What does Aceldama mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Aceldama
Field of blood, a small field south of Jerusalem, which the priest purchased with the thirty pieces of silver that Judas had received as the price of our Savior's blood, Matthew 27:8 ; Acts 1:19 . Pretending that it was not lawful to appropriate this money to sacred uses, because it was the price of blood, they purchased with it the so- called potter's field, to be a burying-place for strangers. Judas is said, Acts 1:8 , to have purchased the field, because it was bought with his money. Tradition points out this field on the steep side of the hill of Evil Counsel overhanging the valley of Hinnom on the south. It appears to have been used, since the time of he crusaders, as a sepulchre for pilgrims, and subsequently by the Armenians. At present it is not thus used.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Aceldama
The name which the Jews gave in their proper tongue, i.e., in Aramaic, to the field which was purchased with the money which had been given to the betrayer of our Lord. The word means "field of blood." It was previously called "the potter's field" (Matthew 27:7,8 ; Acts 1:19 ), and was appropriated as the burial-place for strangers. It lies on a narrow level terrace on the south face of the valley of Hinnom. Its modern name is Hak ed-damm.
Webster's Dictionary - Aceldama
(n.) The potter's field, said to have lain south of Jerusalem, purchased with the bribe which Judas took for betraying his Master, and therefore called the field of blood. Fig.: A field of bloodshed.
King James Dictionary - Aceldama
ACEL'DAMA, n.
A field said to have laid south of Jerusalem, the same as the potters field, purchased with the bribe which Judas took for betraying his master, and therefore called the field of blood. It was appropriated to the interment of strangers.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Aceldama
ACELDAMA . See Akeldama.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Aceldama
"the field of blood." So called because it was bought with the price of blood, according to Matthew 27:6-8; and because it was the scene of retribution in kind, the blood which Judas caused to be shed being avenged by his own blood, according to Acts 1:19; Revelation 16:6. The purchase of the field was begun by Judas, and was completed after Judas' death by the priests, who would not take the price of blood from Judas but used the pieces of silver to pay for the field. He did not pay the money (Matthew 27:5), but had agreed to pay it, with a view of securing "a habitation" to himself and his wife and children (Psalms 109:9; Psalms 69:25). Stung with remorse he brought again the 30 pieces of silver, went to the field, hanged himself, and, the cord breaking, his bowels gushed out.
Thus there is no discrepancy between Matthew 27:8 and Acts 1:19. Substantial unity amidst circumstantial variety is the strongest mark of truth; for it. proves the absence of collusion in the writers. (Bengel.) Or probably Peter's words (Acts 1:18) are in irony. All he purchased with the reward of iniquity was the bloody field of his burial. What was bought with his money Peter speaks of as bought by him. The field originally belonged to a potter, and had become useless to him when its clay was exhausted. Jerome says it was still shown S. of mount Zion, where even now there is a bed of white clay. Matthew (Matthew 27:9) quotes Jeremiah's prophecy as herein fulfilled. Zechariah 11:12-13 is the nearest approach to the quotation, but not verbatim. Probably Jeremiah 18:1-2 and Jeremiah 32:6-12 are the ultimate basis on which Zechariah's more detailed prophecy rests, and Jeremiah is therefore referred to by Matthew.
The field of blood is now shown on the steep S. face of the ravine of Hinnom, on a narrow level terrace, half way up, near its E. end; now Hak-ed-damm. The chalk favors decomposition; and much of it for this reason, and for its celebrity, was taken away by the empress Helena and others, for sarcophagic cemeteries. A large square edifice, half excavated in the rock, and half massive masonry, stands on the steep bank facing the pool of Siloam, as a charnel house 20 feet deep, the bottom covered with moldering bones. "The potter" represents God's absolute power over the clay framed by His own hand: so appropriate in the case of Judas, "the son of perdition," of whom Jesus says, "It had been good for that man if he had not been born"; given over to a reprobate mind and its awful doom. This is the point of Jeremiah 18:6, which is therefore referred to by Matthew (Isaiah 30:14; Isaiah 45:9; Romans 9:20-21).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Aceldama
(uh cehl' duh muh) KJV spelling for Akeldama. The field Judas Iscariot purchased, where he killed himself (Acts 1:19 ). The name is Aramaic and means “field of blood.” Evidently it was purchased with the money that had been paid to Judas for betraying Jesus. According to Matthew 27:7 , the field purchased with this money was used for the burial of strangers. See Judas .
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Aceldama
Field of blood
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Aceldama
The field of blood. It was very properly called so, because it was purchased with the thirty pieces of silver, which the traitor Judas received of the chief priests for Christ's blood. (Matthew 27:8; Acts 1:19.) It lay to the south of mount Zion, not far from the pool of Siloam. The name given it of Aceldama, is rather Syriac than Hebrew; and compounded of Achel, (from Chakel)field, and Damah, blood. This memorable ground is said to be shewn to travellers, even to the present day. Wherefore it was called the potter's field, is not so easy to say: unless, like our church-yards, some neighbouring potter dried his earthen pans there, as people now dry their clothes, after washing, in our church-yards. An old monk, called Drutmar, relates, that in his days, there was an hospital built in this charnel house for strangers, where the pilgrims, going to, and from, the Holy Land, used to lodge.
It is blessed to observe, how the Lord in his providence overruled events, at the crucifixion of Jesus, that his holy body should not have been thrown into this, or any other Aceldama, as a common malefactor. The Mishna reports, that it was not allowed, for any among the Jews who died by the common hands of justice, to be buried in the sepulchre of their fathers, except their flesh was first consumed. Now as the Lord Jesus, being considered by the law as a criminal, (John 18:30) was thus liable to have been cast out with the common dead; what an overruling power must it have been, to prompt the minds of the honourable counsellor, Joseph of Arimathea, and Nicodemus a ruler of the Jews, to have begged the forfeited body from Pilate!
And there was another providence, directing all this to the accomplishment of the purpose intended; in that the request was so well timed before the chief priests could influence Pilate's mind to refuse; and Pilate's mind so guided by the Lord, to grant the request before that he had power to deliberate. Had the Sanhedrim foreseen such a thing, no doubt they would have been beforehand with Joseph and Nicodemus, and prevailed upon the governor to deny. But He that had predicted Jesus should make "his grave with the wicked, and with the rich in his death," (Isaiah 53:9) took care not only that a new sepulchre, suited to the infinite dignity of his person, should be prepared; but all the steps leading to the accomplishment of placing his holy body there, should make way, so as to answer all the important purposes of that prophecy.
As the holy body of Jesus was not to see corruption, but to arise the third day from the dead; this new sepulchre, wherein never man had laid, not only corresponded to the dignity of his person, but served to identify that person, as an article of faith to the believer; that it was Jesus, the very Lord of life and glory, whom the disciples placed there, that arose the third day, as he had promised, from the dead. Thus confirming the faith by circumstances, which, considering the difficulties with which the thing itself was surrounded, and the little probability that one dying, as the Lord Jesus did, under the hands of the Roman government, as a common felon, should make "his grave with the wicked, and with the rich, in his death:" nothing but the over-ruling and determinate counsel and foreknowledge of JEHOVAH could have contrived; nor any less than the same sovereign power could have accomplished. Here, as in a thousand instances beside, we may well cry out, "O the depth of the riches, both of the wisdom, and knowledge of God! how unsearchable are his judgments, and his ways past finding out!" (Romans 11:33.)
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Aceldama
The word Ἀκελδαμα, 'field of blood,' is Aramaic expressed in Greek letters, the word being differently spelt in different MSS. The field was bought with the money paid to Judas for betraying his Lord but which he in despair could not keep. In that sense he bought the field, Acts 1:18,19 ; whereas it was really purchased by the chief priests, Matthew 27:6-8 ; cf. Zechariah 11:12 . The traditional spot is on the slope of the hill south of Jerusalem, where there is a ruined structure, long used as a charnel-house. It is some 20 feet deep, with a few decaying bones at the bottom. Tradition says that the bodies were thrown into it, and that the soil possessed the power to consume them in 24 hours. Shiploads of the earth were carried away to form European burial grounds in the time of the Crusades. The soil cretaceous would favour the decomposition of the bodies.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Aceldama
See Akeldama.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Aceldama
a piece of ground without the south wall of Jerusalem, on the other side of the brook Siloam. It was called the Potter's Field, because an earth or clay was dug in it of which pottery was made. It was likewise called the Fuller's Field, because cloth was dried in it. But it having been afterward bought with the money by which the high priest and ruler of the Jews purchased the blood of Jesus, it was called Aceldama, or the Field of Blood.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Aceldama
Aceldama (a-sĕl'da-mah), field of blood. Acts 1:19. A field said to have been intended for the burial of strangers, which the chief priests bought with the money returned by Judas, as the price of the Saviour's blood. Matthew 27:6-8. It was just without the wall of Jerusalem, south of Mount Zion, and is supposed to have been originally called the Potter's Field, because it furnished a sort of clay suitable for potter's ware. The "field of blood" is now shown on the steep southern face of the valley or ravine of Hinnom. It was believed in the middle ages that the soil of this place had the power of rapidly consuming bodies buried in it, and in consequence of this, or of the sanctity of the spot, great quantities of the earth were taken away.

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Akeldama - NIV, RSV, TEV spelling of Aceldama. See Aceldama
Hakeldama - (huh kehl' duh muh) NAS, NRSV spelling for Aceldama or Akeldama (Acts 1:19 ). See Aceldama
Potter's Field - See Aceldama...
Potter's Field - See Aceldama
Aceldama - Aceldama
Potter's Field - (See Aceldama; POTTERY
Akel'Dama - Revised Version of (Acts 1:19 ) for Aceldama
Potter's Field - See Aceldama
Potters Field - (See Aceldama
Aceldama - But it having been afterward bought with the money by which the high priest and ruler of the Jews purchased the blood of Jesus, it was called Aceldama, or the Field of Blood
Potter's Field - See Aceldama
Aceldama - Aceldama (a-sĕl'da-mah), field of blood
Akeldama - ]'>[1] Aceldama )
Aceldama - The name given it of Aceldama, is rather Syriac than Hebrew; and compounded of Achel, (from Chakel)field, and Damah, blood. ...
It is blessed to observe, how the Lord in his providence overruled events, at the crucifixion of Jesus, that his holy body should not have been thrown into this, or any other Aceldama, as a common malefactor
Judas - See Aceldama
ju'Das Iscar'Iot - (Matthew 27:6-10 ) (4) Judas himself, in his despair, went out and hanged himself, (Matthew 27:5 ) at Aceldama, on the southern slope of the valley of Hinnom, near Jerusalem, and in the act he fell down a precipice and was dashed into pieces
Sepulchre - See Aceldama
Ananias And Sapphira - ' And the young men came in and found her dead, and they buried Ananias and Sapphira in Aceldama, next back-breadth to Judas Iscariot, the proprietor of the place
Peter - Judas lies a cast-out suicide in Aceldama! 'O the depths of the Divine mercy to me! That I who sinned with Judas; that I who had made my bed in hell beside Judas; should be held in this honour, and should be ministering to the holy brethren! O to grace how great a debtor!' And again, just think what all must have been in Peter's mind as he stood up in Solomon's porch to preach the Pentecost sermon