אָדָ֔ם man 1
(מֵֽאָדָ֤ם) first man. 1

Definitions Related to Adam

G76


   1 Adam, the first man, the parent of the whole human race.
   Additional Information: Adam = “the red earth”.
   

H120


   1 man, mankind.
      1a man, human being.
      1b man, mankind (much more frequently intended sense in OT).
      1c Adam, first man.
      1d city in Jordan valley.
      

H121


   1 first man.
   2 city in Jordan valley.
   Additional Information: Adam = “red”.
   

Frequency of Adam (original languages)

Frequency of Adam (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Marisco, Adam de
(Adam Marsh) Franciscan scholar (died c.1258),born probably Somerset, England. Known as "Doctor illustris," he helped to organize the teaching and discipline at Oxford.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Adam
1. The progenitor and representative head of our race; formed of the dust of the ground, and made a living soul by the Creator's breath. He was the last work of the creation, and received dominion over all that the earth contained. That he might not be alone, God provided Eve as a helpmeet for him, and she became his wife. Marriage is thus a divine institution, first in order of time, as well as of importance and blessedness to mankind. Adam was made a perfect man-complete in every physical, mental, and spiritual endowment; and placed in the Garden of Eden on probation, holy and happy, but liable to sin. From this estate he fell by breaking the express command of God, through the temptations of Satan and the compliance of Eve; and thus brought the curse upon himself and all his posterity. Sovereign grace interposed; a Savior was revealed, and the full execution of the curse stayed; but Adam was banished from Eden and its tree of life, and reduced to a life of painful toil. His happiness was farther imbittered by witnessing the fruits of his fall in his posterity. Cain his first born son, and Abel the second, born in the likeness of their fallen parents, were ere long last to them-the one slain, and the other a fugitive. They probably had many other sons and daughters, but the name of Seth alone is given. Adam lived to the age of nine hundred and thirty years, and saw the earth rapidly peopled by his descendants; but "the wickedness of man was great upon the earth." At the time of his death, Lamech, the father of Noah, was fifty-six years of age; and being in the line of those who "walked with God," had probably heard the early history of the race from the lips of the penitent Adam.
The curse pronounced on man includes not only physical labor and toil on a barren and thorny earth, and the physical dissolution of the body, but also the exposure of the soul, the nobler part, to "everlasting death." In that very day he should lose the moral image of his Maker, and become subject not only to physical death, but also to God's eternal wrath and curse, which is death in the highest sense of the word, and is the doom which has fallen upon all his race. Such is the view of the apostle Paul; who everywhere contrasts the death introduced into the world through Adam, with the life which is procured for our race through Jesus Christ, Romans 5:1-21 . This life is spiritual; and the death, in its highest sense, is also spiritual. So far as the penalty is temporal and physical, no man is or can be exempt from it; but to remove the spiritual and eternal punishment, Christ has died; and he who comes to him in penitence and faith will avoid the threatened death, and enter into life eternal, both of the body and the soul.
The Redeemer is called "the second Adam," 1 Corinthians 15:45 , as being the head of his spiritual seed, and the source of righteousness and life to all believers, as the first Adam was the sorrow of sin and death to all his seed.
2. A city near the Jordan, towards the sea of Tiberias, at some distance from which the waters of the Jordan were heaped up for the passage of the Jews, Joshua 3:16 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Fall of Adam
Since by the grace of original justice Adam was elevated to a supernatural state, his loss of that grace is termed his fall.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Adam, the City of
Is referred to in Joshua 3:16 . It stood "beside Zarethan," on the west bank of Jordan (1 Kings 4:12 ). At this city the flow of the water was arrested and rose up "upon an heap" at the time of the Israelites' passing over (Joshua 3:16 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Adam
Red, a Babylonian word, the generic name for man, having the same meaning in the Hebrew and the Assyrian languages. It was the name given to the first man, whose creation, fall, and subsequent history and that of his descendants are detailed in the first book of Moses (Gen (Genesis 5 ). "God created man [1] in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them." Adam was absolutely the first man whom God created. He was formed out of the dust of the earth (and hence his name), and God breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and gave him dominion over all the lower creatures (Genesis 1:26 ; 2:7 ). He was placed after his creation in the Garden of Eden, to cultivate it, and to enjoy its fruits under this one prohibition: "Of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die."
The first recorded act of Adam was his giving names to the beasts of the field and the fowls of the air, which God brought to him for this end. Thereafter the Lord caused a deep sleep to fall upon him, and while in an unconscious state took one of his ribs, and closed up his flesh again; and of this rib he made a woman, whom he presented to him when he awoke. Adam received her as his wife, and said, "This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man." He called her Eve, because she was the mother of all living.
Being induced by the tempter in the form of a serpent to eat the forbidden fruit, Eve persuaded Adam, and he also did eat. Thus man fell, and brought upon himself and his posterity all the sad consequences of his transgression. The narrative of the Fall comprehends in it the great promise of a Deliverer (Genesis 3:15 ), the "first gospel" message to man. They were expelled from Eden, and at the east of the garden God placed a flame, which turned every way, to prevent access to the tree of life (Genesis 3 ). How long they were in Paradise is matter of mere conjecture.
Shortly after their expulsion Eve brought forth her first-born, and called him Cain. Although we have the names of only three of Adam's sons, viz., Cain, Abel, and Seth, yet it is obvious that he had several sons and daughters (Genesis 5:4 ). He died aged 930 years.
Adam and Eve were the progenitors of the whole human race. Evidences of varied kinds are abundant in proving the unity of the human race. The investigations of science, altogether independent of historical evidence, lead to the conclusion that God "hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth" (Acts 17:26 . Compare Romans 5:12-12 ; 1 Corinthians 15:22-49 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Adam, a Type
The apostle Paul speaks of Adam as "the figure of him who was to come." On this account our Lord is sometimes called the second Adam. This typical relation is described in Romans 5:14-19 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Marsh, Adam
(Adam Marsh) Franciscan scholar (died c.1258),born probably Somerset, England. Known as "Doctor illustris," he helped to organize the teaching and discipline at Oxford.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Adam
"Adam" is both the proper name of the first human and a designation for humankind. God himself gave this appellation to Adam and Eve (Genesis 5:1-2 ). The color red lies behind the Hebrew root adam [1]. This may reflect the red soil from which he was made.
Adam was formed from the ground (Genesis 2:7 ). Word play between "Adam" and "ground" (adama [2]) is unmistakable. It is important that Adam is identified with humankind rather than any particular nationality. The country from which the dust was taken is not specified. Rabbis believed it came from all over the earth so no one could say, "My father is greater than yours."
The word "formed" suggests the careful work of a potter making an exquisite art-piece. Into this earthen vessel God breathed the breath of life (Genesis 2:7 ). These words describe vivid intimacy between God and man not shared by animals.
Adam was made a little lower than "angels" (or "God") at his creation and "crowned with glory and honor" (Psalm 8:5 ). (Rabbis speculated the glory of Adam's heel outshone the sun.) He was commissioned as a vassal king to rule over God's creation. The words "subdue, " "rule, " "under his feet" (Genesis 1:28 ; Psalm 8:6 ) suggest kingship over nature but not over his fellow man.
Many elements present in Mesopotamian creation stories like Enuma Elish are absent. There is nothing about autocratic king ship lowered from heaven. No brick mold is given. Adam is not laden with the task of building temples and cities. He was not created to relieve Gods of tedious labor but to reflect God's care of the world of nature. God did not appoint death for Adam and keep life exclusively for himself as in the Gilgameth epic.
No shrub or cultivated plant had yet grown where Adam was created. He awoke to a barren landscape (Genesis 2:5-7 ). His first sight may have been God planting a garden for him. He could clearly see that all good and perfect gifts come from the Lord God.
Man was placed into this beauty to "work it and take care of it" (Genesis 2:15 ). Unlike the Sumerian garden story of Enki and Ninhursag, there was no gardener working for Adam. Meaningful, productive activity was always part of paradise. Adam was not placed there to be a vegetable but to grow them. Man was not created to be waited on but to join God in preserving and propagating creation.
Man was furnished with every pleasant, nourishing experience God could provide. He was warned about the tree of knowledge of good and evil (2:17). The Hebrew word for "know" includes the idea of knowing by experience. The forbidden tree contained the option of experiencing the opposite of what comes from the hand of God. God wished to spare Adam from pain and death but at the same time left him freedom of choice for options beyond the sphere of his provision.
Adam was not only a laborer but a thinker. God brought him all the animals to see what he would call them. Included in ancient ideas of naming would also be sovereignty over the item named. (Note that Hebrews brought before the king are renamed in Daniel 1:7 ).
The first lesson Adam learned was that his work was too big to do alone. His inspection of the animal kingdom revealed no suitable helper. The one who would make his life complete came from his own rib. They would become one flesh (Genesis 2:18-24 ). This is a far different scenario from the sexual escapades of Enki (= "lord of the earth") in the Sumerian garden story.
The most intelligent animal confronted humankind under whose feet he had been placed (Genesis 1:28 ; 3:1 ). Was Eve selected because she would in some way be easier to deceive? Or was the more difficult subject taken first? It is noteworthy that no special efforts to persuade Adam are recorded. He seems to eat what he is offered without objection (3:6). It is, however, important to observe that Adam was called first as the one whose position of leadership made him responsible for the act (3:9).
The anticipation of being like God never materialized. Adam and Eve's state of existence was not enhanced but filled with misery and death. They would have to leave the garden to experience what life would be outside God's perfect will.
Paul Ferguson
See also Eve ; Fall, the ; Genesis, Theology of
Bibliography . W. Brueggemann, Genesis ; J. Davis, Paradise to Prison ; L. Harris, Man—God's Eternal Creation ; A Ross, Creation and Blessing .
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Adam, the Second
Christ is the "image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation" (Colossians 1:15 ). Like the first Adam, he is the "ruler of creation" (Revelation 3:14 ). He is its author and perfecter (Hebrews 12:2 ). Anyone in Christ is a "new creation" (2 Corinthians 5:17 ).
He existed in the form of God, yet did not consider equality with God something to be grasped (Philippians 2:6 ). He did not desire to be more than man (2:7-8). He was "made like his brothers in every way" so that "by his death he might destroy him who holds the power of death" and free those held in slavery by fear of death (Hebrews 2:14,17 ).
Christ was crowned with glory and honor over the world to come (Hebrews 2:5-7 ). The first Adam lost his crown and gained death. The second Adam was crowned because he tasted death for every man (2:8-9). Sin and death upon all men entered the world through one man. By the obedience of the second Adam life abounds to many (Romans 5:12-19 ).
He was tempted in every way, as was Adam, yet was without sin (Matthew 4:1-11 ; Hebrews 4:15 ). Like the serpent he says, "Take and eat" (Matthew 26:26 ), but this food brings life to the world (John 6:33 ). Christ and Adam are both sons of God (Matthew 1:1 ; Luke 3:37 ). Both have their sonship by his power (Genesis 2:7 ; Luke 1:35 ; Romans 1:4 ). God breathed into Adam the breath of life. Jesus breathed on his disciples and said, "Receive the Holy Spirit" (John 20:22 ).
"As in Adam all die, so in Christ all will be made alive" (1 Corinthians 15:22 ). Adam was a pattern of the one to come (Romans 5:14 ). One of the greatest things to be said for the first Adam was that he became "a living being." Christ, however, became "a life-giving spirit" (1 Corinthians 15:45 ). This spiritual life force does not make us slaves again to fear but the spirit of the Son comes into our hearts crying "Abba, Father" (Romans 8:15 ; Galatians 4:6-7 ).
The first Adam came from the dust. The second Adam came from heaven (1 Corinthians 15:47 ). He came down from heaven not to do his own will but the will of him who sent him (John 6:38 ). God called the first man by name out of hiding (Genesis 3:9 ). The second Adam calls his own by name and they hear his voice (John 10:3 ). One day the dead will hear the voice of the Son of God. Those who hear will live (John 5:25 ).
We have borne the likeness of the earthly man, the first Adam. In the resurrection we will bear the likeness of the man from heaven (1 Corinthians 15:49 ). By the power that enables him to bring everything under his control, he will transform our lowly bodies so they will be like his glorious body. The last enemy placed under the feet of the second Adam is death (Psalm 110:1 ; 1Col 15:26). He will not reach out and try to grasp more but will turn everything over to God who will be all in all (15:28).
Paul Ferguson
See also Christ, Christology ; Jesus Christ, Name and Titles of
Bibliography . C. K. Barrett, From First Adam to Last ; W. D. Davies, Paul and Rabbinic Judaism ; J. D. G. Dunn, Christology in the Making ; H. Ridderbos, Paul ; R. Scroggs, The Last Adam .
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Second Adam (2)
SECOND ADAM.—See Divinity of Christ in vol. i. p. 477b.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Second Adam
See Adam; Christ, Christology.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Adam
Earthy; red
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Second Adam
See Adam, the Second
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Adam (1)
("red earth".) The name given by God to the first man, to remind him of his earthly nature; whereas Ιsh was the name whereby he designates himself, a man of earth (as opposed to Enosh "a man of low degree" Psalms 62:9) (Genesis 2:23). The Hebrew Αdam never assumes any change to mark the dual or plural numbers, men. Probably the Syro-Arabian is the primitive tongue, whence sprang the Hebrew and other so-called Shemitic tongues. The names in Genesis are therefore essentially the same as were actually spoken. Adam's naming of the animals in Eden implies that God endued Adam with that power of generalization based on knowledge of their characteristics, whereby he classified those of the same kinds under distinctive appellations, which is the fundamental notion of human language.
Its origin is at once human and divine. divine, in that "God brought" the animals "to Adam to see what he would call them," and enabled him to know intuitively their characteristics, and so not at random or with arbitrary appellations, but with such as marked the connection (as all the oldest names did, when truth logical and moral coincided) between the word and the thing, to name them; human, in that Adam, not God, was the name. "He did not begin with names, but with the power of naming; for man is not a mere speaking machine; God did not teach him words, as a parrot, from without, but gave him a capacity, and then evoked the capacity which He gave." (Abp. Trench.)
As the crown of creation, he was formed at the close of the sixth day. Adam came into the world a full grown man, with the elements of skill and knowledge sufficient to maintain his lordship over nature. The Second Adam came as an infant by humiliation to regain for man his lost lordship. Original records are perhaps traceable as employed in the inspired record of Moses. Genesis 1:1-2:3 is one concerning creation and man in a general summary. A second is Genesis 2:4-4:26, treating in a more detailed way what was summarily given as to man (Genesis 1), his innocence, first sin, and immediate posterity. A third is Genesis 5:1 - 9:29, "the book of the generations of Adam," and especially of Noah.
But the theory of an Elohist author for Genesis 1, and a Jehovist author for Genesis 2, distinct from Moses, on the ground that ELOHIM is the divine name in Genesis 1, but JEHOVAH ELOHIM in Genesis 2, is untenable. Nay, the names are used in their respective places with singular propriety; for ELOHIM expresses the mighty God of creation, and is fitting in His relation to the whole world. (Genesis 1) But JEHOVAH, the unchanging I AM (Exodus 6:3), in covenant with His people, always faithful to His promises to them, is just the name that the Spirit of God would suggest in describing His relation to man, once innocent, then fallen, then the object of an everlasting covenant of love. It is just one of the undesigned proprieties which confirm Scripture's divine origination, that the JEHOVAH of the covenant with the church is the ELOHIM of the world, and vice versa.
The Elohim in man's creation use anthropomorphic language, implying collective counsel: "Let us make man in our image, after our likeness," Abp. Trench remarks: "The whole history of man, not only in his original creation, but also in his after restoration and reconstitution in the Son, is significantly wrapped up in this double statement; which is double for this very cause, that the divine mind did not stop at the contemplation of his first creation but looked on to him as renewed in knowledge after the image of Him that created him (Colossians 3:10); because it knew that only as partaker of this double benefit would he attain the true end for which he was made." In 1 Corinthians 11:7 man is called "the image and glory of God." This ideal is realized fully in the Son of man (Psalms 8:4-5). Man is both the "image" (Greek eikon , Hebrew tzelem )), and made in the "likeness" (Greek homoiosis , Hebrew demuth ) of God (James 3:9). "Image" (eikon ) alone is applied to the Son of God (Colossians 1:15); compare Hebrews 1:3, "the express image of His person" (Greek character, the impress). Eicon, "image," presupposes a prototype, as the monarch is the prototype and his head on the coin the image.
But "likeness" implies mere resemblance. Thus the "image" of God remains in some degree after the fall (Genesis 9:6; James 3:9; 1 Corinthians 11:7). The likeness of God is what we are to be striving toward. The archetype is in God; man in his ideal is molded after the model realized in the Son of Man, "the image of the invisible God, the Firstborn of every creature," the incarnate God, already existing in the divine point of view (Colossians 1:15), with body and animal life akin to the animal world, yet the noble temple of an immortal spirit, with reason, imagination, freewill finding its true exercise in conformity to God's will, and a spiritual nature resembling God's, reflecting God's truth, righteousness, and love; capable of reasoning in the abstract which the lower animals cannot, as they have no general signs for universal ideas.
Some indeed, as the parrot, can frame articulate sounds, but they have not the power to abstract ideas from the particular outward objects, so as to generalize; as their want of a general language proves. Man is the interpreter of nature's inarticulate praises to nature's God. The uniformity of type in the animal kingdom, including man in his bodily nature, and the affinity of structure in the homologous bones, are due not to development from a common parentage, but to the common archetype in the divine mind, of which the cherubim was probably an ideal representation. When man fell, he still is called "in the image of God," with a view to his future restoration in the God-man. It is a "palace" in God's design, for a while spoiled by the "strong man" Satan, but to be reinstated by the "stronger" Man with God's archetypal image and likeness more vividly than ever standing forth (Luke 11:21).
Adam is the generic term for man, including woman (Genesis 1:26-27). Christ came to reveal not only God, but MAN to us; He alone is therefore called "THE Son of man"; the common property of mankind; who alone realizes the original ideal of man: body, soul, and spirit, in the image and likeness of God, the body subordinate to the animal and intellectual soul, and the soul to the spirit (1 Thessalonians 5:23), combining at once the man and woman (Galatians 3:28); and in whom believers shall realize it by vital union with Him: having the masculine graces, majesty, power, wisdom, strength, courage, with all woman's purity, intuitive tact, meekness, gentleness, sympathetic tenderness and love, such as Roman Catholics have pictured in the Virgin Mary. So the first Adam, the type, combined both (Genesis 1:27). The creation of woman from man (marked by the very names isha, ish) subsequently implies the same truth.
The Second Adam combined in Himself, as Representative Head of redeemed men and women, both man's and woman's characteristic excellencies, as the first Adam contained both before that Eve was taken out of his side. Her perfect suitableness for him is marked by Jehovah's words, "I will make for him a help suitable as before him," according to his front presence: a helping being in whom, as soon as he sees her, he may recognize himself (Delitzsch). The complement of man. So the bride, the church, is formed out of the pierced side of Christ the Bridegroom, while in the death sleep; and, by faith vitally uniting her to Him in His death and His resurrection, is "bone of His bone, and flesh of His flesh" (Ephesians 5:25-32.)
The dominion which Adam was given as God's vicegerent over the lower world, but lost by sin, is more than regained for man in the person of Christ. Even in His humiliation He exercised unlimited sway over man's bodily diseases and even death itself, over vegetable nature (the fig tree), the dumb animal kingdom (the ass's colt), the inorganic world, the restless sea, and the invisible world of demons; compare Psalm
8. In His manifested glory, His full dominion, and that of His redeemed with Him, shall be exercised over the regenerated earth: Isaiah 11; Isaiah 2:4; Isaiah 65:25; Isaiah 35:9-10; Psalm 72; Ezekiel 34:25; Hosea 2:18; Revelation 11:15-17; Revelation 11:20; Revelation 21; Revelation
22. The first man Adam was made a "living soul," endowed with an animal soul, the vital principle of his body; but "the last Adam a quickening spirit" (1 Corinthians 15:45). As the animal souled body (1 Corinthians 15:44) is the fruit of our union with Adam, an animal souled man, so the spiritual body is the fruit of our union with Christ, the life-giving Spirit.
Eden (See EDEN) is by Sir H. Rawlinson identified with Babylonia; the Babylonian documents giving an exact geographical account of the garden of Eden, and the rivers bearing the same names: the Hiddekel is certainly the Tigris, and the Phrath the Euphrates; the other two seem tributary branches, though some make Gihon the Nile and Pison the Indus (?). Any fruit tree (some have supposed, from Egyptian representations still extant, the pomegranate) would suffice as a test of obedience or disobedience, by the eating of which the knowledge of evil as well as of good would result. To know evil without being tainted by it is the prerogative of God. Man might have attained this knowledge by making his will one with God's, in not eating it; he then would have attained to a Godlike knowledge of good and evil, and would have exercised true liberty in conformity with his likeness, to God.
But man aspired to it by his own way, and fell. Only in Christ shall he know it and triumph over it. To distinguish good and evil is the gift of a king (1 Kings 3:9) and the wisdom of angels (2 Samuel 14:17). The tree of knowledge suggested to man the possibility of evil, which in the absence of lust might not occur. If he was to be tried at all, it could only be by a positive precept; and the smaller the subject of the command was, the more it tested the spirit of obedience. Satan's antitrinity, the lust of the flesh ("the woman saw that the tree was good for food"), the lust of the eye ("and that it was pleasant to the eyes"), and the pride of life (and a "tree to be desired to make one wise") seduced man: 1 John 2:16; compare ACHAN; Joshua 7:21. As this tree was the sacramental pledge of God's requirement, so the tree of life was the pledge of God's promised blessing.
ArchbishopWhately thought the tree of life acted medicinally, and that Adam and Eve ate of it; and that hence arose his longevity and that of the patriarchs, so that it was long before human life sank to its present average. Genesis 2:16 seems to imply his free access to it; but perhaps Genesis 3:22 that he had,tot actually touched it. Indeed it is only sacramentally, and in inseparable connection with faith and obedience, when tested first as to the tree of knowledge, that the tree of life could give man true immortal life. In the day that he ate he died (Genesis 2:17, compare Hosea 13:1), because separation from God, sin's necessary and immediate consequence, is death; the physical death of Adam was deferred until he was 930.
Sin's immediate effects on Adam and Eve, after she in her turn became a seducer, having first been seduced herself (Genesis 3:6 end), were shame (Genesis 3:7), concealment and folly (Genesis 3:8-9; compare Psalm 139), fear (Genesis 3:10), selfishness on Adam's part toward Eve, and presumption in virtually laying the blame on God (Genesis 3:12), the curse, including sorrow, agony, sweat of the brow in tilling the thorny ground, death. All these are counter worked by Christ. He bore our shame and fear (Hebrews 12:2; Hebrews 5:7), denied self wholly (Matthew 20:28), resisted Satan's temptation to presumption (Matthew 4:6), bore the curse (Galatians 3:13), was "the man of sorrows" (Isaiah 53), endured the agony and bloody sweat of Gethsemane, the crown of thorns, and the dust of death (Psalms 22:15, compare Genesis 3:19). The temporary exclusion from the tree of life was a merciful provision for fallen man, (for immortality in a lost state is a curse), until that, through Christ, he should have it restored (Revelation 22:2; Revelation 22:14; Revelation 2:7).
The cherubim were not outside the garden, blocking up access to it (as Genesis 3:24 is often explained), but "keeping the way to the tree of life," doing what man had failed to do (Genesis 2:15). So the cherubim's position implies, not at the threshold, or even before the mercyseat, but in immediate connection with it, the throne of God (Exodus 25:18). So in Ezekiel and Revelation they are the living ones, combining the highest forms of creaturely life, suggesting to man his interest still in life and in paradise, and even in a share of God's throne through divine grace. As the flaming sword represents justice excluding man's access by his own righteousness, so the cherubim represents man reunited to God upon the ground of the mercy-seat, which is Christ our propitiatory.
The unity of the human race is plainly asserted in Acts 17:26 (See CREATION). The co-extensiveness of sin's curse upon all men as Adam's offspring, and of Christ's redemption for all men (Romans 5:12-21; 1 Corinthians 15:22-47) implies the same. "That the races of men are not species of one genus, but varieties of one species, is confirmed by the agreement in the physiological and pathological phenomena in them all, by the similarity in the anatomical structure, in the fundamental powers and traits of the mind, in the limits to the duration of life, in the normal temperature of the body, and the average rate of pulsation, in the duration of pregnancy, and in the unrestricted fruitfulness of marriages between the various races." (Delitzsch.) The brain of the lowest savage is larger than his needs require, usually five sixths of the size of a civilized man's brain. This implies the latent, power of intellectual development, which proves he is essentially one with his more favored brethren.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Adam (2)
A city beside Zarthan (Joshua 3:16), on the Jordan. Near the present ford Damieh, which possibly is derived from the ancient name Adam; the northern extremity of Israel's passage (Joshua 22:11). Probably Reuben' s altar of ED, or witness, was near, on the Kurn Surtabeh. Near Damieh the remains of a Roman bridge are still found. Kurn Surtabeh was more than 15 miles from Jericho, which tallies with the words "very far from the city Adam." Knobel thinks the name Sartabeh preserves the name Zarthan, a long rocky ridge S.W. of Damieh ford. See ED.
Webster's Dictionary - Adam
(1):
(n.) The name given in the Bible to the first man, the progenitor of the human race.
(2):
(n.) "Original sin;" human frailty.
King James Dictionary - Adam
AD'AM, n. In Heb., Man primarily, the name of the human species, mankind appropriately, the first Man, the progenitor of the human race. The word signifies form, shape, or suitable form, hence, species. It is evidently connected with Heb., to be like or equal, to form an image, to assimilate. Whence the sense of likeness, image, form, shape Gr., a body, like. See Man.
Adam's apple, a species of citron See Citron also the prominent part of the throat.
Ad'am's needle, the popular name of the yucca, a plant of four species, cultivated in gardens. Of the roots, the Indians made a kind of bread. See Yucca.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Adam
ADAM . The derivation is doubtful. The most plausible is that which connects it with the Assyr. [1] adâmu , ‘make,’ ‘produce’; man is thus a ‘creature’ one made or produced. Some derive it from a root signifying ‘red’ (cf. Edom , Genesis 25:30 ), men being of a ruddy colour in the district where the word originated. The Biblical writer ( Genesis 2:7 ) explains it, according to his frequent practice, by a play on the word ’adâmâh , ‘ground’; but that is itself derived from the same root ‘red.’ The word occurs in the Heb. 31 times in Genesis 1:5 to Genesis 5:5 . In most of these it is not a proper name, and the RV [2] has rightly substituted ‘man’ or ‘the man’ in some verses where AV [2] has ‘Adam.’ But since the name signifies ‘mankind,’ homo, Mensch , not ‘a man,’ vir, Mann (see Genesis 5:2 ), the narrative appears to be a description, not of particular historical events in the life of an individual, but of the beginnings of human life (ch. 2), human sin (ch. 3), human genealogical descent ( Genesis 4:1 ; Genesis 4:25 , Genesis 5:1-5 ). In a few passages, if the text is sound, the writer slips into the use of Adam as a proper name, but only in Genesis 5:3-5 does it stand unmistakably for an individual.
1 . The creation of man is related twice, Genesis 1:26-27 (P [4] ) and Genesis 2:7 (J [5] ). The former passage is the result of philosophical and theological reflexion of a late date, which had taught the writer that man is the climax of creation because his personality partakes of the Divine (and in Genesis 5:3 this prerogative is handed on to his offspring); but the latter is written from the naïve and primitive standpoint of legendary tradition, which dealt only with man’s reception of physical life (see next article).
2 . Man’s primitive condition , Genesis 2:8-25 (J [5] ). The story teaches: that man has work to do in life ( Genesis 2:15 ); that he needs a counterpart, a help who shall be ‘meet for him’ ( Genesis 2:18 ; Genesis 2:21-24 ); that man is supreme over the beasts in the intellectual ability, and therefore in the authority, which he possesses to assign to them their several names ( Genesis 2:19-20 ); that man, in his primitive condition, was far from being morally or socially perfect; he was simply in a state of savagery, but from a moral standpoint innocent, because he had not yet learned the meaning of right and wrong ( Genesis 2:25 ); and this blissful ignorance is also portrayed by the pleasures of a luxuriant garden or park ( Genesis 2:8-14 ).
3 . The Fall , Genesis 2:16 f., Genesis 2:3 (J [5] ). But there came a point in human evolution when man became conscious of a command the earliest germ of a recognition of an ‘ought’ ( Genesis 2:16 f., Genesis 3:3 ); and this at once caused a stress and strain between his lower animal nature, pictured as a serpent, and his higher aspirations after obedience ( Genesis 3:1-5 ) [8]; by a deliberate following of the lower nature against which he had begun to strive, man first caused sin to exist ( Wis 2:6 ); with the instant result of a feeling of shame ( Wis 2:7 ), and the world-wide consequence of pain, trouble, and death ( Wis 2:14-19 ), and the cessation for ever of the former state of innocent ignorance and bliss ( Wis 2:22-24 ).
On the Babylonian affinities with the story of Adam, see Creation, Eden.
A. H. M‘Neile.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Adam (1)
ADAM (city). A city in the Jordan valley, ‘beside Zarethan’ ( Joshua 3:16 ); usually identified with Jisr ed-Damieh , near the confluence of the Jabbok and the Jordan, where there was once a bridge. Hiram, Solomon’s worker in brass, may have had his furnace here (cf. 1 Kings 7:46 ).
G. L. Robinson.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Adam in the nt
ADAM IN THE NT
A. In the Gospels . 1 . In Matthew 19:4-6 || Mark 10:6-8 Jesus refers to Genesis 1:27 . His answer to the Pharisees is intended to show that the provision made for divorce in the Mosaic law ( Deuteronomy 24:1 ) was only a concession to the hardness of men’s hearts. The truer and deeper view of marriage must be based on a morality which takes its stand upon the primeval nature of man and woman. And with His quotation He couples one from Genesis 2:24 (see also Ephesians 5:21 ). The same result is reached in Mt., but with a transposition of the two parts of the argument.
2 . In Luke 3:38 the ancestry of Jesus is traced up to Adam. As a Gentile writing for Gentiles, St. Luke took every opportunity of insisting upon the universal power of the gospel. Jesus is not, as in St. Matthew’s Gospel, a descendant of Abraham only, but of the man to whom all mankind trace their origin. But further, the same Evangelist who relates the fact of the Virgin-birth, and records that Christ was, in His own proper Person, ‘Son of God’ ( Luke 1:35 ), claims, by the closing words of the genealogy, that the first man, and hence every human being, is ‘son of God.’ As Jesus is both human and Divine, so the genealogy preserves the truth that all mankind partake of this twofold nature.
B . In the Epistles . The truth taught by St. Luke is treated in its redemptive aspect by his master St. Paul.
1 . 1 Corinthians 15:22 . The solidarity of mankind in their physical union with Adam, and in their spiritual union with Christ, involves respectively universal death and life as a consequence of Adam’s sin and of Christ’s work.
2 . In Romans 5:12-21 this is treated more fully. ( a ) Romans 5:12-14 . There is a parallelism between Adam and Christ . Both had a universal effect upon mankind in the case of Adam by a transmission of guilt, and therefore of death; the corresponding statement concerning Christ is postponed till Romans 5:19 , because St. Paul intervenes with a parenthesis dealing with those who lived before any specific commands were given in the Mosaic law, and yet who sinned, owing to the transmitted effects of Adam’s fall, and therefore died. The Apostle, without attempting fully to reconcile them, places side by side the two aspects of the truth the hereditary transmission of guilt, and moral responsibility; ‘and thus death made its way to all men, because all sinned .’ ( b ) Romans 5:15-17 . The contrast is far greater than the similarity ; in quality ( Romans 5:15 ), in quantity ( Romans 5:16 ), in character and consequences ( Romans 5:17 ). ( c ) Summary of the argument ( Romans 5:18-21 ).
3 . 1 Corinthians 15:44-47 . In the foregoing passages St. Paul deals with the practical moral results of union with Adam and Christ respectively. These verses ( a ) go behind that, and show that there is a radical difference between the nature of each; ( b ) look forward, and show that this difference has a vital bearing on the truth of man’s resurrection.
( a ) 1 Corinthians 15:36-44 . It is shown, by illustrations from nature, that it is reasonable to believe man to exist in two different states, one far higher than the other. In 1 Corinthians 15:44 b, 1 Corinthians 15:45 St. Paul adapts Genesis 2:7 (LXX [1] ), and reads into the words the doctrinal significance that the body of the first representative man became the vehicle of a ‘psychical’ nature, while the body of the Second is the organ of a ‘pneumatical’ nature. The second half of his statement ‘the last Adam became a life-giving spirit’ appears to be based on a reminiscence of Messianic passages which speak of the work of the Divine Spirit, e.g. Isaiah 11:1-2 , Joel 2:28-32 .
( b ) But as the living soul ( psyche ) preceded the life-giving spirit ( pneuma ), so it is with the development of mankind ( 1 Corinthians 15:46 ). As the first man had a nature in conformity with his origin from clay, while the Second has His origin ‘from heaven’ ( 1 Corinthians 15:47 ), so the nature of some men remains earthy, while that of some has become heavenly ( 1 Corinthians 15:48 ). But further, in his present state man is the exact counterpart of the first man, because of his corporate union with him; but the time is coming when he shall become the exact counterpart of the Second Man (cf. 1 Corinthians 15:25 f.), because of our spiritual union with Him ( 1 Corinthians 15:49 ).
4 . In Philippians 2:6 there is an implied contrast between ‘Christ Jesus, who … deemed it not a thing to be snatched at to be on an equality with God,’ and Adam, who took fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil, which God said had made him ‘as one of us’ ( Genesis 3:22 ).
5 . On 1 Timothy 2:13 f. see Eve; and on Judges 1:14 see Enoch.
A. H. M‘Neile.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Adam
Genesis 5:2 (c) This man is a type of CHRIST in that he was the head of the human family, and
CHRIST is the head of GOD's family.
Adam was sinless in the first part of his life, and then deliberately and knowingly became a partner in Eve's sin in order that he might be with her, partake of her punishment, and continue to have her for his very own.
So our Lord JESUS was sinless and perfect.
He willingly and knowingly took upon Himself the form of a servant,
and was made sin for us that He might forever have us with Him. (See1Ti2:14). As by the sin of Adam all who are in Adam were made sinners, so by the obedience of CHRIST all who are in CHRIST are made righteous ( Romans 5:18).
Romans 5:19 (b) Adam was the first of the earthly family and CHRIST is the first of the heavenly family. Our bodies are in the likeness of Adam, and in the new creation we shall be like CHRIST, the last Adam.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Adam And Eve
(ad' uhm uhnd eeve) The first man and woman created by God from whom all other people are descended. They introduced sin into human experience.
Old Testament The Hebrew word for Eve means “life,” while the Hebrew word for Adam simply means “man.” The Hebrew word adam is used in at least three different ways in the Old Testament. In its most common occurrence, the word adam refers to mankind in general. It has this use in Genesis 1:26-27 , where it includes both male and female, those who were created in the image of God. It is also used in referring to a specific man where it occurs with the Hebrew definite article (Genesis 2:24 ; Genesis 4:1 ). A third use of Adam is in reference to the city beside Zaretan (Joshua 3:16 ) on the Jordan. The Hebrew word for Eve is used only as reference to Adam's wife.
New Testament In the New Testament, Adam is used as a proper name, clearly referring to our ancestral parents. Jesus' genealogy is traced back to Adam (Luke 3:38 ). However, the most important New Testament usage treats Jesus as a second Adam (1 Corinthians 15:45 ), where the word is used as a symbol. Furthermore, Paul in a similar manner treats Adam as a type of Christ (Romans 5:14 ). As the first Adam brought death into the world, the “second Adam” brought life and righteousness (Romans 5:15-19 ).
Eve is referenced two times in the New Testament. In 2 Corinthians 11:3 , Eve's gullibility before the serpent is presented as undesirable. In 1 Timothy 2:11-15 , women are urged to be silent and subjected to man because Adam was created before Eve and because Eve was deceived into sinning.
Theological Concerns Adam and Eve are the ancestors of humanity. They are described as being the first persons. They also produced the first offspring (Genesis 4:1-2 ,Genesis 4:1-2,4:25 ). The Genesis narrative shows the development of humanity from these first parents. The interrelatedness of all humanity is stressed in Genesis.
Further the biblical writers use the story of Adam and Eve as symbolic of the universal history of all mankind. All persons reenact in their own lives the tragic story of our ancestral parents. Thus Adam and Eve are real but also symbolic.
Adam and Eve introduced sin into human experience. The first record of sinful rebellion in the Bible is found in the narrative of the first persons (Genesis 3:1-13 ). They fell victim to the serpent's lie (Genesis 3:4 ). They made the choice to disbelieve and to disobey. They were not forced to disobey God but freely chose to do so.
The consequences of Adam and Eve's sin fell not merely upon them but upon the earth as well (Genesis 3:14-19 ). The consequences of sin had lasting influence far beyond the two individuals. Further, following their sin, Adam and Eve hid from God; God did not hide from them (Genesis 3:8-9 ). Their ultimate punishment was being driven from the garden (Genesis 3:22-24 ). However, this was also an act of God's mercy, for it kept humanity from living forever in a sinful state. Thus an opportunity was offered for the possibility of future redemption. See Jesus; Sin ; Judgement; Wrath; Mercy.
Robert Cate
Holman Bible Dictionary - Adam
(ad' uhm) 1. Place name of city near Jordan River, where waters of Jordan heaped up so Israel could cross over to conquer the land (Joshua 3:16 ). Its location is probably Tel ed-Damieh near the Jabbok River. 2. The word adam occurs 539 times in the Old Testament. The etymology of the word is uncertain, although Genesis 2:7 makes a wordplay with the word adamah, dust ( Genesis 3:19 ). In Genesis 1-5 the word occurs 31 times, sometimes as a proper noun and sometimes as a personal name, Adam. When the word has the definite article (ha-'adam), it means mankind. Opinion is divided on the earliest occurrence of Adam as a proper name, some preferring Genesis 2:20 and others Genesis 4:25 . The personal name Adam appears in Genesis 5:1 , Genesis 5:3-4 , Genesis 5:5 and 1 Chronicles 1:1 .
Old Testament In Genesis 1:1 mankind is the crown of God's creation. Mankind is granted a unique status, expressed as being made “in the image” of God, and is given dominion over the earth and its creatures, that is, made responsible for the earth. In Genesis 2:1 the earth-boundedness of mankind is stressed: mankind is formed of the dust of the ground, thus dispelling any idea of the divine in mankind. The Lord God blew into his nostrils the breath of life, and Adam became a “living, breathing thing,” the same phrase that is used to describe the animals in Genesis 1:1 . Thus Genesis 1:1 and Genesis 2:1 together present both sides of the human situation: the unique relationship to God and the essential connection to earth.
Genesis 3:1 relates the appearance of sin which consisted of the refusal of mankind to be content with being human and the desire to become divine. The Bible affirms that humans have dignity as humans; they do not have to try to become divine to find meaning. The serpent, the woman, and the man receive their sentences, one of which is the unequal relationship of the man and the woman as the result of sin. The separation which sin causes is emphasized in the account of the expulsion from Eden ( Genesis 3:22-24 ).
Psalm 8:1 , like Genesis 1:1 , celebrates the exalted status of mankind in God's sight and the dominion of mankind over God's creation. The biblical view of the worth of humans is to be contrasted sharply with the other views in the ancient Near East, especially in Mesopotamia, where the human being was created to be the slave of the gods. The tragedy of the human situation is the failure to celebrate mankind's unique status before God and through human effort to distort the divine intention.
New Testament The writer of Hebrews referred Psalm 8:1 to Jesus, seeing in Jesus alone the realization of all that God intended mankind to be and the means for divine-human reconciliation. Paul twice used the contrast of Christ with Adam to clarify the achievement of Christ for mankind. In Romans 5:12-21 , Adam is referred to as the type of the One to come, although the contrast is mainly negative. Just as sin entered the world through one man, Adam (Romans 5:12 ), so the act of righteousness of one man, Jesus, leads to acquittal and life for all people (Romans 5:18 ). In 1 Corinthians 15:1 , Paul used the Adam-Christ analogy to affirm the resurrection. As by a man came death, so by a Man has come resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:21 ). Just as the first Adam became a living being, so the last Adam became a life-giving Spirit (1 Corinthians 15:45 ). Whatever the origin of this typology or analogy of Adam and Jesus, for Paul, Adam represented the old humanity with all its failures, while Jesus represented the new humanity as God intended humanity to be from the beginning. Through the sacrifice of Jesus, entrance into the new humanity is made possible.
Thomas G. Smothers
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Adam de Marisco
(Adam Marsh) Franciscan scholar (died c.1258),born probably Somerset, England. Known as "Doctor illustris," he helped to organize the teaching and discipline at Oxford.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Adam de Marsh
(Adam Marsh) Franciscan scholar (died c.1258),born probably Somerset, England. Known as "Doctor illustris," he helped to organize the teaching and discipline at Oxford.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Adam
(Hebrew: man) The first man and father of the human race. God made him in His own image, and placed him in the Garden of Eden. He made a woman, Eve, from the rib of Adam and gave her to him for a wife. Adam and Eve were tempted by the devil, disguised as a serpent, to disobey God by eating of the tree of knowledge. For their sin God expelled them from Paradise and they were condemned to pain and hardship in the outer world. Adam was the father of Cain and Abel, of Seth when he was 130 years old, and of many sons and daughters. He died at the age of 930 according to the scriptural computation. In the New Testament Saint Paul alludes to Christ as the "last Adam," through whom all are saved, as in the first Adam all inherited the effect of his sin.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Adam, Fall of
Since by the grace of original justice Adam was elevated to a supernatural state, his loss of that grace is termed his fall.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Adam
The first man. The name implies the earth, from whence he was formed, which signifies red. It is worthy remark, that Christ is also called Adam. (1 Corinthians 15:45) And if we compare what the apostle saith of Christ, (Colossians 1:15) with what is said of Adam, at the creation of the world, (Genesis 1:26) it serves to explain, in what sense we are to limit the expression concerning him, who was formed from the earth as the first man. In that Scripture of the apostle, when speaking of Christ, he is called, "the image of the invisible God, the first born of every creature." Hence we infer, that though the first Adam was indeed the first man, as manifested openly; yet the second Adam, so called, even the Lord from heaven, had a pre-existence in secret, and stood up the Great Head of his body the church, in the counsels of the divine mind, the Wisdom man, from all eternity. Indeed from this Wisdom man, this pattern, the first earthly man was formed. For so the charter of grace, at the creation, expressed it: "Let us make man in our image, after our likeness." (Genesis 1:26) And if Christ was, and is, as the apostle was commissioned to tell the church, "the image of the invisible God, the first born of every creature," nothing can be plainer than that the first Adam, so called, because indeed he was the first man openly, was created in the image or likeness of Him, who alone can be said to be the image of the invisible God, and in his human nature, "the first born of every creature." (See Psalms 89:19; Proverbs 8:22-31; Micah 5:2)
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Adam
The first man. The name is supposed to be derived from Adamah, 'earth, or red earth,' agreeing with the fact that "the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, Genesis 2:7 . He differed from all other creatures, because God breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, by which man became a living soul. He differed also in being made after the image and likeness of God: he was God's representative on earth, and to him was given dominion over all other living things, and he gave them names. He was placed in the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it, showing that occupation was a good thing for man even in innocence. God said also that it was not good for man to be alone, so He caused him to sleep, took from him a rib, and of this 'builded' a woman. Adam called her Isha for she was taken out of Ish, man: the two being a type of Christ and the church, in the closest union: cf. Ephesians 5:31,32 .
Adam and Eve were permitted to eat of all the trees of the garden except the tree of the knowledge of good and evil: of the which if they ate, in the same day they should die. Eve, being beguiled by Satan, ate of that tree; and at her suggestion, though not deceived as Eve was, Adam also took of it. Their eyes were at once opened, they knew they were naked, and hid themselves from God. They were transgressors, had fallen from their state of innocence, and acquired a conscience, and with it the sense of their own evil and guilt. When questioned by God, Adam laid the blame on Eve, ungratefully saying, "the woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did eat." The ground was then cursed for Adam's sake: in sorrow he should eat of it all his life: thorns and thistles should be produced, and in the sweat of his face he should eat bread.
God made for Adam and Eve coats of skins and clothed them, foreshadowing the need for a vicarious sacrifice, and the righteousness that could only come to them through death. They were driven from the garden, and Cherubim with a flaming sword prevented them re-entering, lest they should eat of the tree of life and live for ever in their sin. Adam did not beget a son until after his fall: hence all mankind are alike fallen creatures. Acts 17:26 ; Romans 5:18,19 ; 1 Corinthians 15:22 . Adam lived 930 years and begat sons and daughters. We have no details of the life of Adam as a fallen man. Viewed typically as head of a race he stands in marked contrast to Christ, the last Adam.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Adam
ADAM.—1. In Luke 3:38 the ancestry of Jesus is traced up to Adam. From what source the Evangelist drew his genealogy it is impossible to say. But when compared with that in the First Gospel, it clearly shows the purpose with which St. Luke wrote. As a Gentile, writing for a Gentile, he took every opportunity of insisting upon the universal power of the gospel. The effects of the life and Person of Jesus are not confined to the Jews; for Jesus is not, as in St. Matthew’s Gospel, a descendant of Abraham only, but of the man to whom all mankind trace their origin. See art. Genealogy of Jesus Christ. But further, St. Luke closes his genealogy with the significant words ‘the son of Adam, the son of God’ (τοῦ Ἀδάμ, τοῦ Θεοῦ). Adam, and therefore all mankind, had a Divine origin. The same Evangelist who relates the fact of the virgin birth, and records that Christ was, in His own proper Person, υἱὸς Θεοῦ (Luke 1:35), claims that the first man, and hence every human being, is υἱὸς Θεοῦ. Thus the genealogy, which might at first sight appear to be a useless addition to the Gospel narrative, possesses a lasting spiritual value.
The truth placed by St. Luke in the forefront of his Gospel is treated in its redemptive aspect by his master St. Paul, who in four passages brings Adam and Christ into juxtaposition:
(a) 1 Corinthians 15:22. The solidarity of mankind in their physical union with Adam involves universal death as a consequence of Adam’s sin. Similarly the solidarity of mankind in their spiritual union with Christ involves universal life as a consequence of Christ’s perfect work.
(b) In Romans 5:12-21. this solidarity and its results are treated in fuller detail. (i.) Romans 5:12-14. There is a parallelism between Adam and Christ. Adam ‘is a type of him who was to come’ (Romans 5:14), in the sense that his act affected all men. Adam committed a ταράττωμα, a lapse, a false step—commonly termed the Fall. By this lapse, sin was as ‘a malignant force let loose among mankind’; and through sin came physical death. (St. Paul sees no occasion for proof of the connexion between sin and physical death; he unhesitatingly bases his position on the narrative in Genesis; see Romans 2:17, Romans 3:3; Romans 3:19; Romans 3:21). Were this all, the passage would implicitly annul human responsibility. But St. Paul, without attempting fully to reconcile them, places side by side the two aspects of the truth—the hereditary transmission of guilt, and moral responsibility: ‘and thus death made its way (διῆλθεν) to every individual man, because all sinned (ἐφʼ ᾧ πάντες ἥμαρτον)’. Controversy has raged hotly round this phrase, Augustine and many other writers having understood the relative ω as masculine, and as referring to Adam; so Vulgate in quo. But there can be no doubt that ἐφʼ ᾧ must be taken in its usual meaning ‘because.’ Adam’s fall involved all men in sin, and therefore in death; but this was because all men (in full exercise of their free will) sinned. It would be out of place here to discuss the attempts that have been made to combine these two factors in the moral history of man (see Literature): strictly speaking, they cannot fully and logically he combined; but many of the most fundamental truths of the Christian religion can be arrived at only by the balancing of complementary statements. In Romans 3:13-14 a qualification is entered, which causes St. Paul to ruin his construction, and omit the apodosis of which Romans 3:12 forms the protasis. He feels obliged to explain that, sin being an offence against law, those who lived between Adam and Moses had no law, and thus did not transgress an explicit command as Adam had done. But the fact that death reigned throughout that period only shows that—not the guilt of individuals, but—the transmitted effects of Adam’s sin were at work. And it is this that makes him a type of the Messiah. (ii.) Romans 3:15-17. The contrast is far greater than the similarity. The contrast between Adam and Christ is great:—In quality (Romans 3:15). The one representative man, Adam, committed a παράττωμα; but over-against that must be placed the undeserved kindness (χαρις) of God, and the gift of righteousness arising from the kindness of the other representative Man, Jesus Christ. In quantity (Romans 3:16). ‘One act tainting the whole race with sin, and a multitude of sins collected together in one only to be forgiven.’ In character and consequences (Romans 3:17). Adam’s fall ushered in a reign of death; Christ’s work ensures that all who have received His kindness and His gift of righteousness shall themselves reign in life. (iii.) Romans 3:18-21. Summary of the argument, in which it is further shown that Law ‘came in as an afterthought’ (παρεισῆλθεν), multiplying sin, but thereby only increasing the abundance of God’s kindness.
(c) 1 Corinthians 15:44-47. The two foregoing passages from St. Paul’s writings deal with the practical moral results of union with Adam and Christ respectively. These verses (i.) go back behind that, and show that there is a complete and radical difference between the nature of each; (ii.) look forward, and show that this difference has a vital bearing on the truth of man’s resurrection.
(i.) St. Paul maintains (1 Corinthians 15:36-44 a), by a series of illustrations from the natural world, the reasonableness of a resurrection from death. In Nature ‘every seed has its own particular body’—‘all flesh is not the same flesh’—the terrestrial differs from the celestial—there is a different glory of the sun, the moon, and the stars. So also it may be rightly held that it is possible for man to exist in two different states, one far higher than the other. Not only so, but (1 Corinthians 15:44 b, 45) there actually exists such an analogous distinction between man and man, as Scripture shows. The thought in 1 Corinthians 15:45 is arrived at by an adaptation of Genesis 2:7 : Θ καὶ ἐγένετο ὁ ἄνθρωτος εἰς ψυχὴν ζῶσαν. These words relate only that after being lifeless clay, man was by God’s breath transformed into a living being. But St. Paul reads into the statement the doctrinal significance that the body of the first representative man became the vehicle of a ‘psychical’ nature, while the body of the Second is the organ of a ‘pneumatical’ nature. St. Paul’s trichotomy of man may he represented thus:
 
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Everything in man that is not τνεῦμα may he called ‘psychical’ is so far as it is considered as ‘intellect,’ and ‘carnal’ in so far as it is thought of as the seat of the animal passions; both the adjectives ψυχικός and σαρκικός thus mean ‘non-spiritual.’ The second half of St. Paul’s statement—‘the last Adam became a life-giving spirit’—finds no exact parallel in the OT, but seems to be based on a reminiscence of Messianic passages which speak of the work of the Divine Spirit, e.g. Isaiah 11:1-2, Joel 2:28-32.
(ii.) But as the ψυχὴ ζῶσα came first and the τνεῦμα ζωοτοιοῦν last, so it is with the development of mankind; the spiritual must follow the psychical (1 Corinthians 15:46). As the first man was formed from the clay, and had a nature in conformity with his origin, while the second Man has His origin ‘from heaven’ (1 Corinthians 15:47), so among mankind there are those whose nature remains low and mean, tied to the clods of earth, and there are those whose nature has become heavenly (1 Corinthians 15:48). But this implies more (1 Corinthians 15:49). In his present state man is an exact counterpart, he visibly reproduces the lineaments and character, of the first man, because of his corporate union with him (ἐφορέσαμεν τὴν εἰκόνα τοῦ χοϊκοῦ). But the time is coming when we shall become the exact counterpart or image of the second Man (cf. Genesis 1:26 f.), because of our spiritual union with Him (φορέσομεν καὶ τἡν εἱκόνα τοῦ ἑπουρανίον). The above follows the text of B a c g 17 aeth. arm. [1]; and Theodoret distinctly is says to τὸ γὰρ φορέσομεν προρρητικῶς οὐ παραινετικῶς εἳρκεν The mass of authorities read φορέσωμεν, ‘from a desire to turn what is really a physical assertion into an ethical exhortation’ (Alf.); so Chrys., τοῦτʼ ἐστιν, ἃριστα πράξωμεν … συμβουλευτικω̈ς εἰσάγει τόν λὀγόν. But it is difficult to conceive how St. Paul, who has from 1 Corinthians 15:35 been leading up to the thought of the resurrection, could at the critical moment throw his argument to the winds, and content himself with saying, ‘according as we have been earthly in our thoughts, let us strive to be heavenly.’
It has been suggested that St. Paul adopted the designation of Christ as ‘the last Adam’ and ‘the second Adam’ from Rabbinic theology. But such a comparison between Adam and the Messiah was unknown to the earlier Jewish teachers. Passages adduced to support it belong to the Middle Ages, and are influenced by the Kabbala. See G. F. Moore, JBL [2] xvi. (1897), 158–161; Dalman, The Words of Jesus, English translation 248 f., 251 f.
(d) Philippians 2:6. St. Paul speaks of ‘Christ Jesus, who being [3] in the form of God, deemed it not a thing to be snatched at (ἁρταγμον) to be on an equality with God.’ There is here an implied contrast with Adam, who took fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil, which God said had made him ‘as one of us’ (Genesis 3:22).
2. In Matthew 19:4-6 || Mark 10:6-8 reference is made by Jesus to the account of Adam and Eve in Genesis 1:27 ‘male and female created he them’ (ἄρσεν καὶ θῆλυ ἐποίησεν αὐτούς). Pharisees came and asked Him whether divorce was allowable [4]. Our Lord’s answer is intended to show that the provision made for divorce in the Mosaic law (Deuteronomy 24:1) was only a concession to the hardness of men’s hearts. The truer and deeper view of marriage which Christians should adopt must be based on a nobler morality,—on a morality which takes its stand on the primeval nature of man and woman as God made them. ‘To suit (πρός) your hardness of heart he wrote for you this commandment. But from the beginning of the creation “he made them male and female.” ’ And with this quotation is coupled one from Genesis 2:24 (see also Ephesians 5:31), ‘For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother [5], and they twain shall become one flesh.’ The same result is reached in Mt., but with a transposition of the two parts of the argument. See Wright’s Synopsis, in loc. Thus Jesus bases the absolute indissolubility of the marriage tie on the union of man and woman from the first. In Matthew 19:9; Matthew 5:32 this pronouncement is practically annulled by the admission of the words ‘except for fornication’ (μὴ ἐπὶ πορνείᾳ, and παρεκτὸς λόγου πορνείας). See Wright, in loc., who contends that ‘the Church (of Alexandria?) introduced these two clauses into the Gospel in accordance with the permission to legislate which our Lord gave to all Churches (Matthew 18:18).’ See art. Marriage.
3. In John 8:44 ἀνθρωποκτόνος may refer to the introduction of death into the world by the fall of Adam. But see art. Abel.
4. The parallel drawn by St. Paul between Adam and Christ may have been the origin of the tradition that Adam was buried under Golgotha. Jer. (Com. in Mat. § iv. 27) rejects it, saying that it arose from the discovery of an ancient human skull at that spot. He also declines to see any reference to it in Ephesians 5:14. But in Ep. 46 he says, ‘The place where our Lord was crucified is called Calvary, because the skull of the primitive man was buried there. So it came to pass that the second Adam, that is the blood of Christ (a play on אדם and הדם), as it dropped from the Cross, washed away the sins of the buried protoplast,* [6] the first Adam, and thus the words of the apostle were fulfilled,’—quoting Ephesians 5:14. Epiphanius (contra Haer. xlvi. 5) goes farther, stating that Christ’s blood dropped upon Adam’s skull, and restored him to life. The tradition is mentioned also by Basil, Ambrose, and others.
Literature.—Besides the works cited in the article, the following may be consulted on the relation between Adam and Christ: Sanday-Headlam, Com. on Epistle to Romans (pp. 130–153); Bethune-Baker, An Introduction to the Early History of Christian Doctrine, ch. xvii.; Tennant, The Sources of the Doctrine of the Fall and Original Sin; Sadler, The Second Adam and the New Birth; Thackeray, The Relation of St. Paul to Contemporary Jewish Thought, ch. ii.
A. H. M‘Neile.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Adam, the Last
In contrast to the first man, Adam, who was made a living soul, the last Adam, the Lord Jesus Christ, was a life-giving Spirit: the first was natural; the second spiritual: the first man was of the earth, earthy; the second Man was out of heaven. 1 Corinthians 15:45-47 . Everything committed to man having failed in Adam, Christ as last Adam becomes the head of a new and redeemed race. He is the last Adam because there will be no other: every man must come under one of these two headships: the first Adam, man; or the last Adam, Christ: cf. 1 Corinthians 15:22 ; Psalm 8:3-9 ; Hebrews 2:6-9 .
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Adam
LET US MAKE MAN IN OUR IMAGE
In the wise and good providence of Almighty God a new and an entrancing light has been cast in our day on the origin of the earth and on the early ages of mankind. A noble succession of ministers and interpreters of nature has been raised up in these later generations who, by the labours they have undertaken, and by the methods they have followed, have been enabled to make discoveries that had not entered the mind of man to imagine in former ages. Up till our day far more was known about the way and process of our redemption than about the way and process of our creation. But it will be in the complete and harmonious combination of these two kinds of knowledge, divine revelation and human science, that we shall come to a perfect man, in which the whole body of knowledge and faith and love shall be fitly joined together and compacted by that which every joint supplieth.
Magnificent as have been the services of such men as Herschel, and Faraday, and Lyell, and Darwin, and Spencer, at the same time their magnificent services have Iain far more in the regions of matter and motion than in the mind and the heart of man. It is enough for any man, or for any school of men, to be enabled to take us back to the first beginnings of this present system of things, when as yet our earth was without form and void, and to lead us up step after step, age after age, till we open our eyes on this wonderful world as it now is. To one of His servants God gives the talents of revelation and inspiration, and to another the talents of observation, and experiment, and discovery, and the exposition of discovery-to each one of His servants separately as He will. And to each several steward and servant of His, according to his faithfulness to the talents committed to him, his Master at His coming will say, 'Well done!' And it is surely a kind of forecast and foretaste of that 'Well done!'-the warm exclamation of wonder and of worship that rises out of our enlarged minds and exalted hearts as we lay down The Outlines of Astronomy, The Principles of Geology. The Origin of Species, The First Principles, and such-like books. At the same time, at their best, those ministers and interpreters of nature do not satisfy their readers. Even in their own rich and well-worked fields they do not satisfy all their readers. Even after they have led us so far up on the shining path of scientilic truth, we feel sure that there are still sources and paths and fields uf light, as well as shadows and belts and whole worlds of darkness, over which we have been hurried, and into which we have not been led or let look. We feel not unlike that famous philosopher of our day who divined that there must surely be a serious disturbance somewhere in the order and stability of the solar system that no astronomy had as yet discovered, acknowledged, or attempted to account for. As we are carried away by the spell of the great writers on evolution, we feel all the time that, after all has been told, there is still something unrecognised and undescribed from which we suffer the most disturbing and injurious influences. All the time we feel in ourselves a backward, sideward, downward, perverse pull under which we reel and stagger continually; it is an experience that makes us wiser than all our teachers in some of the most obscure, but at the same time some of the most certain matters of mankind and their spiritual history. Speaking for myself, as I read the great books of our modem scientific men with a delight and an advantage I cannot put enough words upon, I always miss in them-in them all, and in the best of them all-a matter of more importance to me than all else that they tell me. For, all the time I am reading their fascinating discoveries and speculations, I still feel in myself a disturbance, a disorder, a disharmony, and a positive dislocation from the moral, and even from the material, order of the universe around me and above me: a disorder and a dislocation that my scientific teachers neither acknowledge nor leave room for its acknowledgment or redress. That is magnificent! That is noble! That is divine! I exclaim as I read. But when I come to the end of my reading-Is that all? I ask. I am compelled by all my experience and all my observation to ask, Is that all? Is that your very last word to me? Then, if that is all, I must still go in search of a philosophy of nature and of man that understands me, and accounts for me, and has, if so be, a more comprehensive, a more scientific, a more profound, and a more consoling message to me. In one word, and to speak out the whole of my disappointment and complaint in one word, what about sin? What in sin? When and where did sin enter in the evolution of the human race and seize in this deadly way on the human heart? Why do you all so avoid and shut your eyes to sin? And, still more, what about Jesus Christ? Why do I find nothing in your best text-books about Him who was without sin? About Him who is more to me, and to so many more of your best readers, than all Nature, and all her suns, and systems, and laws, and processes put together? Far more. For He has carried both our understanding and our imagination and our heart so absolutely captive that we cannot read with our whole heart the best book you have written because His name is not in it. Who and what is he, we insist, who has leapt at a bound above all taw and all order of matter and of mind, and of cosmic and ethic evolution, and has taken His stand of holiness at the head of the human race? Schools of science, schools of morals, schools of philosophy, ministers and interpreters of nature and of man, what is sin? and what think ye of Christ?
Bishop Butler has taught us, and that with an impressiveness we can never forget, that knowledge at its best is not our proper happiness. With all his immense weight Butler has impressed upon us that our proper province is virtue and religion, life and manners; the science of improving the temper and making the heart better. This is the field assigned us to cultivate, he exclaims, and how much it has lain neglected is indeed astonishing! And thus it is that Moses, so to call him, with two or three splendid strokes, passes over all that which so fascinates and absorbs our modern men of science, and takes up mankind at that point when they have the image and likeness of God completely and perfectly stamped upon them. Nor does Moses delay long, even upon that, but, after one great and fruitful word upon that, he passes on to take up at more length, in his own wonderful way, and in answerable style, the temptation and the fall of Adam and of all Adam's offspring. 'The Scripture begins,' says Butler, 'with an account of God's creation of the world, in order to ascertain who He is concerning whose providences, commands, promises, and threatenings this sacred book all along treats, the Maker and Proprietor of the world, He whose creatures we are-the God of Nature, Revelation, indeed, considers the common affairs of this world, and what is going on in it, as a mere scene of distraction, and cannot be supposed to give any account of this wild scene for its own sake. This earth, our habitation, has everywhere the appearance of being a ruin, and revelation comes in on the supposition that this world is in a ruined state.' Thus Butler. And Moses begins his priceless contribution to that revelation by telling us what, without him, would have remained a dreadful mystery to us-that is to say, he tells us how man was made upright, and how he fell from that estate wherein he was created by sinning against God. It is a fashion with the prevailing philosophy of our day to decry and contemn the old, orthodox, and fruitful argument from final causes; but I shall continue, in this matter also, to follow Bishop Butler, to me by far the deepest and the wisest philosopher the world has ever seen. Now Moses, long before Butler, is clear and sure as to the final cause of our creation. In his opening pages, Moses, after his royal manner, lets us hear the Maker of all things taking counsel with Himself concerning His end and object in the creation of man. 'Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.' And then, from this and from many other Scriptures, we learn that the image and likeness of God is love: love, knowledge, righteousness, and true holiness, with dominion over the creatures.
Now, the multiplication and the increase of the image of God is an altogether worthy reason, adequate explanation, and final cause for the creation of this world, and for all the processes, preparations, and providences through which this world has passed. Love amply accounts for and explains and justices it all-God's love to man, and then man's love to God and to his neighbour. All of God's wisdom and power that was expended on this world, and on Adam its possessor and its priest, was all to find its reward and its return in a world replenished with a race of creatures who were to be such partakers of the divine nature that they would live for ever and grow for ever in the love, in the holy fellowship, in the blessed service, and in the full enjoyment of God. That was why God made man. That was why God prepared such a home for man as this world in Adam's day was, and still in our day is. The Garden of Eden in Moses, delightful as it is, is but a dim, a faded, and a colourless picture of what God had prepared for them that were to walk with Him in that garden, and were to tell Him, as they walked with Him, how much they loved Him who had planted it. But all the time, as Thomas Goodwin says, the true Garden of Eden was in the gardener's own heart. And his blessed task was set to Adam in his own heart. And what more blessed task could have been set by God to man than to till, and water, and dress, and keep, and reap his own heart for God? And that the serpent came in all his malignity mid subtlety and sowed tares in that mystical garden-that should only have given God's son and servant an embraced opportunity and an occasion of all joy to show to God and to the serpent, to heaven and to hell, how much he loved and feared God for all that God had done for him. But, how it went with Adam and with Eve, and with the Garden of Eden, and with Cain and Abel their children, Moses tells us in his sad history. And then, by the time he takes his pen in hand to tell us all this, Moses himself has been banished out of Canaan for his sin, and is waiting for death in the wilderness. And thus it is that he dips his pen in such an inkhorn of tears, and describes to us with such sympathy, and in such sad words, that aboriginal mystery of iniquity-the temptation, the fall, and the expulsion of Adam from Eden. And then Moses adds in a psalm which he indites more immediately concerning himself the well-known words: 'Thou turnest man to destruction; and sayest, Return, ye children of men. For we are consumed by Thine anger, and by Thy wrath are we troubled. Thou hast set our iniquities before Thee, our secret sins in the light of Thy countenance. Who knoweth the power of Thine anger? Even according to Thy fear, so is Thy wrath. Return, O Lord, how long? And let it repent Thee concerning Thy servants. Make us glad according to the days wherein. Thou hast afflicted us, and the years wherein we have seen evil.'
In one of William Law's finest dialogues Theophilus asks his pupil Humanus how he would set about convincing a man of his fallen estate. And Humanus answers to this effect: Man is a poor, miserable, weak, vain, distressed, corrupt, depraved, selfish, self-tormenting, perishing creature. And this world is a sad mixture of false good and real evil; a widespread scene of all sorts of trials, vexations, and miseries, all arising from the frame and nature and condition both of man and the world. This is the sure and infallible proof of the fall of man. The fall of man is not a thing to be learnt from any history whatsoever, but shows itself everywhere and every day and in every man with as much clearness as we see the sun. My first attempt, therefore, upon any man, to convince him of Adam's fall as the ground of Christ's redemption, should be an attempt to do that for him which affliction, disappointment, sickness, pain, and the approach of death have a natural tendency to do; that is, to convince him of the vanity, poverty, and misery of his life and condition in this world. I would appeal at first to nothing but his own nature and condition in this world to demonstrate this capital truth of Holy Scripture that all mankind lie in a fallen state. Humanus says that the mere approach of death is enough to bring any man to his senses. And so it is. Death is the great debater. Death does not bandy words. Death comes to us with overwhelming proofs of our fall in his hands. There is no brow-beating or perplexing of Death. Your smart replies and unanswerable arguments will not stagger Death. All your shafts are quenched like tow before the bosses of his buckler. Now, Death made his first approach to this world in that hour of Adam and Eve's first temptation. God's own fatherly and forewarning words first uttered the dreadful name of Death. O, if Adam had only believed God about sin and death! O, if he had only stopped his ears against the father of lies! O, if he could only have foretasted guilt and remorse and agony of conscience as he was led up to the tree! O, if he could only at that fatal moment have foreseen that coming garden where the Son of God Himself lay among the dark olive-trees recoiling from sin and death in a sweat of blood! O, if he could only have seen spread out before him all the death-beds of all his children on the earth, and all the beds of their second death in hell! O Adam and Eve in Eden, and still under the tree of temptation, look before it is too late; look on through the endless ages at the unutterable woes that you are working! 'Ye shall not eat of it, neither shall ye touch it, lest ye die.'
An Egyptian Father has said somewhere that while the four evangelists supply the wool, yet it is Paul who weaves the web. And what Paul does in this respect for Matthew, and Mark, and Luke, and John, he does at the same time for Moses, and David, and Isaiah. Moses, indeed, supplies the history, but it is Paul, that prince of the apostles, who takes us down into the philosophy, as we say, of that history. As we go on speaking about this and that man of science, and this and that book of science and of the philosophy of science, the unlettered people who hear us are tempted to envy us our time and our talents and our books. But they need not. Really, if they knew it, they need not. For, as long as they have Moses and Paul, the Book of Genesis and the Epistle to the Romans, they need envy no man. Thomas à Kempis used to say that his idea of perfect rest and perfect happiness was 'to sit with a little book in a little nook.' Now, with these two little books of Moses and of Paul, and with another little epistle or two of Paul's added, those who are otherwise quite unlettered men will soon become wiser men than many of their teachers. The most unlearned and ignorant man among us has sin in himself; and he has Christ, if not yet in himself also, then in his Bible, and thus in his offer; and with both sin and Christ in his heart, and with Paul on sin and on Christ in his hand, the most unlettered man is already a man of the truest and the deepest science, and a philosopher of the first water. For it is just those two men, Adam and Christ, with their sin and their righteousness, that so stumble and so throw out our evolutionists; and it is in his handling of those two men, and of that which we have of those two men alone, that Paul shows his matchless philosophic power. Those two stumbling-stones on which so many false philosophies have been ground to powder are the very foundation-stones, corner-stones, and cope-stones of Paul's immortal school and far-shining temple of truth.
In every epistle of his the apostle's immediate, supreme, and alone subject is Jesus Christ. Paul has not a moment of his time, nor a corner of his mind, nor a beat of his heart, nor a stroke of his pen for any other person, great or small, but Jesus Christ. And Paul is in the very heat and at the very heart of one of his greatest chapters on Jesus Christ, and on the atonement that we sinners of mankind have received through Jesus Christ, when, if I may say so, the very sweep and grasp of Paul's mind, the very philosophical necessity of Paul's great intellect, all compel him to go back and take up Adam into his great argument and great gospel. The passage is one of the most profound and magnificent even in his profound and magnificent epistles. It runs thus: 'Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin, therefore, as by the offence of one judgment came upon all men to condemnation, even so by the righteousness of one the free gift came upon all men unto justification of life. For as by one man's disobedience many were made sinners, so by the obedience of one shall many be made righteous.' To Paul's so comprehensive mind, so far-sweeping imagination, and so righteousness-hungry heart, Adam and Christ are the two poles upon whom this whole world of human life revolves. As the best expositor of Paul I know of anywhere says, Adam and Jesus Christ, to Paul's heaven-soaring eye, stand out before God with all other men 'hanging at their girdles.' And it is in his evolution, illustration, and enforcement of this great truth that Paul brings in, and makes so familiar to us those peculiarly Pauline and polar terms-law and grace, faith and works, condemnation and justification, enmity and peace, alienation and reconciliation, imputation and sanctification, sin and holiness, the flesh and the Spirit, eternal life and eternal death, and such-like. On all these Scripture subjects the Westminster Catechisms supply us with Paul's doctrines in a nutshell; as will again be seen and acknowledged when theology shall have recovered herself from her temporary lapse into mere Bibliography, and when Bible history shall have again become Bible doctrine and a Bible life.
And then, just as the full truth about the atonement led the apostle back from Christ to Adam, so in another epistle of his, the resurrection of Christ, and the resurrection of all those who have fallen asleep in Christ, leads Paul back again to Adam in this way. 'For since by man came death, by man came also the resurrection of the dead. For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive. And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam was made a quickening spirit. The first man is of the earth, earthy; the second man is the Lord from heaven.' The 'second man' and the 'last Adam' are most happy names and most illustrious titles of Paul's bold invention for his Master, our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. Which glorious Man is called the Second Adam, says Theophilus, as having in His regeneration that very perfection which the first Adam had in his creation. And because He is to do all that for us by a birth of grace, which we should have had by a birth of nature from Adam, had he kept his first estate of sinless perfection.
Praise to the Holiest in the height,And in the depth he praise;In all His words most wonderful,Most sure in all His ways.O loving wisdom of our God!When all was sin and shame,A second Adam to the fightAnd to the rescue came.Now, what say you, Academicus, to all that?
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Adam
The first man. The name is supposed to be derived from Adamah, 'earth, or red earth,' agreeing with the fact that "the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, Genesis 2:7 . He differed from all other creatures, because God breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, by which man became a living soul. He differed also in being made after the image and likeness of God: he was God's representative on earth, and to him was given dominion over all other living things, and he gave them names. He was placed in the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it, showing that occupation was a good thing for man even in innocence. God said also that it was not good for man to be alone, so He caused him to sleep, took from him a rib, and of this 'builded' a woman. Adam called her Isha for she was taken out of Ish, man: the two being a type of Christ and the church, in the closest union: cf. Ephesians 5:31,32 .
Adam and Eve were permitted to eat of all the trees of the garden except the tree of the knowledge of good and evil: of the which if they ate, in the same day they should die. Eve, being beguiled by Satan, ate of that tree; and at her suggestion, though not deceived as Eve was, Adam also took of it. Their eyes were at once opened, they knew they were naked, and hid themselves from God. They were transgressors, had fallen from their state of innocence, and acquired a conscience, and with it the sense of their own evil and guilt. When questioned by God, Adam laid the blame on Eve, ungratefully saying, "the woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did eat." The ground was then cursed for Adam's sake: in sorrow he should eat of it all his life: thorns and thistles should be produced, and in the sweat of his face he should eat bread.
God made for Adam and Eve coats of skins and clothed them, foreshadowing the need for a vicarious sacrifice, and the righteousness that could only come to them through death. They were driven from the garden, and Cherubim with a flaming sword prevented them re-entering, lest they should eat of the tree of life and live for ever in their sin. Adam did not beget a son until after his fall: hence all mankind are alike fallen creatures. Acts 17:26 ; Romans 5:18,19 ; 1 Corinthians 15:22 . Adam lived 930 years and begat sons and daughters. We have no details of the life of Adam as a fallen man. Viewed typically as head of a race he stands in marked contrast to Christ, the last Adam.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Adam
the name given to man in general, both male and female, in the Hebrew Scriptures, Genesis 1:26-27 ; Genesis 5:1-2 ; Genesis 11:5 ; Joshua 14:15 ; 2 Samuel 7:19 ; Ecclesiastes 3:21 ; Jeremiah 32:20 ; Hosea 6:7 ; Zechariah 13:7 : in all which places mankind is understood; but particularly it is the name of the first man and father of the human race, created by God himself out of the dust of the earth. Josephus thinks that he was called Adam by reason of the reddish colour of the earth out of which he was formed, for Adam in Hebrew signifies red. God having made man out of the dust of the earth, breathed into him the breath of life, and gave him dominion over all the creatures of this world, Genesis 1:26-27 ; Genesis 2:7 . He created him after his own image and resemblance; and having blessed him, he placed him in a delicious garden, in Eden, that he might cultivate it, and feed upon its fruits, Genesis 2:8 ; but under the following injunction: "Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat: but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day thou eatest thereof, thou shalt surely die." The first thing that Adam did after his introduction into paradise, was to give names to all the beasts and birds which presented themselves before him, Genesis 2:19-20 .
But man was without a fellow creature of his own species; wherefore God said, "It is not good for man to be alone; I will make him a help meet for him." And the Lord caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam, and while he slept, he took one of his ribs, "and closed up the flesh instead thereof;" and of that substance which he took from man made he a woman, whom he presented to him. Then said Adam, "This is now bone of my bone, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called woman, because she was taken out of man," Genesis 2:21 , &c.
The woman was seduced by the tempter; and she seduced her husband to eat of the forbidden fruit. When called to judgment for this transgression before God, Adam attempted to cast the blame upon his wife, and the woman upon the serpent tempter. But God declared them all guilty, and punished the serpent by degradation; the woman by painful childbearing and subjection; and the man by agricultural labour and toil; of which punishments every day witnesses the fulfilment. As their natural passions now became irregular, and their exposure to accidents was great, God made a covering of skins for Adam and for his wife; and expelled them from the garden, to the country without; placing at the east of the garden cherubims and a flaming sword, which turned every way, to keep the way of the tree of life. It is not known how long Adam and his wife continued in paradise: some say, many years; others, not many days; others, not many hours. Adam called his wife's name Eve, which signifies "the mother of all living." Shortly after, Eve brought forth Cain, Genesis 4:1-2 . It is believed that she had a girl at the time, and that, generally, she had twins. The Scriptures notice only three sons of Adam: Cain, Abel, and Seth; and omits daughters; except that Moses tells us, "Adam beast sons and daughters;" no doubt many. He died, aged nine hundred and thirty, B.C. 3074.
Upon this history, so interesting to all Adam's descendants, some remarks may be offered.
1. It is disputed whether the name Adam is derived from red earth. Sir W. Jones thinks it may be from Adim, which in Sanscrit signifies, the first. The Persians, however, denominate him Adamah, which signifies, according to Sale, red earth. The term for woman is Aisha. the feminine of Aish, man, and signifies, therefore, maness, or female man.
2. The manner in which the creation of Adam is narrated indicates something peculiar and eminent in the being to be formed. Among the heavenly bodies the earth, and above all the various productions of its surface, vegetable and animal, however perfect in their kinds, and beautiful and excellent in their respective natures, not one being was found to whom the rest could minister instruction; inspire with moral delight; or lead up to the Creator himself. There was, properly speaking, no intellectual being; none to whom the whole frame and furniture of material nature could minister knowledge; no one who could employ upon them the generalizing faculty, and make them the basis of inductive knowledge. If, then, it was not wholly for himself that the world was created by God; and if angels were not so immediately connected with this system, as to lead us to suppose that it was made for them; a rational inhabitant was obviously still wanting to complete the work, and to constitute a perfect whole. The formation of such a being was marked, therefore, by a manner of proceeding which serves to impress us with a sense of the greatness of the work. Not that it could be a matter of more difficulty to Omnipotence to create man than any thine beside; but principally, it is probable, because he was to be the lord of the whole and therefore himself accountable to the original proprietor; and was to be the subject of another species of government, a moral administration; and to be constituted an image of the intellectual and moral perfections, and of the immortality of the common Maker. Everything therefore, as to man's creation, is given in a solemn and deliberative form, and contains also an intimation of a Trinity of Persons in the Godhead, all equally possessed of creative power, and therefore Divine, to each of whom man was to stand in relations the most sacred and intimate:—"And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness; and let them have dominion," &c.
3. It may be next inquired in what that image of God in which man was made consists.
It is manifest from the history of Moses, that human nature has two essential constituent parts, the BODY formed out of pre-existing matter, the earth; and a LIVING SOUL, breathed into the body by an inspiration from God. "And the Lord God formed man out of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils (or face ) the breath of life, ( lives, ) and man became a living soul." Whatever was thus imparted to the body of man, already "formed," and perfectly finished in all its parts, was the only cause of life; and the whole tenor of Scripture shows that this was the rational spirit itself, which, by a law of its Creator, was incapable of death, even after the body had fallen under that penalty.
The "image" or likeness of God in which man was made has, by some, been assigned to the body; by others to the soul. It has, also, been placed in the circumstance of his having "dominion" over the other creatures. As to the body, it is not necessary to prove that in no sense can it bear the image of God; that is, be "like" God. An upright form has no more likeness to God than a prone or reptile one; God is incorporeal, and cannot be the antitype of any thing material.
Equally unfounded is the notion that the image of God in man consisted in the "dominion" which was granted to him over this lower world. Limited dominion may, it is true, be an image of large and absolute dominion; but man is not said to have been made in the image of God's dominion, which is an accident merely, for, before creatures existed, God himself could have no dominion; he was made in the image and likeness of God himself. Still farther, it is evident that man, according to the history, was made in the image of God in order to his having dominion, as the Hebrew particle imports; and, therefore, his dominion was consequent upon his formation in the "image" and "likeness" of God, and could not be that image itself.
The notion that the original resemblance of man to God must be placed in some one essential quality, is not consistent with holy writ, from which alone we can derive our information on this subject. We shall, it is true, find that the Bible partly places it in what is essential to human nature; but that it should comprehend nothing else, or consist in one quality only, has no proof or reason; and we are, in fact, taught that it comprises also what is so far from being essential that it may be both lost and regained. When God is called "the Father of Spirits," a likeness is suggested between man and God in the spirituality of their nature. This is also implied in the striking argument of St. Paul with the Athenians: "Forasmuch, then, as we are the OFFSPRING of God, we ought not to think that the Godhead is like unto gold, or silver, or stone, graven by art and man's device;"—plainly referring to the idolatrous statues by which God was represented among Heathens. If likeness to God in man consisted in bodily shape, this would not have been an argument against human representations of the Deity; but it imports, as Howe well expresses it, that "we are to understand that our resemblance to him, as we are his offspring, lies in some higher, more noble, and more excellent thing, of which there can be no figure; as who can tell how to give the figure or image of a thought, or of the mind or thinking power?" In spirituality, and, consequently, immateriality, this image of God in man, then, in the first instance, consists. Nor is it any valid objection to say, that "immateriality is not peculiar to the soul of man; for we have reason to believe that the inferior animals are actuated by an immaterial principle." This is as certain as analogy can make it: but though we allow a spiritual principle to animals, its kind is obviously inferior; for that spirit which is incapable of induction and moral knowledge, must be of an inferior order to the spirit which possesses these capabilities; and this is the kind of spirit which is peculiar to man.
The sentiment expressed in Wis_2:23 , is an evidence that, in the opinion of the ancient Jews, the image of God in man comprised immortality also. "For God created man to be immortal, and made him to be an image of his own eternity:" and though other creatures were made capable of immortality, and at least the material human frame, whatever we may think of the case of animals, would have escaped death, had not sin entered the world; yet, without admitting the absurdity of the "natural immortality" of the human soul, that essence must have been constituted immortal in a high and peculiar sense which has ever retained its prerogative of continued duration amidst the universal death not only of animals, but of the bodies of all human beings. There appears also a manifest allusion to man's immortality, as being included in the image of God, in the reason which is given in Genesis for the law which inflicts death on murderers: "Whose sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his, blood be shed: for in the image of God made he man." The essence of the crime of homicide is not confined here to the putting to death the mere animal part of man; and it must, therefore, lie in the peculiar value of life to an immortal being, accountable in another state for the actions done in this, and whose life ought to be specially guarded for this very reason, that death introduces him into changeless and eternal relations, which were not to be left to the mercy of human passions.
To these we are to add the intellectual powers, and we have what divines, in perfect accordance with the Scriptures, have called, "the NATURAL image of God in his creatures," which is essential and ineffaceable. Man was made capable of knowledge, and he was endowed with liberty of will. This natural image of God was the foundation of that MORAL image by which also man was distinguished. Unless he had been a spiritual, knowing, and willing being, he would have been wholly incapable of moral qualities. That he had such qualities eminently, and that in them consisted the image of God, as well as in the natural attributes just stated, we have also the express testimony of Scripture: "Lo this only have I found, that God made man UPRIGHT; but they have sought out many inventions." There is also an express allusion to the moral image of God, in which man was at first created, in Colossians 3:10 : "And have put on the new man, which is renewed in knowledge, after the image of Him that created him;" and in Ephesians 4:24 : "Put on the new man, which after God is created in righteousness and true holiness." In these passages the Apostle represents the change produced in true Christians by the Gospel, as a "renewal of the image of God in man; as a new or second creation in that image;" and he explicitly declares, that that image consists in "knowledge," in "righteousness," and in "true holiness."
This also may be finally argued from the satisfaction with which the historian of the creation represents the Creator as viewing the works of his hands as "very good," which was pronounced with reference to each of them individually, as well as to the whole: "And God saw every thing that he had made, and behold it was very good." But, as to man, this goodness must necessarily imply moral as well as physical qualities. Without them he would have been imperfect as man; and had they, in their first exercises, been perverted and sinful, he must have been an exception, and could not have been pronounced "very good." The goodness of man, as a rational being, must lie in devotedness and consecration to God; consequently, man was at first holy. A rational creature, as such, is capable of knowing, loving, serving, and living in communion with the Most Holy One. Adam, at first, did or did not exert this capacity; if he did not, he was not very good, —not good at all.
4. On the intellectual and moral endowments of the progenitor of the human race, erring views appear to have been taken on both sides.
In knowledge, some have thought him little inferior to the angels; others, as furnished with but the simple elements of science and of language. The truth seems to be that, as to capacity, his intellect must have been vigorous beyond that of any of his fallen descendants; which itself gives us very high views of the strength of his understanding, although we should allow him to have been created "lower than the angels." As to his actual knowledge, that would depend upon the time and opportunity he had for observing the nature and laws of the objects around him; and the degree in which he was favoured with revelations from God on moral and religious subjects.
On the degree of moral excellence also in the first man, much license has been given to a warm imagination, and to rhetorical embellishment; and Adam's perfection has sometimes been fixed at an elevation which renders it exceedingly difficult to conceive how he could fall into sin at all. On the other hand, those who either deny or hold very slightly the doctrine of our hereditary depravity, delight to represent Adam as little superior in moral perfection and capability to his descendants. But, if we attend to the passages of holy writ above quoted, we shall be able, on this subject, to ascertain, if not the exact degree of his moral endowments, yet that there is a certain standard below which they cannot be placed.—Generally, he was made in the image of God, which, we have already proved, is to be understood morally as well as naturally. Now, however the image of any thing may be limited in extent, it must still be an accurate representation as far as it goes. Every thing good in the creation must always be a miniature representation of the excellence of the Creator; but, in this case, the "goodness," that is, the perfection, of every creature, according to the part it was designed to act in the general assemblage of beings collected into our system, wholly forbids us to suppose that the image of God's moral perfections in man was a blurred and dim representation. To whatever extent it went, it necessarily excluded all that from man which did not resemble God; it was a likeness to God in "righteousness and true holiness," whatever the degree of each might be, and excluded all admixture of unrighteousness and unholiness. Man, therefore, in his original state, was sinless, both in act and in principle. Hence it is said that "God made man UPRIGHT." That this signifies moral rectitude cannot be doubted; but the import of the word is very extensive. It expresses, by an easy figure, the exactness of truth, justice, and obedience; and it comprehends the state and habit both of the heart and the life. Such, then, was the condition of primitive man; there was no obliquity in his moral principles, his mind, or affections; none in his conduct. He was perfectly sincere and exactly just, rendering from the heart all that was due to God and to the creature. Tried by the exactest plummet, he was upright; by the most perfect rule, he was straight. The "knowledge" in which the Apostle Paul, in the passage quoted above from Colossians 3:10 , places "the image of God" after which man was created, does not merely imply the faculty of understanding, which is a part of the natural image of God; but that which might be lost, because it is that in which we may be "renewed." It is, therefore, to be understood of the faculty of knowledge in right exercise; and of that willing reception, and firm retaining, and hearty approval, of religious truth, in which knowledge, when spoken of morally, is always understood in the Scriptures. We may not be disposed to allow, with some, that Adam understood the deep philosophy of nature, and could comprehend and explain the sublime mysteries of religion. The circumstance of his giving names to the animals, is certainly no sufficient proof of his having attained to a philosophical acquaintance with their qualities and distinguishing habits, although we should allow their names to be still retained in the Hebrew, and to be as expressive of their peculiarities as some expositors have stated. Sufficient time appears not to have been afforded him for the study of the properties of animals, as this event took place previous to the formation of Eve; and as for the notion of his acquiring knowledge by intuition, this is contradicted by the revealed fact that angels themselves acquire their knowledge by observation and study, though no doubt, with great rapidity and certainty. The whole of this transaction was supernatural; the beasts were "brought" to Adam, and it is probable that he named them under a Divine suggestion. He has been also supposed to be the inventor of language, but his history shows that he was never without speech. From the first he was able to converse with God; and we may, therefore, infer that language was in him a supernatural and miraculous endowment. That his understanding was, as to its capacity, deep and large beyond any of his posterity, must follow from the perfection in which he was created; and his acquisitions of knowledge would, therefore, be rapid and easy. It was, however, in moral and religious truth, as being of the first concern to him, that we are to suppose the excellency of his knowledge to have consisted. "His reason would be clear, his judgment uncorrupted, and his conscience upright and sensible." The best knowledge would, in him, be placed first, and that of every other kind be made subservient to it, according to its relation to that. The Apostle adds to knowledge, "righteousness and true holiness;" terms which express, not merely freedom from sin, but positive and active virtue.
Sober as these views of man's primitive state are, it is not, perhaps, possible for us fully to conceive of so exalted a condition as even this. Below this standard it could not fall; and that it implied a glory, and dignity, and moral greatness of a very exalted kind, is made sufficiently apparent from the degree of guilt charged upon Adam when he fell: for the aggravating circumstances of his offence may well be deduced from the tremendous consequences which followed.
5. The salvation of Adam has been disputed; for what reason does not appear, except that the silence of Scripture, as to his after life, has given bold men occasion to obtrude their speculations upon a subject which called for no such expression of opinion. As nothing to the contrary appears, the charitable inference is, that as he was the first to receive the promise of redemption, so he was the first to prove its virtue. It is another presumption, that as Adam and Eve were clothed with skins of beasts, which could not have been slain for food, these were the skins of their sacrifices; and as the offering of animal sacrifice was an expression of faith in the appointed propitiation, to that refuge we may conclude they resorted, and through its merits were accepted.
6. The Rabbinical and Mohammedan traditions and fables respecting the first man are as absurd as they are numerous. Some of them indeed are monstrous, unless we suppose them to be allegories in the exaggerated style of the orientals. Some say that he was nine hundred cubits high; whilst others, not satisfied with this, affirm that his head touched the heavens. The Jews think that he wrote the ninety-first Psalm, invented the Hebrew letters, and composed several treatises; the Arabians, that he preserved twenty books which fell from heaven; and the Musselmen, that he himself wrote ten volumes.
7. That Adam was a type of Christ, is plainly affirmed by St. Paul, who calls him "the figure of him who was to come." Hence our Lord is sometimes called, not inaptly, the Second Adam. This typical relation stands sometimes in SIMILITUDE, sometimes in CONTRAST. Adam was formed immediately by God, as was the humanity of Christ. In each the nature was spotless, and richly endowed with knowledge and true holiness. Both are seen invested with dominion over the earth and all its creatures; and this may explain the eighth Psalm, where David seems to make the sovereignty of the first man over the whole earth in its pristine glory, the prophetic symbol of the dominion of Christ over the world restored. Beyond these particulars fancy must not carry us; and the typical CONTRAST must also be limited to that which is stated in Scripture, or supported by its allusions. Adam and Christ were each a public person, a federal head to the whole race of mankind; but the one was the fountain of sin and death, the other of righteousness and life. By Adam's transgression "many were made sinners," Romans 5:14-19 . Through him, "death passed upon all men, because all have sinned" in him. But he thus prefigured that one man, by whose righteousness the "free gift comes upon all men to justification of life." The first man communicated a living soul to all his posterity; the other is a quickening Spirit, to restore them to newness of life now, and to raise them up at the last day. By the imputation of the first Adam's sin, and the communication of his fallen, depraved nature, death reigned over those who had not sinned after the similitude of Adam's transgression; and through the righteousness of the Second Adam, and the communication of a divine nature by the Holy Spirit, favour and grace shall much more abound in Christ's true followers unto eternal life. See REDEMPTION .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Adam
Adam (ăd'am), red, red earth. The name appropriated to the first man, the father of the inhabitants of the world; used, however, sometimes more generally, as in Genesis 5:1-2, where the woman is included. This name was probably chosen to remind the man of his earthly nature, seeing that out of the ground his body was taken, though his soul, the breath of life, was breathed into his nostrils by God's immediate act. This history of his creation is narrated in Genesis 1:26-30; Genesis 2:7; Genesis 2:15-25, a single pair being formed, to whom the earth was given for a possession, to replenish it with their children, to enjoy the fruits of it, and to have dominion over the inferior animate. We are told that "God created man in his own image" and after his "likeness;" not with respect to bodily shape, but with a likeness to God in moral attributes. This is implied by the expressions of St. Paul, who plainly considers righteousness and holiness the likeness of God. Ephesians 4:24; Col 3:10. The phrase must also denote the possession of dominion and authority; for immediately it is subjoined "let them have dominion," Genesis 1:26, explanatory, it would seem, of the term "image." And so St. Paul calls the man "the image and glory of God," on the ground of his being "the head of the woman." 1 Corinthians 11:3; 1 Corinthians 11:7. The high intellectual power with which man was endowed is illustrated by his giving appropriate names to the lower animals. Genesis 2:19-20. He was indeed a glorious creature, and would have been uninterruptedly and increasingly happy had he continued in his first estate of innocence. Adam's lamentable fall is next related. How long it was after his creation, ingenious men have puzzled themselves to discover, but in vain. By sin Adam lost his best prerogative. He had suffered spiritual death, and he was to suffer bodily death: dust as he was, to dust he should return. To his posterity he transmitted, therefore, a corrupted nature, which could be restored and recovered only by the power of the second Adam, a head of life and blessedness to all that believe in him. Romans 5:15-16; 1 Corinthians 15:21-22; 1 Corinthians 15:45; 1 Corinthians 15:47-48. Of Adam's subsequent history we know little. We are expressly told that he had "sons and daughters," though the names of but three of his sons are recorded. He lived 930 years, Genesis 4:1-2; Genesis 4:25-26; Genesis 5:3-5; 1 Chronicles 1:1; Luke 3:38, and was probably contemporary with Methusalah about 240 years. Methusalah lived 600 years with Noah; Shem lived 150 years with Abram, and 50 years with Isaac, according to the Ussher Chronology, so that the history of the world before the flood might have been carried through three or four persons to the time of Moses. 2. A city near the Jordan, by which the waters were cut off when Israel passed over. Joshua 3:16.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Schall Von Bell, Johann Adam
Jesuit missionary to China. Born in Cologne, Germany in 1591; died in Beijing, China in August 15, 1666. He labored first in Sheii-si, and later was summoned to Peking to reform the Chinese Calendar. The Emperor Shun-chi appointed him president of the Board of Mathematics and raised him to the rank of mandarin. During the reign of Shun-chi Christianity was tolerated. In 1664Father Schall was thrown into prison and narrowly escaped death.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Adam
(a) (3760-2830 BCE) The first man, created by G-d. Married Eve, and together they are the progenitors of the human race. They were placed in the Garden of Eden, but were banished from there after eating from the forbidden Tree of Knowledge. (b) Man.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Adam kadmon
(lit. "primordial man") a mystic primordial level within the G-dhead
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Adam
ADAM.—1. In Luke 3:38 the ancestry of Jesus is traced up to Adam. From what source the Evangelist drew his genealogy it is impossible to say. But when compared with that in the First Gospel, it clearly shows the purpose with which St. Luke wrote. As a Gentile, writing for a Gentile, he took every opportunity of insisting upon the universal power of the gospel. The effects of the life and Person of Jesus are not confined to the Jews; for Jesus is not, as in St. Matthew’s Gospel, a descendant of Abraham only, but of the man to whom all mankind trace their origin. See art. Genealogy of Jesus Christ. But further, St. Luke closes his genealogy with the significant words ‘the son of Adam, the son of God’ (τοῦ Ἀδάμ, τοῦ Θεοῦ). Adam, and therefore all mankind, had a Divine origin. The same Evangelist who relates the fact of the virgin birth, and records that Christ was, in His own proper Person, υἱὸς Θεοῦ (Luke 1:35), claims that the first man, and hence every human being, is υἱὸς Θεοῦ. Thus the genealogy, which might at first sight appear to be a useless addition to the Gospel narrative, possesses a lasting spiritual value.
The truth placed by St. Luke in the forefront of his Gospel is treated in its redemptive aspect by his master St. Paul, who in four passages brings Adam and Christ into juxtaposition:
(a) 1 Corinthians 15:22. The solidarity of mankind in their physical union with Adam involves universal death as a consequence of Adam’s sin. Similarly the solidarity of mankind in their spiritual union with Christ involves universal life as a consequence of Christ’s perfect work.
(b) In Romans 5:12-21. this solidarity and its results are treated in fuller detail. (i.) Romans 5:12-14. There is a parallelism between Adam and Christ. Adam ‘is a type of him who was to come’ (Romans 5:14), in the sense that his act affected all men. Adam committed a ταράττωμα, a lapse, a false step—commonly termed the Fall. By this lapse, sin was as ‘a malignant force let loose among mankind’; and through sin came physical death. (St. Paul sees no occasion for proof of the connexion between sin and physical death; he unhesitatingly bases his position on the narrative in Genesis; see Romans 2:17, Romans 3:3; Romans 3:19; Romans 3:21). Were this all, the passage would implicitly annul human responsibility. But St. Paul, without attempting fully to reconcile them, places side by side the two aspects of the truth—the hereditary transmission of guilt, and moral responsibility: ‘and thus death made its way (διῆλθεν) to every individual man, because all sinned (ἐφʼ ᾧ πάντες ἥμαρτον)’. Controversy has raged hotly round this phrase, Augustine and many other writers having understood the relative ω as masculine, and as referring to Adam; so Vulgate in quo. But there can be no doubt that ἐφʼ ᾧ must be taken in its usual meaning ‘because.’ Adam’s fall involved all men in sin, and therefore in death; but this was because all men (in full exercise of their free will) sinned. It would be out of place here to discuss the attempts that have been made to combine these two factors in the moral history of man (see Literature): strictly speaking, they cannot fully and logically he combined; but many of the most fundamental truths of the Christian religion can be arrived at only by the balancing of complementary statements. In Romans 3:13-14 a qualification is entered, which causes St. Paul to ruin his construction, and omit the apodosis of which Romans 3:12 forms the protasis. He feels obliged to explain that, sin being an offence against law, those who lived between Adam and Moses had no law, and thus did not transgress an explicit command as Adam had done. But the fact that death reigned throughout that period only shows that—not the guilt of individuals, but—the transmitted effects of Adam’s sin were at work. And it is this that makes him a type of the Messiah. (ii.) Romans 3:15-17. The contrast is far greater than the similarity. The contrast between Adam and Christ is great:—In quality (Romans 3:15). The one representative man, Adam, committed a παράττωμα; but over-against that must be placed the undeserved kindness (χαρις) of God, and the gift of righteousness arising from the kindness of the other representative Man, Jesus Christ. In quantity (Romans 3:16). ‘One act tainting the whole race with sin, and a multitude of sins collected together in one only to be forgiven.’ In character and consequences (Romans 3:17). Adam’s fall ushered in a reign of death; Christ’s work ensures that all who have received His kindness and His gift of righteousness shall themselves reign in life. (iii.) Romans 3:18-21. Summary of the argument, in which it is further shown that Law ‘came in as an afterthought’ (παρεισῆλθεν), multiplying sin, but thereby only increasing the abundance of God’s kindness.
(c) 1 Corinthians 15:44-47. The two foregoing passages from St. Paul’s writings deal with the practical moral results of union with Adam and Christ respectively. These verses (i.) go back behind that, and show that there is a complete and radical difference between the nature of each; (ii.) look forward, and show that this difference has a vital bearing on the truth of man’s resurrection.
(i.) St. Paul maintains (1 Corinthians 15:36-44 a), by a series of illustrations from the natural world, the reasonableness of a resurrection from death. In Nature ‘every seed has its own particular body’—‘all flesh is not the same flesh’—the terrestrial differs from the celestial—there is a different glory of the sun, the moon, and the stars. So also it may be rightly held that it is possible for man to exist in two different states, one far higher than the other. Not only so, but (1 Corinthians 15:44 b, 45) there actually exists such an analogous distinction between man and man, as Scripture shows. The thought in 1 Corinthians 15:45 is arrived at by an adaptation of Genesis 2:7 : Θ καὶ ἐγένετο ὁ ἄνθρωτος εἰς ψυχὴν ζῶσαν. These words relate only that after being lifeless clay, man was by God’s breath transformed into a living being. But St. Paul reads into the statement the doctrinal significance that the body of the first representative man became the vehicle of a ‘psychical’ nature, while the body of the Second is the organ of a ‘pneumatical’ nature. St. Paul’s trichotomy of man may he represented thus:
 
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Everything in man that is not τνεῦμα may he called ‘psychical’ is so far as it is considered as ‘intellect,’ and ‘carnal’ in so far as it is thought of as the seat of the animal passions; both the adjectives ψυχικός and σαρκικός thus mean ‘non-spiritual.’ The second half of St. Paul’s statement—‘the last Adam became a life-giving spirit’—finds no exact parallel in the OT, but seems to be based on a reminiscence of Messianic passages which speak of the work of the Divine Spirit, e.g. Isaiah 11:1-2, Joel 2:28-32.
(ii.) But as the ψυχὴ ζῶσα came first and the τνεῦμα ζωοτοιοῦν last, so it is with the development of mankind; the spiritual must follow the psychical (1 Corinthians 15:46). As the first man was formed from the clay, and had a nature in conformity with his origin, while the second Man has His origin ‘from heaven’ (1 Corinthians 15:47), so among mankind there are those whose nature remains low and mean, tied to the clods of earth, and there are those whose nature has become heavenly (1 Corinthians 15:48). But this implies more (1 Corinthians 15:49). In his present state man is an exact counterpart, he visibly reproduces the lineaments and character, of the first man, because of his corporate union with him (ἐφορέσαμεν τὴν εἰκόνα τοῦ χοϊκοῦ). But the time is coming when we shall become the exact counterpart or image of the second Man (cf. Genesis 1:26 f.), because of our spiritual union with Him (φορέσομεν καὶ τἡν εἱκόνα τοῦ ἑπουρανίον). The above follows the text of B a c g 17 aeth. arm. [1]; and Theodoret distinctly is says to τὸ γὰρ φορέσομεν προρρητικῶς οὐ παραινετικῶς εἳρκεν The mass of authorities read φορέσωμεν, ‘from a desire to turn what is really a physical assertion into an ethical exhortation’ (Alf.); so Chrys., τοῦτʼ ἐστιν, ἃριστα πράξωμεν … συμβουλευτικω̈ς εἰσάγει τόν λὀγόν. But it is difficult to conceive how St. Paul, who has from 1 Corinthians 15:35 been leading up to the thought of the resurrection, could at the critical moment throw his argument to the winds, and content himself with saying, ‘according as we have been earthly in our thoughts, let us strive to be heavenly.’
It has been suggested that St. Paul adopted the designation of Christ as ‘the last Adam’ and ‘the second Adam’ from Rabbinic theology. But such a comparison between Adam and the Messiah was unknown to the earlier Jewish teachers. Passages adduced to support it belong to the Middle Ages, and are influenced by the Kabbala. See G. F. Moore, JBL [2] xvi. (1897), 158–161; Dalman, The Words of Jesus, English translation 248 f., 251 f.
(d) Philippians 2:6. St. Paul speaks of ‘Christ Jesus, who being [3] in the form of God, deemed it not a thing to be snatched at (ἁρταγμον) to be on an equality with God.’ There is here an implied contrast with Adam, who took fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil, which God said had made him ‘as one of us’ (Genesis 3:22).
2. In Matthew 19:4-6 || Mark 10:6-8 reference is made by Jesus to the account of Adam and Eve in Genesis 1:27 ‘male and female created he them’ (ἄρσεν καὶ θῆλυ ἐποίησεν αὐτούς). Pharisees came and asked Him whether divorce was allowable [4]. Our Lord’s answer is intended to show that the provision made for divorce in the Mosaic law (Deuteronomy 24:1) was only a concession to the hardness of men’s hearts. The truer and deeper view of marriage which Christians should adopt must be based on a nobler morality,—on a morality which takes its stand on the primeval nature of man and woman as God made them. ‘To suit (πρός) your hardness of heart he wrote for you this commandment. But from the beginning of the creation “he made them male and female.” ’ And with this quotation is coupled one from Genesis 2:24 (see also Ephesians 5:31), ‘For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother [5], and they twain shall become one flesh.’ The same result is reached in Mt., but with a transposition of the two parts of the argument. See Wright’s Synopsis, in loc. Thus Jesus bases the absolute indissolubility of the marriage tie on the union of man and woman from the first. In Matthew 19:9; Matthew 5:32 this pronouncement is practically annulled by the admission of the words ‘except for fornication’ (μὴ ἐπὶ πορνείᾳ, and παρεκτὸς λόγου πορνείας). See Wright, in loc., who contends that ‘the Church (of Alexandria?) introduced these two clauses into the Gospel in accordance with the permission to legislate which our Lord gave to all Churches (Matthew 18:18).’ See art. Marriage.
3. In John 8:44 ἀνθρωποκτόνος may refer to the introduction of death into the world by the fall of Adam. But see art. Abel.
4. The parallel drawn by St. Paul between Adam and Christ may have been the origin of the tradition that Adam was buried under Golgotha. Jer. (Com. in Mat. § iv. 27) rejects it, saying that it arose from the discovery of an ancient human skull at that spot. He also declines to see any reference to it in Ephesians 5:14. But in Ep. 46 he says, ‘The place where our Lord was crucified is called Calvary, because the skull of the primitive man was buried there. So it came to pass that the second Adam, that is the blood of Christ (a play on אדם and הדם), as it dropped from the Cross, washed away the sins of the buried protoplast,* [6] the first Adam, and thus the words of the apostle were fulfilled,’—quoting Ephesians 5:14. Epiphanius (contra Haer. xlvi. 5) goes farther, stating that Christ’s blood dropped upon Adam’s skull, and restored him to life. The tradition is mentioned also by Basil, Ambrose, and others.
Literature.—Besides the works cited in the article, the following may be consulted on the relation between Adam and Christ: Sanday-Headlam, Com. on Epistle to Romans (pp. 130–153); Bethune-Baker, An Introduction to the Early History of Christian Doctrine, ch. xvii.; Tennant, The Sources of the Doctrine of the Fall and Original Sin; Sadler, The Second Adam and the New Birth; Thackeray, The Relation of St. Paul to Contemporary Jewish Thought, ch. ii.
A. H. M‘Neile.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Adam
The name ‘Adam’, which is the name of the first human, is also the common Hebrew word for ‘man’, both man the individual and the human race as a whole. The root of the word appears originally to have meant ‘red’, and is the same as that for ‘red soil’. The two words are used together in the sentence, ‘The Lord God formed man (adam) of dust from the ground (adamah)’ (Genesis 3:14-1998).
Adam represented the climax of God’s creation. He shared his physical origin with other animals in being made of common earthly chemicals, yet he was uniquely different in that he was made in the image of God (Genesis 1:27; Genesis 2:7; see CREATION; HUMANITY, HUMANKIND). God gave Adam a wife, Eve, who shared his unique nature (Genesis 2:21-23), and this nature has passed on to the human race that has descended from them (1 Corinthians 15:45-49).
God placed Adam and Eve in a beautiful parkland for their time of testing and training. There they had opportunity to develop in body, mind and spirit, through doing physical work, making choices, learning skills, relating to each other and living in fellowship with God (Genesis 2:15-23). But instead of submitting to God, Adam attempted to live independently of God and so fell into sin (Genesis 3:1-7). In so doing he brought judgment upon himself and upon the whole human race which, in effect, existed in him (1618448749_9; Romans 5:12; see DEATH; SIN).
Only Jesus Christ can undo the damage that Adam has caused. Through his death, he becomes head of a new race of people, those saved by God’s super-abundant grace (Romans 5:14-19). As Adam was the first of a race of people fitted for the physical life of the present age, so Jesus Christ is the first of a race of people fitted for the spiritual life of the age to come. As all who are in physical union with Adam share the deathly consequences of Adam’s sin, so all who are in spiritual union with Christ share the resurrection life that Christ has made possible (1 Corinthians 15:21-22; 1 Corinthians 15:45-49; see also IMAGE).
Adam lived 930 years, during which he fathered many sons and daughters (Genesis 5:1-5; cf. Genesis 1:28). The most well known of these were Cain, his firstborn; Abel, whom Cain murdered; and Seth, whom Adam and Eve considered a special gift from God to replace Abel (Genesis 4:1-8; Genesis 4:25).

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Adam, the Last - In contrast to the first man, Adam, who was made a living soul, the last Adam, the Lord Jesus Christ, was a life-giving Spirit: the first was natural; the second spiritual: the first man was of the earth, earthy; the second Man was out of heaven. Everything committed to man having failed in Adam, Christ as last Adam becomes the head of a new and redeemed race. He is the last Adam because there will be no other: every man must come under one of these two headships: the first Adam, man; or the last Adam, Christ: cf
Preadamite - ) One who holds that men existed before Adam. ) An inhabitant of the earth before Adam
Eve - Originally the name ‘Eve’ was related to the word for ‘life’, and this was why Adam gave the name to his wife. God gave her to Adam as one equal with him in nature but opposite to him in sex, to be his companion and counterpart (Genesis 1:27; Genesis 2:18-25). However, she too readily listened to the temptations of Satan and is blamed for leading Adam into sin (Genesis 3:1-7; 2 Corinthians 11:3; 1 Timothy 2:13-15; see Adam)
Adam And Eve - ...
Old Testament The Hebrew word for Eve means “life,” while the Hebrew word for Adam simply means “man. ” The Hebrew word Adam is used in at least three different ways in the Old Testament. In its most common occurrence, the word Adam refers to mankind in general. A third use of Adam is in reference to the city beside Zaretan (Joshua 3:16 ) on the Jordan. The Hebrew word for Eve is used only as reference to Adam's wife. ...
New Testament In the New Testament, Adam is used as a proper name, clearly referring to our ancestral parents. Jesus' genealogy is traced back to Adam (Luke 3:38 ). However, the most important New Testament usage treats Jesus as a second Adam (1 Corinthians 15:45 ), where the word is used as a symbol. Furthermore, Paul in a similar manner treats Adam as a type of Christ (Romans 5:14 ). As the first Adam brought death into the world, the “second Adam” brought life and righteousness (Romans 5:15-19 ). In 1 Timothy 2:11-15 , women are urged to be silent and subjected to man because Adam was created before Eve and because Eve was deceived into sinning. ...
Theological Concerns Adam and Eve are the ancestors of humanity. ...
Further the biblical writers use the story of Adam and Eve as symbolic of the universal history of all mankind. Thus Adam and Eve are real but also symbolic. ...
Adam and Eve introduced sin into human experience. ...
The consequences of Adam and Eve's sin fell not merely upon them but upon the earth as well (Genesis 3:14-19 ). Further, following their sin, Adam and Eve hid from God; God did not hide from them (Genesis 3:8-9 )
Adam - ...
Adam was sinless in the first part of his life, and then deliberately and knowingly became a partner in Eve's sin in order that he might be with her, partake of her punishment, and continue to have her for his very own. As by the sin of Adam all who are in Adam were made sinners, so by the obedience of CHRIST all who are in CHRIST are made righteous ( Romans 5:18). ...
Romans 5:19 (b) Adam was the first of the earthly family and CHRIST is the first of the heavenly family. Our bodies are in the likeness of Adam, and in the new creation we shall be like CHRIST, the last Adam
Adamite - ) One of a sect of visionaries, who, professing to imitate the state of Adam, discarded the use of dress in their assemblies. ) A descendant of Adam; a human being
Adam, a Type - The apostle Paul speaks of Adam as "the figure of him who was to come. " On this account our Lord is sometimes called the second Adam
Adam - He made a woman, Eve, from the rib of Adam and gave her to him for a wife. Adam and Eve were tempted by the devil, disguised as a serpent, to disobey God by eating of the tree of knowledge. Adam was the father of Cain and Abel, of Seth when he was 130 years old, and of many sons and daughters. In the New Testament Saint Paul alludes to Christ as the "last Adam," through whom all are saved, as in the first Adam all inherited the effect of his sin
Adam, the Second - Like the first Adam, he is the "ruler of creation" (Revelation 3:14 ). The first Adam lost his crown and gained death. The second Adam was crowned because he tasted death for every man (2:8-9). By the obedience of the second Adam life abounds to many (Romans 5:12-19 ). ...
He was tempted in every way, as was Adam, yet was without sin (Matthew 4:1-11 ; Hebrews 4:15 ). Christ and Adam are both sons of God (Matthew 1:1 ; Luke 3:37 ). God breathed into Adam the breath of life. ...
"As in Adam all die, so in Christ all will be made alive" (1 Corinthians 15:22 ). Adam was a pattern of the one to come (Romans 5:14 ). One of the greatest things to be said for the first Adam was that he became "a living being. ...
The first Adam came from the dust. The second Adam came from heaven (1 Corinthians 15:47 ). The second Adam calls his own by name and they hear his voice (John 10:3 ). ...
We have borne the likeness of the earthly man, the first Adam. The last enemy placed under the feet of the second Adam is death (Psalm 110:1 ; 1Col 15:26). Barrett, From First Adam to Last ; W. Scroggs, The Last Adam
Adam's Apple - See under Adam
Second Adam - See Adam; Christ, Christology
Second Adam - See Adam, the Second ...
...
Preadamic - ) Prior to Adam
Man, the Second - See Adam, THE LAST
Seth - (compensation ), ( Genesis 4:25 ; 6:3 ; 1 Chronicles 1:1 ) the third son of Adam, and father of Enos. ) Adam handed down to Seth and his descendants the promise of mercy, faith in which became the distinction of God's children
Adam - The name ‘Adam’, which is the name of the first human, is also the common Hebrew word for ‘man’, both man the individual and the human race as a whole. The two words are used together in the sentence, ‘The Lord God formed man (adam) of dust from the ground (adamah)’ (Genesis 2:7). ...
Adam represented the climax of God’s creation. God gave Adam a wife, Eve, who shared his unique nature (Genesis 2:21-23), and this nature has passed on to the human race that has descended from them (1 Corinthians 15:45-49). ...
God placed Adam and Eve in a beautiful parkland for their time of testing and training. But instead of submitting to God, Adam attempted to live independently of God and so fell into sin (Genesis 3:1-7). ...
Only Jesus Christ can undo the damage that Adam has caused. As Adam was the first of a race of people fitted for the physical life of the present age, so Jesus Christ is the first of a race of people fitted for the spiritual life of the age to come. As all who are in physical union with Adam share the deathly consequences of Adam’s sin, so all who are in spiritual union with Christ share the resurrection life that Christ has made possible (1 Corinthians 15:21-22; 1 Corinthians 15:45-49; see also IMAGE). ...
Adam lived 930 years, during which he fathered many sons and daughters (Genesis 5:1-5; cf. The most well known of these were Cain, his firstborn; Abel, whom Cain murdered; and Seth, whom Adam and Eve considered a special gift from God to replace Abel (Genesis 4:1-8; Genesis 4:25)
Eve - Genesis 3:20 (c) A type of the church as Adam is a type of CHRIST. As she was made out of a part of Adam, so the church is a part of the Lord JESUS. The church is called His Bride as Eve was Adam's bride
Eve - A name given by Adam to his wife after they had fallen, and afterGod had spoken of 'her seed,' and had told her that in sorrow she should bring forth children. The Hebrew name is chavvah, which signifies 'life,' Adam adding that at she was 'the mother of all living. Eve being formed from a rib taken out of Adam, which God 'built' into a woman, and hence called by him Isha, is a beautiful type of the church being of Christ and presented to Him: cf. A woman is to be silent in the church: she is not to exercise authority over the man, for Adam was formed before Eve; and Adam was not deceived, but she was
Adam - "Adam" is both the proper name of the first human and a designation for humankind. God himself gave this appellation to Adam and Eve (Genesis 5:1-2 ). The color red lies behind the Hebrew root Adam [1]. ...
Adam was formed from the ground (Genesis 2:7 ). Word play between "Adam" and "ground" (adama [2]) is unmistakable. It is important that Adam is identified with humankind rather than any particular nationality. ...
Adam was made a little lower than "angels" (or "God") at his creation and "crowned with glory and honor" (Psalm 8:5 ). (Rabbis speculated the glory of Adam's heel outshone the sun. Adam is not laden with the task of building temples and cities. God did not appoint death for Adam and keep life exclusively for himself as in the Gilgameth epic. ...
No shrub or cultivated plant had yet grown where Adam was created. Unlike the Sumerian garden story of Enki and Ninhursag, there was no gardener working for Adam. Adam was not placed there to be a vegetable but to grow them. God wished to spare Adam from pain and death but at the same time left him freedom of choice for options beyond the sphere of his provision. ...
Adam was not only a laborer but a thinker. ...
The first lesson Adam learned was that his work was too big to do alone. Was Eve selected because she would in some way be easier to deceive? Or was the more difficult subject taken first? It is noteworthy that no special efforts to persuade Adam are recorded. It is, however, important to observe that Adam was called first as the one whose position of leadership made him responsible for the act (3:9). Adam and Eve's state of existence was not enhanced but filled with misery and death
Adamical - ) Of or pertaining to Adam, or resembling him
Tree of the Knowledge of Good And Evil - Adam and Eve were forbidden to take of the fruit which grew upon it. But they disobeyed the divine injunction, and so sin and death by sin entered our world and became the heritage of Adam's posterity. (See Adam
Original Sin - This is a term used to describe the effect of Adam's sin on his descendants (Romans 5:12-21). Specifically, it is our inheritance of a sinful nature from Adam. The sinful nature originated with Adam and is passed down from parent to child
Preadamitic - ) Existing or occurring before Adam; preadamic; as, preadamitic periods
Fall, the - The fall is that event in the Garden of Eden where Adam and Eve disobeyed the command of God and ate of The Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil (Genesis 2:1-25; Gen 3:1-24). Since Adam represented all of mankind, when He sinned, all of mankind fell with Him (Romans 5:12)
Pre-Adamites - The teaching that there was a race of people before Adam and Eve lived in the Garden and that the fall of Satan caused a widespread destruction of the world. The result of this destruction was so vast that the world needed to be re-made with Adam and Eve being the first of the new order
Second Adam (2) - SECOND Adam
Eden - ) The garden where Adam and Eve first dwelt; hence, a delightful region or residence
Adam - The word Adam occurs 539 times in the Old Testament. The etymology of the word is uncertain, although Genesis 2:7 makes a wordplay with the word Adamah, dust ( Genesis 3:19 ). In Genesis 1-5 the word occurs 31 times, sometimes as a proper noun and sometimes as a personal name, Adam. When the word has the definite article (ha-'adam), it means mankind. Opinion is divided on the earliest occurrence of Adam as a proper name, some preferring Genesis 2:20 and others Genesis 4:25 . The personal name Adam appears in Genesis 5:1 , Genesis 5:3-4 , Genesis 5:5 and 1 Chronicles 1:1 . The Lord God blew into his nostrils the breath of life, and Adam became a “living, breathing thing,” the same phrase that is used to describe the animals in Genesis 1:1 . Paul twice used the contrast of Christ with Adam to clarify the achievement of Christ for mankind. In Romans 5:12-21 , Adam is referred to as the type of the One to come, although the contrast is mainly negative. Just as sin entered the world through one man, Adam (Romans 5:12 ), so the act of righteousness of one man, Jesus, leads to acquittal and life for all people (Romans 5:18 ). In 1 Corinthians 15:1 , Paul used the Adam-Christ analogy to affirm the resurrection. Just as the first Adam became a living being, so the last Adam became a life-giving Spirit (1 Corinthians 15:45 ). Whatever the origin of this typology or analogy of Adam and Jesus, for Paul, Adam represented the old humanity with all its failures, while Jesus represented the new humanity as God intended humanity to be from the beginning
Garden of Eden - (Genesis 2) Home of Adam and Eve, located by tradition in the valley of the Euphrates
Eden, Garden of - (Genesis 2) Home of Adam and Eve, located by tradition in the valley of the Euphrates
Terrestrial Paradise - (Genesis 2) Home of Adam and Eve, located by tradition in the valley of the Euphrates
Mahalaleel - Fourth from Adam in Seth's line, Cainan's son ("the praise of God"
Cave of machpelah - The cave in Hebron, Israel, wherein are buried Adam, Eve, Abraham, Sara, Isaac, Rebecca, Jacob and Leah
Garden of eden - The place in which the narrative of Adam, Eve and the sin of the Tree of Knowledge occurred
Seth - Son of Adam, and father of Enos
Eden - The country and garden in which Adam and Eve were placed by God himself
Preadamite - A denomination given to the inhabitants of the earth, conceived by some people to have lived before Adam. The Jews he calls Adamites, and supposes them to have issued from Adam; and gives the title Preadamites to the Gentiles, whom he supposes to have been a long time before Adam. , and where he printed a retraction of his book of Preadamites. The arguments against the Preadamites are these. The sacred history of Moses assures us that Adam and Eve were the first persons that were created on the earth, Genesis 1:26 . It is undeniable that he speaks this of Adam and Eve, because in the next verse he uses the same words as those in Genesis 2:24 . " It is also clear from Genesis 3:20 , where it is said, that "Adam called his wife's name Eve, because she was the mother of all living, " that is, she was the source and root of all men and women in the world; which plainly intimates that there was no other woman that was such a mother. Finally, Adam is expressly called twice, by the apostle Paul, the first man, 1 Corinthians 15:45 ; 1 Corinthians 15:47
Enos, Enosh - Son of Seth and grandson of Adam
Eve - (Hebrew: hawwah, living, life) ...
The name of the first woman, the wife of Adam, the mother of Cain, Abel, and Seth
Adam - The name is supposed to be derived from Adamah, 'earth, or red earth,' agreeing with the fact that "the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, Genesis 2:7 . Adam called her Isha for she was taken out of Ish, man: the two being a type of Christ and the church, in the closest union: cf. ...
Adam and Eve were permitted to eat of all the trees of the garden except the tree of the knowledge of good and evil: of the which if they ate, in the same day they should die. Eve, being beguiled by Satan, ate of that tree; and at her suggestion, though not deceived as Eve was, Adam also took of it. When questioned by God, Adam laid the blame on Eve, ungratefully saying, "the woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did eat. " The ground was then cursed for Adam's sake: in sorrow he should eat of it all his life: thorns and thistles should be produced, and in the sweat of his face he should eat bread. ...
God made for Adam and Eve coats of skins and clothed them, foreshadowing the need for a vicarious sacrifice, and the righteousness that could only come to them through death. Adam did not beget a son until after his fall: hence all mankind are alike fallen creatures. Adam lived 930 years and begat sons and daughters. We have no details of the life of Adam as a fallen man. Viewed typically as head of a race he stands in marked contrast to Christ, the last Adam
Adam - The name is supposed to be derived from Adamah, 'earth, or red earth,' agreeing with the fact that "the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, Genesis 2:7 . Adam called her Isha for she was taken out of Ish, man: the two being a type of Christ and the church, in the closest union: cf. ...
Adam and Eve were permitted to eat of all the trees of the garden except the tree of the knowledge of good and evil: of the which if they ate, in the same day they should die. Eve, being beguiled by Satan, ate of that tree; and at her suggestion, though not deceived as Eve was, Adam also took of it. When questioned by God, Adam laid the blame on Eve, ungratefully saying, "the woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did eat. " The ground was then cursed for Adam's sake: in sorrow he should eat of it all his life: thorns and thistles should be produced, and in the sweat of his face he should eat bread. ...
God made for Adam and Eve coats of skins and clothed them, foreshadowing the need for a vicarious sacrifice, and the righteousness that could only come to them through death. Adam did not beget a son until after his fall: hence all mankind are alike fallen creatures. Adam lived 930 years and begat sons and daughters. We have no details of the life of Adam as a fallen man. Viewed typically as head of a race he stands in marked contrast to Christ, the last Adam
Seth - Third son of Adam and Eve
Eve - The Scriptures name only these three sons of Adam and Eve, but sufficiently inform us, Genesis 5:4 , that they had many more, saying, that "Adam lived, after he had begotten Seth, eight hundred years, and begat sons and daughters. " See Adam
Eve - The wife of Adam, and mother of mankind. Her formation, her yielding to the tempter, and inducing Adam to join her in disobedience to the divine command, the promise in respect to her seed, and the names she imposed on three of her sons, indicating her expectations and feeling in regard to them, are narrated in Genesis 2:1-25; Genesis 3:1-24; Genesis 4:1-26
Enos - The grandson of Adam. Adam, Seth, and Enoch died before him; and Noah was contemporary with him eighty-four years, Genesis 4:26 ; 5:6-11 ; Luke 3:38
Man - Four Hebrew terms are rendered "man" in the Authorized Version:
Adam, the name of the man created in the image of God. It appears to be derived from Adam , "he or it was red or ruddy," like Edom
Fall of Adam - Since by the grace of original justice Adam was elevated to a supernatural state, his loss of that grace is termed his fall
Adam, Fall of - Since by the grace of original justice Adam was elevated to a supernatural state, his loss of that grace is termed his fall
Seth - The first son of Adam after the death of Abel, Genesis 4:25,26 ; 5:3,6,8 , and ancestor of the line of godly patriarchs
Abel - Son of Adam and Eve
Methodist Testimony - Adam Clarke
Man - The first man, Adam, was made in God's image (Genesis 1:2627), and placed in the Garden of Eden for the purpose of enjoying the fellowship of the Lord and fulfilling the purpose of God's creation. When Adam and Eve sinned, all of humanity fell with them (Romans 5:12-21). Adam represented all humanity: "In Adam all die. As a result of Adam's disobedience, condemnation resulted to all men (Romans 5:18)
Doctor Illustris - (Adam Marsh) Franciscan scholar (died c
Marisco, Adam de - (Adam Marsh) Franciscan scholar (died c
Marsh, Adam - (Adam Marsh) Franciscan scholar (died c
Illustris, Doctor - (Adam Marsh) Franciscan scholar (died c
Adam de Marisco - (Adam Marsh) Franciscan scholar (died c
Adam de Marsh - (Adam Marsh) Franciscan scholar (died c
Eve - See Adam. The latter teaches that since ‘Adam was first formed, then Eve,’ women must live in quiet subordination to their husbands. that Adam was ‘not deceived,’ in the fundamental manner that Eve was, for ‘the woman being completely deceived has come into [1] transgression
Adam - It is worthy remark, that Christ is also called Adam. (1 Corinthians 15:45) And if we compare what the apostle saith of Christ, (Colossians 1:15) with what is said of Adam, at the creation of the world, (Genesis 1:26) it serves to explain, in what sense we are to limit the expression concerning him, who was formed from the earth as the first man. " Hence we infer, that though the first Adam was indeed the first man, as manifested openly; yet the second Adam, so called, even the Lord from heaven, had a pre-existence in secret, and stood up the Great Head of his body the church, in the counsels of the divine mind, the Wisdom man, from all eternity. " (Genesis 1:26) And if Christ was, and is, as the apostle was commissioned to tell the church, "the image of the invisible God, the first born of every creature," nothing can be plainer than that the first Adam, so called, because indeed he was the first man openly, was created in the image or likeness of Him, who alone can be said to be the image of the invisible God, and in his human nature, "the first born of every creature
Paradise - The name is also applied to thehappy abode of Adam and Eve before the Fall
Adam (2) - Near the present ford Damieh, which possibly is derived from the ancient name Adam; the northern extremity of Israel's passage (Joshua 22:11). Kurn Surtabeh was more than 15 miles from Jericho, which tallies with the words "very far from the city Adam
Enoch - He was the "seventh from Adam" (Jude 1:14 ), as distinguished from the son of Cain, the third from Adam. When he was translated, only Adam, so far as recorded, had as yet died a natural death, and Noah was not yet born
Rib - Genesis 2:21 (c) This probably signifies that the act of becoming a Christian is wholly and entirely from and of GOD as the rib was a part of Adam and was taken out of him. "Salvation is of the Lord" as this rib was "of" Adam. came from CHRIST, is a part of CHRIST, the last Adam, and lives because of His life
Cain - Son of Adam and Eve
Mathusala - A Hebrew patriarch mentioned in the book of Genesis, chapter 5, son of Henoch and great-grandson of Adam
Seth - ” Third son of Adam and Eve born after Cain murdered Abel (Genesis 4:25 ; Genesis 5:3 )
Antitype - Adam, Noe, Moses, David are some of the Old Testament types of Christ
Fall, the - The word "fall" is widely used to refer to what is recorded in Genesis 3 , particularly to what is written of the temptation of Adam and Eve, their being overcome by it, and their immediate reactions after they became aware of the consequences (3:1-8). ...
Since the account includes the role of a speaking serpent in an environment of perfect peace, beauty, and well-being for Adam and Eve, critical scholars have proposed that the account is a myth. Christ came and actually undid what Adam and Eve had done. ...
Adam and Eve had been created as image-bearers of God. Adam and Eve did not question God; they accepted the prohibition. Satan, undoubtedly very envious of Adam and Eve whom God had given the role of vicegerents in the cosmic kingdom, sought to become the sovereign ruler. To do this, he had to gain the submission and service of Adam and Eve. " The added comment revealed Eve's uncertainty about herselfwhat would she do if she came near it and touched it?...
Satan attacked God directly by contradicting him, saying Adam and Eve would not die and that God knew they would become as he was (3:4-5). Eve led Adam to join her, acting with hearts deviated from God's stipulated way of life, service, and peace. ...
The effects of Adam and Eve's unbelief, disobedience, and rejection of God's command not to eat is stated in a seeming euphemistic manner: "Their eyes were opened" and "they realized they were naked. ...
The consequences of Adam and Eve's disobedience, rejection, deviation, and transgression had far-reaching effects. Paul, under the Spirit's inspiration, wrote that through the one man's disobedience the many were made sinners (Romans 5:19 ) and therefore all suffer the consequence of sin: all died in Adam (1 Corinthians 15:22 ). God informed Adam that creation would not respond to his efforts as before. Adam would labor and sweat; thorns would grow. ...
Adam, Eve, and all their posterity's disobedience, rejection, and deviation had a direct consequence on God also. No longer did Adam and Eve hear only words of love and encouragement; they heard reproof, condemnation, and retribution. ...
Fourth, a mitigated curse was pronounced on Adam and the ground. Adam would experience painful toil and sweat as food was cultivated in a thorn- and thistle-infested ground. ...
Fifth, Adam and Eve were also informed that although they could be spiritually restored (delivered from spiritual death), they would experience physical death. ...
Sixth, while the mitigated curse was surely executed, an absolute curse on Adam and Eve and on the natural world would not be. Adam and Eve would continue as covenantal vicegerentsalthough in a weakened condition. ...
God revealed that although his wisdom, love, goodness, integrity, sovereignty, and majesty had been assaulted by Satan and violated by Adam and Eve, in his infinite compassion and with his unsurpassing power and authority he would destroy Satan and his dominion. He would undo the fall by providing full redemption and restoration through the mediatorial work of the seed of the woman, his incarnate Son, Jesus Christ, who would serve as the second Adam. ...
Gerard Van Groningen...
See also Adam ; Eve ; Genesis, Theology of ...
Bibliography
Apron - Genesis 3:7 (c) The fig leaves used by Adam and Eve are called aprons which cover only a part of the body, and are not sufficient for a complete covering. After Adam and Eve made the fig leaf aprons they still hid from GOD knowing that they were still naked in His sight
Seth - Son of Adam and Eve, born after the death of Abel, and father of Enos. " This is immediately followed by "This is the book of the generations of Adam," giving the lineage through Seth and his descendants, and making no mention of Cain and his descendants
Eve - The consort of Adam, and mother of the human race so called by Adam, because she was the mother of all living
Apron - ' When Adam and Eve had sinned they discovered that they were naked, and sewed fig-leaves together and made aprons, Genesis 3:7 ; but were soon conscious that this did not cover their nakedness, for when God called to them they owned that they were naked, and hid behind the trees. God clothed Adam and Eve with coats of skins; it was through death, typical of Christ Himself
Enoch - The seventh from Adam
Seth - Appointed; a substitute, the third son of Adam and Eve (Genesis 4:25 ; 5:3 )
Works, Covenant of - Entered into by God with Adam as the representative of the human race (Compare Genesis 9:11,12 ; 17:1-21 ), so styled because perfect obedience was its condition, thus distinguishing it from the covenant of grace
Tabrets - no sooner wast thou created than, like Adam, thou wast surrounded with tabrets, the emblem of Eden-like joys (Ezekiel 28:13)
Sheth - Son of Adam
Methuselah - Son of Enoch, and the seventh from Adam: he lived 969 years, longer than any other person, and died in the year of the flood
Adam - ADAM. In Luke 3:38 the ancestry of Jesus is traced up to Adam. Luke closes his genealogy with the significant words ‘the son of Adam, the son of God’ (τοῦ Ἀδάμ, τοῦ Θεοῦ). Adam, and therefore all mankind, had a Divine origin. Paul, who in four passages brings Adam and Christ into juxtaposition:...
(a) 1 Corinthians 15:22. The solidarity of mankind in their physical union with Adam involves universal death as a consequence of Adam’s sin. There is a parallelism between Adam and Christ. Adam ‘is a type of him who was to come’ (Romans 5:14), in the sense that his act affected all men. Adam committed a ταράττωμα, a lapse, a false step—commonly termed the Fall. Controversy has raged hotly round this phrase, Augustine and many other writers having understood the relative ω as masculine, and as referring to Adam; so Vulgate in quo. ’ Adam’s fall involved all men in sin, and therefore in death; but this was because all men (in full exercise of their free will) sinned. He feels obliged to explain that, sin being an offence against law, those who lived between Adam and Moses had no law, and thus did not transgress an explicit command as Adam had done. But the fact that death reigned throughout that period only shows that—not the guilt of individuals, but—the transmitted effects of Adam’s sin were at work. The contrast between Adam and Christ is great:—In quality (Romans 3:15). The one representative man, Adam, committed a παράττωμα; but over-against that must be placed the undeserved kindness (χαρις) of God, and the gift of righteousness arising from the kindness of the other representative Man, Jesus Christ. Adam’s fall ushered in a reign of death; Christ’s work ensures that all who have received His kindness and His gift of righteousness shall themselves reign in life. Paul’s writings deal with the practical moral results of union with Adam and Christ respectively. Paul’s statement—‘the last Adam became a life-giving spirit’—finds no exact parallel in the OT, but seems to be based on a reminiscence of Messianic passages which speak of the work of the Divine Spirit, e. Paul adopted the designation of Christ as ‘the last Adam’ and ‘the second Adam’ from Rabbinic theology. But such a comparison between Adam and the Messiah was unknown to the earlier Jewish teachers. ’ There is here an implied contrast with Adam, who took fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil, which God said had made him ‘as one of us’ (Genesis 3:22). In Matthew 19:4-6 || Mark 10:6-8 reference is made by Jesus to the account of Adam and Eve in Genesis 1:27 ‘male and female created he them’ (ἄρσεν καὶ θῆλυ ἐποίησεν αὐτούς). In John 8:44 ἀνθρωποκτόνος may refer to the introduction of death into the world by the fall of Adam. Paul between Adam and Christ may have been the origin of the tradition that Adam was buried under Golgotha. So it came to pass that the second Adam, that is the blood of Christ (a play on אדם and הדם), as it dropped from the Cross, washed away the sins of the buried protoplast,* [6] the first Adam, and thus the words of the apostle were fulfilled,’—quoting Ephesians 5:14. 5) goes farther, stating that Christ’s blood dropped upon Adam’s skull, and restored him to life. —Besides the works cited in the article, the following may be consulted on the relation between Adam and Christ: Sanday-Headlam, Com. ; Tennant, The Sources of the Doctrine of the Fall and Original Sin; Sadler, The Second Adam and the New Birth; Thackeray, The Relation of St
Adam - ADAM. In Luke 3:38 the ancestry of Jesus is traced up to Adam. Luke closes his genealogy with the significant words ‘the son of Adam, the son of God’ (τοῦ Ἀδάμ, τοῦ Θεοῦ). Adam, and therefore all mankind, had a Divine origin. Paul, who in four passages brings Adam and Christ into juxtaposition:...
(a) 1 Corinthians 15:22. The solidarity of mankind in their physical union with Adam involves universal death as a consequence of Adam’s sin. There is a parallelism between Adam and Christ. Adam ‘is a type of him who was to come’ (Romans 5:14), in the sense that his act affected all men. Adam committed a ταράττωμα, a lapse, a false step—commonly termed the Fall. Controversy has raged hotly round this phrase, Augustine and many other writers having understood the relative ω as masculine, and as referring to Adam; so Vulgate in quo. ’ Adam’s fall involved all men in sin, and therefore in death; but this was because all men (in full exercise of their free will) sinned. He feels obliged to explain that, sin being an offence against law, those who lived between Adam and Moses had no law, and thus did not transgress an explicit command as Adam had done. But the fact that death reigned throughout that period only shows that—not the guilt of individuals, but—the transmitted effects of Adam’s sin were at work. The contrast between Adam and Christ is great:—In quality (Romans 3:15). The one representative man, Adam, committed a παράττωμα; but over-against that must be placed the undeserved kindness (χαρις) of God, and the gift of righteousness arising from the kindness of the other representative Man, Jesus Christ. Adam’s fall ushered in a reign of death; Christ’s work ensures that all who have received His kindness and His gift of righteousness shall themselves reign in life. Paul’s writings deal with the practical moral results of union with Adam and Christ respectively. Paul’s statement—‘the last Adam became a life-giving spirit’—finds no exact parallel in the OT, but seems to be based on a reminiscence of Messianic passages which speak of the work of the Divine Spirit, e. Paul adopted the designation of Christ as ‘the last Adam’ and ‘the second Adam’ from Rabbinic theology. But such a comparison between Adam and the Messiah was unknown to the earlier Jewish teachers. ’ There is here an implied contrast with Adam, who took fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil, which God said had made him ‘as one of us’ (Genesis 3:22). In Matthew 19:4-6 || 1618448749_16 reference is made by Jesus to the account of Adam and Eve in Genesis 1:27 ‘male and female created he them’ (ἄρσεν καὶ θῆλυ ἐποίησεν αὐτούς). In John 8:44 ἀνθρωποκτόνος may refer to the introduction of death into the world by the fall of Adam. Paul between Adam and Christ may have been the origin of the tradition that Adam was buried under Golgotha. So it came to pass that the second Adam, that is the blood of Christ (a play on אדם and הדם), as it dropped from the Cross, washed away the sins of the buried protoplast,* [6] the first Adam, and thus the words of the apostle were fulfilled,’—quoting Ephesians 5:14. 5) goes farther, stating that Christ’s blood dropped upon Adam’s skull, and restored him to life. —Besides the works cited in the article, the following may be consulted on the relation between Adam and Christ: Sanday-Headlam, Com. ; Tennant, The Sources of the Doctrine of the Fall and Original Sin; Sadler, The Second Adam and the New Birth; Thackeray, The Relation of St
Kenan - Grandson of Adam, son of Enosh, and father of Mahalaleel (Genesis 5:9-14 ; KJV has Cainan; 1 Chronicles 1:2 )
Puttyroot - Called also Adam-and-Eve
ad'am - It apparently has reference to the ground from which he was formed, which is called in Hebrew Adamah . Adam was created (not born) a perfect man in body and spirit, but as innocent and completely inexperienced as a child. The man Adam was placed in a garden which the Lord God had planted "eastward in Eden," for the purpose of dressing it and keeping it. [1] Adam was permitted to eat of the fruit of every tree in the garden but one, which was called ("the tree of the knowledge of good and evil," because it was the test of Adam's obedience. By it Adam could know good and evil int he divine way, through obedience; thus knowing good by experience in resisting temptation and forming a strong and holy character, while he knew evil only by observation and inference. " While Adam was in the garden of Eden, the beasts of the field and the fowls of the air were brought to him to be named. By the subtlety of the serpent the woman who was given to be with Adam was beguiled into a violation of the one command which had been imposed upon them. Though the curse of Adam's rebellion of necessity fell upon him, yet the very prohibition to eat of the tree of life after his transgression was probably a manifestation of divine mercy, because the greatest malediction of all would have been to have the gift of indestructible life super-added to a state of wretchedness and sin. Adam is stated to have lived 930 years
ad'am - It apparently has reference to the ground from which he was formed, which is called in Hebrew Adamah . Adam was created (not born) a perfect man in body and spirit, but as innocent and completely inexperienced as a child. The man Adam was placed in a garden which the Lord God had planted "eastward in Eden," for the purpose of dressing it and keeping it. [1] Adam was permitted to eat of the fruit of every tree in the garden but one, which was called ("the tree of the knowledge of good and evil," because it was the test of Adam's obedience. By it Adam could know good and evil int he divine way, through obedience; thus knowing good by experience in resisting temptation and forming a strong and holy character, while he knew evil only by observation and inference. " While Adam was in the garden of Eden, the beasts of the field and the fowls of the air were brought to him to be named. By the subtlety of the serpent the woman who was given to be with Adam was beguiled into a violation of the one command which had been imposed upon them. Though the curse of Adam's rebellion of necessity fell upon him, yet the very prohibition to eat of the tree of life after his transgression was probably a manifestation of divine mercy, because the greatest malediction of all would have been to have the gift of indestructible life super-added to a state of wretchedness and sin. Adam is stated to have lived 930 years
ad'am - It apparently has reference to the ground from which he was formed, which is called in Hebrew Adamah . Adam was created (not born) a perfect man in body and spirit, but as innocent and completely inexperienced as a child. The man Adam was placed in a garden which the Lord God had planted "eastward in Eden," for the purpose of dressing it and keeping it. [1] Adam was permitted to eat of the fruit of every tree in the garden but one, which was called ("the tree of the knowledge of good and evil," because it was the test of Adam's obedience. By it Adam could know good and evil int he divine way, through obedience; thus knowing good by experience in resisting temptation and forming a strong and holy character, while he knew evil only by observation and inference. " While Adam was in the garden of Eden, the beasts of the field and the fowls of the air were brought to him to be named. By the subtlety of the serpent the woman who was given to be with Adam was beguiled into a violation of the one command which had been imposed upon them. Though the curse of Adam's rebellion of necessity fell upon him, yet the very prohibition to eat of the tree of life after his transgression was probably a manifestation of divine mercy, because the greatest malediction of all would have been to have the gift of indestructible life super-added to a state of wretchedness and sin. Adam is stated to have lived 930 years
Abel - The second son of Adam and Eve, Abel was a keeper of sheep. But God gave to Adam and Eve another son, Seth, who helped maintain the sort of faith in God that Abel had shown (Genesis 4:25-26)
Mahal'Ale-el -
The fourth in descent from Adam, according to the Sethite genealogy, and son of Cainan
Enos - ” The son of Seth and therefore the grandson of Adam (Genesis 4:26 )
Adam - Adam was made a perfect man-complete in every physical, mental, and spiritual endowment; and placed in the Garden of Eden on probation, holy and happy, but liable to sin. Sovereign grace interposed; a Savior was revealed, and the full execution of the curse stayed; but Adam was banished from Eden and its tree of life, and reduced to a life of painful toil. Adam lived to the age of nine hundred and thirty years, and saw the earth rapidly peopled by his descendants; but "the wickedness of man was great upon the earth. " At the time of his death, Lamech, the father of Noah, was fifty-six years of age; and being in the line of those who "walked with God," had probably heard the early history of the race from the lips of the penitent Adam. Such is the view of the apostle Paul; who everywhere contrasts the death introduced into the world through Adam, with the life which is procured for our race through Jesus Christ, Romans 5:1-21 . ...
The Redeemer is called "the second Adam," 1 Corinthians 15:45 , as being the head of his spiritual seed, and the source of righteousness and life to all believers, as the first Adam was the sorrow of sin and death to all his seed
Tree of Knowledge - ...
The tree of knowledge was Adam and Eve's opportunity to demonstrate obedience and loyalty to God, but the serpent used it to tempt Eve to eat and to become like God “knowing good and evil” (Genesis 3:5 ). When Adam joined Eve in eating the forbidden fruit, the result was shame, guilt, exclusion from the garden, and separation from the tree of life and from God. See Adam and Eve ; Eden ; Tree of Life
Head: Christ - Adam had feet to stand with, but we have lost them by his disobedience; yet glory be to God, we have found a Head, in whom we abide eternally secure, a Head which we shall never lose
Sin, Original - Man has derived an evil nature from Adam, but his sins are his own. Death passed upon all men because of Adam's sin, but all have sinned
Adam (1) - Adam (city)
Adam's Peak - It is a place of pilgrimage of Indian Christians, Brahmins, Buddhists, Chinese, and Mohammedans; the last claim the foot-print to be that of Adam
Original - Primitive pristine as the original perfection of Adam. Original sin, as applied to Adam, was his first act of disobedience in eating the forbidden fruit as applied to his posterity, it is understood to mean either the sin of Adam imputed to his posterity, or that corruption of nature, or total depravity, which has been derived from him in consequence of his apostasy
Onan - Who shall say the numbers which since his days have fallen into it? And who shall calculate the army which by Onanism have hastened the termination of a life of sin, and hurried themselves into eternity! Into how many streams of evil, diffusing themselves into all the parts of our poor fallen nature, hath that one deadly poison the old serpent put into Adam manifested itself through all our passions! Blessed Lord Jesus! what, but for thy gracious recovery of our nature, could have saved the wretched race of Adam from the wrath to come
Adam - , Adam]'>[1] in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them. " Adam was absolutely the first man whom God created. " ...
The first recorded act of Adam was his giving names to the beasts of the field and the fowls of the air, which God brought to him for this end. Adam received her as his wife, and said, "This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man. ...
Being induced by the tempter in the form of a serpent to eat the forbidden fruit, Eve persuaded Adam, and he also did eat. Although we have the names of only three of Adam's sons, viz. ...
Adam and Eve were the progenitors of the whole human race
Admah - It is supposed by some to be the same as the Adam of Joshua 3:16 , the name of which still lingers in Damieh, the ford of Jordan
Prohibit - ) To forbid by authority; to interdict; as, God prohibited Adam from eating of the fruit of a certain tree; we prohibit a person from doing a thing, and also the doing of the thing; as, the law prohibits men from stealing, or it prohibits stealing
Beset - Adam sore beset replied
Patriarchs - This name is given to the ancient fathers, chiefly those who lived before Moses, as Adam, Lamech, Noah, Shem, &c, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, the sons of Jacob, and heads of the tribes
Seth - (Hebrew: appointed) ...
Third son of Adam, born after Abel's murder, hence his name (Genesis 4)
Eve - ) (See Adam. Formed from "one of Adam's ribs," taken by God from Adam in a deep sleep; type of the church formed from the opened side of her Heavenly Bridegroom (from whence flowed blood and water) in the death sleep, so as by faith in His atoning blood, and by the cleansing water of His Holy Spirit, to be "bone of His bone, and flesh of His flesh" (Ephesians 5:25-32; 1 John 5:6). Yet Eve's being made after Adam, and out of him, makes her 'the glory of the man. Her finer susceptibilities and more delicate organization are implied by her being formed, not out of dust as Adam, but of flesh already formed. She was made from Adam's rib, to mark her oneness with him. ...
"This is now (Hebrew this time, as contrasted with the creatures heretofore formed besides Adam) bone of my bones," he exclaims in joyful surprise; and, with the intuitive knowledge wherewith he had named the other creatures according to the? natures, he names her "woman" ('ishah ) as being taken out of "man" ('ish ). " She yielded to his deceits; Adam yielded to conjugal love. So, the woman is sentenced next after Satan, and Adam is sentenced last. In Romans 5:12 Adam is made the transgressor; but there Eve is included, he representing the sinning race as its head. Adam as a believer fitly gives her this name directly after God's promise of life through "the Seed of the woman
Fall - Paul’s belief, it adds force to his argument for woman’s subordination in 1 Timothy 2:14 ‘Adam was not beguiled, but the woman being beguiled hath fallen into transgression. 6, we read: ‘And on this account he [1] conceived designs against Adam; in such a manner he entered [2] and deceived Eve. But he did not touch Adam’ (cf. ...
(d) Man’s present racial condition is traced back to Adam’s fall (παράπτωμα; Wisdom of Solomon 10:1 ‘Wisdom guarded to the end the first formed father of the world, that was created alone, and delivered him out of his own transgression’). The teaching in Romans 5:12-21 is very fully anticipated in 2 Esdras 3:21-22 : ‘For the first Adam bearing a wicked heart transgressed, and was overcome; and not he only, but all they also that are born of him. Thus disease was made permanent; and the law was in the heart of the people along with the wickedness of the root; so the good departed away, and that which was wicked abode still’; 2 Esdras 4:30 ‘For a grain of evil seed was sown in the heart of Adam from the beginning, and how much wickedness hath it brought forth unto this time! and how much shall it yet bring forth until the time of threshing come!’; 7:118 ‘O thou Adam, what hast thou done? for though it was thou that sinned, the evil is not fallen on thee alone, but upon all of us that come of thee. ’ While it is generally assumed that in these passages man’s moral corruption in the sense of inherited depravity is traced to Adam’s transgression as its cause, yet Tennant maintains that the available evidence does not support the view. But the cor malignum is certainly the yezer hara of the Rabbis, regarded by Pseudo-Ezra, as well as by talmudic writers, as inherent in Adam from the first, and as the cause, not the consequence, of his fall. Paul held, even in germ, the doctrine of an inherited corruption derived from Adam’ (op. Paul’s doctrine we must return when dealing with it in detail in the next section; but meanwhile it may be made clear that it is not the assertion of a connexion between Adam’s fall and man’s sinfulness which is denied in these passages, but the inference from them that Adam’s fall is regarded as the cause of moral depravity, and not merely as its first instance. ...
(e) There can be no doubt of the distinctness and emphasis with which Jewish thought insists on man’s individual responsibility, sometimes even, it would seem, in opposition to the view of a moral solidarity of the race, as the following passages show: 2 Esdras 3:26 ‘In all things doing even as Adam and all his generation had done: for they also bare a wicked heart’; 8:59, 60 ‘The Most High willed not that man should come to nought: but they which be created have themselves defiled the name of him that made them, and were unthankful unto him which prepared life for them’; 9:11, 12 ‘As many as have scorned my law, while they had yet liberty, and, when as yet place of repentance was open unto them, understood not, but despised it; the same must know it after death by torment. ’ The strongest assertion of the exclusion of the derivation of any guilt from Adam is found, however, in Apoc. 15, 19: ‘For though Adam first sinned and brought untimely death upon all, yet of those who were born from him each one of them has prepared for his own soul torment to come, and again each of them has chosen for himself glories to come. … Adam is therefore not the cause, save only of his own soul, but each one of us has been the Adam of his own soul’ (Charles’s translation in Apoc. Paul is constant in his assertion of individual liberty, yet he does not think of opposing it to, or trying to harmonize it with, the common sin of the race, sprung from Adam. ...
(f) On the connexion between Adam’s sin and the introduction of death there is no such uncertainty in the evidence. The curse that rests on man since the Fall is mentioned in Sirach 40:1 : ‘Great travail is created for many men, and a heavy yoke is upon the sons of Adam. 3: ‘Adam … brought death and cut off the years of those who were born from him’ (cf. There are two passages, however, that seem to teach that man was by nature mortal, and that the Fall only hastened the process; ‘Adam first sinned and brought untimely death (mortem immaturam) upon all’ (liv. Paul’s letter on the relation of Christ and Adam in Romans 5 and 1 Corinthians 15, which must be discussed in detail, death is connected with sin as its penalty in Romans 6:23 ‘The wages of sin is death,’ and in James 1:15 ‘Sin, when it is fullgrown, bringeth forth death. -Although the classical passage on the subject is Romans 5:12-21, yet there are references to Adam in 1 Corinthians 15:21-22; 1 Corinthians 15:45; 1 Corinthians 15:49 which may be briefly examined in so far as they present doctrine supplementary to that in Romans 5. The contrast is emphasized in 1 Corinthians 15:45 by the description of the first Adam, in accordance with the account of his creation in Genesis 2:7, as living soul, while Christ, the last Adam, is a life-giving spirit. Adam was given life by the breath or spirit of God, but could not impart any; Christ not only has life, but gives it. The psychic order of the first Adam necessarily preceded the pneumatic order of the last (1 Corinthians 15:46): so far there is no moral censure of the first Adam implied, and the Apostle’s statement corrects an error into which theological speculation on man’s primitive condition often fell. Paul the cor malignum, which Jewish thought assigned to Adam. Paul assigned the yezer hara to the unfallen Adam, as, since the reference in the ‘second man from heaven’ is not to the pre-existent Word, but to the Risen Lord, the contrast is between Adam fallen as the source of death to mankind and Christ risen as the fountain of its eternal life. Paul regarded Adam’s position as so inferior morally that the Fall would to him appear as inevitable. As Romans 5:14 shows, he assigns to Adam a greater moral culpability than to his descendants before the Law was given, for he transgressed a definite commandment of God. He assumes as not needing any proof that man’s sinfulness is the result of Adam’s fall. If that be so in the case of Adam, it can be and is so in the case of Christ as the Author of righteousness and life, and even so much more as Christ is superior to Adam. The purpose of the passage is to show that Christ can and does bring more blessing to man than Adam has brought curse. Paul affirms the entrance of sin into the world, and death as its penalty, as the result of Adam’s transgression, and the diffusion of death among mankind in consequence either of Adam’s sin alone, or of the spread of sin among all his descendants. It is improbable that ᾧ is masculine and the antecedent either Adam or death; taking it as neuter, the rendering ‘because’ is more probable than ‘in like manner as’ or ‘in so far as. Firstly, if individual death is the penalty of individual sin, Adam is not responsible for the sin or the death, and so there is no parallelism with Christ as the source of righteousness and life to all; but the purpose of the whole argument is to prove a connexion between Adam and the race similar to that between Christ and redeemed humanity. Paul goes on to show that till the time of Moses, in the absence of law, the descendants of Adam could not be held as blameworthy as Adam himself was; while sin was in the world it could not be imputed as personal guilt, incurring of itself, apart from the connexion with Adam, the penalty of death. ...
(2) Some connexion with Adam must be asserted; but of what kind? An explanation accepted by many commentators, while on grammatical grounds not rendering ἐφʼ ᾧ ‘in whom’ but ‘because,’ yet treats the sentence as convening the equivalent meaning. Bengel presents this view in its classical expression: omnes peccarunt, Adamo peccante. But even if we accept it, what sense are we to attach to the statement that in Adam’s sin all sinned?...
(i. ) Firstly, there is the realistic explanation: that as Adam was the ancestor of the race, so all his descendants were physically included in him, even as Levi is represented to have paid tithes to Melchizedek ‘in the loins’ of Abraham (Hebrews 7:9-10). Adam acted, not for himself alone, but as representative of the race, and so the race shares the responsibility of his act. ) Thirdly, the explanation more generally accepted is that from Adam all mankind has inherited a tendency to evil, which, while not abolishing individual liberty and responsibility so as to make individual transgression inevitable, yet as a fact of experience has resulted in the universal sinfulness of the race. ‘Without expressly stating it, Paul assumes the doctrine of original sin in the sense of an inherited tendency to sin, for what he affirms beyond all doubt here is that both the sin and the death of the human race are the effects of Adam’s transgression’ (p. Referring to Sanday-Headlam’s objection to Bengal’s explanation that the words ‘in Adam’ would have been given had St. ” Indeed, it may be asked whether the idea of inherited sinfulness, as the cause of death to all who come between Adam and Moses, does not call at least as loudly for explicit mention, if St. Paul’s full meaning be expressible in terms of it, as that signified by Bengel’s addition of “in Adam”? Would it not be equally novel to the reader, so far as our knowledge of the thought of that age goes, and more remote from the actual language of the verse and its context?’ (The Fall and Original Sin, p. ) Though he rejects the realistic explanation in any form, either as already mentioned or as presented in Augustine’s theory ‘which makes human nature a certain quantum of being and treats descent from Adam as a division of this mass of human nature into parts’ (Stevens, The Pauline Theology, 1892, p. ), he accepts the following explanation:...
‘Much more probable, in the opinion or the present writer, is the suggestion that, in his identification of the race and Adam, St. These relations, especially the two just specified (that of unregenerate humanity to Adam, and of spiritual humanity to Christ), may be termed mystical in the sense of being unique, vital, and inscrutable; they are real in the sense that sinful humanity is conceived as being actually present and participant in Adam’s sin …” (op. Paul identifies the race, as sinners, with Adam in the same sense that he identifies the believer with Christ. “The moral defilement of man is represented as contracted in and with the sin of Adam” (op. ...
If it be the case that, as Tennant maintains, Jewish thought assigned the cor malignum or the yezer hara to Adam even before his Fall as well as to his descendants, and so did not teach a moral corruption of man’s action of a result of the Fall (see op
Pelagianism - He taught that man's will was and still is free to choose good or evil and there is no inherited sin (through Adam). Every infant born into the world is in the same condition as Adam before the fall and becomes a sinner because he sins
Pelagianism - Pelagius, of whom little is known, began the spread of his false doctrines at Rome, c405 His teachings might be summarized as follows: God did not give Adam immortality, nor did Adam need grace to avoid sin
Kirjath-Arba - The city of Arba, Arba being its founder, or the city of Four—Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Adam having been buried there—is mentioned Genesis 23:2; Genesis 35:27; Joshua 14:15; Joshua 15:13; Joshua 15:54; Joshua 20:7; Joshua 21:11; Judges 1:10; Nehemiah 11:25
Man (First) - 1 Corinthians 15:47 Adam is used in this case under this title as the beginning of the human race so that every person on earth partakes of the characteristics of that first man
Sublapsarians - Those who hold that God permitted the first man to fall into transgression without absolutely predetermining his fall; or that the decree of predestination regards man as fallen, by an abuse of that freedom which Adam had, into a state in which all were to be left to necessary and unavoidable ruin, who were not exempted from it by predestination
Innocent - It was the true state of Adam and Eve before they fell
Kirjath-Arba - , of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Adam, who were all, as they allege, buried there
Permissive Decree - An example of a permissive decree would be the fall of Adam into sin
a'Bel - , breath, vapor, transitoriness , probably so called from the shortness of his life), the second son of Adam, murdered by his brother Cain, ( Genesis 4:1-16 ) he was a keeper or feeder of sheep
a'Bel - , breath, vapor, transitoriness , probably so called from the shortness of his life), the second son of Adam, murdered by his brother Cain, ( Genesis 4:1-16 ) he was a keeper or feeder of sheep
Man - (See Adam; CIVILIZATION; CREATION. ) Hebrew "Αadam ," from a root "ruddy" or fair, a genetic term. Therefore, if Adam had come into the world as a child he could not have lived in it. As Adam's incarnation was the crowning miracle of nature, so Christ's incarnation is the crowning miracle of grace; He represents man before God, as man represents nature, not by ordinary descent but by the extraordinary operation of the Holy Spirit. Not a full grown man as Adam; but, in order to identify Himself with our weakness, a helpless infant
Natural - The natural body is derived from the first Adam, and is our body in so far as it is accommodated to, and limited by, the needs of the animal side of the human nature. Man derives his spiritual life from union with Christ (‘the last Adam’), but his present body is not adapted to the needs of this spiritual existence; hence the distinction made by St
Noah - (a) (2704-1754 BCE) Tenth generation descendent of Adam, he and his immediate family were the only ones to remain righteous when all of humankind descended into a state of anarchy and lawlessness
Eve - See Adam and Eve
Paradise - The garden of Eden, in which Adam and Eve were placed immediately after their creation
Zaretan - Adam, the city by which the upper Jordan waters remained during Israel's passage, was "by the side of Zaretan. Adam means "red earth". (See Adam
Age of Man - From Adam to Noah men lived much longer than in the period that followed. Adam lived 930 years, Noah 950, and Methuselah 969, the longest recorded. God said to Adam "Be fruitful and multiply and replenish the earth
Abel - Second son of Adam, slain by his brother Cain because the latter's oblation was not accepted favorably by God, as Abel's was
Theory - ) The philosophical explanation of phenomena, either physical or moral; as, Lavoisier's theory of combustion; Adam Smith's theory of moral sentiments
Adam in the nt - Adam IN THE NT...
A. In 1 Corinthians 15:44-4750 the ancestry of Jesus is traced up to Adam. The solidarity of mankind in their physical union with Adam, and in their spiritual union with Christ, involves respectively universal death and life as a consequence of Adam’s sin and of Christ’s work. There is a parallelism between Adam and Christ . Both had a universal effect upon mankind in the case of Adam by a transmission of guilt, and therefore of death; the corresponding statement concerning Christ is postponed till Romans 5:19 , because St. Paul intervenes with a parenthesis dealing with those who lived before any specific commands were given in the Mosaic law, and yet who sinned, owing to the transmitted effects of Adam’s fall, and therefore died. Paul deals with the practical moral results of union with Adam and Christ respectively. The second half of his statement ‘the last Adam became a life-giving spirit’ appears to be based on a reminiscence of Messianic passages which speak of the work of the Divine Spirit, e. In Philippians 2:6 there is an implied contrast between ‘Christ Jesus, who … deemed it not a thing to be snatched at to be on an equality with God,’ and Adam, who took fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil, which God said had made him ‘as one of us’ ( Genesis 3:22 )
Justice, Original - The first named gift is strictly supernatural; the others, less strictly supernatural, and more commonly called preternatural gifts, were allied with this to form the rich endowment which Adam was to transmit to all his descendants
Original Justice - The first named gift is strictly supernatural; the others, less strictly supernatural, and more commonly called preternatural gifts, were allied with this to form the rich endowment which Adam was to transmit to all his descendants
Kain - Adam and Eve's son Cain is spelled the same in Hebrew, and many scholars regard Cain as the ancestors of the Kenites
Eve - Her history is so closely connected with that of Adam that the remarks made in the article Genesis 3:20
Creation, the New - This stands in contrast to the first creation ranged under Adam, who was blessed by God, and should have maintained his allegiance to Him. Those who have died with Christ, and have risen with Christ, have lost their standing in the first Adam, and are in the Second man
Abel - The second Son of Adam. In process of time the great difference in the two brothers was manifested by Abel offering to God a slain animal, whilst Cain brought the fruit of own labour from the cursed ground, ignoring the facts that in the fall of Adam life had been forfeited and the ground cursed
Abel - The second Son of Adam. In process of time the great difference in the two brothers was manifested by Abel offering to God a slain animal, whilst Cain brought the fruit of own labour from the cursed ground, ignoring the facts that in the fall of Adam life had been forfeited and the ground cursed
Laurentius (15) - one period from Adam to Christ, the other from Christ to the end of the world. The sin inherited from Adam is in baptism entirely put away through the merits of Christ. Christ the second Adam simply cancelled the sin derived from the first Adam
Enos - Man the son of Seth, and grandson of Adam (Genesis 5:6-11 ; Luke 3:38 )
Seth - The third son of Adam, Genesis 4:25 (J Zaretan - The point of arrest was the "city of Adam beside Zaretan," probably near Succoth, at the mouth of the Jabbok, some 30 miles up the river from where the people were encamped
Methuselah - He lived 243 years with Adam and 600 years with Noah
Condemnation - Without Jesus we stand condemned before God not only because of the sin of Adam (Romans 5:16-18) but also because of our own sin (Matthew 12:37)
Trance - The same word is used in the LXX for the deep sleep of Adam and of Abram
Paradise - ) The garden of Eden, in which Adam and Eve were placed after their creation
Apron - In Genesis 3:7 , the fig leaves sown together by Adam and Eve are called aprons to hide their nakedness
Cain - He was the eldest son of Adam and Eve; he followed the business of agriculture
Trees - The "tree of knowledge of good and evil" bore the forbidden fruit, by eating of which Adam fatally increased his knowledgeof good by its loss, of sin and woe by actual experience, Genesis 2:9,17
Eve - Through the subtlety of the serpent Eve was beguiled into a violation of the one commandment which had been imposed upon her and Adam
Cain - He was the eldest son of Adam and Eve; he followed the business of agriculture
First - Adam was the first man. Adam was first formed, then Eve
Adamah - The earth or cultivated ground from whose dust God formed mankind, forming the wordplay Adam from dust of Adamah
Cain - The first born of Adam and Eve
Imputation - Thus in doctrinal language (1) the sin of Adam is imputed to all his descendants, i
Cain - The first-born of Adam and Eve
Cain - ” The firstborn son of Adam and Eve (Genesis 4:1 )
Downward - In a course of lineal descent from an ancestor, considered as a head as, to trace successive generations downward from Adam or Abraham
Coat - The "coats of skins" prepared by God for Adam and Eve were probably nothing more than aprons (Genesis 3:21 )
Generation - This is the book of the generations of Adam
Cain - The eldest son of Adam and Eve; he tilled the ground as a farmer
Seth - son of Adam and of Eve, was born A
Paarai - There was a tradition among the Rabbins, as it is related by Jerome in his questions on Genesis, that Arbe, the original name of Hebron, was so called because it means four, and Adam, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were buried there
Adam (1) - Adam's naming of the animals in Eden implies that God endued Adam with that power of generalization based on knowledge of their characteristics, whereby he classified those of the same kinds under distinctive appellations, which is the fundamental notion of human language. divine, in that "God brought" the animals "to Adam to see what he would call them," and enabled him to know intuitively their characteristics, and so not at random or with arbitrary appellations, but with such as marked the connection (as all the oldest names did, when truth logical and moral coincided) between the word and the thing, to name them; human, in that Adam, not God, was the name. Adam came into the world a full grown man, with the elements of skill and knowledge sufficient to maintain his lordship over nature. The Second Adam came as an infant by humiliation to regain for man his lost lordship. A third is Genesis 5:1 - 9:29, "the book of the generations of Adam," and especially of Noah. ...
Adam is the generic term for man, including woman (Genesis 1:26-27). So the first Adam, the type, combined both (Genesis 1:27). ...
The Second Adam combined in Himself, as Representative Head of redeemed men and women, both man's and woman's characteristic excellencies, as the first Adam contained both before that Eve was taken out of his side. )...
The dominion which Adam was given as God's vicegerent over the lower world, but lost by sin, is more than regained for man in the person of Christ. The first man Adam was made a "living soul," endowed with an animal soul, the vital principle of his body; but "the last Adam a quickening spirit" (1 Corinthians 15:45). As the animal souled body (1 Corinthians 15:44) is the fruit of our union with Adam, an animal souled man, so the spiritual body is the fruit of our union with Christ, the life-giving Spirit. ...
ArchbishopWhately thought the tree of life acted medicinally, and that Adam and Eve ate of it; and that hence arose his longevity and that of the patriarchs, so that it was long before human life sank to its present average. In the day that he ate he died (Genesis 2:17, compare Hosea 13:1), because separation from God, sin's necessary and immediate consequence, is death; the physical death of Adam was deferred until he was 930. ...
Sin's immediate effects on Adam and Eve, after she in her turn became a seducer, having first been seduced herself (Genesis 3:6 end), were shame (Genesis 3:7), concealment and folly (Genesis 3:8-9; compare Psalm 139), fear (Genesis 3:10), selfishness on Adam's part toward Eve, and presumption in virtually laying the blame on God (Genesis 3:12), the curse, including sorrow, agony, sweat of the brow in tilling the thorny ground, death. The co-extensiveness of sin's curse upon all men as Adam's offspring, and of Christ's redemption for all men (Romans 5:12-21; 1 Corinthians 15:22-47) implies the same
Limbo - Theologians distinguish a two-fold limbo: the limbo of the Fathers (limbus patrum), where the just that died before Christ, were detained until heaven, which had been closed in punishment for the sin of Adam, was reopened by the Saviour; and the limbo of infants (limbus infantium), where those who die in original sin, but without personal mortal sin, are deprived of the happiness which would come to them in the supernatural order, but not of happiness in the natural order
Impeccability - Concupiscence and actual sin flow from original sin which we contract by reason of our carnal descent from Adam, but Christ was conceived miraculously through the operation of the Holy Ghost
Man (Second) - Each of these men, Adam the first, and JESUS the second, began a new race of people
Zarethan - Zarethan is most often identified with the two mounds of tell es-Saidiyah on the east bank of the Jordan about fourteen miles north of Adam (tell ed-Damiyeh)
Covenant Theology - made between God and Adam, and the Covenant of Grace between the Father and the Son where the Father promised to give the Son the elect and the Son must redeem them
Death - When God created Adam and Eve, death was not part of the created order
Altar - Altars are, doubtless, of great antiquity; some suppose they were as early as Adam; but there is no mention made of them till after the flood, when Noah built one, and offered burnt offerings on it
Anti-Sabbatarians - That no command was given to Adam or Noah to keep any Sabbath
Scriptural Patriarchs - Thus of the Semites from Adam to Therah inclusively, there were nineteen patriarchs
Tree of Life - For the biblical writer the tree of life was an important consideration only after Adam and Eve disobeyed. See Adam and Eve ; Eden ; Tree of Knowledge
Eden - The garden of Eden (that is 'delights'), in which dwelt Adam and Eve for the short time before they sinned. Adam was put in the garden to dress and to keep it; but on his fall he was driven out and cherubim were placed to keep the way of the tree of life
Eden - The garden of Eden (that is 'delights'), in which dwelt Adam and Eve for the short time before they sinned. Adam was put in the garden to dress and to keep it; but on his fall he was driven out and cherubim were placed to keep the way of the tree of life
Cain - Cain and Abel are represented as the sons of Adam and Eve. But it is clear that the narrative was at one time independent of Adam and Eve; it presupposes a much later stage in human progress. But in its present form, the connexion of Cain with Adam and Eve suggests the thought of the terrible effects of the Fall: the next generation reaches a deeper degree of guilt; Cain is more hardened than Adam, in that he feels no shame but boldly tries to conceal his guilt; and the punishment is worse Adam was to till the ground with labour, but Cain would not henceforth receive from the earth her strength
Kiriath-Arba - Others point to the nearby cave of Machpelah where, according to Jewish tradition, Adam, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were buried—thus, “city of four
Enosh - The name is poetical, denoting ‘man’; the son of Seth, and grandson of Adam
Apple - In the Bible (Genesis 3) it is identified as the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge eaten by Adam and Eve. ...
In religious symbolism and ecclesiastical art, the apple is used as a decoration on a church; the Infant Christ is represented holding an apple, the fruit of Paradise that became the cause of Adam's fall; it is also (rare) the apple of obedience and of life; Sodom's apple symbolizes sin, or sinful lust
Adam - Josephus thinks that he was called Adam by reason of the reddish colour of the earth out of which he was formed, for Adam in Hebrew signifies red. " The first thing that Adam did after his introduction into paradise, was to give names to all the beasts and birds which presented themselves before him, Genesis 2:19-20 . " And the Lord caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam, and while he slept, he took one of his ribs, "and closed up the flesh instead thereof;" and of that substance which he took from man made he a woman, whom he presented to him. Then said Adam, "This is now bone of my bone, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called woman, because she was taken out of man," Genesis 2:21 , &c. When called to judgment for this transgression before God, Adam attempted to cast the blame upon his wife, and the woman upon the serpent tempter. As their natural passions now became irregular, and their exposure to accidents was great, God made a covering of skins for Adam and for his wife; and expelled them from the garden, to the country without; placing at the east of the garden cherubims and a flaming sword, which turned every way, to keep the way of the tree of life. It is not known how long Adam and his wife continued in paradise: some say, many years; others, not many days; others, not many hours. Adam called his wife's name Eve, which signifies "the mother of all living. The Scriptures notice only three sons of Adam: Cain, Abel, and Seth; and omits daughters; except that Moses tells us, "Adam beast sons and daughters;" no doubt many. ...
Upon this history, so interesting to all Adam's descendants, some remarks may be offered. It is disputed whether the name Adam is derived from red earth. The Persians, however, denominate him Adamah, which signifies, according to Sale, red earth. The manner in which the creation of Adam is narrated indicates something peculiar and eminent in the being to be formed. Adam, at first, did or did not exert this capacity; if he did not, he was not very good, —not good at all. ...
On the degree of moral excellence also in the first man, much license has been given to a warm imagination, and to rhetorical embellishment; and Adam's perfection has sometimes been fixed at an elevation which renders it exceedingly difficult to conceive how he could fall into sin at all. On the other hand, those who either deny or hold very slightly the doctrine of our hereditary depravity, delight to represent Adam as little superior in moral perfection and capability to his descendants. We may not be disposed to allow, with some, that Adam understood the deep philosophy of nature, and could comprehend and explain the sublime mysteries of religion. The whole of this transaction was supernatural; the beasts were "brought" to Adam, and it is probable that he named them under a Divine suggestion. Below this standard it could not fall; and that it implied a glory, and dignity, and moral greatness of a very exalted kind, is made sufficiently apparent from the degree of guilt charged upon Adam when he fell: for the aggravating circumstances of his offence may well be deduced from the tremendous consequences which followed. The salvation of Adam has been disputed; for what reason does not appear, except that the silence of Scripture, as to his after life, has given bold men occasion to obtrude their speculations upon a subject which called for no such expression of opinion. It is another presumption, that as Adam and Eve were clothed with skins of beasts, which could not have been slain for food, these were the skins of their sacrifices; and as the offering of animal sacrifice was an expression of faith in the appointed propitiation, to that refuge we may conclude they resorted, and through its merits were accepted. That Adam was a type of Christ, is plainly affirmed by St. " Hence our Lord is sometimes called, not inaptly, the Second Adam. Adam was formed immediately by God, as was the humanity of Christ. Adam and Christ were each a public person, a federal head to the whole race of mankind; but the one was the fountain of sin and death, the other of righteousness and life. By Adam's transgression "many were made sinners," Romans 5:14-19 . By the imputation of the first Adam's sin, and the communication of his fallen, depraved nature, death reigned over those who had not sinned after the similitude of Adam's transgression; and through the righteousness of the Second Adam, and the communication of a divine nature by the Holy Spirit, favour and grace shall much more abound in Christ's true followers unto eternal life
Bourignonists - She held many extravagant notions, among which, it is said, she asserted that Adam, before the fall, possessed the principles of both sexes; that in an ecstacy, God represented Adam to her mind in his original state; as also the beauty of the first world, and how he had drawn from it the chaos; and that every thing was bright, transparent, and darted forth life and ineffable glory with a number of other wild ideas
Genealogy - The first eight chapters of 1 Chronicles are devoted to genealogical accounts, beginning with Adam, because, as it is stated, "all Israel were reckoned by genealogies. This is the only genealogy given us in the New Testament We have two lists of the human ancestors of Christ: Matthew, writing for Jewish Christians, begins with Abraham; Luke, writing for Gentile Christians, goes back to Adam, the father of all men
Eve - The man, saith the apostle, Adam was first formed, then Eve, (1 Timothy 2:13) Here the man hath the precedency. (Jeremiah 31:22) The man of the earth, therefore, Adam and all his race, shall have no hand in this generation; yea, the womb of the woman only shall be no more than but for the deposit of this Holy Thing
Image - The posterity of Adam were born in his fallen, sinful likeness, Genesis 5:3 ; and as we have borne the image of sinful Adam, so we should be molded into the moral image of the heavenly man Christ, 1 Corinthians 15:47-49 2 Corinthians 3:18
Die - 5:5 records that Adam lived “nine hundred and thirty years: and he died. When Adam and Eve ate of the fruit, both spiritual and physical death came upon Adam and Eve and their descendants (cf
Victor, Claudius Marius - The most notable variation is the introduction of a prayer by Adam on his expulsion from Paradise, which is followed by a strange episode. The serpent is discerned by Eve, who urges Adam to take vengeance on him. In assailing him with stones, a spark is struck from a flint, which sets fire to the wood in which Adam and Eve had taken shelter, and they are threatened with destruction
Adam - Adam . ]'>[3] has ‘Adam. In a few passages, if the text is sound, the writer slips into the use of Adam as a proper name, but only in Genesis 5:3-5 does it stand unmistakably for an individual. ...
On the Babylonian affinities with the story of Adam, see Creation, Eden
Illuminati Bavarian - Name assumed by the members of a secret society founded by Adam Weishaupt (1748-1830) of Bavaria
Antipodes - He must have made it clear that he did not believe in a race of human beings not sprung from Adam
Build - Moses, speaking of the formation of the first woman, says, God built her with the rib of Adam, Genesis 2:22
Adam - Nor does Moses delay long, even upon that, but, after one great and fruitful word upon that, he passes on to take up at more length, in his own wonderful way, and in answerable style, the temptation and the fall of Adam and of all Adam's offspring. All of God's wisdom and power that was expended on this world, and on Adam its possessor and its priest, was all to find its reward and its return in a world replenished with a race of creatures who were to be such partakers of the divine nature that they would live for ever and grow for ever in the love, in the holy fellowship, in the blessed service, and in the full enjoyment of God. That was why God prepared such a home for man as this world in Adam's day was, and still in our day is. And his blessed task was set to Adam in his own heart. But, how it went with Adam and with Eve, and with the Garden of Eden, and with Cain and Abel their children, Moses tells us in his sad history. And thus it is that he dips his pen in such an inkhorn of tears, and describes to us with such sympathy, and in such sad words, that aboriginal mystery of iniquity-the temptation, the fall, and the expulsion of Adam from Eden. My first attempt, therefore, upon any man, to convince him of Adam's fall as the ground of Christ's redemption, should be an attempt to do that for him which affliction, disappointment, sickness, pain, and the approach of death have a natural tendency to do; that is, to convince him of the vanity, poverty, and misery of his life and condition in this world. Now, Death made his first approach to this world in that hour of Adam and Eve's first temptation. O, if Adam had only believed God about sin and death! O, if he had only stopped his ears against the father of lies! O, if he could only have foretasted guilt and remorse and agony of conscience as he was led up to the tree! O, if he could only at that fatal moment have foreseen that coming garden where the Son of God Himself lay among the dark olive-trees recoiling from sin and death in a sweat of blood! O, if he could only have seen spread out before him all the death-beds of all his children on the earth, and all the beds of their second death in hell! O Adam and Eve in Eden, and still under the tree of temptation, look before it is too late; look on through the endless ages at the unutterable woes that you are working! 'Ye shall not eat of it, neither shall ye touch it, lest ye die. For it is just those two men, Adam and Christ, with their sin and their righteousness, that so stumble and so throw out our evolutionists; and it is in his handling of those two men, and of that which we have of those two men alone, that Paul shows his matchless philosophic power. And Paul is in the very heat and at the very heart of one of his greatest chapters on Jesus Christ, and on the atonement that we sinners of mankind have received through Jesus Christ, when, if I may say so, the very sweep and grasp of Paul's mind, the very philosophical necessity of Paul's great intellect, all compel him to go back and take up Adam into his great argument and great gospel. ' To Paul's so comprehensive mind, so far-sweeping imagination, and so righteousness-hungry heart, Adam and Christ are the two poles upon whom this whole world of human life revolves. As the best expositor of Paul I know of anywhere says, Adam and Jesus Christ, to Paul's heaven-soaring eye, stand out before God with all other men 'hanging at their girdles. ...
And then, just as the full truth about the atonement led the apostle back from Christ to Adam, so in another epistle of his, the resurrection of Christ, and the resurrection of all those who have fallen asleep in Christ, leads Paul back again to Adam in this way. For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive. And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam was made a quickening spirit. ' The 'second man' and the 'last Adam' are most happy names and most illustrious titles of Paul's bold invention for his Master, our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. Which glorious Man is called the Second Adam, says Theophilus, as having in His regeneration that very perfection which the first Adam had in his creation. And because He is to do all that for us by a birth of grace, which we should have had by a birth of nature from Adam, had he kept his first estate of sinless perfection. O loving wisdom of our God!When all was sin and shame,A second Adam to the fightAnd to the rescue came
Jabal - Adam "dressed and kept" the garden of Eden, and his sons must have learned from him some of his knowledge
Father - Adam was the father of the human race
Image - " (Hebrews 1:3) So this is the very person in whose likeness, Adam the first open man, was created and made; "Let us make man in our image, after our likeness
Moseroth - What a thought! If the ashes of Adam, or Aaron, or any, or all of the patriarchs were to arise this hour, their bodies would be all alike unconscious whether they had slept a single night, or several thousand years
Sin - ...
Origin of sin...
From the activity of Satan in the Garden of Eden, it is clear that sin was present in the universe before Adam and Eve sinned. ...
Ever since Adam’s sin, the human story is one of people running from God, loving themselves instead of God, and doing their will instead of God’s (Romans 1:19-23). God, however, has not left sinners in this helpless condition, but through the one fully obedient human being, Jesus Christ, has reversed the effects of Adam’s sin (Romans 5:6; Romans 5:8; Romans 5:15; Romans 5:18). ...
All sinned in Adam (‘Original sin’)...
In Romans 5:12-21 the whole human race is viewed as having existed originally in Adam, and therefore as having sinned originally in Adam (Romans 5:12; cf. Adam is humankind; but because of his sin he is humankind separated from God and under his condemnation. ...
Because of Adam’s sin (his ‘one act of disobedience’) the penalty of sin, death, passes on to all people; but because of Christ’s death on the cross (his ‘one act of obedience’) the free gift of God, life, is available to all people. Adam, by his sin, brings condemnation; Christ, by his death, brings justification (Romans 5:17-20; Romans 6:23; 1 Corinthians 6:9-11). ...
Just as Adam is the representative head of humankind as sinful and separated from God, so Jesus Christ is the representative head of humankind as declared righteous and brought back to God. All who die, die because of their union with Adam; all who are made alive, are made alive because of their union with Christ (Romans 5:16; 1 Corinthians 15:22). ...
Human nature is corrupt (‘Total depravity’)...
In addition to being sinners because of their union with Adam, people are sinners because of what they themselves do. They are born with a sinful nature inherited from Adam, and the fruits of this sinful nature are sinful thoughts and actions (Psalms 51:5; John 3:6; Acts 17:26)
Name - ...
Finally, the name Adam [ Genesis 3:9 ), becomes universalized in Jesus, the second Adam, through whom his redemptive pursuit of the entire race is consummated (Hebrews 1:1-2 ; cf
Testament, New - In the latitude wherein the term is used in holy writ, the command under the sanction of death, which God gave to Adam, may, with sufficient propriety, be termed a Covenant; but it is never so called in Scripture; and when mention is made of the two covenants, the old and the new, or the first and the second, there appears to be no reference to any thing that related to Adam
Genesis - It contains an account of the creation; the primeval state and fall of man; the history of Adam and his descendants, with the progress of religion and the origin of the arts; the genealogies age, and death of the patriarchs until Noah; the general defection and corruption of mankind, the general deluge, and the preservation of Noah and his family in the ark; the history of Noah and his family subsequent to the time of the deluge; the repeopling and division of the earth among the sons of Noah; the building of Babel, the confusion of tongues, and the dispersion of mankind; the lives of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph. " Yet many of the facts it records must have been of the facts it records must have been well known among the Jews; the account given by Adam himself may have been verbally transmitted through seven of the patriarchs to Moses, and he may also have had ancient historical writings to consult
Lilith - In the Talmud she is associated with the legends of Adam, whose wife she was before Eve was created, and so became the mother of the demons
Adamites - Epiphanius tells us, that they were called Adamites, from their pretending to be re-established in the state of innocence, such as Adam was at the moment of his creation, whence they ought to imitate him in going naked
Clean - Solomon demands, (Proverbs 20:9) "Who can say, I have made my heart clean, I am pure from my sin?" None among the sons of Adam can lay claim to this cleanness, much less, that any have made themselves so
Enoch - "The seventh from Adam," and the father of Methuselah; eminent as a patriarch who lived near to God, through faith in a Redeemer to come, Hebrews 11:5,13
Golgotha - (3) That the name is due to an ancient, and probably pre-Christian, tradition that the skull of Adam was found there. , and its survival to-day is marked by the skull shown in the Chapel of Adam under the ‘Calvary’ in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. (4) There is the highly improbable theory that the legend of the skull of Adam, and even the name Golgotha, really have their origin in the capitolium of Ælia Capitolina, which stood on the site now covered by the Church of the Sepulchre
Adam - Adam (ăd'am), red, red earth. Adam's lamentable fall is next related. By sin Adam lost his best prerogative. To his posterity he transmitted, therefore, a corrupted nature, which could be restored and recovered only by the power of the second Adam, a head of life and blessedness to all that believe in him. Of Adam's subsequent history we know little
Land, Ground - There is a play on words in the Hebrew text here: Adam (the Hebrew word for “humankind”) was made from Adamah (the Hebrew word for “ground”). Every beast and every bird was also formed from the ground ( Genesis 2:19 )...
After sin entered the Garden of Eden, God described death in terms of the basic elements from which Adam was created: Adam would work and eat “til thou return unto the ground; (for out of it wast thou taken; for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return” (Genesis 3:19 ). After the fall (Genesis 3:1 ), God sent Adam and Eve away from the garden. Adam was to till the ground from which he was taken (Genesis 3:23 ). Cain, the firstborn son of Adam and Eve, became a tiller of the ground (Genesis 4:2-10 )
Face - Means simply presence, as when it is recorded that Adam and Eve hid themselves from the "face [1] of the Lord God" (Genesis 3:8 ; Compare Exodus 33:14,15 , where the same Hebrew word is rendered "presence")
Sin - But the truth is, that sin doth not consist in this, or in that act of it, for the acts of sin are but the branches; the root is within: so that strictly and properly speaking, in the fallen and corrupt nature of man, sin itself is alike in every son and daughter of Adam
From - , are regarded as setting out or beginning; also, less frequently, the source, the cause, the occasion, out of which anything proceeds; - the aritithesis and correlative of to; as, it, is one hundred miles from Boston to Springfield; he took his sword from his side; light proceeds from the sun; separate the coarse wool from the fine; men have all sprung from Adam, and often go from good to bad, and from bad to worse; the merit of an action depends on the principle from which it proceeds; men judge of facts from personal knowledge, or from testimony
Eden - The home of Adam and Eve before their fell
Jehovah - We have reason to believe that God himself, who named man Adam, named himself Genesis 17:1 26:11 ; or, "I am Jehovah, the God of Abraham," etc
Where - Adam, where art thou? Genesis 3
Grace - Before the fall Adam received grace directly from God, without reference to the Saviour of mankind; and so did the angels whilst they were oh probation. But now we, the children of the fallen Adam, receive grace only through Christ Our Lord
Eve - (Εὔα)...
Eve was (according to J, Genesis 3:20; Genesis 4:1) the wife of Adam (q. Paul recalls the story of her fall as a warning to his young and attractive, but weak and unstable, Corinthian Church, As God presented Eve, a pure virgin, to Adam, so St
Man - Adam , 'man,' a generic term for man, mankind. ...
Man was God's crowning work of creation (see Adam),and He set him in dominion over the sphere in which he was placed. God breathed into Adam's nostrils the breath of life, and man is responsible to Him as his Creator; and for this reason he will be called to account, which is not the case with any of the animals. All have descended from Adam and Eve: God "hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth, and hath determined the times before appointed, and the bounds of their habitation; that they should seek the Lord [6]
Abel - The second son of Adam and Eve
Leaf, Leaves - Adam and Eve made their first clothes from leaves (Genesis 3:7 )
Man - 'Adam, used as the proper name of the first man. The name is derived from a word meaning "to be red," and thus the first man was called Adam because he was formed from the red earth
Abel - ]'>[1] ‘vanity’), which is suggestive as the name of a son of Adam (‘man’). ’ Abel was a son of Adam and Eve, and brother of Cain
Age, - From 'Adam to Moses' excluding both, is an epoch when men's sins could not be classed as transgressions, seeing there was no definite law such as was given to Adam, or such as was administered by Moses
Infant Baptism - It ishenceforth not only a child of Adam, but also a child, or member ofthe second Adam, Jesus our Lord
Fall - The traditional name for the first sin of Adam and Eve which brought judgment upon both nature and mankind. Three features are crucial for understanding the human role in the garden: (1) Adam was put in the garden to “dress it and to keep it” (Matthew 2:15 ). The tree reminded Adam and Eve that their freedom was not absolute but had to be exercised in dependence upon God. Adam may have passed on this information that he initially received prior to woman's creation (Genesis 2:17-18 ). She ate of the fruit and gave it to Adam who ate as well. Adam admitted that God's presence now provoked fear, and human shame provoked hiding (Genesis 3:10 ). ...
Adam's punishment also involved the frustration of his service. The...
earth was apparently cursed because it was within Adam's domain. ...
Yahweh acknowledged the partial truth of the serpent's claim: Adam's and Eve's autonomy had made them like the divine (Genesis 3:5 ,Genesis 3:5,3:22 ). When comparing Adam and Christ, Paul declared that sin and death gained entrance into the world through Adam and that sin and death are now common to all people (Romans 5:12 ; Romans 6:23 ). Adam may be pictured as a representative of mankind, all of whom share in his penalty (Romans 5:19 )
Fall - When Adam came out of the hands of his gracious Creator, we are told, that he was created in the image of God. " Now from hence it plainly appears that Christ as Christ, that is, God and man in one person, had a priority of existence to every other, and was, and is, he image of the invisible JEHOVAH, in whose likeness Adam, the first man, was made. This image then of the invisible God was the Person in whose likeness, it should seem, Adam, the first man of the earth, was formed. The holiness of Adam was but the holiness of the creature, peaceable, capable of being lost; and was lost
Fall of Man - In addition to what is stated on this subject under the article Adam, it may be necessary to establish the literal sense of the account given of man's fall in the book of Genesis. This account is, that a garden having been planted by the Creator, for the use of man, he was placed in it, "to dress it, and to keep it;"—that in this garden two trees were specially distinguished, one as "the tree of life," the other as: "the tree of the knowledge of good and evil;"—that from eating of the latter Adam was restrained by positive interdict, and by the penalty, "In the day thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die;"—that the serpent, who was more subtle that any beast of the field, tempted the woman to eat, by denying that death would be the consequence, and by assuring her, that her eyes and her husband's eyes "would be opened," and that they would "be as gods, knowing good and evil;"—that the woman took of the fruit, gave of it to her husband, who also ate;—that for this act of disobedience they were expelled from the garden, made subject to death, and laid under other maledictions. The other indisputable fact to which I just now adverted, as establishing the literal sense of the history, is that, as such, it is referred to and reasoned upon in various parts of Scripture: "Knowest thou not this of old, since man (Adam) was placed upon earth, that the triumphing of the wicked is short, and the joy of the hypocrite but for a moment?" Job 20:4-5 . " "If I...
covered my transgressions as Adam, by hiding mine iniquity in my bosom,"...
Job 31:33 . Magee renders the verse,...
"Did I cover, like Adam, my transgression, By hiding in a lurking place mine iniquity?" ...
and adds, "I agree with Peters, that this contains a reference to the history of the first man and his endeavours to hide himself after his transgression. ) That the intimacy and indissolubility of the marriage relation rests upon the formation of the woman from the man; for our Lord quotes the words in Genesis, where the obligation of man to cleave to his wife is immediately connected with that circumstance: "And Adam said, This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called woman, because she was taken out of man. "In Adam," says the Apostle Paul, "all die;" "by one man sin entered into the world. Paul repeats in 1 Timothy 2:13-14 : "Adam was first formed, then Eve. And Adam was not deceived," first or immediately, "but the woman being deceived was in the transgression. The effect of the sin or lapse of Adam was to bring him under the wrath of God; to render him liable to pain, disease, and death; to deprive him of primeval holiness; to separate him from communion with God, and that spiritual life which was before imparted by God, and on which his holiness alone depended, from the loss of which a total moral disorder and depravation of his soul resulted; and finally to render him liable to everlasting misery. For the effect of the fall of Adam upon his posterity, See JUSTIFICATION
Eve - All four passages in the Bible that contain the name "Eve" refer to the wife of the original man, Adam (see 5:11-15 ; 4:1 ; 2Col 11:3; 1 Timothy 2:13 ). ...
Genesis 3:20 describes Adam assigning his wife the name, Eve, "because she would become the mother of all the living. " Adam's comment reinforces the idea that all of humanity constitutes a family, a family for which the unsavory consequences of human transgression and the possibility of human redemption are a common heritage. ...
In the New Testament, Eve is remembered for being created after Adam and for being deceived. " The theme of Eve's deception is also present in 1 Timothy 2:14 following the mention of her creation after Adam (v. Hiebert...
See also Adam ; Fall, the ; Head, Headship ; Woman ...
Bibliography
Paradise - The principal references for our period occur in the Apocalypse of Moses, more correctly known as the Books of Adam and Eve, in 4 Ezra , 2 Baruch; there is also one reference in the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs (‘Levi,’ xviii. ...
The most important passages in the Books of Adam and Eve and the parallel Apocalypse of Moses are: Ad. 5: ‘Christ, descending on earth shall lead thy father Adam to Paradise to the tree of mercy’ (this passage is an interpolation from the Christian apocryphal Gospel of Nicodemus); Apoc. ; here Paradise in the third heaven is contrasted with Paradise on earth where Adam’s body is lying (xxxviii. While there is apparently some confusion of thought, the central idea is that, in the Resurrection, Adam will be restored to Paradise, and that meanwhile his spirit (apparently) is in the heavenly Paradise, in the third heaven. -Thus we find the background of the conceptions which appear in the three passages in which the word occurs in the NT-...
(1) In Luke 23:43, as in the Books of Adam and Eve, Paradise is conceived of as a place of intermediate abode, though whether in heaven or in Sheol is not clear
Abel - The second son of Adam and Eve
Paradise - The garden of Eden, in which Adam and Eve were placed
Cain - The first son of Adam and Eve
Family - The whole human race are the family of Adam, the human family
Cain - The first son of Adam and Eve
Act - " The contrast is between the one trespass by Adam and the one act of Christ in His atoning Death
Enoch - Death is one of the evil consequences of human sin, and the genealogical record of the generations from Adam to Noah is characterized by repetition of the word ‘death’ (Genesis 5:5; Genesis 5:8; Genesis 5:11; Genesis 5:14; Genesis 5:17; Genesis 5:20)
Paul as an Evangelical Mystic - Our first mystical Head was Adam, and our second mystical Head is Christ. Speaking mystically, says the most mystical of the Puritans, there are only two Men who stand before God; the first and the second Adam; and these two public Men have all us private men hanging at their great girdles. But, all the time, above Adam, and before Adam, and only waiting till Adam had shipwrecked his headship and all who were in it with him, stood the second Adam ready to restore that He had not taken away. I,-you and I,-have in our hearts the very same life that was in Adam, with all its deadly infection and dreadful pollution; but, identified with Adam as we are, Adam does not really and actually dwell in our hearts. We still inherit the "fair patrimony" that he left us; but, I for one, both hope and believe, that Adam has escaped that patrimony himself. At any rate, wherever Adam dwells, he does not dwell in our hearts. But the second Adam is so constituted for us, and we are so constituted for Him, that He, in the most real and actual manner, and without any figure of speech whatever, dwells in us. Paul, and you, and I, hung, originally, and in the beginning, at Adam's mystical girdle, and we have all had to take the consequences of that mystical suspension. But now we have all been loosened off from Adam, and have been united close and inseparably to Christ
Enoch - Chăn ôk ) is the ‘seventh from Adam’ ( Judges 1:14 ) in the Sethite genealogy of Genesis 5:1-32 (see Genesis 5:18-24 ). he is the son of Cain, and therefore the third from Adam
Generation - " 5:1, "The book of the generations," means a family register, or history of Adam 37:2, "The generations of Jacob" = the history of Jacob and his descendants 7:1, "In this generation" = in this age
Generation - Beside the common acceptation of this word, as signifying descent, it is used for the history and genealogy of any individual, as "The book of the generations of Adam," Genesis 5:1 , the history of Adam's creation, and of his posterity
Paradise - ...
The Septuagint uses the word Paradise when speaking of the Garden of Eden, in which the Lord placed Adam and Eve
e'Noch - ) In the Epistle of Jude ( Jude 1:14 ) he described as "the seventh from Adam;" and the number is probably noticed as conveying the idea of divine completion and rest, while Enoch was himself a type of perfected humanity
Patriarch - In common usage the title of patriarch is assigned especially to those whose lives are recorded in Scripture previous to the time of Moses, as Adam, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob
Body - When God created Adam and Eve, he provided them with physical bodies (Genesis 2:7,22 ). Prior to the fall, Adam and Eve enjoyed perfect fellowship with God, and that fellowship was experienced in the body (Genesis 1:27-31 ). For example, the sin of Adam and Eve not only affected their spiritual status before God, but had physical consequences as well. Just as the fall of Adam brought a curse on the earth, the resurrection of the body has consequences of cosmic proportions
Image - ...
The story of Adam and Eve shows something of the dignity and responsibility that God gave them (and all human beings through them) as being in God’s image. ...
The perfect man...
In contrast with Adam and Eve, Jesus shows what people in God’s image should really be. ...
By his life, death and resurrection, Jesus undid the evil consequences of Adam and Eve’s disobedience (1618448749_9). Adam and Eve were made in the image of God and passed on that character to the human race that is descended from them
Flesh - ...
Relationship Adam said of Eve's creation that she is the “bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh” (Genesis 2:23 ; compare Genesis 29:14 ) denoting a kinship between the two, thus Adam and Eve were regarded as one flesh (Romans 6:15-23 ; Matthew 19:5 ; 1 Corinthians 6:16 ; Ephesians 5:31 ). Adam and Eve were created as fleshly human beings. Because of the limited perspective and the weakness of the flesh, Adam and Eve accepted Satan's lie. This does not imply that flesh is automatically sinful, but its history in Adam shows the weakness of flesh and its strong tendency to yield to the commands of sin
Image of God - Later, in Genesis 5:1-3 , after God's image-bearers had sinned against him, the language of Genesis 1:26-27 is repeated as a prelude to a list of Adam's posterity. Significantly, this passage links God's original creation of humans in his likeness with the subsequent human procreation of children in Adam's image and likeness. ...
Sadly, the pristine beauty and harmony of this original created order were shattered by the rebellion of Adam and Eve, and the record in Genesis 3 as well as the history of human cultures show how alienation between humans and God, humans and other humans, and humans and nature quickly became the normal state of affairs. As the first Adam failed the satanic test, the second Adam passed with flying colors (Matthew 4:1-11 ). Jesus did not forsake God as did Adam, but as the sin-bearer Jesus was forsaken by God (Matthew 27:46 ) so that he might restore his people to harmonious relationships to God, neighbor, and nature. Jesus' work of redemption is both compared and contrasted to Adam's work of rebellion (Romans 5:12-21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:22 ). Turner...
See also Adam ; Eve ; Fall, the ; Person, Personhood ; Salvation ; Sin ...
Bibliography
Earth - A distinct term expresses the material of which the earth consists damaah , the "ground," "soil," from whence Adam was named (Genesis 2:7), his body coming from and returning to the earth (Genesis 3:19), a different word "dust" (Job 10:9; Ecclesiastes 12:7)
Fig, Fig-Tree - It was one of the trees in the garden of Eden, of the leaves of which Adam and Eve made aprons
Abel - The second son of Adam and Eve may have been a twin because Genesis 4:2 literally reads, “And she continued to bear his brother Abel
Garden, Gardener - Genesis 3:19 ; Song of Solomon 1:6 ; and in Eden, before the curse, Adam was placed in the garden 'to dress it and to keep it
Following - 4:25: “And Adam [1] his wife again; and she bare a son, and called his name Seth: For God, said she, hath appointed me another seed instead of Abel
New Man - 'The new man' stands in contrast to 'the old man,' which represents the corrupt state by nature of the children of the first man Adam
Noah - In the genealogy of Jesus (Luke 3:36) he appears in the ninth generation after Adam, as in the OT narrative
Brass - This is spoken of as known prior to the flood; and to have been discovered, or at least wrought, as was also iron, in the seventh generation from Adam, by Tubal-cain: whence the name Vulcan
Cain - Eldest of Adam and Eve’s family, Cain was a crop farmer
Noah - In the genealogy of Jesus (Luke 3:36) he appears in the ninth generation after Adam, as in the OT narrative
Fable - ) is the oldest in existence; the Hebrew mind had a special power of perceiving analogies to man in the lower world; this power is a relic of the primeval intuition given to Adam by God who "brought every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air, unto Adam to see what he would call them
Fear - Since the fall of man, the whole race of Adam have known the effects both of natural and sinful fear; none but the regenerated are acquainted with what is known in Scripture by a religious, or holy fear. ...
Natural and slavish fear, arising from a conscious sense of sin, manifested itself immediately upon the fall, when Adam sought to hide himself from the presence of the Lord amidst the trees of the garden
Sin - Created in God's image, Adam and Eve are good but immature, fine but breakable, like glass dishes. Satan uses a serpent to tempt Eve and Adam, first to question God, then to rebel against him. Will Adam and Eve heed their impressions or God's instructions? Will they listen to a creature or the Creator? Will they serve God or themselves? Who will judge what is right, God or humans? Who will see to the results? Ultimately, by taking the position of arbiter between the conflicting counsel of God and the serpent, Eve and Adam have already elevated themselves over God and rebelled against him. Why would the first couple, sinless and without inclination toward sin, choose to rebel? Why would any creature presume to know more or know better than its creator?...
Adam and Eve become sinners by a historical act. Alienation from God lead Adam and Eve to fear and flee from him. Adam Acts out all three alienations at once when, in response to God's questions, he excuses himself by blaming both Eve and God for his sin: "The woman you put here with me—she gave me some fruit" (3:12). Adam and Eve seek new freedoms and dignity, but sin robs them of what they have; seeking advantage, they experience great losses. ...
Genesis and Romans teach that Adam and Eve did not sin for themselves alone, but, from their privileged position as the first, originally sinless couple, act as representatives for the human race. Every child of Adam enters a race marked by sin, condemnation, and death (Romans 5:12-21 ). Whereas Satan prompted Adam and Eve to sin, God himself cannot talk Cain out of it (Genesis 3:1-5 ; 4:6 ). While sin was external to Adam and Eve, it appears to spring up spontaneously from within Cain; it is a wild force in him, which he ought to master lest it devour him (4:7). Similarly, when Satan tempted Jesus, the second Adam, he offered things good in themselves: food, knowledge, and rule over the kingdoms of the earth. Why would Adam and Eve, well-cared-for and without propensity toward sin, rebel against God? Why would a creature want to rebel against the Creator? The prophets find Israel's rebellion absurd; even animals know better
Patriarch - This name is generally applied to the progenitors of families or "heads of the fathers" (Joshua 14:1 ) mentioned in Scripture, and they are spoken of as antediluvian (from Adam to Noah) and post-diluvian (from Noah to Jacob) patriachs
Eve - Life; living, the name given by Adam to his wife (Genesis 3:20 ; 4:1 )
Sarah - Whyte, Bible Characters: Adam to Achan, 1896; R
Descent - No man is a thousand descents from Adam
Alive - All who belong to Adam are dead in trespasses and sins
Behind - ” 'Achar may be a conjunction, “after,” with a temporal emphasis: “And the days of Adam after he had begotten Seth were eight hundred years …” ( Eneral - ) Having a relation to all; common to the whole; as, Adam, our general sire
Infants - On these principles, the death of Christ saves more than the fall of Adam lost
Son of God - The title was applied to Adam, who had no human father
Generation - Besides the common acceptation of this word, as signifying race, descent, lineage, it is used for the history and genealogy of a person, as in Genesis 5:1 , "the book of the generations of Adam," that is, the history of Adam's creation and of his posterity
Chronology - for the antediluvian patriarchs would place the creation of Adam 2262 years before the end of the flood or B
Father - He deceived Eve and Adam; he introduced sin and falsehood; he inspires his followers with his spirit and sentiments. Adam is the first father, the father of the living; Abraham is the father of the faithful, the father of the circumcision; called also the "father of many nations," because many people sprung from him; as the Jews, Ishmaelites, Arabs, &c
Song of Solomon, Theology of - Since Adam had no suitable partner, God created Eve, and the man and the woman stood naked in the garden and felt no shame (Genesis 2:25 ), exulting in one another's "flesh" (Genesis 2:23-24 ). Eve, then Adam, rebelled against God and a horrible distance grew between the sinful human race and their holy God. Now Adam and Eve were naked and they felt shame and fled from one another (Genesis 3:7,10 ). The sin of Adam and Eve was not a specifically sexual sin, but the alienation that resulted from the sin is recounted in sexual terms
Genesis - , Adam (1-3), Noah (4-9), Abraham ((10-25:18),), Isaac ((25:19-35:29),), and Jacob (36-50)
Human Race - As regards the first, faith clearly teaches that all men are descended from one pair, Adam and Eve
Bosom - If I covered my transgressions as Adam, by hiding my iniquity in my bosom
Paradise - In Eden Adam and Eve lived solitary, exhibiting the perfection of the individual
Work, Theology of - Adam and Eve were given a situation that needed tending. As He expelled them from the garden, God told Adam and Eve they would have to labor hard to carve out a living
Fall of Man - The record of Adam's temptation and fall must be taken as a true historical account, if we are to understand the Bible at all as a revelation of God's purpose of mercy. The state therefore to which Adam was reduced by his disobedience, so far as his subjective condition is concerned, was analogous to that of the fallen angels. , liability to punishment, of that sin comes by imputation upon all men, because all were represented by Adam in the covenant of works (q
Garden - ...
Important Gardens The garden of Eden (Genesis 2:8 ; Genesis 3:23-24 ) was planted by God (Genesis 2:8 ) and entrusted to Adam for cultivating and keeping (Genesis 2:15 ). Following their sin, Adam and Eve were banished from the garden; but “Eden the garden of God” (Ezekiel 28:13 ) continued as a symbol of blessing and bounty (Ezekiel 36:35 ; Joel 2:3 )
Conscience - This resulted from the fall of Adam. ' This agrees with what God said of Adam after the fall, "Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil
Law - God gave a commandment (or law) to Adam, which made Adam's subsequent sin to be transgression. Where there is no law there is no transgression (Romans 4:15 ), though there may be sin, as there was from Adam to Moses: "until the law sin was in the world, but sin is not imputed [1] when there is no law. Men sinned, and death reigned, though they "had not sinned after the similitude of Adam's transgression" (Romans 5:14 ), for no definite law had been given to them
Voice - ...
The word can also represent the thing that is spoken: “And unto Adam he said, Because thou hast hearkened unto the voice of thy wife, and hast eaten of the tree of which I commanded thee …” ( Adam and Eve hear in the garden? Was it the sound of God walking (cf
Sin - ...
Adam's sin (Genesis 3:1-6 ) consisted in his yielding to the assaults of temptation and eating the forbidden fruit. " Adam was constituted by God the federal head and representative of all his posterity, as he was also their natural head, and therefore when he fell they fell with him (Romans 5:12-21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:22-45 ). Because of Adam's first sin all his posterity came into the world in a state of sin and condemnation, i. , (1) a state of moral corruption, and (2) of guilt, as having judicially imputed to them the guilt of Adam's first sin. ...
"Original sin" is frequently and properly used to denote only the moral corruption of their whole nature inherited by all men from Adam. It is a total depravity, and it is also universally inherited by all the natural descendants of Adam (Romans 3:10-23 ; 5:12-21 ; 8:7 )
Marriage - This is God's institution: He said it was not good that man should be alone, and He provided a suitable help for Adam in the person of Eve. Adam said, "This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman (isha ), because she was taken out of Man (ish ). This order was first broken through by Lamech, the sixth from Adam, who had two wives
Genesis - The first eleven chapters describe the creation of things, the history of Adam, the deluge, and the confusion of tongues at Babel
Natural, Naturally - " ...
A — 2: ψυχικός (Strong's #5591 — Adjective — psuchikos — psoo-khee-kos' ) "belonging to the psuche, soul" (as the lower part of the immaterial in man), "natural, physical," describes the man in Adam and what pertains to him (set in contrast to pneumatikos, "spiritual"), 1 Corinthians 2:14 ; 15:44 (twice),46 (in the latter used as a noun); James 3:15 , "sensual" (RV marg
Type - Thus Adam and Melchizedek, the prophetic and the priestly office, manna and the brazen serpent, the smitten rock and the passage over Jordan, the Passover and the Day of Atonement, Canaan and the cities of refuge are scriptural types of Christ
Beasts - They were all brought to Adam to be named
Fall (2) - Our attention will here be confined to those points in which the Fall comes into more direct relation with the work of Christ, or in which the fall of man in Adam and his restoration in Christ serve to illuminate each other. The general and clear line of argument in the former passage brings out the following points:...
Adam’s act of disobedience involved all men in (a) Sin, and (b) Death. This latter, however, is not to be held in any sense as personal participation in or responsibility for Adam’s offence, though it is the transmitted effect of it (see below). ...
Another question raised in this connexion is concerned with the precise moral relationship between Adam and his posterity on the one hand, and between Christ and His people on the other. Adam and Christ (‘the second Adam’) are represented as standing in an analogous relation to mankind, forming the basis in the one case of universal sin and death, and in the other of restoration for believers. In regard to Adam it has been variously held (1) that the relation between him and his posterity was virtually one of identity; mankind sinned in him and therefore share his guilt; (2) that the relation is representative or federal, Adam acting on behalf of his descendants; and (3) that the relation is natural, the evil effects of Adam’s fall being communicated to the race through the ordinary channels of heredity. The transmitted effect of Adam’s sin consists mainly of the loss of moral balance, an inborn tendency of heart and will towards evil, a disability, though not a total inability, for goodness. Though men are not personally implicated in the guilt of Adam’s transgression, their condition involves demerit and necessitates redemption. ...
Christ is thus a new beginning for the fallen race, a fountain of life and righteousness, as Adam was of death and sin. Adam was a true ‘figure of him that was to come,’ a type based not on mere analogy, but on deep and real correspondences between his relation as ‘psychical’ parent to his natural descendants, and Christ’s relation to His people as the ‘second Adam,’ the ‘spiritual’ originator of a regenerated race. —The Fall of Adam, as we have seen, introduced into the nature of all descended from him a fatal taint of sin, an insuperable moral disability. The question now before us is, How did Jesus Christ, the new Adam, as a true member of the fallen race, escape this evil influence? That Christ in His nature and Person was absolutely free from sin, is one of the clearest and most generally admitted as well as most vital facts of the gospel. ...
On Adam and Christ: Relative sections of treatises on Systematic Theology, such as Dorner, Hodge; Orr’s Christian View; Fairbairn, Christ in Modern Theology; also Sanday-Headlam, Romans (on 5:12–21), and other good Commentaries; Beyschlag, NT Theology, vol
Original Sin - It is one of the consequences of the sin of our first parent, Adam. Other consequences of Adam's sin are death, and concupiscence, or the rebellion of our lower appetites against reason and will
Free Will - Against the Protestant Reformers, the Council of Trent has solemnly condemned those who affirm that the free will of man was lost through the sin of Adam and those also who maintain that God's grace removes freedom from the human will
Sacrifice - The Lord clothed Adam and Eve with the skins of animals, which in all probability had been offered in sacrifice (Genesis 3:21 )
Catholic Latin Literature - The drama, an outgrowth of Church liturgy, included such writers as ...
Andreas Fabricius
Beccadelli
Bruni
Cornelius Crocus
Cornelius Laurimanus
Dati
De Loches
Filelfo
Hannardus Gamerius
Holonius
Jacob Locher
Johann von Kitzcher
Levin Brecht
Mussato
Poggio
Reuchlin
Wimpfeling
Among the poets of this period may be mentioned: ...
Adam Widl
Famian Strada
Hieronymus Petrucci
Hosschius
Jacob Masen
Johannes Dantiscus
John Bissel
John Salmon
Nicola Avancini
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Bellarmine
Sarbiewski
Simon Rettenbacher
Tarquinius Galuzzi
Vida
The writers of the neo-Latin epic included: ...
Saint Alcuin
Saint Aldhelm
Saint Boniface
Saint Columbanus
Saint Thomas More
Venerable Bede
Balde
Dante Alighieri
Flodoard
Hildebert of Tours
Hroswitha
John of Salisbury
Maffeo Vegio
Marbod
Petrarch
Sadolet
Theodulf the Goth
Venantius Fortunatus
Walafrid Strabo
the five Ekkehards
the four Notkers
Son of God - In the singular it is always used of the second Person of the Trinity, with the single exception of Luke 3:38 , where it is used of Adam
Nothing - ...
Adam, with such counsel nothing sway'd-- ...
In the phrase, nothing worth, the words are transposed the natural order being, worth nothing
Alpha - , 1:1086) say, "Adam transgressed the whole law from Αleph ( א ) to Τau ( ת )" (the last Hebrew letter); so Christ fulfilled it from Αlpha ( Α - α ) to Οmega ( Ω - ω ) (Matthew 3:15)
Covenant - God's covenants, from the beginning, have been with his people and their seed—with Adam, Genesis 2:17; Romans 5:12; 1 Corinthians 15:22; with Noah, Genesis 9:9
Curse, the - The punishment pronounced by God consequent on the sin of Adam and Eve
Beguile - 1, is used of Adam
Sin, Original - It is one of the consequences of the sin of our first parent, Adam. Other consequences of Adam's sin are death, and concupiscence, or the rebellion of our lower appetites against reason and will
Will, Free - Against the Protestant Reformers, the Council of Trent has solemnly condemned those who affirm that the free will of man was lost through the sin of Adam and those also who maintain that God's grace removes freedom from the human will
Man - Adam is capable of recognizing the qualities of, and so of naming, the living creatures ( Genesis 2:19 ), cannot find a help meet among them ( Genesis 2:20 ), is innocent ( Genesis 2:25 ), and capable of moral obedience ( Genesis 2:16-17 ) and religious communion ( Genesis 3:9-10 ). Luke’s Gospel Adam is described as ‘son of God’ (Luke 3:38 )
Heir - The complete lordship over Creation was given to Adam (Genesis 1:28, Psalms 8:6). These assurances given to Adam and to Abraham were absolutely fulfilled in Christ, who, as the firstborn of all creation, Himself both the Agent of the Creator’s work and summing up in His own Person all created objects (Colossians 1:15-17), enjoys an eternal and incorruptible inheritance
Covenant - ...
COVENANT OF WORKS, the constitution under which Adam was placed at his creation. In this covenant, ...
...
The contracting parties were (a) God the moral Governor, and (b) Adam, a free moral agent, and representative of all his natural posterity (Romans 5:12-19 ). ...
On the part of the Son the conditions were (a) his becoming incarnate (Galatians 4:4,5 ); and (b) as the second Adam his representing all his people, assuming their place and undertaking all their obligations under the violated covenant of works; (c) obeying the law (Psalm 40:8 ; Isaiah 42:21 ; John 9:4,5 ), and (d) suffering its penalty (Isaiah 53 ; Ambrosiaster, or Pseudo-Ambrosius - ad Rom_5:12 "Manifestum est in Adam omnes peccasse quasi in massâ"). 7: "Nam et sic sanctus Hilarius intellexit quod scriptum est, in quo omnes peccaverunt: ait enim, 'In quo, id est in Adam omnes peccaverunt. ' Deinde addidit: 'Manifestum est in Adam omnes peccasse quasi in massâ; ipse enim per peccatum corruptus, quos genuit omnes nati sunt sub peccato
Type - Adam as the first man, under whom all earthly created things were set — type of Christ, the last Adam, who is Head over all things, the second Man. ...
EVE as 'builded' from a rib of Adam, and declared to be bone of his bone and flesh of his flesh — type of the church, those who in relation to Christ are members of His body [1]
Typology - Adam as a type of Christ Paul compared Adam and Christ in Romans 5:12-21 . He argued that Christ's deed is much more powerful than Adam's transgression. Paul said specifically that Adam “is a type of the one who was to come” (Romans 5:14 ). Certainly, huge differences separate Adam and Christ. Adam affected humankind adversely; Christ affects the same humankind for the good. Adam's trespass brought a verdict of condemnation of all people; Christ's righteous deed brought the gracious benefit to all people for the acquittal that brings life ( Romans 5:16 ,Romans 5:16,5:18 )
Language - The Armenians allege, that as the ark rested in their country, Noah and his children must have remained there a considerable time, before the lower and marshy country of Chaldea could be fit to receive them; and it is therefore reasonable to suppose they left their language there, which was probably the very same that Adam spoke. If the Lord God made ‘Adam a help meet for him,' because ‘it was not good for man to be alone,' can we imagine he would leave him unfurnished with the means to make that help useful and delightful to him? If it was not good for him to be alone, certainly neither was it good for him to have a companion to whom he could not readily communicate his thoughts, with whom he could neither ease his anxieties, nor divide or double his joys, by a kind, a friendly, a reasonable, a religious conversation; and how he could do this in any degree of perfection, or to any height of rational happiness, is utterly inconceivable without the use of speech. The consequence from all which is, that the perfection and felicity of man, and the wisdom and goodness of God, necessarily required that Adam should be supernaturally endowed with the knowledge and use of language. And therefore, as certain as it can be, that man was made perfect and happy, and that God is wise and good; so certain is it, that, when Adam and Eve were formed, they were immediately enabled by God to converse and communicate their thoughts, in all the perfection of language necessary to all the ends of their creation. And as this was the conduct most becoming the goodness of God, so we are assured from Moses, that it was that to which his infinite wisdom determined him; for we find that Adam gave names to all the creatures before Eve was formed; and, consequently, before necessity taught him the use of speech
Union With Christ - ...
Incorporation and the Second Adam . By faith believers are incorporated into the representative head of the new humanity, the Second Adam. This reality is expressed by Paul in the parallel drawn between Adam and Christ (Romans 5:12-21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:21-22 ). Just as humankind is "in Adam, " and Israel is God's son (or the Servant of Yahweh), so the New Israel is "in Christ. ...
Through identification with the crucified and resurrected Savior, the believer dies to the old humanity and is incorporated into the new humanity made possible by the Second Adam. It is through solidarity with Christ as the Second Adam that humanity has the possibility of a new course (Romans 5:14 ; 1 Corinthians 15:21-22,45 ; Colossians 1:18 ). ...
In close connection with the Adam-Christ parallel are Paul's references to the "old" and "new" nature (Romans 6:6 ; Ephesians 4:22-24 ; Colossians 3:9-10 ). "In Adam, " old humanity experiences solidarity with him in sin and death. Thus, just as humankind bears the image of the first Adam by virtue of corporate identification, those who have become incorporated into Christ are recreated in the image of the Second Adam (Ephesians 2:10 ). " The phrase also has an ethical dimension, as reflected in the idea of a new humanity made possible in solidarity with the Second Adam
Man - ...
'âdâm (אָדָם, Strong's #120), “man; mankind; people; someone (indefinite); Adam (the first man). 2:7 the word refers to the first “man,” Adam: “And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul. Restoration to his proper place in the creation and relationship to the Creator comes only through spiritual union with the Christ, the second Adam (Job 4:17); and ‘adam, “man” (Job 14:10). ...
Many passages use 'ı̂ysh in the more general or generic sense of “man” (‘adam), a human being: “He that smiteth a man, so that he die, shall be surely put to death” ( Death - ...
Results of Adam’s sin...
Physical and spiritual death are not completely separate. When sin entered the world through Adam, it changed everything. After all, death was apparently part of the world of nature before Adam sinned – leaves fell off trees, fruit was picked, and animals lived by eating other forms of life (Genesis 2:15-16; Genesis 3:1). But it is not death in general that is the result of Adam’s sin; it is human death. ...
It has been suggested that, before Adam and Eve sinned, the spiritual life within them was so dominant that it prevented the natural physical deterioration that we today might expect
Sexuality, Human - The way that Jesus, the "second Adam, " related to women should, like that of unfallen Adam, provide a model for intersexual relationships. Further, since Adam transmits it to his progeny (Genesis 5:1-3 ), it is likewise clear that the image of God (imago Dei ) was not lost in the fall. ...
If the term "man" ('adam [ Genesis 1:26 ); (2) working together to increase the human population (Genesis 1:28 ); and (3) having shared and unimpeded access to available food supplies (Genesis 1:29 ). The help for Adam would therefore designate "that which is lacking, necessary for completion" that "helps" Adam become, not simply the male of the species, but a legitimate microcosm of the human race. ...
On the other hand, rejecting the superiority of the male does not mean that the sexes were undifferentiated and that the term 'adam [1] denotes some sort of androgynous being or "earth creature" from which both man ('is ) and woman ('issa ) were formed. Moreover, as Childs has pointed out, just as 'is and 'issa are paralleled in verse 23, so 'adam [1] and 'issa are paralleled in verse 25. There is no hint in the narrative that 'adam [1] was split into 'is and 'issa but rather that 'issa was derived from 'adam [1]. Likewise, it was after the fall that Adam named his wife Eve, using the same naming formula (Genesis 3:20 ) as he used in naming the animals (2:20), and by its use implying the same authority of a superior over an inferior. Since the degree of intimacy and solidarity diminishes as the size of any group increases, it becomes clear that monogamy is premised not only on the example of Adam and Eve as the first married couple, but also on the metaphor "one flesh" and the nature of the relationships implied by it. Adam's complement is not found in another man (which would be redundancy, not complementarity), but in a woman, his corresponding opposite
Faithfulness of God - The curse came upon Adam according as it was threatened
Thanksgiving - Its antiquity: it existed in Paradise before Adam fell, and therefore prior to the graces of faith, repentance, &c
Judgment, the Final - " ...
The persons to be judged are, (1) the whole race of Adam without a single exception (Matthew 25:31-46 ; 1 Corinthians 15:51,52 ; Revelation 20:11-15 ); and (2) the fallen angels (2 Peter 2:4 ; Jude 1:6 )
Dispensation - From the fall of Adam to the flood
Likeness - Though the likeness of God was not lost with Adam's sin, neither Adam nor subsequent humanity fulfilled God's purpose
New Life - The new age promised by the prophets came in Jesus Christ, the new Adam
Quicken, to: - It is characteristic of the last Adam that He is a quickening Spirit
Genealogy - The genealogy of our Saviour is deduced by the evangelists from Adam to Joseph and Mary, through a space of four thousand years and upward
Abel - Abel (â'bel), vapor, Genesis 4:2, was the second son of Adam and Eve, so called perhaps from the shortness of his life, as he was murdered by Cain
Fig - The first notice we have of this tree is when Adam and Eve endeavored to clothe themselves with leaves
Fig Tree - The first notice we have of this tree is when Adam and Eve endeavored to clothe themselves with leaves
Race - Thus all mankind are called the race of Adam the Israelites are of the race of Abraham and Jacob
Marcus, Surnamed Eremita - ...
(4) ἀπόκρισις πρὸς τοὺς ἀποροῦντας περὶ τοῦ θείου βαπτίσματος , an important treatise on the doctrine of baptism, states distinctly that by the grace of baptism original sin is put away and the baptized are in exactly the condition Adam was before the fall
Die, Dead, Dying - , Matthew 9:24 ; Romans 7:2 ; by reason of descent from Adam, 1 Corinthians 15:22 ; or of violent "death," whether of men or animals; with regard to the latter it is once translated "perished," Matthew 8:32 ; of vegetation, Jude 1:12 ; of seeds, John 12:24 ; 1 Corinthians 15:36 ; it is used of "death" as a punishment in Israel under the Law, in Hebrews 10:28 ; (b) of the separation of man from God; all who are decended from Adam not only "die" physically, owing to sin, see (a) above, but are naturally in the state of separation from God, 2 Corinthians 5:14
Tell - 3:11 (the first biblical occurrence of the word) God asked Adam: “Who told thee that thou wast naked?” This was information immediately before them but not previously grasped by them. 2:18, where God said He would make Adam “a help meet for him,” or someone to correspond to him, just as the males and females of the animals corresponded to (matched) one another
Pelagians - That Adam was by nature mortal, and, whether he had sinned or not, would certainly have died. That the consequences of Adam's sin were confined to his own person. That new-born infants are in the same situation with Adam before the fall
Leaf - As Adam and Eve made these transient coverings for themselves, and used the things which would soon shrink and fade, so self- righteous sinners try to cover up their evil deeds and wicked ways by good works and religious performances. You will note that Adam and Eve hid from GOD after they made the fig leaf aprons
Gen'Esis - --The book of Genesis covered 2369 years,--from the creation of Adam, A. On the supposition that writing was known to Adam, Genesis 1-4 , containing the first two of these documents, formed the Bible of Adam's descendants, or the antediluvians
Messiah - ...
What is the biblical portrait of the messiah?...
Adam and Eve, created in God's image, were placed in a living, loving, lasting relationship, a covenant bond, with the Creator God. Adam and Eve were to believe, obey, and serve God in the living, loving, covenantal relationship. The account of Adam and Eve's deviation, under Satan's influence, from the will, purposes, and goals of God is well known. Yet, God did not remove or permit Adam and Eve to abdicate their creational covenantal position and responsibilities. Rather, God assured Adam and Eve that redemption and restoration would become realities in the lives and history of their seed (Genesis 3:14-20 ). Adam and Eve had a wider task to perform than strictly royal
Pseudepigrapha - ” This is based on those books claiming to be written by Adam, Enoch, Moses, and other famous Old Testament people. 83-90) contains two dream visions dealing with the flood and the history of Israel from Adam to the Maccabean revolt. ...
The Life of Adam and Eve has been preserved in both Latin and Greek. The Life of Adam and Eve was written after 1 A
Deluge, the -
The text does not necessarily imply such a flood, since the words arez and Adamah may just as well be translated by "region" and "land. It is impossible to fix the time of the deluge, since the dates mentioned in the three available texts of Scripture disagree both as to the year from Adam and as to the year before Christ that it occurred
Flood, the -
The text does not necessarily imply such a flood, since the words arez and Adamah may just as well be translated by "region" and "land. It is impossible to fix the time of the deluge, since the dates mentioned in the three available texts of Scripture disagree both as to the year from Adam and as to the year before Christ that it occurred
Impute, Imputation - ...
Not only is the imputation of God's righteousness to the believer taught in Scripture, but the Bible in some sense implies that Adam's sin was imputed to humankind (Romans 5:12-21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:21-22 ). Nevertheless, for a consistent biblical witness, it must be maintained that in Adam God judged the whole human race guilty
Christ, Genealogy of - Saint Luke proceeds in reverse order; he starts from Joseph and goes, beyond Abraham, back to Adam the father of the human race, in accord with the character of his Gospel; and he merely enumerates the names without grouping them according to a thesis or point, as is the case in Saint Matthew
Development of Doctrine - ...
(1) While substantially contained in primitive revelation, the deposit of faith grew from the time of Adam until that of Christ and the Apostles
Doctrine, Development of - ...
(1) While substantially contained in primitive revelation, the deposit of faith grew from the time of Adam until that of Christ and the Apostles
Deep - The Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall on Adam
Cain -
The first-born son of Adam and Eve (Genesis 4 )
Language - Adam Smith's Dissertation on the Formation of Languages; Harris's Hermes; Warburton's Divine Legation of Moses, vol
Shechinah - In Genesis 3:24 is the earliest notice of the Shekinah as a swordlike flame between the cherubim , being the "Presence of Jehovah" from which Cain went out, and before which Adam and succeeding patriarchs worshipped
Interim - The controverted points were, the state of Adam before and after his fall; the redemption of mankind by Jesus Christ; the justification of sinners; charity and good works; the confidence we ought to have in God; that our sins are remitted; the church and its true marks, its power, its authority, and ministers; the pope and bishops; the sacraments; the mass; the commemoration of saints; their intercession; and prayers for the dead
Clothe - 3:21: “Unto Adam also and to his wife did the Lord God make coats of skin, and clothed them
Genealogy of Christ - Saint Luke proceeds in reverse order; he starts from Joseph and goes, beyond Abraham, back to Adam the father of the human race, in accord with the character of his Gospel; and he merely enumerates the names without grouping them according to a thesis or point, as is the case in Saint Matthew
Chronicles - The former part of the first book of Chronicles contains a great variety of genealogical tables, beginning with Adam; and in particular gives a circumstantial account of the twelve tribes, which must have been very valuable to the Jews after their return from captivity
Cain - the eldest son of Adam and Eve
Temptation - Satan had tempted the sinless Adam, and now he tempted the sinless Jesus. But where Adam failed, Jesus triumphed (Matthew 4:1-10; cf
Hebrew Language - Adam, Eve, Abel, etc. As Hebrew sprang from the confusion of Babel, it cannot have been the language of Adam and the whole earth when there was but one speech; still, though an offshoot like the rest, it may retain most of the primitive type, a view which the Hebrew Bible names favor, though these be modified from the original form
Take Away - In other passages this verb is virtually a helping verb serving to prepare for an action stipulated in a subsequent verb; God “took” Adam and put him into the garden of Eden ( Adam and put him into Eden
Flesh - Adam, as the father and head of the human race, rebelled against God and corrupted human nature from the beginning. All human beings, because of their union with Adam, are born with this sinful nature (Psalms 51:5; Romans 5:12; Romans 7:18; see SIN)
Atonement - Romans 5:12-19 contrasts Christ's obedience with Adam's disobedience. An example of representation is Paul's contrast between Adam and Christ (Romans 5:12-21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:45-49 ). Adam and Christ represent two heads of two races of people. Adam is the head of the race of fallen persons. Because of our fallenness, all people belong to Adam's race, the old humanity. ...
Christ, the last Adam, represents a new race of people. Where Adam failed, Christ succeeded
Mary - Certainly the Son of God might have assumed a body such as ours, consisting both of flesh and spirit, and formed, as the first earthly man Adam was, of nothing; but then this would not have been what Scripture saith Christ must be, of "the seed of the woman," and what the promise declared. For we road that at the creation, the Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam, and he slept; and he took one of his ribs and closed up the flesh instead thereof: and the rib, which the Lord God had taken from the man, made he a woman. (Genesis 2:21-23) No doubt the Lord God could have done this by the manhood of Christ; and in this case, it might have been said of the second Adam, as the first Adam said to Eve, "this is now bone of my bone, and flesh of my flesh. And it is not the place or the womb that defiles, but the nature from whom it is begotten or conceived, as in our ordinary nature from Adam all along hath been done
Church - A few examples in point will be known by the name of Adam, as our first father: "As the first Adam was made a living soul, so the last Adam was made a quickening Spirit
Figure - 44 (for AV, "fashion") and in Romans 5:14 , of Adam as a "figure" of Christ
From - Men have all sprung from Adam
Golgotha - And the tradition in the eastern world concerning it was, that this name was given to it from Adam having been buried there
Pollute - There it is stated that after the birth of Seth, who was born to Adam and Eve after the murder of Abel by Cain, “men began to call upon the name of the Lord” (RSV)
Statue - So Adam “begat a son in his own likeness, after his image; and called his name Seth” ( Miraculous Conception - " The conception of Jesus is the point from which we date the union between his divine and human nature; and, this conception being miraculous, the existence of the person in whom they are united, was not physically derived from Adam
Hell - In a broad sense it may mean: ...
the limbo of infants (limbus parvulorum), where those who die in original sin, but without personal mortal sin, are deprived of the happiness which would come to them in the supernatural order, but not of happiness in the natural order; ...
the limbo of the Fathers (limbus patrum) where the souls of the just who died before Christ awaited their admission to heaven, which had been closed against them in punishment for the sin of Adam; ...
purgatory, where the just who die in venial sin or who still owe a debt of temporal punishment for sin are cleansed by suffering before their admission to heaven
Transgress, Transgression - 1, primarily "a going aside," then, "an overstepping," is used metaphorically to denote "transgression" (always of a breach of law): (a) of Adam, Romans 5:14 ; (b) of Eve, 1 Timothy 2:14 ; (c) negatively, where there is no law, since "transgression" implies the violation of law, none having been enacted between Adam's "transgression" and those under the Law, Romans 4:15 ; (d) of "transgressions" of the Law, Galatians 3:19 , where the statement "it was added because of transgressions" is best understood according to Romans 4:15 ; 5:13 ; 5:20 ; the Law does not make men sinners, but makes them "transgressors;" hence sin becomes "exceeding sinful," Romans 7:7,13
Disease - Sickness and disease are among the results of sin that entered the human race when Adam sinned (Genesis 3:16-19)
Shekinah - Ezekiel 11:23 ; Ezekiel 43:2 ); or again, that on the successive sins of Adam and his descendants it had been withdrawn from earth to the first heaven, and finally to the seventh. The first of the six things lost by Adam was ‘the glory,’ i
Garden - It was in a garden of light Adam fell; in a garden of darkness, Gethsemane, the Second Adam overcame the tempter and retrieved us
Genesis, Book of - Genesis contains all the great principles of God's relationship with man, even to the bruising of Satan's head, and in type the union of Christ and the church by a woman being 'builded' out of a rib of Adam, and brought to the man. ' See Adam...
A vast amount of learned labour has been lost in trying to account for the name of 'God' in Genesis 1 and 'Jehovah God' in Genesis 2 , often ending with the conclusion that Moses must have had two or more earlier accounts of the creation before him — one called the Elohistic (which used the name of God) and the other the Jehovistic (which had Jehovah God), and that he copied first a piece of the one, and then a piece of the other
Timothy, First And Second, Theology of - In another passage related to creation and in defense of his statement relative to the position of women in the church, Paul points out that "Adam was formed first, then Eve" (1 Timothy 2:13 ). It is apparent that Paul believed Adam and Eve to be historical figures and that the order in which they were created indicated God's desire for male headship in the family and in the church. In regards to the doctrine of sin, Paul refers to the first sin of Adam and Eve as the origin of all kinds of sinning, from the love of money to the sin of apostasy, which he particularly stresses in 1,2Timothy. He seems to take the blame for the first sin from the shoulders of Eve, and places it squarely on those of Adam. He points out that "Adam was not the one deceived; it was the woman who was deceived and became a sinner" (1 Timothy 2:14 ). Some believe that Paul is implying that Eve was not able to help herself, but Adam sinned deliberately with his eyes wide open. At any rate, the human race, according to Paul in Romans 5:12-21 , fell in its head, Adam, and not in Eve. Some have taken these to be cultural instructions for Paul's day only; however, it is important to notice that Paul grounds his directions here on Adam's being created first and then Eve and also on Eve's being deceived, not Adam
Enoch - ...
This, then, is the book of the generations of Adam. 'Adam begat a son in his likeness, after his image, and called his name Seth. And Adam lived after he had begotten Seth, he begat sons and daughters, and he died. Adam and all his sons, after they had begotten sons and daughters, died. But of Enoch, the seventh from Adam, we read very differently. Adam, and Seth, and Enos, and Cainan, and Mahalaleel, and Jared all lived, they simply lived on, after they had had children born to them, and then died
Noah - The son of Lamech, a descendant of Adam in the line of Seth, and a survivor of the flood
God, City of - In the last 12 books, he shows that the natural unity of the human race was broken by the sin of Adam, from whom in consequence sprang two kinds of men or "Cities"; the one ruled by self-love, the other by love of God
Sacrifice - ...
The first sacrifice we read of was that offered by Abel, though there is an indication of the death of victims in the fact that Adam and Eve were clothed by God with coats of skins
Abel - " This sacrifice was made "by faith;" this faith rested in God, not only as the Creator and the God of providence, but especially in God as the great Redeemer, whose sacrifice was typified by the sacrifices which, no doubt by the divine institution, were offered from the days of Adam downward
Condemnation - "...
In New Testament theology the rebellion of the first Adam with its disastrous consequences of death and condemnation for all humankind is more than offset by the obedience of the second Adam, the Lord Messiah Jesus (Romans 5:12-21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:22 )
Regeneration - ...
The holy Scriptures, with one voice, declare, that man by the fall of Adam lost all apprehension of the divine nature; he became virtually dead in trespasses and sins: so that the recovery from hence could only be effected by the quickening influences of the Holy Ghost. Hence every son and daughter of Adam is born, as to spiritual faculties, in a state of spiritual death, and is as incapable, until an act of regeneration hath passed in quickening to a new and spiritual life, of any act of spiritual apprehension, as a dead body is to any act of animal life
Image - ...
The word is used (1) of an "image" or a coin (not a mere likeness), Matthew 22:20 ; Mark 12:16 ; Luke 20:24 ; so of a statue or similar representation (more than a resemblance), Romans 1:23 ; Revelation 13:14,15 (thrice); 14:9,11; 15:2; 16:2; 19:20; 20:4; of the descendants of Adam as bearing his image, 1 Corinthians 15:49 , each a representation derived from the prototype; (2) of subjects relative to things spiritual, Hebrews 10:1 , negatively of the Law as having "a shadow of the good things to come, not the very image of the things," i. , not the essential and substantial form of them; the contrast has been likened to the difference between a statue and the shadow cast by it; (3) of the relations between God the Father, Christ, and man, (a) of man as he was created as being a visible representation of God, 1 Corinthians 11:7 , a being corresponding to the original; the condition of man as a fallen creature has not entirely effaced the "image;" he is still suitable to bear responsibility, he still has Godlike qualities, such as love of goodness and beauty, none of which are found in a mere animal; in the Fall man ceased to be a perfect vehicle for the representation of God; God's grace in Christ will yet accomplish more than what Adam lost; (b) of regenerate persons, in being moral representations of what God is, Colossians 3:10 ; cp
Nation - Adam, Vitality of Platonism: ‘Hymn of Cleanthes,’ p. Adam, The Vitality of Platonism and other Essays, Edinburgh, 1911, pp
Head, Headship - ...
Adam was crowned with glory and honor (Psalm 8:5 ). She is not formed from dust but was taken from Adam. ...
Paul Ferguson...
See also Adam ; Church, the ; Eve ; Marriage ...
Bibliography
Sanctification - Everything and everyone functioned flawlessly until Adam and Eve believed Satan's lie. When Adam sinned, he and his race forfeited that which made it possible for them to function as designedthe presence of God himself. Adam and Eve's prefallen sanctification was not a result of their inherent capabilities. God's presence was the essential missing factor in Adam and Eve's postfall state. ...
God sought Adam and Eve, indicating that restoration of the original purpose would be undertaken by him. He sanctified common coats of skin to cover Adam and Eve's nakedness (Genesis 3:21 ). Before being "in Christ" the believer was "in Adam" (Romans 5:12-21 ). To be "in Adam" is to be spiritually dead
Sin - Paul does not in Romans 5:12; Romans 5:21 formally offer this explanation, the passage being introduced into the argument for another purpose-to prove the greater efficacy of grace than of sin, by as much as Christ is greater than Adam-yet, as he is there dealing with his view of the introduction of sin into the world, we must regard that passage as his explanation both of sin as a power in humanity and of the flesh; for it is not likely that he would leave sin in the race and sin in the individual unconnected. The relation of the race to Adam may be conceived as two-fold: (1) a participation in guilt; (2) an inheritance of a sinful disposition. Paul teaches that all men are involved in the penalty of Adam’s transgression, for ‘death passed unto all men’ (Romans 5:12), but he does not teach that all men are held guilty of Adam’s transgression; for (a) by a surprising change of construction and discontinuity of thought he affirms as the reason for the universality of death the actual transgression of all men ‘for that all sinned,’ and (b) he guards himself against the charge of imputing guilt when there is no conscious and voluntary transgression, by affirming that ‘sin is not imputed when there is no law’ (Romans 5:13). ...
As regards (a), the clause ἐφʼ ᾧ πάντες ἥμαρτον cannot mean that all sinned in Adam (‘omnes peccarunt, Adamo peccante,’ Bengel), either as the physical source or as the moral representative of the race; for ἐφʼ ᾧ most probably means ‘because. Paul affirms that guilt is not ascribed unless there is transgression of law, as in the case of Adam, yet he asserts that nevertheless the same penalty falls on all. -Unless the analogy with Christ is incomplete, there must be, however, some connexion between Adam’s transgression and the actual sin of all mankind. Paul conceive that connexion? It has usually been taken for granted that he teaches that by Adam’s transgression human nature was itself infected, and that from him there descends to all men a sinful disposition. Paul regarded all men as involved In Adam’s guilt, either because of their physical descent from him or of any federal relation to him, even although all men are subject to the penalty of death. Nor is there any ground for holding that he ascribed to Adam that moral endowment which this theology assigned to him. He does not, as is sometimes maintained, represent Adam himself as subject to the flesh in the same way as are his descendants; for 1 Corinthians 15:47 contrasts not the unfallen Adam with the pre-existent Christ, but the fallen Adam with the Risen Christ; but be does emphasize the voluntary character of Adam’s act: it was disobedience (Romans 5:19). Could he have assigned to it the moral significance he does, had he thought of Adam as in the hopeless and helpless bondage described in Romans 7:7-25? This passage, however, represents that bondage not as directly inherited, but as resulting in the individual from a moral development, in which sin uses the flesh to bring it about
Man - Paul is in these verses contrasting Adam and Christ as, in some sense, both unique in their influence on human history; the debatable point is, in what sense? The entrance of death into the world is clearly ascribed to Adam’s sin, just as the entrance of new life is ascribed to Christ’s obedience (Romans 5:17). Just as Achan’s sin brought death on his whole family, since it brought them as a group under the ban (Joshua 7:24-25), so Adam’s sin brought death on the whole human race, since it constituted them ‘sinners’ as a group. Paul adds that all men have actually sinned, though, prior to the giving of explicit law, their sin was different in kind from Adam’s wilful disobedience (Romans 5:12-14). Paul does not connect this universality of actual sin in the race, which has justified the Divine sentence of death upon it, with the initial sin of Adam, in such a way as to make them effect and cause. Adam’s sin was, indeed, fatal to man, since it brought the Divine penalty of death upon the race; but St. Paul recognizes to the full the individual freedom and responsibility of its individual members, who followed in the footsteps of Adam. Paul’s teachers, but only for ascribing to them the doctrine of the yezer hara, the evil impulse present in Adam and in successive individuals of his race, though not due to his sin (cf. Men acted like Adam because they themselves had the evil heart ( Adam of his own soul’ (Apoc. But he has not definitely said this; in Romans 5 his interest lies in the relation not of Adam to the race, but of Adam to Christ, i. His point in Romans 5 is fairly summed up in 1 Corinthians 15:22 : ‘As in Adam all die, so also in Christ shall all be made alive
Aphthartodocetae, a Sect of the Monophysites - This whole question is rather one of scholastic subtlety, though not wholly idle, and may be solved in this way: that the body of Christ, before the Resurrection, was similar in its constitution to the body of Adam before the Fall, containing the germ or possibility of immortality and incorruptibility, but subject to the influence of the elements, and was actually put to death by external violence, but through the indwelling power of the sinless Spirit was preserved from corruption and raised again to an imperishable life, when—to use an ingenious distinction of St
Christ - Some types of CHRIST:...
Aaron, Exodus 28:2 (c)...
Adam, Genesis 5:2 (c)...
Ark, (covenant), Exodus 25:10 (c)...
Ark, (Noah's), Genesis 6:14 (c)...
Ass, Genesis 49:14 (c)...
Author, Hebrews 5:9 (c)...
Bishop, 1 Peter 2:25 (a)...
Body, 1 Corinthians 12:12 (a)...
Branch, Zechariah 3:8 (a)...
Bread, John 6:51 (a)...
Bridegroom, Matthew 25:1 (b)...
Bullock, Leviticus 1:5 (c)...
Burnt Offering, Leviticus 1:3 (b)...
Calf, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Captain, Hebrews 2:10 (a)...
Chief, Song of Solomon 5:10 (b)...
Commander, Isaiah 55:4 (b)...
Cornerstone, Isaiah 28:16 (a)...
Covert, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
David, 2 Samuel 19:10 (c)...
Day, Psalm 118:24 (b)...
Door, John 10:9 (a)...
Eagle, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Flour, Leviticus 2:1 (c)...
Foundation, Isaiah 28:16 (b)...
Fountain, Zechariah 13:1 (b)...
Garment, Isaiah 61:10 (b), Romans 13:14...
Gate, Psalm 118:20 (b)...
Gold, Isaiah 13:12 (a)...
Headstone, Psalm 113:22 (b)...
Heir, Hebrews 1:2 (a)...
Hen, Matthew 23:37 (a)...
Hiding Place, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
High Priest, Hebrews 4:14 (a)...
Isaac, Genesis 24:36 (c)...
Jacob, Genesis 32:28 (c)...
Jonah, Matthew 12:40 (a)...
Joseph, Genesis 37:7 (c)...
Joshua, Joshua 1:1 (c)...
Judge, Acts 17:31 (a)...
King, Psalm 2:6 (a)...
Lamb, Revelation 5:6 (a)...
Leaves, Revelation 22:2 (c)...
Light, John 8:12 (a)...
Lily of the Valleys, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Lion, Revelation 5:5 (a)...
Manna, John 6:32 (a)...
Master of the House, Luke 13:25 (b)...
Meal, 2 Kings 4:41 (c)...
Mediator (umpire), 1 Timothy 2:5 (a)...
Melchizedek, Genesis 14:18 (c)...
Merchantman, Matthew 13:45 (b)...
Owl, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Ox:, Ezekiel 1:10 (b)...
Passover, 1 Corinthians 5:7 (a)...
Peace Offering, Leviticus 3:1 (c)...
Pelican, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Physician, Jeremiah 8:22 (c)...
Pigeon, Leviticus 12:6 (c)...
Propitiation (mercy seat), Romans 3:25 (a)...
Ram, Genesis 22:13 (a)...
Rock, Matthew 16:18 (a)...
Rock of Ages, Isaiah 26:4 (margin) (a)...
Rose of Sharon, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Root, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sabbath, Colossians 2:16-17 (b)...
Seed, Genesis 3:15 (a)...
Serpent, John 3:14 (a)...
Shepherd, John 10:11 (a)...
Sin, 2 Corinthians 5:21 (a)...
Sin Offering, Leviticus 4:32 (c)...
Solomon, 1 Kings 10:13 (c)...
Sower, Matthew 13:37 (a)...
Sparrow, Psalm 102:7 (a)...
Star, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sun, Malachi 4:2 (a)...
Temple, John 2:19 (a)...
Thief, Revelation 3:3 (a)...
Tree, Revelation 22:2 (b)...
Trespass Offering, Leviticus 5:6 (c)...
Turtle dove, Leviticus 1:14 (c)...
Vine, John 15:5 (a)...
Worm, Psalm 22:6 (a)...
Natural - ...
The natural man is here evidently opposed to, ο πνευματικος , "him that is spiritual," 1 Corinthians 2:15 , even as the natural body which we derive from Adam is opposed to the spiritual body which believers will receive from Christ at the resurrection, according to 1 Corinthians 15:44-45
Say - Thus Adam said, this is bone of my bone Noah said, blessed be the Lord God of Shem
Cain (1) - Adam's sin now bears fratricide among its first and terrible fruits; and the seed of the serpent stands forth thenceforward throughout man's history, as distinguished from the seed of the woman (Genesis 3:15). Adam hid in the trees and then confessed his sin; but Cain stoutly denies it, showing himself the child of him who is the father of lying and the murderer from the beginning (John 8:44). "It shall come to pass that every one that findeth me shall slay me," words implying that the human race had even then multiplied since Adam's expulsion from Eden, a fact also appearing from Cain having a wife, doubtless one of Adam's descendants; the sacred historian only giving one or two prominent links of the genealogy, not the sons, much less the daughters, all in full. Adam was placed in Eden to until it, and his power of knowledge and speech was exercised in naming the beasts. China has been in a state of mental cultivation and art far beyond Adam, yet for ages has made no progress
Red Heifer - Perhaps the reader may not know, or if he doth, he may not immediately re collect, that Adam was called Adam, or Adamah, on account of the red earth or dust from whence he was taken. Now the Lord Jesus is also called the last Adam
Pelagians - ...
In contending for the truth of their doctrines, they are said to have asserted, "that mankind derived no injury from the sin of Adam; that we are now as capable of obedience to the will of God as he was; that, otherwise, it would have been cruel and absurd to propose to mankind the performance of certain duties, with the sanction of rewards, and the denunciation of punishments; and that, consequently, men are born without vice, as well as without virtue. He acknowledged, "that the power we possess of obeying the will of God, is a divine gift;" but asserted, "that the direction of this power depends upon ourselves; that natural death is not a consequence of the sin of Adam, but of the frame of man; and that Adam would have died, though he had not sinned
Marriage - (See Adam) The charter of marriage is Genesis 2:24, reproduced by our Lord with greater distinctness in Matthew 19:4-5; "He which made them at the beginning made them male and female, and said, For this cause shall a man leave father and mother, and shall cleave to his wife: and they twain, shall be one flesh. " Adam's deep sleep wherein Eve was formed out of His opened side, symbolizes Christ's death which was the birth of the spouse, the church (John 12:24; John 19:34-35). As Adam gave Eve a new name, 'ishah , "woman" or "wife" the counterpart of iysh , "man" or "husband," so Christ gives the church His new name; He, Solomon, she, the Shulamite (Song of Solomon 6:13; Revelation 2:17; Revelation 3:12). ...
The propagation of the church from Christ, as that of Eve from Adam, is the foundation of the spiritual marriage. ) (See Adam
Sin - Rebellion was at the root of the problem for Adam and Eve (Genesis 3:1 ) and has been at the root of humanity's plight ever since. Since Adam and Eve rebelled against the clear command of God, sin has infected humanity like a dread malignancy. This understanding of the human situation would say that when Adam rebelled against God, he incorporated all of his descendants in his action (see Hebrews 7:9-10 for a similar analogy). ...
Adam and Eve introduced sin into human history by their rebellious actions
Cabbala - They derive the mysteries contained in it from Adam; and assert, that whilst the first man was in paradise, the angel Raphael brought him a book from heaven, which contained the doctrines of heavenly wisdom; and that when Adam received this book, angels came down from heaven to learn its contents; but that he refused to admit them to the knowledge of sacred things, intrusted to himself alone: that, after the fall, this book was taken back into heaven; that, after many prayers and tears, God restored it to Adam; and that it passed from Adam to Seth
Nebaioth - ...
But the mention of names resembling Adam, Seth, Enoch, Noah, Shem, Abraham, and of Hermes, Agathodaemon, Tammuz, and the Ionians, and the anachronisms geographical, linguistic, historical, and religious, point to a modern date even as late as the first century A
Image - ...
This is seen in perfection in the second Man, who has in resurrection superseded Adam, who was in this sense a figure or type of Christ
Chronicles, Books of the - John goes back to the 'beginning,' when the Eternal Word was with God: the Chronicles go back to the beginning of man's history: "Adam, Sheth, Enosh," in order to develop that history in the chosen line of promise and grace
Antediluvians - Two distinct genealogies beginning with Adam, trace his descendants through Cain (Genesis 4:1 , Genesis 4:17-24 ) and through Seth to Noah's sons (Genesis 5:1-32 )
Woman - This is its meaning in its first biblical usage: “And the rib, which the Lord God had taken from man [1], made he a woman, and brought her unto the man” ( Lot - For example, the Jordan Valley is described as being well watered “like the garden of the Lord” (Genesis 13:10 ) reminding one of the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. One wonders if Lot would be more successful in this garden spot than Adam and Eve had been. The prospect of success was thrown in doubt by the way Lot's journey is described—he journeyed east, a description that recalls Adam's and Eve's journey after their expulsion from the garden (Genesis 3:24 )
Chronology - ...
From Adam to the Flood … … … … … … … … … 1656...
(Arrived at by adding the ages of the patriarchs, when the sons named were born. ...
4004 Adam created
Flood, the - The flood was about 1700 years after the creation of Adam, and it is impossible to say how many millions of people there were on the earth at the time, or how far they had been dispersed. Compare the statement that 'every living creature' was brought to Adam to be named
Law - He gave, also, a law to Adam, and which was in the form of a covenant, and in which Adam stood as a covenant head to all his posterity, Romans 5:1-21 : Genesis 2:1-25 : But our first parents soon violated that law, and fell from a state of innocence to a state of sin and misery, Hosea 6:7
Land - The body of the first man, Adam, was formed exclusively from the 'ădâmâh (cf. ” If Adam were to remain obedient to God, the “ground” would give forth its fruit
Chronicles, Books of - These four books provide a scribal (priestly) history of Israel from the time of Adam (1 Chronicles 1:1 ) to the rebuilding of the house of God and the walls of Jerusalem and the restoration of the people in the worship of God according to the law of Moses (Nehemiah 13:31 ). Chronicles shows how God worked from the time of Adam but particularly in the times of David through Ezra and Nehemiah to accomplish His desire to dwell in holiness with His people. The people are those of faith whose lineage goes back to Adam through Seth to Shem to Abraham (1Chronicles 1:1,1Chronicles 1:17,1 Chronicles 1:28 ) to whom God made the promise of the seed (the Christ) through whom He would bless all nations (Genesis 12:1-4 ; Genesis 15:4-6 ; Genesis 17:7 ; Genesis 22:16-18 ; Galatians 3:16 ). Godly line of Adam (1 Chronicles 1:1-4 )...
B
Bartholomew - Adam and Eve vainly cloaked their shame under fig leaves
Iron (2) - ) Tubal-cain, 500 years after Adam according to Hebrew chronology, 1,000 according to Septuagint, was the first "instructor of every artificer in brass and iron
Reckon, Reckoning - 3); in Romans 4:3,5,6,9,11,22-24 , of "reckoning" faith for righteousness, or "reckoning" righteousness to persons, in all of which the RV uses the verb "to reckon" instead of the AV "to count or to impute;" in Romans 4:4 the subject is treated by way of contrast between grace and debt, which latter involves the "reckoning" of a reward for works; what is owed as a debt cannot be "reckoned" as a favor, but the faith of Abraham and his spiritual children sets them outside the category of those who seek to be justified by self-effort, and, vice versa, the latter are excluded from the grace of righteousness bestowed on the sole condition of faith; so in Galatians 3:6 (RV, "was reckoned," AV, "was accounted"); since Abraham, like all the natural descendants of Adam, was a sinner, he was destitute of righteousness in the sight of God; if, then, his relationship with God was to be rectified (i
Dispensations - ...
(2) The Adamic dispensation of promise (Genesis 3:15) after the fall, down to the flood; the remembrance of the promise being kept alive by sacrifice. ...
(3) The dispensation of Noah, like that of Adam, requiring, besides the duties of the light of nature, repentance for sin, faith in God's mercy, hope of the promised Savior, kept up by sacrifices; to which were added the prohibition to shed blood of man on penalty of death, and to eat animals' blood, and the permission to eat flesh (Genesis 9); extending from the flood to Abraham
Wisdom, the, of Solomon, - The second part, again, follows the action of wisdom summarily, as preserving God's servants, from Adam to Moses, and more particularly in the punishment of the Egyptians and Canaanites
Genealogy of the Lord Jesus - According to the distinctive character of Matthew in which Christ is emphatically the Messiah and Son of David, the genealogy commences with Abraham; whereas in Luke, in which Christ is displayed as the Son of man, the list is traced up to "Adam who was the son of God
Name - 2:19 (an early occurrence of this word): “… And whatsoever Adam called every living creaturethat was the name thereof
Naked - Thus Adam and his wife in the state of innocency were naked, but not ashamed
Last - , Matthew 5:26 , "the last (farthing)," RV (AV, "uttermost"); Matthew 20:8,12,14 ; Mark 12:6,22 ; 1 Corinthians 4:9 , of Apostles as "last" in the program of a spectacular display; 1 Corinthians 15:45 , "the last Adam;" Revelation 2:19 ; of the "last" state of persons, Matthew 12:45 , neuter plural, lit
Trespass - , because of) our trespasses;" Romans 5:15 (twice), where the trespass is that of Adam (in contrast to the free gift of righteousness, ver. 17, a contrast in the nature and the effects); Romans 5:16 , where "of many trespasses" expresses a contrast of quantity; the condemnation resulted from one "trespass," the free gift is "of (ek, expressing the origin, and throwing stress upon God's justifying grace in Christ) many trespasses;" Romans 5:17 , introducing contrast between legal effects and those of Divine grace; Romans 5:18 , where the RV, "through one trepass," is contrasted with "one act of righteousness;" this is important, the difference is not between one man's "trespass" and Christ's righteousness (as AV), but between two acts, that of Adam's "trespass" and the vicarious death of Christ; Romans 5:20 Pillow - Bushnell compares in a striking way the sleep of Adam in Paradise with that of Jesus in the storm (Christ and His Salvation, 127)
Melchizedek - Another tradition distinguishes Shem from Melchizedek, but associates them in the work of transferring the body of Adam to Jerusalem. The story survives with many embellishments in the Ethiopic Book of Adam; and only for its beginnings, with mixed Jewish and Christian influences at work upon it, can a place be allowed within our century
Illuminati (3) - Adam Weishaupt, professor of canon law in the university of Ingoldstadt. Weishaupt is allowed to be influenced by a high degree of vanity; as an evidence of which he communicates as the last secret to his most favoured adepts, that the mysteries of Illuminism, which, in going through the inferior degrees, had been successively attributed to the most ancient patriarchs and philosophers, and even to Christ himself, owed its origin to no other than Adam Weishaupt, known in the order by the name of Spartacus
Call - He allowed Adam to “name” the animals as a concrete demonstration of man’s relative sovereignty over them ( Adam, and said unto him
Naturalness - Paul emphasizes between the first Adam as the ‘natural man’ (ψυχικός), and the last Adam as the ‘life-giving spirit’ (1 Corinthians 15:45)
Noah - Noah) the grandson of Methuselah (Genesis 5:25-29 ), who was for two hundred and fifty years contemporary with Adam, and the son of Lamech, who was about fifty years old at the time of Adam's death
Famine And Drought - For example, the sins of Adam, Eve, and Cain resulted in unfruitfulness of the earth (Genesis 3:17-18 ; Genesis 4:12 )
Deluge - ...
The cause of this judgment was the corruption and violence that filled the earth in the ninth generation from Adam
Sin - " This is sometimes called indwelling sin, Romans 7:1-25 : The imputation of the sin of Adam to his posterity is also what divines generally call, with some latitude of expression, original sin
Flesh And Spirit - The Bible simply records that God closed up Adam's flesh. Adam's own judgment in Genesis 2:23 was that this is now “bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh. ” Thus Adam recognized that whatever he was, Eve was the same
Genealogies - Luke also included a genealogy reaching back to Adam and God (Matthew 3:23-38 )
Heredity - Similarly Adam is represented as degraded to a lower status by his sin, as cast out of the garden and begetting children in banishment from God’s presence
Eden - "...
God's purpose, though deferred, will, in His own time, be realized by the Second Adam, the Lord Jesus from heaven
Heifer, Red - The "red" pointed not so much to the blood of Christ as to the earth color (adam ) or "red earth"), the flesh being the object of the purifying; also to sin, deep dyed as "scarlet," and associated with the flesh (Isaiah 1:18)
Tree (2) - As he lay a dying, it was said, Adam sent his son Seth to the angel that guarded Paradise, to crave a bough from the tree of life
Earth Earthen Earthy Earthly - -The only occurrence of the word is in 1 Corinthians 15:47-49, where Adam is called ‘earthy,’ i
Spiritualizing of the Parables - The traveller is Adam; Jerusalem is Paradise; Jericho is the world; the robbers are hostile demons; the Priest is the Law; the Levite is the Prophets; the Samaritan is Christ; the wounds are disobedience; the beast is the Lord’s body; the inn is the Church; the two denarii are the Father and the Son (the New and the Old Covenant, says Euthymius Zigabenus); the innkeeper is the Bishop
Bone - ” When Adam remarked of Eve that she was “bone of his bone,” and flesh of his flesh, he was referring to her creation from one of his rib bones ( General - Adam, our general sire
Garments - This was the garment God made of skins for Adam and Eve, and what Jacob made of many colours for Joseph
Return - In the first occurrence of this verb God told Adam that he and Eve would “eat bread, till thou return unto the ground; for out of it wast thou taken: for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return” ( Fear - ” Adam told God: “… I was afraid, because I was naked; and I hid myself” ( Find - This same emphasis appears in the first biblical occurrence of the word: “… But for Adam there was not found a help meet for him” ( Enoch - 622, and being contemporary with Adam, he had every opportunity of learning from him the story of the creation, the circumstance of the fall, the terms of the promise, and other important truths
Taste - Thou, Adam, wilt taste no pleasure
Genesis, Theology of - Allusions to Genesis tend to be rather veiled here, however, as in the refrain that everything is "meaningless" (hebel, 1:2, which is also "Abel, " the name of Adam and Eve's murdered son ). In Romans 5:12-21 , he observes that through the sin of one man, Adam, death and sin spread to all humanity, and that in the same way the obedience of one man, Jesus, provided justification and life for all. In the same fashion, he develops the concept of the first and second Adam in 1 Corinthians 15 . Garrett...
See also Abraham ; Adam ; Create, Creation ; Eve ; Fall, the ; Flood, the ...
Bibliography
Paul in Arabia - And, does Adam burst out into his bridegroom doxology,-This is now bone of my bone, and flesh of my flesh!-than Paul instantly adds, Amen! But I speak concerning Christ and His Church. And before he leaves the first Adam he gets such a revelation of the second Adam made in him that the Corinthians had many a glorious Sabbath morning on the two Adams, all the way from Arabia, long afterwards. So did Paul discover the Son of God in Arabia: so did Paul have the Son of God revealed to him in Adam, and in Abraham, and in Moses, and in David, and in Isaiah, but, best of all, in Paul himself
Sacrifice - ...
And if the coats of skin which God directed Adam to make, were the remains of sacrifices, sure Adam could not sacrifice from this observation, when there were no subjects in the world upon which he could make these observations
Supralapsarians - Persons who hold that God, without any regard to the good or evil works of men, has resolved, by an eternal decree, supra lapsum, antecedently to any knowledge of the fall of Adam, and independently of it, to save some and reject others: or, in other words, that God intended to glorify his justice in the condemnation of some, as well as his mercy in the salvation of others; and, for that purpose, decreed that Adam, should necessarily fall
Gospels, the - " And the genealogy goes no further than Abraham, whereas in Luke it ascends to Adam, agreeing with the scope of that gospel. In this gospel Jesus is presented as Son of man: as observed above, His genealogy is traced to Adam
Waldenses - That the Scriptures teach that there is one God, almighty, all-wise, and all-good, who made all things by his goodness; for he formed Adam in his own image and likeness; but that by the envy of the devil sin entered into the world, and that we are sinners in and by Adam
Language - Adam and Eve when created knew how to converse with each other and with the Creator. The language of Noah and his son Shem was substantially that of Adam and all the antediluvians
Hopkinsians - That though men became sinners by Adam, according to a divine constitution, yet they have and are accountable for no sins but personal; for, ...
1. Adam's act, in eating the forbidden fruit, was not the act of his posterity; therefore they did not sin at the same time he did. Therefore Adam's act, in eating the forbidden fruit, was not the cause, but only the occasion of his posterity's being sinners. God was pleased to make a constitution, that, if Adam remained holy through his state of trial, his posterity should in consequence be holy also; but if he sinned, his posterity should in consequence be sinners likewise. Adam sinned, and now God brings his posterity into the world sinners. By Adam's sin we are become sinners, not for it; his sin being only the occasion, not the cause of our committing sins. Adam's view of Religions; Hopkins on Holiness; Edwards on the Will, p
Metals - Instruments before Tubalcain (born according to Hebrew chronology 500 years after Adam and contemporary with Enoch from Seth; 1,000 according to Septuagint chronology) were apparently of flint, bone, and hard wood, such as uncivilized nations now use. The oldest European races used only flint weapons, which are found in the gravel; but this is no proof they were unknown to Adam's early descendants
Baxterians - It was to Adam, as the common father of lapsed mankind, that God made the promise, (Genesis 3:15
Man From Heaven - Whereas the first man, Adam, was a man of dust, the last man, Jesus, is "from heaven" (v
Picards - Picard, the author of this sect, from whom it derived its name, drew after him, as has been generally said, a number of men and women, pretending he would restore them to the primitive state of innocence wherein man was created; and accordingly he assumed the title of New Adam. He first published his notions in Germany and the Low Countries, and persuaded many people to go naked, and gave them the name of Adamites
on (2) - Re-Athom is the Egyptian hieroglyphical designation, the sun (Ra) the father of the gods, as Adam or Athom was of mankind
Righteousness - No man, not a single man of the whole race of men sprung from Adam, can be an exception to this universal decree of God
Gospel, the, - It was good news to Adam and Eve that the Seed of the woman should bruise the head of the serpent
Hear - ...
The verb can represent the mere “hearing” of something, as when Adam and Eve “heard” the sound of God walking in the garden ( Flesh - ...
The word means the “meaty part plus the skin” of men: “And the Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam, and he slept: and he took one of his ribs, and closed up the flesh instead thereof” ( Dispensation, - One law was given to Adam and Eve, and obedience was required, the penalty being announced if they failed
Mark, Gospel of - Luke, as the universal Redeemer, "the son of Adam, which was the son of God
Creation - Thirdly, that God compressed the work of those untold ages into six short days, and created the world as he did Adam, in a state of maturity, embodying in its rocks and fossils those rudimental forms of animal and vegetable life which seem naturally to lead up to the existing forms
Egyptians - If man has been found brutal and degraded it is because he has fallen from the intelligent condition in which Adam and Eve were created
Jesus Christ - ...
Humanity in Christ is generic (1 Corinthians 15:45; 1 Corinthians 15:47), as the second "man" or "last Adam," "the Son of man" (a title used in New Testament only by Himself of Himself, except in Stephen's dying speech, Acts 7:56; from Daniel 7:13; marking at once His humiliation as man's representative Head, and His consequent glorification in the same nature: Matthew 20:28; Matthew 26:64. The first Adam was created, and not born; the Second Adam, in His manhood, both born and created with a body free from the inherited taint of original sin (Hebrews 10:5). Mark 1:13 says "He was with the wild beasts," a contrast to the first Adam among the beasts tame and subject to man's will. Adam changed paradise into a wilderness, Jesus changed the wilderness into paradise (John 3:34). Thus the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eye, and the pride of life, which lured the first Adam, could not entice the Second (Genesis 3:6; compare Luke 4:8)
Romans, the Epistle to the - Christ the head of redeemed manhood, as Adam of fallen manhood (Romans 5:12-19); as sin came by Adam to man, so grace by Christ. The law came in parenthetically (pareiselthen ) and incidentally to reveal the malignity of the evil introduced by Adam, and the need of the remedy by Christ (Romans 5:20-21)
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - traces back the genealogy to Adam, Mt. ...
( b ) The Lukan list , which inverts the order, beginning at Jesus and ending at Adam, takes the line from Adam to Abraham, from Genesis 5:1-32 ; Genesis 10:21-25 (to Peleg), 1 Chronicles 1:1-27 , but inserts Cainan between Arphaxad and Shelah, as does the LXX Love - We are not prepared, then, when God looks for Adam after his sin, calling out "Where are you?" God seeks Adam, not to put him to death, but to reestablish a relationship with him
Guilt (2) - It can only be separated from its actual manifestations by being represented, not as a predisposing cause of these, but as itself an act of disobedience on the part of Adam (Romans 5:19). Death, which passed upon all men in consequence of transgression (Romans 5:12), reigned from Adam to Moses (Romans 5:14). Paul does say that death ‘passed unto all men’ through Adam’s transgression. ’ The teaching of the Rabbis, however, differentiating the actual transgression of Adam from the potentiality of sin involved in his creation, expressly asserts that death was decreed against the generations of Adam. Elsewhere death is spoken of as incurred by the personal guilt of each individual, and the statement of the Apocalypse of Baruch (54:15, 19), that ‘each of us is the Adam of his own soul,’ looks like an attempt to express a mystery which alone can reconcile these divergent views
Biblical Commission - , universal creation by God, the special creation of man, the formation of the first woman from man, the unity of the human race, the original happiness and subsequent fall of Adam and Eve, and the promise of a Redeemer
Good, Goodness - The choice between good and evil has lain before people since the garden of Eden when Adam and Eve ate fruit from the "tree of the knowledge of good and evil" (Genesis 2:9 )
Deceit, Deceitful, Deceitfully, Deceitfulness, Deceive, Deceivableness - 1), is used (a) of those who "deceive" "with empty words," belittling the true character of the sins mentioned, Ephesians 5:6 ; (b) of the fact that Adam was "not beguiled," 1 Timothy 2:14 , RV (cp
Directions (Geographical) - ” Christians in the first centuries after Christ took over this type of geographical description and made Golgotha, considered the grave of Adam and of Christ, the middle point of the world
Ed - , crossed Jordan to return to their eastern possessions; not the ford near Jericho, but the Damieh ford the highway from the eastern uplands to central Palestine (identified with the "city Adam"), opposite to the opening of the broad wady Far'ah, the route from Shiloh the national sanctuary to Gilead and Bashan
Shame - The first response of Adam and Eve to their sinful condition was to hide from God, and consequently from one another (Genesis 3:7-8 ; 2:25 )
Abel - Second of Adam and Eve's sons, Genesis 4: Abel means "vanity" or "weakness", "vapor" or "transitoriness"
Walk - For example, Adam and Eve heard the sound of God “walking” to and fro in the garden of Eden ( Mennonites - The posterity of Adam derive no moral guilt from his fall: sin is personal, and the desert of punishment cannot be inherited
Age - the age of the law of nature, called by the Jews the void age, from Adam to Moses
New - dates as far back as Adam; a new man has been born, who therefore is fitly so called" Person, Personhood - While the word Adam [1] is used of humankind. ...
The Greek counterpart of the Hebrew Adam [3] is anthropos [4]
Calvinism - If all whom the Lord predestinates to death are, in their natural condition, liable to the sentence of death, what injustice do they complain of receiving from him?" To this Calvin very fairly states the obvious rejoinder made in his day; and which the common sense of mankind will always make,— "They object, Were they not by the decree of God antecedently predestinated to that corruption which is now stated as the cause of their condemnation? When they perish in their corruption, therefore, they only suffer the punishment of that misery into which, in consequence of his predestination, Adam fell, and precipitated his posterity with him. "I confess," says he, "indeed, that all the descendants of Adam fell, by the Divine will, into that miserable condition in which they are now involved; and this is what I asserted from the beginning, that we must always return at last to the sovereign determination of God's will; the cause of which is hidden in himself. In much the same manner he contends that the necessity of sinning is laid upon the reprobate by the ordination of God, and yet denies God to be the author of their sinful acts, since the corruption of men was derived from Adam, by his own fault, and not from God. So, in writing to Castellio, he makes the sin of Adam the result of an act of God: "You say Adam fell by his free will. Why did he not afford this to Adam, if he would have had him stand in his integrity?" And with this view of necessity, as resulting from the decree of God, the immediate followers of Calvin coincided; the end and the means, as to the elect, and as to the reprobate, are equally fixed by the decree, and are both to be traced to the appointing and ordaining will of God. As all men have sinned in Adam, and have become exposed to the curse and eternal death, God would have done no injustice to any one, if he had determined to leave the whole human race under sin and the curse, and to condemn them on account of sin; according to those words of the Apostle, ‘All the world is become guilty before God,' Romans 3:19 ; Romans 3:23 ; Romans 6:23
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - " But there is indirect confirmation in the fact which we learn from Adamantius (i. He could not be the Supreme, for He was of limited intelligence, not being able to find Adam when he hid himself, and obliged to ask, "Where are thou?", and also obliged to come down to see before He could know whether Sodom had done according to its cry. He named him Adam, gave him a wife, and placed him in Paradise. Then the Lord of Creation, seeing that Adam was worthy to serve Him, devised how he might withdraw him from Hyle and unite him to himself. He took him aside, and said, "Adam, I am God, and beside me there is no other; if thou worshippest any other God thou shalt die the death. " When Adam heard of death he was afraid, and gradually withdrew himself from Hyle. When Hyle came after her wont to serve him, Adam did not listen to her, but withdrew himself. Then was the Creator full of wrath; and as men died he cast them into hell, both Adam, on account of the tree, and the rest. Tertullian goes through it in minute detail; Epiphanius also has made a series of minute notes on Marcion's corruptions of the text; some notices are also found in the Dialogue of Adamantius
Pelagianism And Pelagius - The charges against Coelestius were that he taught that: (1) Adam was created liable to death, and would have died, whether he had sinned or not. (2) The sin of Adam hurt himself only, and not the human race. (3) Infants at their birth are in the same state as Adam before the fall. (4) Neither by the death nor the fall of Adam does the whole race of man die, nor by the resurrection of Christ rise again. The first established the positions that death in man was the penalty of sin, and not a mere condition of his natural constitution; that the whole offspring of Adam was affected by his sin, and that baptism of infants was for the remission of original sin, the guilt of which they bear from their birth. The critical passage in Rom_5:12 "By one man sin entered into the world," they interpreted to mean that Adam sinned by an act of free choice and so caused all his descendants to sin by the imitation of his example. If they scoffingly asked men are born sinners from a sinful parent why are not men born righteous from believing parents who have been justified by baptism? If Adam's sin hurt those who had not sinned why by parity of consequence should not the death of Christ profit those who have not believed on Him? Towards the close of his sermon Augustine read to the congregation from the epistle of their martyred bishop St. Anathemas were pronounced on the doctrine that infants derive no original sin from Adam which needs expiation in baptism, and that there is some middle place of happiness in the kingdom of heaven for infants who die unbaptized
America (Land) - Adam of Bremen, in "A Description of the Northern Islands" (1075), mentions Greenland and Vinland and gives the oldest written account of Norse discovery of America
Enoch - Seventh from Adam (seven indicating divine completeness, Enoch typifying perfected humanity)
Death, Death-Stroke - , "the stroke of death:" ...
(b) the separation of man from God; Adam died on the day he disobeyed God, Genesis 2:17 , and hence all mankind are born in the same spiritual condition, Romans 5:12,14,17,21 , from which, however, those who believe in Christ are delivered, John 5:24 ; 1 John 3:14
Flesh - of the first actual sin of Adam
Call, Calling - ” For example, God called to Adam (Genesis 3:9 ); Moses called the elders together (Exodus 19:7 ); and Joel gave a command to call a solemn assembly (Joel 1:14 )
Aaron (2) - ...
Thus Christ may well be spoken of as the second Adam, but not as a second Aaron
Blood - Adam’s sin merited death and brought death on all his posterity ( Adam and all others represented by the sacrifice ( Book - 5:1: “This is the book of the generations of Adam
Fig - Adam and Eve used its leaves to cover their shame and nakedness; Nathanael to lay bore his soul "without guile" before God
Nose - ” God cursed Adam saying: “In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground …” ( Romans - The Apostle, after expressing his affection to the Roman Christians, and asserting that the Gospel is the power of God unto salvation to all who believe, takes a comprehensive view of the conduct and condition of men under the different dispensations of Providence; he shows that all mankind, both Jews and Gentiles, were equally "under sin," and liable to the wrath and punishment of God; that therefore there was a necessity for a universal propitiation and redemption, which were now offered to the whole race of men, without any preference or exception, by the mercy of him who is the God of the Gentiles as well as of the Jews; that faith in Jesus Christ, the universal Redeemer, was the only means of obtaining this salvation, which the deeds of the law were wholly incompetent to procure; that as the sins of the whole world originated from the disobedience of Adam, so the justification from those sins was to be derived from the obedience of Christ; that all distinction between Jew and Gentile was now abolished, and the ceremonial law entirely abrogated; that the unbelieving Jews would be excluded from the benefits of the Gospel, while the believing Gentiles would be partakers of them; and that this rejection of the Jews, and call of the Gentiles, were predicted by the Jewish Prophets Hosea and Isaiah
Proselyte - ...
Maimonides says, that the first six of these precepts were given to Adam, and the seventh to Noah
Obed-Edom - But as Obed-jah, the prophet, was called the slave or labourer of the Lord, so Obed-edom, the slave of the Adam or Edom, the earth or earthy, was eminently the Lord's chosen for that peculiar service of receiving the ark, when David himself trembled on the occasion
Covenant - Hosea (6:7) refers to Adam breaking the covenant. God blessed Adam and Eve; he thus gave them ability and authority to serve as his covenant agents. Creation was affected, for it too suffered the consequences of Adam and Eve's sin. Yahweh, graciously maintaining his mandates, revealed that Adam and Eve could still work under them. The social mandate was maintained; Adam and Eve as one flesh would have offspring, but pain would be suffered. ...
The third stage in the process of Yahweh's renewing and confirming of the covenant he had made previously with Adam, Noah, and the patriarchs was the actual ratification ceremony (24:4b-18)
Romans, Theology of - ...
The Old Testament example of Abraham is complemented in 5:1-21 with a fuller comparison of two principial personalities, Adam I and Adam II. While Abraham functions as a secondary figure as patriarch of righteousness by faith for Gentile and Jewish believers, Adam and Christ represent archetypal progenitors of the human race where works are the primary focus. The first Adam forsook the image of God for which he was responsible, and by his work of sin spread death and sin to all (vv. The far greater work of Christ the second Adam is a righteous work of grace and life (v
Flood, the - ...
Many lines of biblical evidence converge in affirming the universal extent of the flood and also reveal the theological significance of this conclusion: (1) the trajectory of major themes in Genesis 1-11 creation, fall, plan of redemption, spread of sinis universal in scope and calls for a matching universal judgment; (2) the genealogical lines from both Adam (Genesis 4:17-26 ; 5:1-31 ) and Noah (Genesis 10:1-32 ; 11:1-9 ) are exclusive in nature, indicating that as Adam was father of all preflood humanity, so Noah was father of all postflood humanity; (3) the same inclusive divine blessing to be fruitful and multiply is given to both Adam and Noah (Genesis 1:28 ; 9:1 ); (4) the covenant (Genesis 9:9-10 ) and its rainbow sign (Genesis 9:12-17 ) are clearly linked with the extent of the flood (Genesis 9:16,18 ); if there was only a local flood, then the covenant would be only a limited covenant; (5) the viability of God's promise (Genesis 9:15 ; cf
Chronology - Thus, Adam lives 130 years before the birth of his oldest son in Hebrew, but 230 years in the Septuagint; Seth is 105 in the Hebrew text, but 205 years in the Septuagint, etc. After the births of their oldest sons, Adam, 800; Seth, 807 in Hebrew, but 700 and 707 in the Septuagint; thus, the totals come to the same, Adam (930), Seth (912), in both Hebrew and Septuagint Similarly, in the case of Enos, Cainan, Mahalaleel. Adam's creation he makes 5361 or 5421. Sprung from a pair originally immortal, living a simple even course of life, they retained some of the original vitality of Adam's state in paradise
Chronology of the Old Testament - In the genealogy of the sons of Adam, for example (Genesis 5:1-32 ), we read how Adam was 130 years old when he begat Seth, Seth 105 years old when he begat Enosh, and so on down to the six hundredth year of Noah’s life, in which the Flood came
Genealogy - ...
So Genesis 5:1, "the book of the generations of Adam," wherein his descendants are traced down to Noah; Genesis 6:9, "the generations of Noah," the history of Noah and his sons; Genesis 10:1, "the generations of the sons of Noah," Shem, Ham, and Japhet, the oldest and most precious existing ethnological record; Genesis 11:10-26 "the generations of Shem," Genesis 11:27 "the generations of Terah," Abram's father; Genesis 25:12 "the generations of Ishmael," Genesis 25:19 "the generations of Isaac"; Genesis 36:1, "the generations of Esau"; Exodus 6:16-20 "the generations of Jacob"; Genesis 35:22-26, "the sons of Jacob," etc. Christ's descent through David, from Abraham and Adam, is given in an unbroken line of genealogy
Doubt - Tragically Eve and Adam bought into his deceptive plan and plunged humankind into the fall (vv
Immanuel - Sin destroyed the faculty of intuitively perceiving, as Adam once did, the characteristics; hence the name is now generally arbitrary, and not expressive of the nature
Beast - The hare and the coney represent really the rodentia ; (the Coney, or Hyrax, though a pachyderm, is linked with the hare, because externally resembling the rodentia;) swine, pachydermata ; "whatsoever goeth upon his paws," "all manner of beasts that go on all four," carnivora: only those of a limited district, and those at all possible to be used as food, are noticed, it is noteworthy that it is only "every animal of the field" that Jehovah brought to Adam to name, namely, animals in any way useful to man (Genesis 2:19), mainly the herbivora
Fall of Man - From this one sin arose another, and then another, from the connection of causes and effects, till this repetition brought on a habit of sin, consequently a state of moral slavery; called by divines a death in sin, a spiritual death, a defect of power to act according to the law, and from the motive of the divine perfections, as death in general is such a defect of power of action; and this defect or inability, with all its consequences, man entailed on his posterity, remaining upon them, till one greater man remove this, and reinstate them in all they forfeited in Adam
Fulfill - Christ was foreshadowed by Adam ( Romans 5:12-21 ; 1Corinthians 15:22,1 Corinthians 15:45-49 ), by the rock in the wilderness (1 Corinthians 10:4 ), and by the Passover lamb (1 Corinthians 5:7 )
Blessedness - The original experience of Adam and Eve in Eden is a blessedness derived from a creation in which God provides for their spiritual well-being with his companionship and their physical needs with the garden's trees (Genesis 2 )
Nag Hammadi - In this category are such works as On the Origin of the World , Secret Book of the Great Invisible Spirit , Revelation of Adam , The Thought of our Great Power , The Paraphrase of Shem , The Second Logos of the Great Seth , and The Trimorphic Protennoia
Fruit - This implies that Adam and Eve's progeny were not only to be the physical fruit of the pair but also to be endowed with moral, intellectual, and spiritual power, since they too, as descendants of the God-created pair, were made in "the image of God" (Genesis 1:27 ; cf
Adultery - (See Adam
Fathers - In a sort of appendix (Sirach 49:14-16) are given Enoch (again), Joseph, Shem, Seth, Enos, Adam
See, Perceive - Third, râ'âh can represent perception in the sense of hearing something—God brought the animals before Adam “to see what he would call them” ( Send - ” God was concerned lest after the Fall Adam “put forth his hand, and take also of the tree of life” ( Jesus Christ - 1, and four thousand years after the creation of Adam
Virgin Birth - The striking feature about it is that it traces the descent of Jesus right up to Adam (the son) of God. Evidently, in linking Adam to Christ, the editor or compiler intends to suggest that Christ is the Second Adam, the re-founder of the human race; and that just as the first Adam was son of God by a direct creative act, so also was the Second (by the power of the Holy Spirit). But the suggestion is that the Second Adam, like the first, owes His human existence to a direct creative act on the part of God
Commentary - Adams; the Hebrews, Mr. Adam Clarke's commentary, with critical notes, and marginal references, possess considerable merit, and will be found a valuable treasure for the Biblical student. ...
2 Peter: ...
Adam
Ecclesiastes, the Book of - So Solomon speaks of man ('adam , not 'iysh ) as such, frail and mortal, not redeemed man nor the elect nation Israel. Hence, not Jehovah, expressing the covenant relation to His people, but the general name God ('Εlohim ), appears throughout, the correlative to "man" ('adam ) in general
Covenant - The idea of a covenant with Adam, beyond the simple injunction of Genesis 2:16-17 , has been found by some writers in Sir 17:12 , which is more easily interpreted of the transactions on Horeb ( Deuteronomy 5:3 ). A distinction is often drawn between the Covenant of Works, assumed to have been made by God with Adam ( Genesis 2:17 ), and that of Grace or Redemption ( 2 Timothy 1:9 ), whereby Christ becomes to man the medium of all spiritual blessings
God, Name of - ...
As God's image-bearer Adam imitated God's creative speech by naming the creation (Genesis 2:19-20 ): this naming gave expression to the order in the universe and showed Adam's understanding of the character, place, and function of the animals. Adam may well have been able to name other creatures, but only God can assign his own name; only he can fully understand himself and reveal his character and nature (Exodus 3:13-14 ; 6:2-3 )
Art, Christian - In Italy and Germany, too, sculpture had its place, and the names of such artists as Donatello, the Pisani, Ghiberti, Della Robbia, Veit Stoss, Peter Vischer, and Adam Krafft are associated with carved ornamentation, baptismal fonts, bronze doors and tombs, altars of stone or wood
Christian Art - In Italy and Germany, too, sculpture had its place, and the names of such artists as Donatello, the Pisani, Ghiberti, Della Robbia, Veit Stoss, Peter Vischer, and Adam Krafft are associated with carved ornamentation, baptismal fonts, bronze doors and tombs, altars of stone or wood
Symbol - Examples of these are the Second Adam, the Firstborn, the Chief Shepherd, the Chief Corner-stone
Evil - It was Satan's appeal which stirred within Adam and Eve the desire which led them to sin
Generation - Thus creation, Adam, Noah, Noah's sons, Shem, Terah, Ishmael, the sons of Ishmael, Isaac, Esau, and Jacob each provide a generation and a structural unit in the Genesis narrative
Chronicles, Books of - " The "Chronicles" are an epitome of the sacred history from the days of Adam down to the return from Babylonian Exile, a period of about 3,500 years
Nature - Therefore, when Adam and Eve sinned and brought suffering upon themselves, nature also suffered (Genesis 3:17-18; Romans 8:20; Romans 8:22)
Security of the Believer - In our identity with Adam, humanity experienced lostness and death; but as we identify with the ultimate power of Christ in the resurrection, we, too, shall experience the effective meaning of the security of the believer in the triumph of God (1 Corinthians 15:20-28 )
Responsibility - Adam pointed to Eve, and ultimately to the Lord, for the sin in which he found himself
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - ...
Matthew downward, from Abraham the father of the Jews (naturally, but of the Gentiles also spiritually: Genesis 17:5; Romans 4:16-17); Luke upward, to Adam, "who was the son of God" and the father of Gentiles and Jews alike
Ancestors - Matthew traces Jesus' lineage to Abraham (Matthew 1:1-17 ) while Luke traces the lineage to Adam, the son of God (Luke 3:23-38 )
Build - …” Somewhat in the same sense, we read that God “made” or “fashioned” Eve out of Adam’s rib ( Adam “begat sons and daughters” ( Lord - ” Apparently Adam knew Him by this personal or covenantal name from the beginning, since Seth both called his son Enosh (i
Neonomianism - Whether the Gospel be a law more new than is implied in the first promise to fallen Adam, proposed to Cain, and obeyed by Abel, to the differencing him from his unbelieving brother
Sculpture - In Italy and Germany, too, sculpture had its place, and the names of such artists as Donatello, the Pisani, Ghiberti, Della Robbia, Veit Stoss, Peter Vischer, and Adam Krafft are associated with carved ornamentation, baptismal fonts, bronze doors and tombs, altars of stone or wood
Hopkinsians - Hopkins maintains, therefore, that "God was the author, origin, and positive cause of Adam's sin:" yea, "that he is the origin and cause of moral evil, as really as he is of the existence of any thing that he wills. That though men became sinners by Adam, according to a divine constitution, yet they were and are accountable for no sins but personal: for,...
(1. ) Adam's act, in eating the forbidden fruit, was not the act of his posterity; therefore they did not sin at the same time that he did. ) Therefore Adam's act, in eating the forbidden fruit, was not the cause, but only the occasions of his posterity being sinners. Adam sinned, and now God brings his posterity into the world sinners
Backsliding - "Like Adam, they have broken the covenant—they were unfaithful to me there" (Hosea 6:7 )
Nature, Natural - When a helper for Adam was sought, none of the other creatures was suitable (2:18-20); only God's special creative act could provide that helper (2:21-23)
Presence of God - Adam and Eve's sinfulness drove them to hide from the Lord in the garden of Eden (Genesis 3:8 )
Anthropomorphism - Mankind resembles God in a manner similar to Seth's resembling Adam (Genesis 5:3 )
Law of Moses - A Christian has died with Christ and lives unto God, beyond the jurisdiction of law, which applies to man in the flesh, man 'in Adam
Natural - 46 the history of man is said to be ‘a progress from Adam to Christ, from soulish to spiritual, from the present life to the future’ (T
Genesis - ...
Outline of contents...
Genesis begins with the story of creation (1:1-2:3) and the rebellion of Adam and Eve (2:4-4:26)
Romans, Book of - Paul used the figures of Adam and Christ as representing the only two possibilities for human existence. Adam, the original transgressor (Romans 9:6-29 ), was the one through whom sin entered; but sin did not come alone—death is inseparably linked to sin in Paul's thought (Romans 5:12-14 ). ...
Paul alone in the New Testament explained the transition from the realm of Adam to the realm of Christ as a dying and rising with Christ (Romans 6:5-11 ). The immediate result of justification is a realization of peace with God based on the assurance coming from God's love for us and results in one's ability to rejoice in the face of difficulties because Christ has reversed the results of Adam's disobedience (Romans 5:1-21 )
Mark, the Gospel According to - ...
He notices Jesus being "with the wild beasts" when tempted by Satan in the wilderness; contrast Adam tempted amidst the tame animals in Eden (Genesis 2; 3). Adam changed paradise into a wilderness, Jesus changes the wilderness into paradise
Atonement - ) of skin, and clothed Adam and his wife (Genesis 3:21). " It is only as Representative Head of humanity, that the Son of man, the second Adam, made full and adequate satisfaction for the whole race whose nature He took
Nebuchadnezzar - "...
The kingdom originally given to Adam (Genesis 1:28; Genesis 2:19-20), forfeited by sin, God temporarily delegated to Nebuchadnezzar, the "head of gold," the first of the four great world powers (Daniel 2 and Daniel 7). When man would be as God, like Adam and Nebuchadnezzar he sinks from lordship over creation to the brute level and loses his true manhood, which is likeness to God (Genesis 1:27; Genesis 2:19; Genesis 3:5; Psalms 49:6; Psalms 49:10-12; Psalms 82:6-7); a key to the symbolism which represents the mighty world kingdoms as "beasts" (Daniel 7)
Covenant - The covenant of grace is generally defined to be that which was made with Christ, as the second Adam, and in him with all the elect as his seed, Isaiah 42:1-6 . the covenant of works was made with Adam; the condition of which was, his perseverance during the whole time of his probation; the reward annexed to this obedience was the continuance of him and his posterity in such perfect holiness and felicity he then had while upon earth, and everlasting life with God hereafter. This covenant was broken by Adam's eating of the forbidden fruit, whereby he and his posterity were all subject to ruin, Genesis 3:1-24 : Romans 5:12 ; Romans 5:19 ; and without the intervention of the divine grace and mercy, would have been lost for ever, Romans 3:23
Bone - As Adam may be taken as a type of CHRIST, so Eve being taken out of him as a very part of him, is a type of the church which owes her very existence to the pains, the suffering and the glory of the Lord JESUS CHRIST
Forgiveness - The need of forgiveness is first seen in the third chapter of Genesis, as Adam and Eve willfully disobeyed God, choosing rather to satisfy their own self-will
Covenant - The covenant alluded to in Hosea 6:7 margin is not with Adam (KJV "men" is better, compare Psalms 82:7), for nowhere else is the expression "covenant" applied to Adam's relation to God, though the thing is implied in Romans 5:12-19; 1 Corinthians 15:22; but the Sinaitic covenant which Israel transgressed as lightly as "men" break their every day covenants with their fellow men, or else they have transgressed like other "men," though distinguished above all men by extraordinary spiritual privileges
Adoption - By creation Adam (Luke 3:38) and all men (Acts 17:28-29) are sons of God; by adoption only believers (1 Corinthians 12:3)
Samaria, Samaritans - ...
The Jewish inhabitants of Samaria identified Mount Gerizim as the chosen place of God and the only center of worship, calling it the “navel of the earth” because of a tradition that Adam sacrificed there
Spirit - Paul speaks of Adam as a "living soul" but of Christ as a "life-giving spirit
Shem - Methuselah and Shem were the two links between Adam and Isaac, so that the record of creation and man's fall came to Isaac on the testimony of the original chief actor, transmitted by only two intervening links
Elkesai, Elkesaites - The formula of baptism runs, In the name of the Most High God and of His Son, the Great King; but this Great King is not exclusively identified with Jesus of Nazareth, for He appeared in the world in successive incarnations, Adam being the first
Regeneration (2) - passim), or, in more mystical or metaphysical fashion, from being in Adam to being in Christ: see esp. Every man in himself is ψυχικός, a descendant and representative of Adam; every man has through the gospel the opportunity of becoming πνευματικός, a child of God and representative of Christ. It is one process, one experience, in man, in which the Adam dies and the Christ comes to be. He can speak of the old man and the new, of the natural and the spiritual, of being under law and under grace, in Adam and in Christ, dead to sin and alive to God, and so on; but the distinction between the states is moral rather than metaphysical, and it is in doctrine rather than experience that it is absolute
Noah - Son of Lamech, grandson of Methuselah; tenth from Adam in Seth's line. A transparent substance may have been used, for many arts discovered by the Cainites (Genesis 4:21-22) and their descendants in the 2,262 years between Adam and the flood (Septuagint; Hebrew 1656 years) were probably lost at the deluge. As under Adam (Genesis 2:19-20) so now the lower animals come to Noah and he receives them in pairs; but of clean animals seven pairs of each kind, for sacrifice and for subsequent multiplication of the useful species, the clean being naturally distinguished from the unclean, sheep and (used for milk and wool) from carnivorous beasts of prey, etc. " Noah as second head of mankind receives God's blessing (Genesis 9), the first part of it the repetition of that on Adam (Genesis 1:28), "be fruitful, multiply, and replenish the earth," which blessing had been marred by man's sin
Terah - Why, we may well wonder, why was the covenant of life so long in coming in, and in taking effect? Why,-since God will have all men to be saved, and to come unto the knowledge of the truth,-why were all the families of the earth not embraced in the covenant of life at once? Why was that new covenant not made with Adam, the father of us all? There would surely have been a fine fitness had Adam been our father in the covenant of grace as well as in the covenant of works. And it must surely have been that Adam lost the fatherhood of all penitent, believing, and holy men by the lack of depth and intensity and endurance in his repentance. Abel, Adam's second son, would have made a most excellent covenant head. All this time, then, all this disappointed and postponed time, the angel of the covenant had been passing unceasingly from land to land, and from nation to nation, and from tongue to tongue seeking for some of Adam's sons who should be found worthy to take up the calling and election of God; till, at last, the star came and stood over the house of Terah, on the other side of the flood. ...
As it turned out, then, it was neither Adam, nor Abel, nor Enoch, nor Noah, nor Terah, but it was Abram, Terah's choicest son, who was installed of God into the fatherhood of all foreknown, predestinated, called, justified, and glorified men
Work - One of the prime tasks God gives Adam and Eve is the cultivation of the earth and the classification of the species of wildlife (Genesis 2:5,15,20 ). The judgment of God affects the material world: Adam's efforts to extract a living from it is met by its resistance and his sweat (Genesis 3:17-19 ). Israel is like a new Adam and Eve entering the paradisical garden. As the new Adam he is also tested by Satan, where the issues of allegiance and work are repeatedly stressed (Matthew 4:1-11 ). As such, Jesus, the new Adamthe divine image restoredsets the standard for any human activity. As Jesus was baptized by the Spirit and sent forth as the new Adam, the church is similarly immersed and called forth as a new humanity to do the works of God. A return to Eden has finally been accomplished, where the new Adams and Eves, crowned with glory and honor, are restored finally to their rightful positions as kings and queens of the new creation, God's resplendent images, who will exercise dominion through service and love (22:1-5)
Calvinists - They maintain that God hath chosen a certain number of the fallen race of Adam in Christ, before the foundation of the world, unto eternal glory, according to his immutable purpose, and of his free grace and love, without at least foresight of faith, good works, or any conditions performed by the creature; and that the rest of mankind he was pleased to pass by, and ordain to dishonour and wrath, for their sins, to the praise of his vindictive justice. ...
And yet we are not bound in respect of another's fault; for where it is said that by the sin of Adam we are made subject to the judgment of God, Romans 5:18 . "Such as man was after the fall, such children did he beget...
corruption by the righteous judgment of God being derived from Adam to his posterity...
not by imitation, but by the propagation of a vicious nature
Paul as a Student - It was Paul's imperial mind, winged as it was with his wonderful imagination, that first swept, full of eyes, over the whole Old Testament history, and saw, down to the bottom and up to the top, the whole hidden mystery of the Old Testament economies, from the creation of the first Adam on to the sitting down of the second Adam at the right hand of God. From the creation of Adam to the call of Abraham; and from the call of Abraham to the giving of the law four hundred and thirty years after; and from the giving of the law till the law was magnified in the life and death of Paul's Master
Manicheans - He gives us a list of Manichean works which they introduced into Armenia, including the Penitence or Apocalypse of Adam (pub. Paul, and the Testament of Adam. a Syriac document called the Apocalypse of Adam, which he shewed to be one of those brought by the Manicheans into Armenia in 590 a
Animals - In Genesis 2:20 animals are not suitable companions for Adam. In Genesis 1:29 only plants were given as food for people, and the picture of the garden in Genesis 2 is one of peace between animals and Adam
Life - " When Eve and Adam listened to the tempter and disobeyed the commandment, eating the fruit of the forbidden tree, they brought a curse upon themselves (1618448749_92 ), their descendants (Romans 5:12-14 ; 1 Corinthians 15:21-22 ), and upon all creation (Genesis 3:17 ; Romans 8:19-22 ). Spiritual death reigned from Adam to Christ (Romans 5:14,21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:20-26 ). When he proclaimed the good news of God, he was seeking to save and restore the spiritual life lost in Adam's sin
Glory - ...
According to Rabbinic doctrine, when Adam was created in the image of God, a ray (זַיו) of the Divine glory shone upon his countenance, but among the six things lost by the Fall was the זַיו, which went back to heaven (Weber, Jüdische Theologie, p. ...
(b) But the departed glory is more than restored in Christ, the second Adam, to whom as the Image of God it belongs (2 Corinthians 4:4), who is the Lord of Glory (1 Corinthians 2:8), and in whose face it shines forth in the darkened hearts of men, as at the Creation light first shone upon the face of the earth (2 Corinthians 4:6)
the Angel of the Church in Pergamos - ...
I named them as they passed, and understoodTheir nature; with such knowledge God enduedMy sudden apprehension, says Adam to the angel. When they have overcome by the blood of the Lamb; when their long campaign of sanctification for themselves and for their people has been fought out and won; a new name will be given to every such minister that he alone will know and understand, and that, as Adam said, by a sudden apprehension
Desire - "...
The idea of "be attached to" and "love" comes from hasaq [ Genesis 2:9 ) and the tree forbidden to Adam, which became sinful when "desired" to make one wise (Genesis 3:6 )
Flood - Genesis 1-11 graphically depicts the defection of Adam and Eve, the disaster of Cain, and the alienation at the tower of Babel
Sabbath - It was taken from the symbolic rest of God, which expressed his satisfaction in bringing his creative work to its goal with the creation of Adam and Eve (Genesis 2:1-3; Exodus 20:11)
Nehemiah, Book of - , Ezra, and Nehemiah forms a single continuous narrative from Adam to Nehemiah’s second visit to Jerusalem, and was probably compiled by the Chronicler
Exaltation - Sin entered the world when Adam and Eve ate the forbidden fruit, hoping to become "like God" (Genesis 3:5 )
sa'Tan - The subject of temptation is illustrated, not only by abstract statements, but also by the record of the temptations of Adam and of our Lord
Hell - ...
This is further confirmed by the separation of the rich man and Lazarus, the former in "hell" (Ηades ), the latter in "Abraham's bosom" (Luke 16:23), and in the penitent thief's soul going to be with Jesus in "paradise," the word implying the recovery in heavenly bliss of the paradise lost by Adam (Luke 23:43)
Sex, Biblical Teaching on - ...
In the garden, Adam and Eve were created equal (Genesis 1:27-28 ; Genesis 2:18-23 )
Hosea - They had, like Adam (Hosea 6:7 , instead of 'men'), transgressed the covenant: cf
Keep, Watch, Guard - So God put Adam “into the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it” ( Hutchinsonians - The cherubim, which have been thought "angels placed as a guard to deter Adam from breaking into Eden again," he explains to have been a hieroglyphic of divine construction, or a sacred image, to describe, as far as figures could go, the Aleim and man taken in, or humanity united to deity
Sin - The imputation of the sin of Adam to his posterity, is also what divines call, with some latitude of expression, original sin
Love to God - It is the sum and the end of the law; and though it has been lost by us in Adam, it is restored to us by Christ
Union With God - That perfect spiritual union of man with God which the natural head of our human race, the first Adam, failed to attain to, through sin, has, however, been attained to and realized in the Person of Jesus Christ the second Adam, who is the perfect ‘son of man’ and also ‘son of God’ (1 Corinthians 15:22; 1 Corinthians 15:45-49). Adam
Descent Into Hades - from Adam to Abraham; the second, those from Abraham to Moses; the third, the prophets and ministers (sc. It was, again, a familiar thought in early Christian speculation that in baptism we are restored to Paradise, to the state from which Adam fell, the guilt of original sin being annulled (cf. ]'>[35] who says of the baptized: ‘the fruit which Adam tasted not in Paradise, this day in your mouths has been placed,’ See also Odes of Solomon, xi
Sacrifice - This command is implied in God's having made coats of skins for Adam and Eve (Genesis 3:21); for these must have been taken from animals slain in sacrifice (for it was not for food they were slain, animal food not being permitted until after the flood; nor for clothing, as clothes might have been made of the fleeces, without the needless cruelty of killing the animal). ...
A coat of skin put on Adam from a sacrificed animal typified the covering or atonement (kaphar ) resulting from Christ's sacrifice ("atone" means to cover). ...
As He removed our guilt by His death, so by His obedience He fulfills all which the first Adam left undone (Romans 5:19, though His "obedience" in this verse includes His atoning death; Philippians 2:8; John 10:18)
Ebionism And Ebionites - In the former class they placed Adam, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Aaron, Moses, and Jesus; in the latter David, Solomon, Isaiah, Jeremiah, etc. Some affirmed that He was created (not born) of the Father, a Spirit, and higher than the angels; that He had the power of coming to this earth when He would, and in various modes of manifestation; that He had been incarnate in Adam, and had appeared to the patriarchs in bodily shape; others identified Adam and Christ
Sinlessness - If He sinned, like the other children of Adam, but failed to be humbled and to confess His fault, this brings Him down beneath the religious heroes of the race; for what feature of religious genius is more essential than humility? But if it was no defect, what other explanation of it can there be but sinlessness?...
4. Had Jesus been an ordinary link in the chain of humanity, He could not have been sinless; for ‘there is none righteous, no, not one’: in all who have descended from Adam by ordinary generation, there is a ‘law in the members warring against the law of the mind. If even Adam, in an empty and sinless world, fell, what chance was there of another, standing in a world so corrupt and a society so perverted as that in which Jesus lived, moved and had His being? To bring the Divine nature, however, into play, to account for the sinlessness, would obscure the reality of the temptation of Jesus; and it obscures the vital truth that His sinlessness was not only a gift but an attainment, which He had to secure afresh on every step of a human development, and which rendered Him supremely well-pleasing to His Father in heaven. Had He been one of the sinful sons of Adam, He could have done nothing of the kind; for ‘none of them can redeem his brother or offer to God a ransom for him’ (Psalms 49:7)
Targums - ‘And they heard the voice of the Word ( Memra ) of the Lord God walking in the garden in the evening of the day; and Adam and his wife hid themselves from before the Lord God among the trees of the garden. And the Lord God called to Adam and said: “Where art thou?” And he said: “The voice of Thy Word ( Memra ) I heard in the garden, and I was afraid, because I was naked, and I would hide
Bible, Authority of the - And it is the challenge that leads Eve, and then Adam, into their definitive act of rebellion. It is thus that the Book of Genesis begins with a chapter-long listing of the creative words of God, "And God said" Chapters 2,3 narrate the interlocution of the Lord God and Adam and Eve in the garden
Rufus - Adam of Cambridge]'>[2]. 343 A with the note in Adam’s ed. Adam observes, ‘whenever possible, to quote classical Greek parallels to the figures of the NT, as well as parallels from the Hebrew: the use of figures already familiar to the Greeks cannot but have made the NT writings more acceptable to Greek readers
Thousand Years - The millennial nations will be prepared for a higher state, as Adam would have been in paradise, had he never fallen (Revelation 21:1-24; Revelation 21:26). God from the first, in dividing to the nations their inheritance, when He separated the sons of Adam, set their bounds "according to the number of the children, of Israel" (Deuteronomy 32:8)
Revelation, Idea of - " And then, as the cosmogony resolves into the narrower dimensions of Eden, we read that the Lord God commanded Adam concerning the trees of the gardenwhich to eat, and which not to eat (2:16-17). A chapter later, the next divine words"Where are you?" (3:9)represent the opening salvo in the sustained interchange that exposes sin and announces its penalty for Adam, Eve, the serpent, and the world
Reprobation - For either the reprobates are destroyed for a pure reason of sovereignty without any reference to their sinfulness, and thus all criminality is left out of the consideration; or they are destroyed for the sin of Adam, to which they were not consenting; or for personal faults resulting from a corruption of nature which they brought into the world with them, and which God wills not to correct, and which they have no power to correct themselves. For the "free gift" has come upon all men, "to justification of life," through "the righteousness" of the second Adam, so that the terms of our probation are but changed
Rufus - Adam of Cambridge]'>[2]. 343 A with the note in Adam’s ed. Adam observes, ‘whenever possible, to quote classical Greek parallels to the figures of the NT, as well as parallels from the Hebrew: the use of figures already familiar to the Greeks cannot but have made the NT writings more acceptable to Greek readers
Gnostics - They supported their opinions and practice by various authorities: some referred to fictitious and apocryphal writings of Adam, Abraham, Zoroaster, Christ, and his apostles; others boasted that they had deduced their sentiments from secret doctrines of Christ, concealed from the vulgar; others affirmed that they arrived at superior degrees of wisdom by an innate vigour of mind; and others asserted that they were instructed in these mysterious parts of theological science by Thendas, a disciple of St
Sabbath - That considering Adam was restored to favour through a Mediator, and a religious service instituted, which man was required to observe, in testimony not only of his dependence on the Creator, but also of his faith and hope in the promise, it seems reasonable that an institution so grand and solemn, and so necessary to the observance of this service, should be then existent
Abstain, Abstinence - Even in the pristine garden of Eden God told Adam to abstain from eating the fruit of a certain tree
Know, Knowledge - ...
The word "know" is used as a euphemism for sex and intercourse: Adam knew his wife Eve and she became pregnant (Genesis 4:1 )
Spitting - If he who knew no sin became sin, and he who had incurred no penalty became a curse, well may it be supposed that he who knew no shame should be exposed to the greatest shame, to do away both the sin, curse and the shame, which Adam's transgression had brought upon the whole church when he had made the whole earth naked to their shame. If Adam hath made us by original sin naked, and we all by actual transgression have done the same—behold Jesus
Cosmopolitanism - Luke takes it back to Adam and God (Luke 3:38)
Flesh - Paul’s presentation of it comes in the case of fallen man through natural inheritance-all mankind descending from Adam ‘by ordinary generation’-and is therefore characterized as ‘flesh’; while the life of holiness, as a gift of the Divine Spirit, is described as ‘spirit’ with reference to its source
Clean, To Be - Since the fall of Adam and Eve, none of their offspring is clean in the sight of the holy God: “Who can say, I have made my heart clean, I am pure from my sin?” ( Zabii - " Holding the eternity of the world, they easily became Pre-Adamites, affirming that Adam was not the first man
Type - Adam was "the figure of him that was to come," Romans 5:14
Sedulius, 5th-Cent. Poet - It describes the effect of the Incarnation in contrast to the work of Adam, and Christ as the antitype of the types of O
Humanity, Humankind - Through Jesus Christ, the human race can regain what it lost through the man Adam
Type - In Romans 5:14, where Adam is said to be τύπος τοῦ μέλλοντος (i. In Romans 5:14, Hebrews 8:5 Adam, the natural head of the race, is taken as a type of Christ, the spiritual head. At other times types are found in the transactions or events of the OT narratives, as when the union of Christ with the Church is held to be prefigured by the union of Adam with Eve (Ephesians 5:32; cf
Baruch, Apocalypse of - ...
The world will last until all the predestined sons of Adam have been born (xxiii. All history is divided into 12 parts: the black waters are the six bad periods, beginning with the Fall (‘O Adam, what hast thou done to all those who are born from thee?’ xlviii. * [1]7 They coincide also in much of their teaching, in the division of history into 12 parts, in the importance attached to Adam’s sin, in the legend of Behemoth and Leviathan, in the interest taken in the Lost Tribes,† [1]7)
Confession - ) The books above-said teach this, that there is one God, almighty, all- wise, and all-good, who has made all things by his goodness; for he formed Adam in his own image and likeness, but that by the envy of the devil, and the disobedience of the said Adam, sin has entered into the world, and that we are sinners in Adam and by Adam
Lust - It may be that there is weakness in man due to the removal of ‘original righteousness’ which Adam had before he sinned, but this removal does not impair human nature and it does not make virtue impossible. Sometimes it was simply referred to the fall of Adam (Wisdom of Solomon 2:23 ff. Paul (Romans 7:15-24) simply states these two tendencies and connects the evil with the fall of Adam
Abel - He was the second son of Adam and Eve, and born probably in the second or third year of the world; though some will have it that he and Cain were twins. Whether they remained in their father's family at the time when they brought their offerings to the Lord, or had establishments separate from that of Adam, does not clearly appear
Teach, Teacher - ...
The creation of Adam and Eve signaled the institution of the family (Genesis 1:26-28 ; 2:18-25 ; 4:1 ; 5:1-2 )
Son of God - Adam is called the son of God, because he came into existence as a result of the creative activity of God (Luke 3:38; cf
Thankfulness, Thanksgiving - Neither Adam nor Eve thanked God for his creation, and, compared to Abel's gift of the fat portions from the firstborn of his flock, Cain's gift of "some fruit" seems singularly thankless
Polygamy - Had God intended polygamy for the species, it is probable he would have begun with it; especially as by giving to Adam more wives than one, the multiplication of the human race would have proceeded with a quicker progress
Jew - During fifty generations of the children of Adam the family of this man, or rather the descendants of a part of it, "elected according to the purpose of God," Romans 9:11, enjoyed exclusive privileges; to the Israelites alone "pertaineth the adoption, and the glory, and the covenants, and the giving of the law, and the service of God, and the promises, whose are the fathers, and of whom as concerning the flesh Christ came, who is over all, God blessed forever
Live - In the ground stem this verb connotes “having life”: “And Adam lived a hundred and thirty years …” ( Marriage - On the other hand, Noah and his three sons had each but one wife; and the same appears to be true of all his direct ancestors' back to Adam
Ecclesiastes, Book of - It describes life 'in Adam,' and seeks an answer to the questions, What is best for man? how should he spend his life to be happy on earth? The writer speaks as a human philosopher in his wanderings
Marriage - Genesis 1:26-27 declares that mankind ( Adam [ Genesis 5:1-3 ; 9:6 ; 1 Corinthians 11:7 ; Colossians 3:10 ; Romans 1:26-3209 ). Eve to Adam, Rebecca to Isaac )
Resurrection - ...
Paul's discussion on the "first Adam" who is born of "dust" and the "second Adam" who is Christ and is a "life-giving spirit" has as its goal the statement "flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God. Adams...
See also Second Coming of Christ ...
Bibliography
Death - The account of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 2:1;b13 ) clearly points to sin as the reason humans must experience death (Genesis 2:17 ; Genesis 3:3 )
Baptism, Christian - From Adam they have inherited sin and death; and I can so unite them to myself that in me they shall be heirs of righteousness and life
Justification - Effectually, Abraham was called to counteract the sin of Adam
Ecclesiastes, Book of - ” Even if humans do seem to succeed, like Qoheleth himself, had even this is vanity, because their knowledge is limited and imperfect: “no man (adam ) can find out the work that God maketh from the beginning to the end” (Ecclesiastes 3:11 )
Jesus, the Lord - He is there as the last Adam and the Second man, the Head and pattern of a new race of men
Paul - To Paul also was committed what he calls "my gospel:" this was 'the gospel of the glory' (Christ in glory who put away the Christian's sins being presented in it as the last Adam, the Son of God)
Proselytes - The proselytes of the gate were not bound to circumcision, only to the seven precepts of Noah, namely, the six said to have been given to Adam:...
(1) against idolatry,...
(2) blasphemy,...
(3) bloodshed,...
(4) uncleanness,...
(5) theft,...
(6) the precept of obedience to authorities, and...
(7) that given to Noah against "flesh with the blood"; but he had not the full Israelite privileges, he must not study the law nor redeem his firstborn
Matthew, Gospel by - The genealogy here starts with Abraham, in contrast with that in Luke, which goes back to Adam because in that gospel the Lord is viewed as connected with man, i
Cloth, Clothing - The need for clothing derives its origin from the shame of nakedness experienced by Adam and Eve in the garden (Genesis 3:7-8 )
Valentinus, Founder of a Gnostic Sect - Her formation (πλάσμα) is Adam created in the name of the Ἄνθρωπος προών. Thus furnished with higher insight Adam excites the fears of the angels; for even as κοσμικοὶ ἄνθρωποι are seized with fear of the images made by their own hands to bear the name of God i. The Πατήρ or Βυθός stands at their head; but what place in the Valentinian Pleroma was assigned to the Ἄνθροπος προών in whose name Adam was created, is difficult to determine
Abortion - As the Word become flesh (John 1:14 ) and the last Adam (1Col 15:45; cf. But unlike the first Adam who emerged fully formed from the earth, Jesus' entrance into humanity was as a zygote in Mary's womb
Immorality, Sexual - sela, improperly translated "rib" in many versions) of Adam and fashions it into a genetic counterpart that is specifically female, and which matches Adam's maleness for purposes of reproducing the species. Adam and Eve are thus equal and complementary to one another, of the same physical and genetic composition apart from the slight difference that governs the characteristic nature of male and female fetuses
Division of the Earth - Moses refers to it, as handed down to the Israelites, "from the days of old, and the years of many generations; as they might learn from their fathers and their elders," and farther, as conveying a special grant of the land of Palestine, to be the lot of the twelve tribes of Israel:—...
"When the Most High divided to the nations their settlements, When he separated the sons of Adam, ...
He assigned the boundaries of the peoples [1] According to the number of the sons of Israel: For the portion of the Lord is his people, ...
Jacob is the lot of his inheritance," ...
Deuteronomy 32:7-9 . Here he represents mankind as all of "one blood," race, or stock, "the sons of Adam" and of Noah in succession; and the seasons and the boundaries of their respective settlements, as previously regulated by the divine appointment
Devil - His assuming an animal form, that of a serpent, and the fact of death existing in the pre-Adamite world, imply that evil probably was introduced by him in some way unknown to us, affecting the lower creation before man's creation. "...
(4) At its close, being loosed for a while, in person Satan shall head the last conspiracy against Christ (permitted in order to show the security of believers who cannot fall as Adam fell by Satan's wiles), and shall be finally cast into the lake of life forever (Revelation 20:7-10)
Dress - Aprons of figleaves were our first parents' earliest attempt at dress to clothe their shame (See Adam, (See ABEL) (Genesis 3:7; Genesis 3:21); "God made coats of skin and clothed them," doubtless taken from animals slain in sacrifice at His command; type of the garment of righteousness provided by God through His Son's sacrifice, wherewith we, whose own faulty righteousness could not clothe our shame, are completely covered so as to stand before the all-searching eye of God (Isaiah 61:10)
Cherub (1) - of Eden (after Adam's fall) God placed (yashkeen , 'set as the dwelling place of His Shekinah glory') the Cherubim, and a flaming sword which turned every way to keep the way of life" (Genesis 3:24). (See Adam
Neonomians - Whether the gospel be a law more new than is implied in the first promise to fallen Adam, proposed to Cain, and obeyed by Abel, to the differencing him from his unbelieving brother. 220; William's gospel Truth; Edwards's Crispianism Unmasked; Chauncey's Neonomianism Unmasked; Adams's View of Religions
Criticism - Adam Smith, who accept the main positions of Wellhausen and assign a primary place to the prophets as the chief exponents of the higher religion of Israel, in which the world possesses a genuine revelation of the mind and will of God of the highest value for all ages
Family - Not only Adam but also Noah, the second founder of the human race, represents monogamy, and on that account recommends it as God’s ordinance
Grace - the grace of the one man Jesus Christ ,’ who is the counterpart of the sinful and baleful Adam: the generous bounty of the Man towards men , shown by Jesus Christ, served an essential part in human redemption
Persia - In his work traces appear of Adam and Eve's history, creation, the deluge, David's psalms
Covenant - ...
No sooner had Adam broken the covenant of works, than a promise of a final deliverance from the evils incurred by the breach of it was given
Theophilus, Bishop of Antioch - He supplies a series of dates beginning with Adam and ending with Marcus Aurelius who had died shortly before he wrote i
Revelation of John, the - Revelation represents in reverse order man first sinning and dying, then conquering sin and death through the blood of the Lamb; the first Adam and Eve represented by the second Adam, Christ, and the church His spotless bride in paradise, with access to the tree of life, and the crystal waters of life flowing from the throne of God
Isidorus, Archbaptist of Seville - , under the head of "De discretione temporum," is a chronological summary of sacred and secular history from Adam to Heraclius, concluding in these striking words: "Eraclius xvii nunc agit imperii annum: Judaei in Hispania Christiani efficiuntur. characters and 21 on New, from Adam to Maccabaeus and from Zacharias to Titus
Anthropology - With this in mind, Paul developed the theologically potent distinction between “the first man Adam” and “the last Adam” (1 Corinthians 15:45-47 )
Satan - The Serpent of Genesis 3:1-24 becomes ‘the old serpent’ who seduced Adam and Eve
Time - The covenants God made with Adam, Noah, Abraham, Moses, David, and Jeremiah illustrate that history reveals a progressive unveiling of God's redemptive plan for humanity
Lord's Prayer, the - Where Adam failed he succeeds in his redemptive and exemplary work
Pre-Existence of Jesus Christ - The word is redoubled, perhaps to intimate that Adam was made in the likeness of the human soul of Christ, as well as that he bore something of the image and resemblance of the divine nature
Genesis, the Book of - ...
Thus Adam's history before and in the fall is minutely given, as affecting the whole race whom he represented; but after the fall only a few brief notices, but these of important bearing on mankind's spiritual prospects (Genesis 3:20-24; Genesis 4:1; Genesis 5:1-5). " In Genesis 2:4 to the end of Genesis 3 JEHOVAH ELOHIM are combined, marking that the mighty Creator is the same JEHOVAH who revealed Himself to Adam as subsequently to Moses
Judgment - DAY OF, is that important period which shall terminate the present dispensation of grace toward the fallen race of Adam, put an end to time, and introduce the eternal destinies of men and angels, Acts 16:31 ; 1 Corinthians 15:24-26 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:14-17 ; Matthew 25:31-46
Sacrifice - Adam and his sons, Noah and his descendents, Abraham and his posterity, Job and Melchizedek, before the Mosaic law, offered to God real sacrifices
Jonathan - Jonathan's pious and filial self devotion appears in his readiness (like Isaac) to die at his father's command because of the rash adjuration of the latter; type of the Son of God, volunteering to die for us because Adam by eating the forbidden fruit had his "eyes opened" (Genesis 3; 1 Samuel 14:27; 1 Samuel 14:43); again in his continuing to the last faithful to Saul, though his father had attempted his life, and though he knew that his father's kingdom was doomed to fall and David to succeed
Genealogies of Jesus Christ - ) back to Abraham; but, not stopping there, he carries the pedigree back to ‘Adam the son of God,’ thus bringing the Son of man into relation with all men whom God has created. Genesis 6:9 αὖται δὲ αἱ γενἑσεις Νῶε, and Genesis 10:1), where it introduces a list of Adam’s descendants, and thus practically forms the title of a genealogieal table. Apart from small variations of little interest, there is nothing to notice in the names from David to Adam, except the insertion in Luke 3:36 of a second Canaan in agreement with the LXX Septuagint of Genesis 10:24
Creation - The language of Genesis 2:1 portrays God with a “hands on” closeness shaping Adam and Eve like a potter forming a clay vessel
Daniel, Book of - Generally, apocalyptic writings bear the name of ancient heroes such as Adam, Enoch, or Baruch, who demonstrated in their time the type of character needed in the current situation of the writer
Genesis - See Creation ; Flood ; Sin ; Humanity ; Anthropology ; Earth; Image of God ; Abraham ; Isaac ; Jacob ; Joseph ; Adam and Eve ; Noah ; Names of God ; God of the Fathers
Corinthians, Epistles to the - Adam and Christ are the two heads
Genealogy - The gap between Adam and Noah is filled by a genealogy of 10 generations ( Genesis 5:1-32 ), and in Genesis 10:1-32 the nations of the world, as known to the writer, are traced in a genealogical tree to Noah’s three sons
Pre-Eminence - In 1 Corinthians Christ is God’s power and wisdom (1 Corinthians 1:24; 1 Corinthians 1:30), the only Foundation (1 Corinthians 3:11), the true Passover (1 Corinthians 5:7), our perfect Example (1 Corinthians 11:1), and the Second Adam, who gives life to all in Him (1 Corinthians 15:45)
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - 52 Jesus is compared to Adam, that is, neither had a human father. Some say that this breath was a sneeze made by Adam and preserved by Gabriel. ’ Joseph said: ‘Is a child born without a father?’ Mary said: ‘Yes, without parents, just as Adam and Eve were
Corinthians, First And Second, Theology of - The former is characterized by sin and suffering, due to Adam's fall. If, as a number of scholars believe, the person of Adam in particular and the Hebrew concept of corporate personality in general inform the metaphor, then the eschatological nuance is thereby heightened. The body of Christ can be seen, then, to be the eschatological Adam (1 Corinthians 15:45 ), the new humanity of the endtime that has appeared in history
Create, Creation - Clearly Adam and Eve cannot excuse their transgression on the basis of a deficient environment because it is both perfect and provides bountifully for their every need (1:29; 2:8-16,20-25). Hiebert...
See also Adam ; Eve ; Genesis, Theology of ; God ; Person, Personhood ; Image of God ; Sabbath ; Woman ...
Bibliography
Old Testament - Sin was a great fact which directly entered the world (εἰσῆλθεν) in Adam. Adam in Romans 5:12 f
Priest - He is the antitype of Adam, between whose relation to the race and that of Christ a striking parallel, with a more striking contrast, may be drawn (Romans 5:12-21, 1 Corinthians 15:21 f. The one was the medium of sin and death, the other of redemption and life; and as the one stands for a race sinful before God, so, in virtue of what He does for the race, lifting men up to higher spiritual privileges than the unfallen Adam ever knew, the other is even a fitter representative
Jesus Christ - Jesus came from Mary; but ultimately He came from God via a lineage that extends back to Adam, who was the direct child of God
Apocrypha - It includes significant discussions on the nature of sin and its connection with Adam (cf
Unity - The ruin wrought by Adam and the redemption wrought by Christ seem to be co-extensive in human history (Romans 5:16, 1 Corinthians 15:22); and in the dispensation of the fullness of the times it is God’s purpose to bring all things again into unity (ἀνακεφαλαιώσασθαι) in Christ (Ephesians 1:10; cf
Pilgrimage - The next morning by day-break they visit Al Masher al Karam, or the sacred monument; and, departing thence before sun-rise, haste by Batn Mohasser to the valley of Mina, where they throw seven stones at three marks or pillars, in imitation of Abraham, who, meeting the devil in that place, and being by him disturbed in his devotions, or tempted to disobedience when he was going to sacrifice his son, was commanded by God to drive him away by throwing stones at him; though others pretend this rite to be as old as Adam, who also put the devil to flight in the same place, and by the same means
Headship - Paul’s view of Christ as the Second Adam (1 Corinthians 15:22; 1 Corinthians 15:45 ff
Sabbath - Even Adam in innocence needed the Sabbath amidst earthly works; much more we need it, who are fallen
Fall - Adam fell by eating the forbidden fruit
no'ah - (rest ), the tenth in descent from Adam, in the line of Seth was the son of Lamech and grandson of Methuselah
no'ah - (rest ), the tenth in descent from Adam, in the line of Seth was the son of Lamech and grandson of Methuselah
Jordan - ...
The Lord of the whole earth made the descending waters stand in a heap very far from their place of crossing, namely, by the town of Adam, that is beside Zarthan or Zaretan, the moment that the feet of the priests bearing the ark dipped in the water
Resurrection - ...
In 1 Corinthians 15 the general line of argument is: (1) the proof of the possibility of a resurrection from the resurrection of Christ accepted as a historical event; (2) the argument from analogy, based on the Rabbinical conception of ‘body,’ to prove the possibility of the existence of such a thing as a spiritual body; (3) the contrast between Christ and Adam as the respective sources of the incorruptible and the corruptible, the heavenly and the earthly. The Second Man, the Last Adam, is a quickening spirit; by this title St
Ascension of Isaiah - There he sees all the righteous from the time of Adam, including Abel, Seth, and Enoch, stript of the garments of the flesh, not sitting on their thrones nor as yet wearing their crowns of glory, until the Beloved has descended to earth (9:12, 13) and ascended again (9:18). The righteous from Adam downwards are already in the seventh heaven, stript of the garments of the flesh, though not yet seated on their thrones and crowned (9:9)
Death, Mortality - Death passed on all men because of one man's disobedience so that in Adam all die (Romans 5:12-17 ; 1Col 15:22)
Canticles; the Song of Solomon - ...
As Eve was formed from Adam, so Christ took our flesh to be brother and also husband (compare Hebrews 2:11; Mark 3:35)
Daniel, the Book of - Genesis 2:17, in the day that Adam sinned he died, though his actual death was long subsequent
Prophecy, Prophets - Christ can be compared to Adam (1 Corinthians 15:22-23 ; see 1 Corinthians 10:11 )
Angel - The first was "cherubim, " a plural form, conceived of as winged creatures (Exodus 25:20 ), and mentioned first in connection with the expulsion of Adam and Eve from Eden (Genesis 3:24 )
World - Thus Adam is described as πρωτόπλαστος πατὴρ κόσμου Wisdom of Solomon 10:1); a multitude of wise men is the salvation of the world (Wisdom of Solomon 6:24), as the family of Noah was its hope (Wisdom of Solomon 14:6)
Death - If the belief enshrined in the story of the Fall in Genesis 3:1-24 regarded death in the ordinary sense as the penalty of Adam and Eve’s transgression, they at any rate did not die ‘in the day’ of their transgression; v
the Angel of the Church of the Laodiceans - " On the margin of a copy of Thomas Adam' Private Thoughts now preserved among the treasures of the British Museum, Coleridge has written these pencilled lines: "For a great part of my life I did not know that I was poor, and naked, and blind, and miserable
Evangelist (2) - 6), prevailed throughout the West, and furnished the interpretation which is best known, as most largely represented in Christian art, and as embodied in the noble hymn of Adam of St
mo'Ses - ) Moses is spoken of as a likeness of Christ; and as this is a point of view which has been almost lost in the Church, compared with the more familiar comparisons of Christ to Adam, David, Joshua, and yet has as firm a basis in fact as any of them, it may be well to draw it out in detail
World - Thus Adam is described as πρωτόπλαστος πατὴρ κόσμου Wisdom of Solomon 10:1); a multitude of wise men is the salvation of the world (Wisdom of Solomon 6:24), as the family of Noah was its hope (Wisdom of Solomon 14:6)
Romans, Epistle to the - What can lie before us save progress to perfection? Reconciled to God while yet enemies, for what can we not hope, now that we are His friends? Christ is indeed a second Adam, the creator of a new humanity. His power to save cannot be less than Adam’s power to destroy. Paul strives to draw out the comparison and the contrast between the first Adam and the Second
Samaria, Samaritans - In addition to these they possess a few historical works:—Kitab es-Satir, a history of the period from Adam to Moses; et-Tabakh, an account of judgments which befell the Jews; the Book of Joshua (in Arabic, but probably in parts from a Heb. original), which closely follows the canonical Joshua, but has many apocryphal additions and eight concluding chapters, bringing the history down to the time of Alexander Severus; Chronicle of Abul-Fath; el-Tolidoth, a short Hebrew history from Adam till the present high priest, accompanied by an Arabic translation
Science (2) - The Hebrews defined, not by reference to a class—as when we say ‘man is a rational animal’—but by reference to a type, as when it is implied that natural man is Adam, and redeemed man is Christ, the second Adam (Romans 5, 1 Corinthians 15)
Augustine - Alarmed at the consequences which seemed to him obviously to result from allowing that Adam's sin is transmitted to all his posterity, and fortified in his sentiments on this subject by those of Origen and Ruffinus, with the latter of whom he had associated, he boldly denied tenets which he did not believe. Concerning original sin, he maintained that it was derived from our first parents; and he believed he had ascertained in what the original sin conveyed by Adam to his posterity consisted. Augustine himself, where he asks this question, ‘Doth any man affirm that free will is perished utterly from man by the fall of Adam?' And there unto he makes this answer: ‘Freedom is perished by sin; but it is that freedom only which we had in paradise, of having perfect righteousness with immortality
Chronicles, Theology of - Beginning with creation (Adam), the focus quickly narrows temporally, geographically, and nationally to the tribes of Israel (chaps
Scripture, Unity And Diversity of - Covenant forms are presented to Adam, Noah, Abraham, and Moses; then the promise of a new covenant appears in the prophets
Jesus, Life And Ministry of - Only when this brief biographical sketch was complete did Luke append His genealogy (Luke 3:23-38 ), which confirms in passing Jesus' Davidic ancestry (Mark 10:33-34 ; compare Luke 1:32-33 ), while emphasizing above all His solidarity with the entire human race in its descent from “Adam, which was the son of God” (Luke 3:38 )
Luke, the Gospel According to - the parable of the prodigal son, the tracing of Christ's genealogy up to Adam the common parent of Jew and Gentile, not only to Abraham, as Matthew
Heaven - Ridgley, "which are generally brought in defense of it, are taken from those instances recorded in Scripture, in which persons who have never seen one another before, have immediately known each other in this world, by a special immediate divine revelation given to them, in like manner as Adam knew that Eve was taken out of him; and therefore says, This is now bone of my bone, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called woman, because she was taken out of man, Genesis 2:23
Tongues, Confusion of - " Moreover Christ is the Head of all mankind in redemption, as Adam in the fall of all (Romans 5:15-19; 1 Corinthians 15:22; 1 Corinthians 15:45-49). ...
This is his superiority to brutes; hence to mature Adam's intellectual powers and to teach him the use of language God brought the animals to him to name (Genesis 2:19-20)
Mission - The first records in biblical history of God's sending is his banishment of Adam and Even from the garden and the angelic mission to destroy Sodom and Gomorrah (Genesis 3:23 ; 19:13 )
Ebionism - Paul; Christ’s appearance in Adam and others; permissibility of formal idolatry in times of persecution; magic, astrology, prophecy
Esdras, the Second Book of - Its origin is to be found in the Fall of Adam and the evil heart (cor malignum) which he has transmitted to his descendants (2 Es 7:118; 3:20-22, 25-26; 4:30; cf
Brotherhood (2) - ’ The Son of Mary, of David, of Abraham, was also Son of Adam (Luke 3:38) and one of the race
Judas - In the family of Adam there was a Cain; in Noah's house there was a Ham; Isaac had his Esau as well as Jacob; and, above all, the Lord Jesus had Judas
Mediator - No sooner had Adam transgressed the law of God in paradise, and become a sinful creature, than the Almighty was pleased in mercy to appoint a Mediator or Redeemer, who, in due time, should be born into the world, to make an atonement both for his transgression, and for all the sins of men. Thus it became a necessary part of Adam's religion after the fall, as well as that of his posterity after him, to worship God through hope in this Mediator
Prosper, Saint, a Native of Aquitaine - Those who adopted it, he says, believe that mankind has sinned in Adam, and that without God's grace there can be no salvation for any one
Lutherans - Adam, they said, received for himself and his posterity the gift of righteousness, which he subsequently forfeited; in his loins we were included, and by him were virtually represented: his will was ours, and hence the consequence of his lapse is justly imputable to us his descendants. Thus they contended, that the sin of Adam conveys to us solely imputed guilt; the corporeal infection which they admitted not being sin itself, but only the subject matter of it,—not peccatum, but, according to their phraseology, fomes peccati, a kind of fuel which the human will kindles or not at pleasure
Theodorus, Bishop of Mopsuestia - Augustinum defendentem originale peccatum et Adam per transgressionem mortalem factum catholice disserentem. The same result followed in the case of each descendant of Adam who sinned; and since all si
Virgin Birth - Likewise, for Paul, Adam's appearance as the firstborn of the human race directly created by God coincides well with the idea of the virgin birth, where through Jesus as the second Adam, God has made a new and perfect start (1 Corinthians 15:20-22,45-49 ; Romans 5:14-19 )
Deuteronomy, the Book of - ...
In Deuteronomy 32:8 Moses intimates that from the beginning the distribution of races and nations had a relation to God's final purpose that Israel should be the spiritual center of the kingdom of God; "when the Most High divided to the nations their inheritance, when He separated the sons of Adam, He set the bound: of the people according to the number of the children of Israel," i
Elect, Election - This, to Paul, was perhaps the ultimate mystery: One man's fall (Adam) meant the redemption of many and one nation's sin (Israel) meant the inclusion of all
the Prodigal Son - From the temptation and fall of Adam, on to the marriage supper of the Lamb-all the history of the Church of God, and all the experiences of the individual sinner and saint, are to be found set forth in this most wonderful of all our Lord's histories
the Ten Virgins - Our Lord was of that angel's mind who said to Adam,-'What if earth be but the shadow of heaven, and things therein each to other like, more than on earth is thought
the Sower Who Went Forth to Sow - George Adam Smith's last sermon
Seceders - Alexander Moncrief, Thomas Mair, Adam Gib, and others, contended, on the other hand, that the swearing of the above clause was a virtual renunciation of their testimony; and this controversy was so keenly agitated, that they split into two different parties, and now meet in different synods
Epiphanius, Bishop of Salamis - Barbarism lasted from Adam to Noah Scythianism from Noah to the migration of Peleg and Reu to Scythia
Bible, Theology of - Except for Jesus Christ, each person who has lived since Adam and Eve has followed in their footsteps, sinning against God
Agriculture - Adam, placed in the Garden of Eden, is ‘to dress it and to keep it’ (Genesis 2:15); driven from it, he is sent ‘to till the ground from whence he was taken’ (Genesis 3:23)
Church, the - The body of Christ is the last Adam (1 Corinthians 15:45 ), the new humanity of the endtime that has appeared in history
Matthew, the Gospel According to - From the beginning Matthew introduces Jesus as "Son of David," but Mark 1:1 as "the Son of God," Luke as "the Son of Adam, the son of God" (Luke 3:38), John as "the Word" who "was God" (John 1:4)
Church - This truth, besides being definitely asserted ( Ephesians 5:25 ; Ephesians 5:27 , Acts 20:28 , Titus 2:14 ), is involved in the conception of Christ as the second Adam ( 1618448749_74 , 1618448749_41 ), the federal head of a redeemed race; underlies the institutions of Baptism and the Eucharist; and is expressed in the Apostolic teaching concerning the two Sacraments (see above, also 1 Corinthians 10:16-18 ; 1 Corinthians 11:20-34 )
Gospel - Luke, on the other hand, traced His lineage all the way back to Adam to accentuate His common bond with all the human race
Luke, Gospel According to - 177), who refers to the genealogy of Jesus from Adam; the Clementine Homities (2nd cent
Paul as a Pastor - But after I am like to drop with my work; and most of all with the arrears of it; Paul absolutely prostrates me, and tramples me to death, when he stands up among his elders and deacons and says: "I take you to record this day that I am pure from the blood of all men!" I do not find his rapture into the third heavens hard to be understood, nor his revelations and inspirations, nor his thorn in the flesh, nor any of his doctrines of Adam, or of Christ, or of election, or of justification or of sanctification, or of the final perseverance of the saints
Sarah - Not Adam before his fall; not Enoch, who so pleased God; not Abraham at his call, or after offering his son; not Jacob at Bethel, nor Israel at the Jabbok; not Moses on the mount and in the cleft rock; not Isaiah in the temple, and not John in the spirit-not the best and the most blessed of them all was more blessed or better blessed than was Hagar the polluted outcast on her weeping way to Shur
Demon, Demoniacal Possession, Demoniacs - They were of both sexes, and their species was propagated through cohabitation with Adam and Eve during a period of 130 years after the Creation
Achan - It was at Adam and Eve's eyes that the devil came into man's heart at first
Alpha And Omega (2) - 4, ‘Adam transgressed the whole law from א to ח’; and 48
Jacob - How dreadful is this place! Jacob had been taught to feel and to say how dreadful was that place where his father's altar was built; and those places where God had come down to talk with Adam, and Abel, and Noah, and Abraham, and Hagar
Jonathan - All human souls came into existence already knit together like the souls of Adam and Eve, like the souls of David and Jonathan, like the souls of Jesus and John, like the souls of Christ and His church
Pronunciation of Proper Names - Young’s Analytical Concordance (George Adam Young & Co
Pre-Existence of Christ - ...
The question immediately arises for theology: How is one to relate this conception of the Pre-existent Christ to the Eternal Unity of the God-head? Beyschlag’s theory of an ideal pre-existence in the Divine thought and will is wholly inadequate as a historical interpretation of Pauline thought; and the same may be said of the theory (Baur, Pfleiderer) according to which the conception of the ‘Man from Heaven,’ the ‘Second Adam,’ is the fountainhead of the Pauline Christology
Kings, the Books of - Chronicles is more comprehensive, comprising genealogies from Adam downward, and David's reign; 1 Chronicles 28 - 36:22 synchronizes with 1 and 2 Kings
Fulfilment - There is no more striking or more frequently noted parable of...
The slow sweet hours that bring us all things good,...
The slow sad hours that bring us all things ill;...
or sometimes, as George Eliot has expressed it in Adam Bede, of ‘swift hurrying shame,’ ‘the bitterest of life’s bitterness
Abraham - God promised His Son to Adam and Eve; but generations and generations had to pass before the fulness of time came
Jeru'Salem - The church of the Holy Sepulchre, which is claimed, but without sufficient reason, to be upon the site of Calvary, is "a collection of chapels and altars of different ages and a unique museum of religious curiosities from Adam to Christ
Church - John Owen, that sin having entered into the world, God was pleased to found his church (the catholic or universal church) in the promise of the Messiah given to Adam; that this promise contained in it something of the nature of a covenant, including the grace which God designed to show to sinners in the Messiah, and the obedience which he required from them; and that consequently, from its first promulgation, that promise became the sole foundation of the church and of the whole worship of God therein
Eschatology - Finally, certain texts seem to directly teach universalism: “For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive” (1 Corinthians 15:22 ; “[2] act of righteousness leads to acquittal and life for all” (Romans 5:18 RSV; compare Ephesians 1:10 ; Colossians 1:20 ; 1 Timothy 4:10 ; 1 John 2:2 )
Marriage - ’ Jubilees 4 maintains that all the patriarchs from Adam to Noah married near relatives
Gospels - Luke shows the Gentiles that He was sprung from Adam, the common father of Gentiles and Jews
Golgotha - in Ephesians 5:14) mentions a tradition that Adam was buried at Golgotha, and that at the Crucifixion the drops of Christ’s blood fell on his skull and restored him to life
Metaphor - Thus his language in Romans 5:12, ‘as through one man sin entered into the world and death through sin,’ and Romans 5:14, ‘death reigned from Adam until Moses,’ is something more than metaphor
Gregorius Thaumaturgus, Bishop of Neocaesarea - " He regrets his departure from Caesarea, as Adam might bewail his expulsion from Eden, having to eat of the soil, to contend with thorns and thistles, and dwell in darkness, weeping and mourning
Anger - The ills of life-especially death-suggested later a world lying under a curse, due to Adam’s sin. Paul also holds the idea that the death of Jesus is a sign of His human submission to the elemental world-powers of darkness, who, since Adam, have held the world under their grievous rule (Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) , article ‘Elements’; also Wrede, Paul, Eng. But these ‘world-powers of darkness,’ whose dues the death of Jesus was conceived as satisfying, are but a thinly disguised form of God’s retribution for Adam’s sin
Will - But the corruption introduced into our nature by the fall of Adam has so weakened our mental powers, has given such force to our passions, and such perverseness to our wills, that a man "cannot turn and prepare himself by his own natural, strength and good works to faith and calling upon God
Miracles - The early Christian apologists allege in support of Christianity:...
(1) the greatness, number, completeness, and publicity of the miracles;...
(2) the beneficial tendency of the doctrine;...
(3) the connection of the miracles with prophecy and the whole scheme of redemption from Adam to Christ
Religious Experience - Christ has started a new race, as truly as did Adam (1 Corinthians 15:22; 1 Corinthians 15:45), and the result is a new manhood, a new humanity (τὸν καινὸν [3] ἅνθρωπον, Ephesians 4:24, Colossians 3:10), governed by a new law of life
Parousia - The order is-first, the resurrection of Christ, who is the ἀπαρχή, the firstfruits of the working of the new principle of life, in contrast with the results of the principle of death introduced by Adam (cf
Judgment Damnation - Support has, indeed, been sought for it in certain statements of a general character: ‘As in Adam all die, so also in Christ shall all be made alive,’ ‘God hath shut up all unto disobedience that he might have mercy upon all’ (1 Corinthians 15:22, Romans 11:32, Colossians 1:19, Ephesians 1:10)
Biblical Theology - It is also rooted in humankind's sinful solidarity in the wake of Adam's fall. Both male and female were part of God's creative intention from the beginning (1:27), yet Adam was created first and then Eve as his companion (2:18)
God - So one is not surprised to find him walking in the garden, addressing Adam and Eve, laying out plans to save a morally debased world, covenanting with Abraham, intervening on Moriah to spare Isaac's life, speaking to Jacob in a dream, and preserving Joseph in a foreign and hostile environment in order to procure his will for the people he had chosen to bear his name in the world
Gospels - Jesus is the Second Adam, and His gospel is for all peoples (cf
Son of God - ’ (2) The term is applied to the first man, when, in Luke 3, the genealogy of the Saviour is traced back to Adam, ‘who,’ it is added (Luke 3:38), ‘was the son of God
Apocalyptic Literature - The Histories of Adam and Eve
Methodists - ...
They maintain the total fall of man in Adam, and his utter inability to recover himself, or take one step towards his recovery, "without the grace of God preventing him, that he may have a good will, and working with him when he has that good will
Mahometanism - In the Koran are advanced the following assertions, among others already noticed: That both Jews and Christians are idolaters; that the patriarchs and Apostles were Mohammedans; that the angels worshipped Adam, and that the fallen angels were driven from heaven for not doing so; that our blessed Saviour was neither God, nor the Son of God; and that he assured Mohammed of this in a conference with the Almighty and him; yet that he was both the word and Spirit of God: not to mention numberless absurdities concerning the creation, the deluge, the end of the world, the resurrection, the day of judgment, too gross to be received by any except the most debased understandings
Egypt - It implies a previous pure monotheism, of which it retains the unity, eternity, self-existence of the unseen God; a powerful confirmation of the primitive Bible revelation to Adam handed down to Noah, and thence age by age becoming more and more corrupted by apostasies from the original truth; the more the old text of the "Ritual" is freed from subsequent glo
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - Samuel was not the first person to prophesy, however, for "Enoch, the seventh from Adam, prophesied" ( Jude 14 )
Christ in Art - Although such OT subjects as Adam and Eve do not readily admit of the same typical treatment, yet in some 4th cent
Apocrypha - Patriarchal history from Adam downward is described as thus under the charge of wisdom
Materialism - the doctrine which resolves the thinking principle in man, or the immaterial and immortal soul with which God was pleased to endue Adam at his creation, into mere matter, or into a faculty resulting from its organization
New Jerusalem - 2-7: ‘This building now built in your midst is not that which is revealed with Me, that which was prepared beforehand here from the time when I took counsel to make Paradise, and showed it to Adam before he sinned, but when he transgressed the commandment it was removed from him, as also Paradise
Montanus - We learn that the Montanists brought as Scripture examples of ecstasy the text "the Lord sent a deep sleep (ἔκστασιν ) upon Adam," that David said in his haste (ἐν ἐκστάσει ) "all men are liars," and that the same word is used of the vision which warned Peter to accept the invitation of Cornelius
Prophet - They regarded Him as one of the προφῆται ἀληθείας, and as superior to προφῆται συνέσεως οὐκ ἀληθείας; and, as such, placed Him in line with Adam, Enoch, Noah, etc
Gnosticism - It was he who forbad to Adam and Eve that knowledge by which they might be informed that he had superiors, and who on their disobedience cast them out of Paradise
Enoch Book of - (b) Second dream, in which Enoch sees Adam and other patriarchs under symbolism of bulls, etc
Basilides, Gnostic Sect Founder - Till Moses then from Adam sin reigned as it is written; for the Great Archon reigned he whose end reaches to the firmament supposing himself to be God alone and to have nothing above him for all things remained guarded in secret silence; this is the mystery which was not made known to the former generations
Irenaeus, Bishop of Lyons - There is but one God, Creator of the world and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, Who is the Son, the Eternal God-Logos, and has truly been made Flesh in order to redeem mankind from its fall in Adam
Methodists, Protestant - "In what sense is Adam's sin imputed to all mankind?" A. "In Adam all die, 1:e. That text, 'As by one man's disobedience all men were made sinners, so by the obedience of one all were made righteous' we conceive, means by the merits of Christ all men are cleared from the guilt of Adam's actual sin
Clementine Literature - Simon would bring forward texts which seemed to speak of a plurality of Gods, or which imputed imperfection to God, or spoke of Him as changing His purpose or hardening men's hearts and so forth; or, again, which laid crimes to the charge of the just men of the law, Adam and Noah, Abraham, Jacob, and Moses
Expiation - As death was the sanction of the commandment given to Adam, so every one who transgressed any part of the law of Moses became guilty of death; every man was "accursed," that is, devoted to die, who "continued not in all things written in the book of the law
Jerusalem - The grave is strown with red earth, supposed to be of the Ager Damascenes of which Adam was made; by the side of the corpse is placed a stick, and the priest tells him that the devil will tempt him to become a Christian, but that he must make good use of his stick; that his trial will last three days, and that he will then find himself in a mansion of glory," &c
Perfection (of Jesus) - And so, though born among the most exclusive of nations, a son of Abraham after the flesh, He is no Jew: He is the first Citizen of the world; in Paul’s revealing phrase, ‘the last Adam
Mahometanism - ...
After he began by this advantageous match to live at his ease, it was, that he formed the scheme of establishing a new religion, or, as he expressed it, of replanting the only true and ancient one professed by Adam, Noah, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and all the prophets, by destroying the gross idolatry into which the generality of his countrymen had fallen, and weeding out the corruptions and superstitions which the latter Jews and Christians had, as he thought, introduced into their religion, and reducing it to its original purity, which consisted chiefly in the worship of one God