What does Act Of Faith mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Act of Faith
(Auto da Fe, ) in the Romish church, is a solemn day held by the Inquisition for the punishment of heretics, and the absolution of the innocent accused. They usually contrive the Auto to fall on some great festival, that the execution may pass with the more awe; and it is always on a Sunday. The Auto da Fe may be called the last act of the Inquisitorial tragedy: it is a kind of gaol-delivery, appointed as often as a competent number of prisoners in the Inquisition are convicted of heresy, either by their own voluntary or extorted confession, or on the evidence of certain witnesses. The process is this:
In the morning they are brought into a great hall, where they have certain habits put on, which they are to wear in the procession, and by which, they know their doom. The procession is led up by Dominican friars, after which come the penitents, being all in black coats without sleeves, and barefooted, with a wax candle in their hands. These are followed by the penitents who have narrowly escaped being burnt, who over their black coats have flames painted, with their points turned downwards. Next come the negative and relapsed, who are to be burnt, having flames on their habits pointing upwards. After these come such as profess doctrines contrary to the faith of Rome, who, besides flames pointing upwards, have their picture painted on their breasts, with dogs, serpents, and devils, all open-mouthed, about it. Each prisoner is attended with a familiar of the Inquisition; and those to be burnt have also a Jesuit on each hand, who are continually preaching to them to abjure.
After the prisoners, comes a troop of familiars on horseback; and after them the Inquisitors, and other officers of the court, on mules: last of all, the Inquisitor-general on a white horse, led by two men with black hats and green hat-bands. A scaffold is erected beg enough for two or three thousand people; at one end of which are the prisoners, at the other the Inquisitors. After a sermon made up of encomiums of the Inquisition, and invectives against heretics, a priest ascends a desk near the scaffold, and, having taken the abjuration of the penitent recites the final sentence of those who are to be put to death, and delivers them to the secular arm, earnestly beseeching at the same time the secular power not to touch their blood, or put their lives in danger!!! The prisoners, being thus in the hands of the civil magistrate, are presently loaded with chains, and carried first to the secular gaol, and from thence, in an hour or two, brought before the civil judge; who, after asking in what religion they intend to die, pronounces sentence on such as declare they die in the communion of the church of Rome, that they shall be first strangled, and then burnt to ashes; or such as die in any other faith, that they be burnt alive.
Both are immediately carried to the Ribera, the place of execution, where there are as many stakes set up as there are prisoners to be burnt, with a quantity of dry furze about them. The stakes of the professed, that is, such as persist in the heresy, are about four yards high, having a small board towards the top for the prisoner to be seated on. The negative and relapsed being first strangled and burnt, the professed mount their stakes by a ladder, and Jesuits, after several repeated exhortations to be reconciled to the church, part with them; telling them that they leave them to the devil, who is standing at their elbow, to receive their souls, and carry them with him to the flames of hell. On this a great shout is raised; and the cry is, "Let the dogs' beards be made!" which is done by thrusting flaming furzes fastened to long poles against their faces, till their faces are burnt to a coal, which is accompanied with the loudest acclamations of joy. At last, fire is set to the furze at the bottom of the stake, over which the professed are chained so high, that the top of the flame seldom reaches higher than the seat they sit on, so that they rather seem roasted than burnt. There cannot be a more lamentable spectacle: the sufferers continually cry out, while they are able, "Pity, for the love of God!" Yet it is beheld, by all sexes and ages, with transports of joy and satisfaction
O merciful God! is this the benign, humane religion thou hast given to men? Surely not. If such were the genius of Christianity, then it would be no honour to be a Christian. Let us however, rejoice that the time is coming when the demon of Persecution shall be banished out of this our world, and the true spirit of benevolence and candour pervade the universe; when none shall hurt or destroy, but the earth be filled with the knowledge of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea!
See INQUISITION.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Act of Faith
An acceptance of a doctrine as true which we do not see or cannot prove of ourselves, because God says it is true. It is holding this doctrine as certain, and not as a mere opinion more or less probable. Hence faith excludes all doubt as well as private judgment.

Sentence search

Orientation - The name given to the act of turning to the east orAltar as an Act of Faith and worship in the Church service
Familiars of the Inquisition - When several persons are to be taken up at the same time, these familiars are commanded to order matters that they may know nothing of one another's being apprehended; and it is related, that a father and his three sons and three daughters, who lived together in the same house, were carried prisoners to the inquisition without knowing any thing of one another's being there till seven years afterwards, when they that were alive were released by an Act of Faith. Act of Faith
Fideism - (Latin: fides, faith) ...
 ...
A false system of philosophy, closely related to Traditionalism, which denies the ability of unaided human reason to arrive at certain knowledge of matters meta-physical, religious, and moral; and which insists that an Act of Faith alone is the means by which to attain certitude
Jael - And the Holy Ghost hath recorded her heroic Act of Faith, Judges 5:24-27
Faith - But the special Act of Faith which unites to Christ has as its object the person and the work of the Lord Jesus Christ (John 7:38 ; Acts 16:31 ). This is the specific Act of Faith by which a sinner is justified before God (John 3:16-360 ; Galatians 2:16 ; Philippians 3:9 ; 1618484497_43 ; Acts 10:43 ; 16:31 ). In this Act of Faith the believer appropriates and rests on Christ alone as Mediator in all his offices
Wash - ...
Revelation 7:14 (b) It represents the Act of Faith whereby the believing sinner trusts in the Lord JESUS CHRIST who, by His own Blood, makes the believer clean and white in GOD's sight
Belief - So that the simple Act of Faith, after all, is the simplest thing upon earth; for it is only believing "the record which God hath given of his Son
i'Saac - ) In his infancy he became the object of Ishmael's jealousy; and in his youth the victim, in intention, of Abraham's great sacrificial Act of Faith
Justification - ...
The Act of Faith which thus secures our justification secures also at the same time our sanctification (q
Faith - It is these motives of credibility which precede the Act of Faith and which make it essentially reasonable to assent to the truths of faith, for once it is certain that God has spoken, it is unreasonable to withhold assent to His truths
Faith, Science And - A threefold relation between science and faith may be conceived: ...
of act with act
of habit with habit
of habit with act
The act of science cannot exist with an Act of Faith in regard to the same object, because the objects of science and faith are essentially opposed, as the luminous to the obscure
Science And Faith - A threefold relation between science and faith may be conceived: ...
of act with act
of habit with habit
of habit with act
The act of science cannot exist with an Act of Faith in regard to the same object, because the objects of science and faith are essentially opposed, as the luminous to the obscure
Faith And Reason - " This judgment, however, is only a disposition for faith, and not the motive principle of the Act of Faith
Reason, Faith And - " This judgment, however, is only a disposition for faith, and not the motive principle of the Act of Faith
Serpent - " And as the simple Act of Faith in the Israelite in the wilderness, when beholding the brazen serpent as typical of Christ, became the sole means of recovery when dying under the effects of the serpent's poison in the old dispensation, so the simple Act of Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ becomes the sole cause of salvation when dying under the consequences of sin and Satan under the New
Seal - , at the time of their regeneration, not after a lapse of time in their spiritual life, "having also believed," not as AV, "after that ye believed;" the aorist participle marks the definiteness and completeness of the Act of Faith); the idea of destination is stressed by the phrase "the Holy Spirit of promise" (see also Ephesians 1:14 ); so Ephesians 4:30 , "ye were sealed unto the day of redemption;" so in 2 Corinthians 1:22 , where the Middle Voice intimates the special interest of the Sealer in His act; (e) authentication by the believer (by receiving the witness of the Son) of the fact that "God is true," John 3:33 ; authentication by God in sealing the Son as the Giver of eternal life (with perhaps a figurative allusion to the impress of a mark upon loaves), John 6:27
Abel - ...
God's having made for man coats of skin presupposes the slaying of animals; and doubtless implies that Abel's sacrifice of an animal life was an Act of Faith which rested on God's command (though not expressly recorded) that such were the sacrifices He required
Accountability, Age of - ...
Similarly, the Bible indicates that salvation is a deliberate Act of Faith on the part of individuals
Faith - "...
No form of words could have been more happily chosen to state what is the Act of Faith, and to put it in a clear and full light
Inquisition - For the conclusion of this horrid scene, see Act of Faith
Work, Wrought - , Matthew 5:16 ; Mark 14:6 ; Acts 9:36 ; Romans 13:3 ; Colossians 1:10 ; 1 Thessalonians 1:3 , "work of faith," here the initial Act of Faith at conversion (turning to God, 1 Thessalonians 1:9 ); in 2 Thessalonians 1:11 , "every work of faith," RV, denotes every activity undertaken for Christ's sake; 2:17; 1 Timothy 2:10 ; 5:18 ; 2 Timothy 2:21 ; 3:17 ; Titus 2:7,14 ; 3:1,8,14 ; Hebrews 10:24 ; 13:21 ; frequent in James, as the effect of faith [1]; 1 Peter 2:12 ; Revelation 2:2 and in several other places in chs
Faith - that the gift of the Spirit was received after, not contemporaneously with, the Act of Faith. ’ The sealing with the Spirit is posterior to the Act of Faith and may be associated with the rite of baptism, which came to be known as a sealing ordinance. than when we by a definite Act of Faith became Christians, In St. Paul’s experience and teaching this Act of Faith leads to a life of faith, so that he can write of himself: ‘That life which I now live in the flesh I live in faith, the faith which is in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me’ (Galatians 2:20)
Faith - that the gift of the Spirit was received after, not contemporaneously with, the Act of Faith. ’ The sealing with the Spirit is posterior to the Act of Faith and may be associated with the rite of baptism, which came to be known as a sealing ordinance. than when we by a definite Act of Faith became Christians, In St. Paul’s experience and teaching this Act of Faith leads to a life of faith, so that he can write of himself: ‘That life which I now live in the flesh I live in faith, the faith which is in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me’ (Galatians 2:20)
Kenosis - The cure of the nobleman’s son (John 4:50) does not prove omnipresence, but is explicable as an Act of Faith in God. The command to the disciples about casting their net (Luke 5:5) was probably an Act of Faith in God, even as the command to the storm (Mark 4:39)
Abel - It is impossible, then, to allow the sacrifice of Abel, in this instance, to have been an Act of Faith, without supposing that it had respect to a previous revelation, which agreed with all the parts of that sacrificial action by which he expressed his faith in it
Heresy - ...
See Act of Faith
Acceptance - By that Act of Faith, in virtue of which the sinner ‘accepts’ Christ and appropriates all that He is and has done, he passes from a state of condemnation into a state of grace (Romans 8:1), and is henceforth ‘in Christ’-organically united to Him as the member is to the body (1 Corinthians 12:12 f), as the branch is to the vine (John 15:1-4)
Faith - To the most unlettered Christian this then will be very obvious, that true and saving faith in Christ consists both of assent and trust; but this is not a blind and superstitious trust in the sacrifice of Christ, like that of the Heathens in their sacrifices; nor the presumptuous trust of wicked and impenitent men, who depend on Christ to save them in their sins; but such a trust as is exercised according to the authority and direction of the word of God; so that to know the Gospel in its leading principles, and to have a cordial of belief in it, is necessary to that more specific Act of Faith which is called reliance, or in systematic language, fiducial assent
Self- Denial - This is done by an Act of Faith in Christ
Holy Day - An Act of Faith was the source in which it originated, and its maintenance must be conducted in the free atmosphere of faith
Trust - And man, though free in the Act of Faith, is utterly unable to produce it of himself
Circumcision - The covenant with Abraham prescribed circumcision as an Act of Faith in its promises, and as a pledge to perform its conditions on the part of his descendants
Faith - James' argument for the necessary outworking of this salvation in good works (2:14-24) is countered by Paul's insistence on the working of the grace of God in the Act of Faith for salvation (Romans 3:24-31 )
Sanctification - Every Act of Faith is in the NT an ethical force
Paul (2) - ’ This Act of Faith could be expressed intellectually as assent to the proposition that ‘Jesus is the Christ,’ or that ‘Jesus is Lord