What does Abyss mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἀβύσσου bottomless. 6
ἄβυσσον bottomless. 3

Definitions Related to Abyss

G12


   1 bottomless.
   2 unbounded.
   3 the Abyss.
      3a the pit.
      3b the immeasurable depth.
      3c of Orcus, a very deep gulf or chasm in the lowest parts of the earth used as the common receptacle of the dead and especially as the abode of demons.
      

Frequency of Abyss (original languages)

Frequency of Abyss (English)

Dictionary

Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Abyss
In a general sense, denotes something profound; in its literal sense it signifies without a bottom; in a more particular sense it denotes a deep mass or fund of waters. In this last sense the word is used in the Septuagint for the water which God created at the beginning with the earth, which our translators render by deep. Thus it is that darkness is said to have been on the face of the abyss, Genesis 1:2 . Abyss is also used for an immense cavern in the earth wherein God is supposed to have collected all those waters on the third day, which in our version is rendered the seas, and elsewhere the great deep. Abyss is likewise used to denote the grave or common receptacle of the dead, Romans 10:7 : also hell, or the bottomless pit, Luke 8:31 . Revelation 9:1 . Revelation 11:7 .
See DELUGE.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Abyss
In our English Bibles, the Greek word abyssos [ Isaiah 44:27 ), MeshuLam (Job 41:22 ), and Racha ( Job 36:16 ).
In the Old Testament abyssos [1] never translates Sheol , so in the Old Testament it never carries the idea of the realm of the dead or the afterlife. In Genesis 1:2 the total inchoate earth is called "the deep, " over which the Spirit of God hovered.
During the intertestamental period the situation began to change and the meaning of abyssos [2] broadened to include the idea of death as well as the realm of demonic spirits (e.g., Jub 5:6; 1Enoch 10:4,11).
In the New Testament the changeover is complete. Abyssos [ Revelation 9:1-2 ; 11:7 ; 17:8 ; 20:1,3 ) describe the abyss specifically as the dwelling place of demons and the beast and as a place of confinement unto judgment that is under God's control. In Luke 8:31 the demons beg Jesus not to send them into the abyss, knowing that they will no longer be free to wreak havoc on the earth. Here, abyssos [ Revelation 9:1-11 ), the shaft leading to the abyss is opened, releasing the demonic hoard of locusts. Their ruler is "the angel of the abyss, " whose name is Destruction (Heb. Abaddon; Gk. Appolyon). The beast who ascends from the abyss (Revelation 11:7 ; 17:8 ) presents a complex picture. Combined, it represents the antichrist, demonic power, Rome (i.e., political power as supportive of the harlot), and ultimate evil. This beast is to be thrown alive into the "fiery lake of burning sulphur" (Revelation 19:20 ). Satan is chained in the abyss for a thousand years (Revelation 20:1,3 ), until he, too, is thrown into the lake of fire (Revelation 20:10 ).
Walter A. Elwell
See also Abaddon ; Revelation, Theology of
Holman Bible Dictionary - Abyss
(aw bihssss') Transliteration of Greek word abussos literally meaning “without bottom.” KJV translates, “the deep,” or bottomless pit. NAS, NIV, RSV use abyss to refer to the dark abode of the dead ( Romans 10:7 ). Abaddon rules the Abyss (Revelation 9:11 ), from which will come the beast of the end time of Revelation (Revelation 11:7 ). The beast of the Abyss faces ultimate destruction (Revelation 17:8 ). Satan will be bound there during the millennium (Revelation 20:1-3 ). See Hades ; Hell ; Sheol .
CARM Theological Dictionary - Abyss
The abode of the dead and the place where evil spirits are imprisoned (Revelation 9:1-11).
Webster's Dictionary - Abyss
(1):
(n.) The center of an escutcheon.
(2):
(n.) A bottomless or unfathomed depth, gulf, or chasm; hence, any deep, immeasurable, and, specifically, hell, or the bottomless pit.
(3):
(n.) Infinite time; a vast intellectual or moral depth.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Abyss
(Greek: abyssos, bottomless)
Primarily an adjective signifying very deep (Wisdom of Solomon 10); as a substantive it means a great cavity, primeval waters, or primal chaos, and as used in the New Testament the abode of the dead, or limbo, and the abode of evil spirits, or hell.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Abyss
ABYSS . The Jewish eschatology of the time of Christ conceived of the abode of departed spirits as a great abyss, in the midst of which was a lake of fire, intended primarily as a place of punishment for the angels and giants, and accordingly for sinners. The abyss existed before the creation, and was the home of the various enemies of God, such as the dragon and the beast. In the NT it is used only in Apocalypse (AV [1] ‘ bottomless pit ’) and in Romans 10:7 and Luke 8:31 (AV [1] ‘deep’ ).
Shailer Mathews.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Abyss
See BOTTOMLESS PIT.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Abyss
This is the Revised Version rendering of the word ἄβυσσος which occurs in Luke 8:31, Romans 10:7, Revelation 9:1-2; Revelation 9:11; Revelation 11:7; Revelation 17:8; Revelation 20:1; Revelation 20:3. In Lk. and Rom. Authorized Version translates ‘deep’; in Rev., ‘bottomless pit’-no distinction, however, being made between τὸ φρέαρ τῆς ἀβύσσου in Revelation 9:1-2 (Revised Version ‘the pit of the abyss’) and ἡ ἄβυσσος simply in the remaining passages (Revised Version ‘the abyss’). ἄβυσσος (from α intens. and βυσσός, Ion. βυθός, ‘the depth’) occurs in classical Greek as an adj. moaning ‘bottomless,’ but in biblical and ecclesiastical Greek almost invariably as a substantive denoting ‘the bottomless place,’ ‘the abyss.’ The word is found frequently in the Septuagint , usually as a rendering of the Heb. tehôm, and primarily denotes the water-deeps which at first covered the earth (Genesis 1:2, Psalms 103:6) and were conceived of as shut up afterwards in subterranean storehouses (Psalms 32:7). In Job 38:16 f. the abyss in the sense of the depths of the sea is used as a parallel to Hades; and in Job 41:23 (Septuagint ) the sea-monster regards the Tartarus of the abyss as his captive. In Psalms 71:20 ‘the abyss’ is applied to the depths of the earth, and is here evidently a figurative equivalent for Sheol, though it is nowhere used in the Septuagint to render the Heb, word. In the later Jewish eschatology, where Sheol has passed from its OT meaning of a shadowy under world in which there are no recognized distinctions between the good and the bad, the wicked and the weary (cf. Job 3:17, Ecclesiastes 9:5), and has become a sphere of definite moral retribution, the conception of the abyss has also undergone a moral transformation. The Ethiopian Book of Enoch is especially suggestive for the development of the eschatological conceptions that appear in pre-Christian Judaism; und in the earliest part of that book the fallen angels and demons are represented as cast after the final judgment into a gulf (χάος) of fire (10:13, 14), while in 21:7 the chasm (διακοπή) filled with fire (cf. τὸ φρέαρ in Revelation 9:1-2) is described as bordered by the abyss. Apparently the abyss was conceived of as the proper home of the devil and his angels, in the centre of which was a lake of fire reserved as the place of their final punishment.
The previous history of the word explains its use in the NT. In Romans 10:7, where he is referring to Deuteronomy 30:13, St. Paul uses it simply as the abode of the dead, Sheol or Hades-a sense equivalent to that of Psalms 71:20. In Luke 8:31 the penal aspect of the abyss comes clearly into view: it is a place of confinement for demons. In Rev. we are in the midst of the visions and images of apocalyptic eschatology. In Revelation 9:1-2 ‘the pit of the abyss’ sends forth a smoke like the smoke of a great furnace. The abyss has an angel of its own whose name is Abaddon (q.v. [1] ) or Apollyon (Revelation 9:11). From it ‘the beast’ issues (Revelation 11:7; Revelation 17:8), and into it ‘the old serpent which is the Devil and Satan’ is cast for a thousand years (Revelation 20:1-3).
Literature.-The Commentaries and Bible Dictionaries; article ‘Abyss’ in Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics .
J. C. Lambert.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Abyss
or DEEP αβυσσος , without bottom. The chaos; the deepest parts of the sea; and in the New Testament, the place of the dead, Romans 10:7 ; a deep place of punishment. The devils besought Jesus that he would not send them into the abyss, a place they evidently dreaded, Luke 8:31 ; where it seems to mean that part of Hades in which wicked spirits are in torment. See HELL .
In the opinion of the ancient Hebrews, and of the generality of eastern people at this day, the abyss, the sea, or waters, encompassed the whole earth. This was supposed to float upon the abyss, of which it covered a small part. According to the same notion, the earth was founded on the waters, or at least its foundations were on the abyss beneath, Psalms 24:2 ; Psalms 136:6 . Under these waters, and at the bottom of this abyss, they represented the wicked as groaning, and suffering the punishment of their sin. The Rephaim were confined there, those old giants, who whilst living, caused surrounding nations to tremble, Proverbs 9:18 ; Proverbs 21:16 , &c. Lastly, in these dark dungeons the kings of Tyro, Babylon, and Egypt are described by the Prophets as suffering the punishment of their pride and cruelty, Isaiah 26:14 ; Ezekiel 28:10 , &c.
These depths are figuratively represented as the abodes of evil spirits, and powers opposed to God: "I saw," says St. John, "a star fall from heaven unto the earth, and to him was given the key of the bottomless pit. And he opened the bottomless pit; and there arose a smoke out of it, as the smoke of a great furnace; and the sun and the air were darkened by reason of the smoke of the pit. And there came out of the smoke locusts upon the earth. And they had a king over them, which is the angel of the bottomless pit,"
Revelation 9:1-2 ; Revelation 9:11 . In another place the beast is represented as ascending out of the bottomless pit, and waging war against the two witnesses of God, Revelation 11:7 . Lastly, St. John says, "I saw an angel come down from heaven, having the key of the bottomless pit, and a great chain in his hand. And he laid hold on the dragon, that old serpent, which is the devil, and Satan, and bound him a thousand years, and cast him into the bottomless pit, and shut him up, and set a seal upon him, that he should deceive the nations no more till the thousand years should be fulfilled: and after that he must be loosed a little season," Revelation 20:1-3 .
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Abyss
* For ABYSS see BOTTOM
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Abyss
This is the Revised Version rendering of the word ἄβυσσος which occurs in Luke 8:31, Romans 10:7, Revelation 9:1-2; Revelation 9:11; Revelation 11:7; Revelation 17:8; Revelation 20:1; Revelation 20:3. In Lk. and Rom. Authorized Version translates ‘deep’; in Rev., ‘bottomless pit’-no distinction, however, being made between τὸ φρέαρ τῆς ἀβύσσου in Revelation 9:1-2 (Revised Version ‘the pit of the abyss’) and ἡ ἄβυσσος simply in the remaining passages (Revised Version ‘the abyss’). ἄβυσσος (from α intens. and βυσσός, Ion. βυθός, ‘the depth’) occurs in classical Greek as an adj. moaning ‘bottomless,’ but in biblical and ecclesiastical Greek almost invariably as a substantive denoting ‘the bottomless place,’ ‘the abyss.’ The word is found frequently in the Septuagint , usually as a rendering of the Heb. tehôm, and primarily denotes the water-deeps which at first covered the earth (Genesis 1:2, Psalms 103:6) and were conceived of as shut up afterwards in subterranean storehouses (Psalms 32:7). In Job 38:16 f. the abyss in the sense of the depths of the sea is used as a parallel to Hades; and in Job 41:23 (Septuagint ) the sea-monster regards the Tartarus of the abyss as his captive. In Psalms 71:20 ‘the abyss’ is applied to the depths of the earth, and is here evidently a figurative equivalent for Sheol, though it is nowhere used in the Septuagint to render the Heb, word. In the later Jewish eschatology, where Sheol has passed from its OT meaning of a shadowy under world in which there are no recognized distinctions between the good and the bad, the wicked and the weary (cf. Job 3:17, Ecclesiastes 9:5), and has become a sphere of definite moral retribution, the conception of the abyss has also undergone a moral transformation. The Ethiopian Book of Enoch is especially suggestive for the development of the eschatological conceptions that appear in pre-Christian Judaism; und in the earliest part of that book the fallen angels and demons are represented as cast after the final judgment into a gulf (χάος) of fire (10:13, 14), while in 21:7 the chasm (διακοπή) filled with fire (cf. τὸ φρέαρ in Revelation 9:1-2) is described as bordered by the abyss. Apparently the abyss was conceived of as the proper home of the devil and his angels, in the centre of which was a lake of fire reserved as the place of their final punishment.
The previous history of the word explains its use in the NT. In Romans 10:7, where he is referring to Deuteronomy 30:13, St. Paul uses it simply as the abode of the dead, Sheol or Hades-a sense equivalent to that of Psalms 71:20. In Luke 8:31 the penal aspect of the abyss comes clearly into view: it is a place of confinement for demons. In Rev. we are in the midst of the visions and images of apocalyptic eschatology. In Revelation 9:1-2 ‘the pit of the abyss’ sends forth a smoke like the smoke of a great furnace. The abyss has an angel of its own whose name is Abaddon (q.v. [1] ) or Apollyon (Revelation 9:11). From it ‘the beast’ issues (Revelation 11:7; Revelation 17:8), and into it ‘the old serpent which is the Devil and Satan’ is cast for a thousand years (Revelation 20:1-3).
Literature.-The Commentaries and Bible Dictionaries; article ‘Abyss’ in Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics .
J. C. Lambert.

Sentence search

Bottomless Pit - 'without a bottom,' an Abyss. From the passages in the Revelation we learn that the Abyss is where the Satanic powers are shut up, not where they will be punished, which is in the lake of fire. The demons cast out by the Lord in Luke 8:31 besought Him that He would not send them into the Abyss. In Revelation 9:1-11 , to a star fallen from heaven the key of the Abyss is given, and on its being opened great moral darkness rises, out of which destructive agents proceed: Abaddon (Apollyon) 'the destroyer' is their king. The future Roman empire is represented as a beast rising out of (receiving in its last head power from) the Abyss. Satan will be confined in the Abyss during the thousand years of the millennium
Bottomless Pit - See Abyss
Apollyon - " He is the angel of the Abyss, "They have as king over them, the angel of the Abyss; his name in Hebrew is Abaddon, and in the Greek he has the name Apollyon," (Revelation 9:11 )
Deep - See Abyss
Abyme - ) A Abyss
Bottomless Pit - See Abyss
Abyss - * For Abyss see BOTTOM ...
Abyss - NAS, NIV, RSV use Abyss to refer to the dark abode of the dead ( Romans 10:7 ). Abaddon rules the Abyss (Revelation 9:11 ), from which will come the beast of the end time of Revelation (Revelation 11:7 ). The beast of the Abyss faces ultimate destruction (Revelation 17:8 )
Abysm - ) An Abyss; a gulf
Abyssal - ) Belonging to, or resembling, an Abyss; unfathomable
Abyss - Abyss . The Jewish eschatology of the time of Christ conceived of the abode of departed spirits as a great Abyss, in the midst of which was a lake of fire, intended primarily as a place of punishment for the angels and giants, and accordingly for sinners. The Abyss existed before the creation, and was the home of the various enemies of God, such as the dragon and the beast
Abyss - , ‘bottomless pit’-no distinction, however, being made between τὸ φρέαρ τῆς ἀβύσσου in Revelation 9:1-2 (Revised Version ‘the pit of the Abyss’) and ἡ ἄβυσσος simply in the remaining passages (Revised Version ‘the Abyss’). moaning ‘bottomless,’ but in biblical and ecclesiastical Greek almost invariably as a substantive denoting ‘the bottomless place,’ ‘the Abyss. the Abyss in the sense of the depths of the sea is used as a parallel to Hades; and in Job 41:23 (Septuagint ) the sea-monster regards the Tartarus of the Abyss as his captive. In Psalms 71:20 ‘the Abyss’ is applied to the depths of the earth, and is here evidently a figurative equivalent for Sheol, though it is nowhere used in the Septuagint to render the Heb, word. Job 3:17, Ecclesiastes 9:5), and has become a sphere of definite moral retribution, the conception of the Abyss has also undergone a moral transformation. τὸ φρέαρ in Revelation 9:1-2) is described as bordered by the Abyss. Apparently the Abyss was conceived of as the proper home of the devil and his angels, in the centre of which was a lake of fire reserved as the place of their final punishment. In Luke 8:31 the penal aspect of the Abyss comes clearly into view: it is a place of confinement for demons. In Revelation 9:1-2 ‘the pit of the Abyss’ sends forth a smoke like the smoke of a great furnace. The Abyss has an angel of its own whose name is Abaddon (q. -The Commentaries and Bible Dictionaries; article ‘Abyss’ in Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics
Abyss - , ‘bottomless pit’-no distinction, however, being made between τὸ φρέαρ τῆς ἀβύσσου in Revelation 9:1-2 (Revised Version ‘the pit of the Abyss’) and ἡ ἄβυσσος simply in the remaining passages (Revised Version ‘the Abyss’). moaning ‘bottomless,’ but in biblical and ecclesiastical Greek almost invariably as a substantive denoting ‘the bottomless place,’ ‘the Abyss. the Abyss in the sense of the depths of the sea is used as a parallel to Hades; and in Job 41:23 (Septuagint ) the sea-monster regards the Tartarus of the Abyss as his captive. In Psalms 71:20 ‘the Abyss’ is applied to the depths of the earth, and is here evidently a figurative equivalent for Sheol, though it is nowhere used in the Septuagint to render the Heb, word. Job 3:17, Ecclesiastes 9:5), and has become a sphere of definite moral retribution, the conception of the Abyss has also undergone a moral transformation. τὸ φρέαρ in Revelation 9:1-2) is described as bordered by the Abyss. Apparently the Abyss was conceived of as the proper home of the devil and his angels, in the centre of which was a lake of fire reserved as the place of their final punishment. In Luke 8:31 the penal aspect of the Abyss comes clearly into view: it is a place of confinement for demons. In Revelation 9:1-2 ‘the pit of the Abyss’ sends forth a smoke like the smoke of a great furnace. The Abyss has an angel of its own whose name is Abaddon (q. -The Commentaries and Bible Dictionaries; article ‘Abyss’ in Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics
Nethermost - Lowest as the nethermost hell the nethermost Abyss
Abysmal - ) Pertaining to, or resembling, an Abyss; bottomless; unending; profound
Bottomless - ) Without a bottom; hence, fathomless; baseless; as, a bottomless Abyss
Bottom, Bottomless - ...
B — 1: ἄβυσσος (Strong's #12 — Noun Feminine — abussos — ab'-us-sos ) "bottomless" (from a, intensive, and bussos, "a depth"), is used as a noun denoting the Abyss (AV, "bottomless pit"). It describes an immeasurable depth, the underworld, the lower regions, the Abyss of Sheol. In Romans 10:7 , quoted from Deuteronomy 30:13 , the Abyss (the abode of the lost dead) is substituted for the sea (the change in the quotation is due to the facts of the death and resurrection of Christ); the AV has "deep" here and in Luke 8:31 ; the reference is to the lower regions as the abode of demons, out of which they can be let loose, Revelation 11:7 ; 17:8 ; it is found seven times in the Apocalypse, 9:1,2,11; 11:7; 17:8; 20:1,3; in 9:1,2 the RV has "the pit of the Abyss
Abaddon - " Abaddon is the satanic angel of the Abyss (Revelation 9:11 )
Abyss - Thus it is that darkness is said to have been on the face of the Abyss, Genesis 1:2 . Abyss is also used for an immense cavern in the earth wherein God is supposed to have collected all those waters on the third day, which in our version is rendered the seas, and elsewhere the great deep. Abyss is likewise used to denote the grave or common receptacle of the dead, Romans 10:7 : also hell, or the bottomless pit, Luke 8:31
Bottomless - , it signified fathomless, whose bottom cannot be found by sounding as a bottomless Abyss or ocean
Abyss - In our English Bibles, the Greek word Abyssos [ Isaiah 44:27 ), MeshuLam (Job 41:22 ), and Racha ( Job 36:16 ). ...
In the Old Testament Abyssos Abyssos [ ἄβυσσος ]'>[1] never translates Sheol , so in the Old Testament it never carries the idea of the realm of the dead or the afterlife. ...
During the intertestamental period the situation began to change and the meaning of Abyssos [2] broadened to include the idea of death as well as the realm of demonic spirits (e. Abyssos [ Revelation 9:1-2 ; 11:7 ; 17:8 ; 20:1,3 ) describe the Abyss specifically as the dwelling place of demons and the beast and as a place of confinement unto judgment that is under God's control. In Luke 8:31 the demons beg Jesus not to send them into the Abyss, knowing that they will no longer be free to wreak havoc on the earth. Here, Abyssos [ Revelation 9:1-11 ), the shaft leading to the Abyss is opened, releasing the demonic hoard of locusts. Their ruler is "the angel of the Abyss, " whose name is Destruction (Heb. The beast who ascends from the Abyss (Revelation 11:7 ; 17:8 ) presents a complex picture. Satan is chained in the Abyss for a thousand years (Revelation 20:1,3 ), until he, too, is thrown into the lake of fire (Revelation 20:10 )
Chasm - ) A deep opening made by disruption, as a breach in the earth or a rock; a yawning Abyss; a cleft; a fissure
Deep - " Greek Abyss (Luke 8:31), literally, the bottomless place. " The demons in the Gadarene besought not to be cast into the Abyss, i. Language is used as though the Abyss were in the lowest depth of our earth
Deep - Used to denote (1) the grave or the Abyss (Romans 10:7 ; Luke 8:31 ); (2) the deepest part of the sea (Psalm 69:15 ); (3) the chaos mentioned in Genesis 1:2 ; (4) the bottomless pit, hell (Revelation 9:1,2 ; 11:7 ; 20:13 )
Bottomless Pit - See Abyss ; Hades ; Hell ; Sheol
Pit - 1: φρέαρ (Strong's #5421 — Noun Neuter — phrear — freh'-ar ) "a well, dug for water" (distinct from pege, "a fountain"), denotes "a pit" in Revelation 9:1,2 , RV, "the pit (of the Abyss)," "the pit," i. , the shaft leading down to the Abyss, AV, "(bottomless) pit;" in Luke 14:6 , RV, "well" (AV, "pit"); in John 4:11,12 , "well
Abaddon - In the Book of Revelation (9:1-11), when John sees his vision of the fifth trumpet blowing, a vast horde of demonic horsemen is seen arising from the newly opened Abyss. They have a ruler over them, called a king (basileia [1]), the angel of the Abyss, whose name is given in both Hebrew and Greek. ...
The angel of the Abyss is called Destruction or Destroyer because his task is to oversee the devastation of the inhabitants of the earth, although it is curious that his minions are allowed only to torture and not to kill
Abyss - The devils besought Jesus that he would not send them into the Abyss, a place they evidently dreaded, Luke 8:31 ; where it seems to mean that part of Hades in which wicked spirits are in torment. ...
In the opinion of the ancient Hebrews, and of the generality of eastern people at this day, the Abyss, the sea, or waters, encompassed the whole earth. This was supposed to float upon the Abyss, of which it covered a small part. According to the same notion, the earth was founded on the waters, or at least its foundations were on the Abyss beneath, Psalms 24:2 ; Psalms 136:6 . Under these waters, and at the bottom of this Abyss, they represented the wicked as groaning, and suffering the punishment of their sin
Ulf - ) A hollow place in the earth; an Abyss; a deep chasm or basin,...
(4):...
(n
Abaddon - He is the same as the "angel of the Abyss," that is, the angel of death, or the destroying angel
Apol'Lyon - " From the occurrence of the word in (Psalm 88:11 ) the rabbins have made Abaddon the nethermost of the two regions into which they divide the lower world; but that in (Revelation 9:11 ) Abaddon is the angel and not the Abyss is perfectly evident in the Greek
Key - , knowledge of the revealed will of God, by which men entered into the life that pleases God; this the religious leaders of the Jews had presumptuously "taken away," so that they neither entered in themselves, nor permitted their hearers to do so; (c) of "the keys of death and of Hades," Revelation 1:18 , RV (see HADES), indicative of the authority of the Lord over the bodies and souls of men; (d) of "the key of David," Revelation 3:7 , a reference to Isaiah 22:22 , speaking of the deposition of Shebna and the investiture of Eliakim, in terms evidently Messianic, the metaphor being that of the right of entrance upon administrative authority; the mention of David is symbolic of complete sovereignty; (e) of "the key of the pit of the Abyss," Revelation 9:1 ; here the symbolism is that of competent authority; the pit represents a shaft or deep entrance into the region (see Abyss), from whence issued smoke, symbolic of blinding delusion; (f) of "the key of the Abyss," Revelation 20:1 ; this is to be distinguished from (e): the symbolism is that of the complete supremacy of God over the region of the lost, in which, by angelic agency, Satan is destined to be confined for a thousand years
Deep, the - In Luke 8:31 'the deep' refers to the Abyss where evil spirits are confined
Overlay - And overlay with this portentous bridge the dark Abyss
Deep - ) That which is deep, especially deep water, as the sea or ocean; an Abyss; a great depth. ) That which is profound, not easily fathomed, or incomprehensible; a moral or spiritual depth or Abyss
Gulf - An Abyss a deep place in the earth as the gulf of Avernus
Profound - ) An Abyss
Deep, Deepness, Deeply, Depth - , Abyss, is translated "the deep" in Luke 8:31 ; Romans 10:7 , AV. See Abyss , BOTTOM
Pit - (See Abyss on the "bottomless pit": Revelation 9:1-2; Revelation 20:1-2
A - prefix / without, or privative, not, as in Abyss, atheist; akin to E
Brood - To sit on to spread over, as with wings as, to sit brooding over the vast Abyss
Procrastination: Deprecated - About an hour-and-a-half after, the lights were missing, and though no sound was heard, she and all on board had gone down to the fathomless Abyss
Pinnacle - Here, as Josephus informs us and the excavations corroborate his testimony a spectator looking down into the valley of the Kidron ‘would turn giddy, while his sight could not reach down so such an Abyss’ ( Ant
Keys - ...
In the two remaining passages (Revelation 9:1; Revelation 20:1) the use of the word (‘the key of the pit of the Abyss,’ ‘the key of the Abyss’) depends on the idea familiar in Jewish cosmogony, viz. that there was a communication between the upper world and the under world or Abyss by means of a pit or shaft, the opening to which might be conceived as covered and locked
Behemoth - This is doubtful, but the myth undoubtedly reappears in later Jewish literature: ‘And in that day will two monsters be separated, a female named Leviathan to dwell in the Abyss over the fountains of waters
Abaddon - ...
In Revelation 9:11 Abaddon is not merely personified in the free poetic manner of Job 28:22, but is used as the personal designation in Hebrew of a fallen angel described as the king of the locusts and ‘the angel of the Abyss,’ whose name in the Greek tongue is said to be Apollyon. in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) and Encyclopaedia Biblica ; article ‘Abyss’ in Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics ; Expository Times xx
Fog: a Figure of Our Partial Knowledge - A little mountain tarn, scarcely larger than a farmer's horse-pond, expanded into a great lake whose distant shores were leagues beyond the reach of our poor optics; and as we descended into the valley of Wastwater, the rocks on one side like the battlements of heaven, and the descent on the other hand, looked like the dreadful lips of a yawning Abyss; and yet when one looked back again in the morning's clear light there was nothing very dangerous in the pathway, or terrible in the rocks
Pit - In addition, it is used metaphorically for an underworld dungeon: a gloomy prison for the fallen angels (2 Peter 2:4 ) or a bottomless Abyss for Satan during the millennium (Revelation 20:1-3 )
Deluge - Burnet supposes the primitive earth to have been no more than a crust investing the water contained in the ocean; and in the central Abyss which he and others suppose to exist in the bowels of the earth at the time of the flood, this outward crust broke in a thousand pieces, and sunk down among the water, which thus spouted up in vast cataracts, and overflowed the whole surface. ...
Others, supposing a sufficient fund of water in the sea or Abyss, think that the shifting of the earth's centre of gravity drew after it the water out of the channel, and overwhelmed the several parts of the earth successively. Let us be satisfied with the sources which Moses gives us, namely, the fountains of the great deep broken up, and the waters rushed out from the hidden Abyss of the bowels of the earth, and the clouds poured down their rain incessantly
Depth - The Abyss a gulf of infinite profundity
Abaddon - In conformity to this opinion, Abaddon may be understood to denote either Mohammed, who issued from the Abyss, or the cave of Hera, to propagate his pretended revelations, or, more generally, the Saracen power
Judgment - (See Abyss, Day of the Lord, Book of Life, Gehenna
Prison - The Abyss in which Satan is to be shut up for the thousand years is also called a prison, which may refer to the same place
Hell - See 2 Peter 2:4 , the rebellious angels are said, in the original Greek, to have been cast down into "Tartarus," this being the Grecian name of the lowest Abyss of Hades
Bottom - ) An Abyss
Pit - ) Any Abyss; especially, the grave, or hades
Pit - ) Any Abyss; especially, the grave, or hades
Smoke - The smoke which issues from the opened pit of the Abyss, darkening sun and air like the smoke of a great furnace (καμίνου), and resolving itself into demons in the form of locusts (Revelation 9:2 f
God - I mean, moreover, that He created all things out of nothing, and preserves them every moment, and could destroy them as easily as He made them; and that, in consequence, He is separated from them by an Abyss, and is incommunicable in all His attributes
Deep - The sea the Abyss of waters the ocean
Armour (2) - The ‘stronger’ had already come into the ‘strong one’s’ house and had delivered many; the conflict was continued by Him and against Him till His death, when He overcame him that had the power of death; the same conflict of evil against good is still continued, His ‘spoiling’ is going on, He is still taking from His adversary one and another of his possessions, till in the end He shall bind him in the Abyss and utterly destroy him (cf
Key - ...
(2) Angelic authority is evident in Revelation 9:1; Revelation 20:1, where the key of the ‘pit’ or ‘well’ of the Abyss, or of the Abyss simply, is spoken of
Sea - ...
Note: For the change from "the sea" in Deuteronomy 30:13 , to "the Abyss" in Romans 10:7 , see BOTTOM , B
Leviathan - ]'>[3] ‘their mourning’) aroused by magicians ( Job 3:8 ) is most likely a denizen of the Abyss which threatens the world with destruction
Hell - ταρταρόω, 'to cast into Tartarus,' a term used by heathen writers for the 'deepest Abyss of the infernal regions,' a place of extreme darkness
Boar - The demons beg leave not to be sent to the Abyss of torment, but into the swine
Millennium - the devil) is to be confined in the Abyss, while the martyrs, having been raised from the dead, are to reign with Christ
Spirits in Prison - These abysmal waters were waters of destruction; and the ‘abyss’ (Luke 8:31) was the home of devils, from which the Beast of the Apocalypse came forth (Revelation 11:7; Revelation 17:8). And it was into this ‘abyss’ that Christ descended after His Passion (Romans 10:7). ...
Hence the mention of the Descensus would at once suggest to a Jew the Abyss, whence the waters of judgment burst forth at the Flood
Deep, the - ...
The Greek Bible or Septuagint translated tehom as “abyss,” bringing it into relationship with the pit, the abode of the dead ( Romans 10:7 ) and place of evil spirits (Luke 8:31 ), including the beast of the apocalypse (Revelation 17:8 )
Lunatics - And they repeatedly besought him not to torment them, not to order them to depart into the Abyss, Luke 8:28-31
Antichrist - The first reference to Beliar seems to have been in Jubilees 1:20, but the myth is not unlike that of the Babylonian Tiamat , queen of the Abyss, who was conquered by Marduk. He is apparently to return with the kings of Parthia, but he is also, in Revelation 17:8-11 , identified with the beast of the Abyss (cf
Open, Opening - , Revelation 5:9 ; 6:1 ; the eyes, Acts 9:40 ; the mouth of a fish, Matthew 17:27 ; "the pit of the Abyss," Revelation 9:2 , RV; heaven and the heavens, Matthew 3:16 ; Luke 3:21 ; Acts 10:11 (for Acts 7:56 , see No
Arabah - The Jordan rushes for 150 miles through its northern part (el Ghor) by lakes Huleh and Gennesareth, to the deep Abyss of the Dead Sea
Litany of the Sacred Heart - ...
Heart of Jesus, Abyss of all virtues, have mercy on us
Litany of the Sacred Heart of Jesus - ...
Heart of Jesus, Abyss of all virtues, have mercy on us
Sacred Heart, Litany of the - ...
Heart of Jesus, Abyss of all virtues, have mercy on us
Enoch Book of - Darkness and chains and burning fire, valleys and the Abyss, loom large in all descriptions of the place and mode of punishment. 6), and beyond, a deep Abyss of fire (xviii. Enoch proceeds to chaos and the seven stars and the Abyss of xviii. 3-6), after judgment by the Elect One (Leviticus 3, 4); angels of punishment with scourged are seen proceeding to cast the Watchers’ children into the Abyss (lvi. 1-6, 25); Leviathan a female monster, and Behemoth a male, parted, one in the Abysses of the ocean, the other in the wilderness to the east of the garden (Eden) where Enoch was taken up; they shall feed … (presumably till given as food to the elect as in 2 Bar. ); the first star is cast into the Abyss; evil beasts slay one another (lxxxviii. 13-19); a throne is erected in the pleasant land for Him; the sealed books are opened; the sinning stars are cast into the Abyss of fire, also the Seventy Shepherds; the blinded sheep into the Abyss in the midst of the earth (= Gehenna) (xc
Millennium - During that period Satan will be confined in the Abyss, or bottomless pit
Seal - " For example, Satan's ineffectiveness is secured by God's sealing of the Abyss (Revelation 20:3 )
Descent Into Hell (Hades) - Paul used Deuteronomy 30:12-13 and Psalm 71:20 in Romans 10:6-7 to explain the death of Christ as a descent into the Abyss ( tis katabesetai eis abusson ) and the resurrection as a going up from (among) the dead (ek nekron anagagein )
Pisidia - ...
PIT...
See Abyss
Deluge - ]'>[3] the cause of the Deluge is not only rain, but also the bursting forth of the subterranean Abyss ( Genesis 6:11 ); J Hell - -(1) In Revelation 9:1 ‘the pit of the Abyss’ (see Abyss) is regarded as the special prison-house of the devil and his attendant evil spirits. Closely connected with the idea of the Abyss is its demonic ruler Abaddon (Revelation 9:11, see Abaddon), whose name figures frequently in the Wisdom-literature, and is generally translated in the Septuagint by ἀπώλεια = ‘destruction. -See articles Hades, Abyss, Life and Death, etc
Hell - -(1) In Revelation 9:1 ‘the pit of the Abyss’ (see Abyss) is regarded as the special prison-house of the devil and his attendant evil spirits. Closely connected with the idea of the Abyss is its demonic ruler Abaddon (Revelation 9:11, see Abaddon), whose name figures frequently in the Wisdom-literature, and is generally translated in the Septuagint by ἀπώλεια = ‘destruction. -See articles Hades, Abyss, Life and Death, etc
Creation - ]'>[1] starts with a description ( Genesis 2:2 ) of the primeval chaos a dark formless watery Abyss, out of which the world of light and order was to be evolved. In both we have the conception of chaos as a watery Abyss, in both the separation of the waters into an upper and a lower ocean; the formation of the heavenly bodies and their function in regulating time are described with remarkable similarity; special prominence is given to the creation of man; and it may be added that, while the order of creation differs in the two documents, yet the separate works themselves are practically identical
Eternal Fire (2) - For the impure angels and the faithless angelic rulers an Abyss of fire is prepared, in which, after the judgment, they will be tortured for ever (10:6, 13, 18:11, 21:7, 10, 54:6, 90:24, 25). For human offenders, a fiery Abyss is opened on the right hand of the Temple (90:26, 27); this is Gehenna
Origenists - As in the material system there is a gravitation of the less bodies towards the greater, there must of necessity be something analogous to this in the intellectual system; and since the spirits created by God are emanations and streams from his own Abyss of being, and as self-existent power must needs subject all beings to itself, the Deity could not but impress upon her intimate natures and substances a central tendency towards himself; an essential principle of reunion to their great original
Hell - "Τartarus ," the pagan Greek term for the place of enchainment of the Titans, rebels against God, occurs in 2 Peter 2:4 of the lost angels; the "deep," or "abyss," or "bottomless pit," (abussos ) Luke 8:31; Revelation 9:11
Angels - Abaddon or Apollyon is the name of 'the angel of the bottomless pit,' Revelation 9:11 , that is, 'the Abyss,' not hell, which, as seen above, is the place of punishment
Prison - (2) The term ‘prison’ is also applied to ‘the bottomless pit’ (RV_ ‘the Abyss’), in which Satan is bound a thousand years (Revelation 20:7; cf
Descent Into Hades - By the Hebrews, Sheol or Hades was regarded as the under world, a subterranean region of Abysses and mysterious waters upon which the earth rested (Psalms 24:2; Psalms 136:6). In NT times, a distinction has been drawn between the departments of Sheol inhabited by the good and the bad: ‘Paradise’ is the resting-place of the righteous and penitent (Luke 23:43), while the ‘abyss’ (q. That He went into ‘the Abyss’ does not need argument for St. we have a Song of the Victory of Christ in the under world: ‘The Abysses were dissolved before the Lord: and darkness was destroyed by His appearance: error went astray and perished at His hand: and folly found no path to walk in … He opened His mouth and spake grace and joy … His face was justified, for thus His holy Father had given to Him. Four points in particular may be noted:...
(a) The Descent was a going down into ‘the Abyss’ (Romans 10:7)
Temperance - , for those who are to rescue the victims of strong drink, for we all know that example is far more powerful than precept; we are far more likely to be able to help those who have fallen into this Abyss by saying to them, ‘Do as we do,’ than by saying, ‘Do as we tell you
Satan - Finally, he is bound, imprisoned in the Abyss for one thousand years, then ultimately banished in the fiery lake to suffer eternal torment (20:1-3,10; cf
Lake of Fire - ...
(2) The Abyss (" translation="">Revelation 20:1), in which the dragon is bound during the millennial reign (cf
Temperance - , for those who are to rescue the victims of strong drink, for we all know that example is far more powerful than precept; we are far more likely to be able to help those who have fallen into this Abyss by saying to them, ‘Do as we do,’ than by saying, ‘Do as we tell you
Devil - Enoch 54:6, Matthew 12:24-27 ); though the kingdom is not entirely outside the sovereign rule of Jehovah, who is the Lord of all spirits and of the Abyss in which they dwell (Enoch 40, Deuteronomy 32:22 , Job 11:8 , Psalms 139:8 , Luke 16:24 ). It supplies the preceding chapters in the history, and enables the career to be traced from the first stage of moral choice through the process of hardening of purpose and increasing separation from God to the appropriate Abyss at the close
Hades - Like the Old Testament, the New Testament personifies Hades and associated terms, such as death, Abyss, and Abaddon, as the demonic forces behind sin and ruin (Acts 2:24 ; Romans 5:14,17 ; 1 Corinthians 15:25-26 ; Revelation 6:8 ; 9:1-11 ; 20:14 )
Minister - In its excellence, continuance and naturalness, this well might be a fair picture of the grace of our Lord Jesus, but it fails to set him forth from its poverty of supply, He has a redundance, an overflow, an infinite fulness, and there is no possibility-of his being exhausted by the draughts made upon him, even though ten thousand times ten thousand should come with a thirst as deep as the Abyss
Nile - " The Nile has two names: the sacred name Ηapi , or Ηapi-mu , "the Abyss of waters," Ηp-ro-mu , "the waters whose source is hidden"; and the common name Υeor Αor , Aur (Atur): both Egyptian names. The shorter confluent, the Blue river, is what brings down from the Abyssinian mountains the alluvial soil that fertilizes Egypt
Revelation, Theology of - The beast came (probably in Nero, who was the first Roman emperor to persecute Christians), went to the Abyss (a lull in persecution for several decades) and will soon come out again (probably in Domitian as Nero redivivus: 11:7; 17:8,11). This pattern recurs on a grander scale: Satan's activity through the Roman emperor (the dragon symbol) will be curtailed, but he will eventually return from the Abyss, last of all with Gog (20:1-3,7-10)
Heaven - From the Abyss comes the moving power of the enmity against God. In the writer’s view, earth is ruled by the Abyss rather than by heaven
Apocalyptic - While they give their testimony, the two witnesses are kept safe, even though they are defeated by "the beast from the Abyss" and follow their Lord through death and resurrection (11:5-12)
Evil (2) - Yet the awful and unapproachable character of God, and the infinite Abyss which separates the Creator from the highest creature, are never lost sight of
Heaven - From the Abyss comes the moving power of the enmity against God. In the writer’s view, earth is ruled by the Abyss rather than by heaven
Thousand Years - Satan thought to destroy God's people by persecutions (just as previously to destroy Christ, Revelation 12); but the church is not destroyed from the earth, but raised to rule over it; Satan himself is shut up for a thousand years in the "abyss" (" bottomless pit"), preparatory to the "lake of fire," his final doom
Divination - He was regarded as having his abode in the skies, in which he and his ἄγγελοι had been defeated by an ἀρχάγγελος Michael and his ἄγγελοι, and thrown down on the earth (Revelation 12:7-9) to be flung into the Abyss for a thousand years (Revelation 20:3; Revelation 20:7)
the Prodigal Son - And this was the Abyss of my vileness when I was cast away from before Thine eyes
Unbelief - From the nature of the case, however, it is clear that a fanatical zeal, where the heat of passion concealed from man the hollowness and falsehood of his faith, might be created for a religion, to which man only betook himself as a refuge in his misery, and in his dread of the Abyss of unbelief; a religion which no longer served for the development of man's nature, and into which, nevertheless, he felt himself driven back from the want of any other; and that men must use every kind of power and art to uphold that which was in danger of falling from its own internal weakness, and to defend that which was unable to defend itself by its own power
Apocalyptic Literature - The years of misery are represented by a flock under seventy shepherds, who, in the new age about to dawn, are to be cast with the evil men and angels into an Abyss of fire
Antichrist - 11 ‘the beast that cometh up out of the Abyss’ was evidently suggested by the dragon-myth as embodied in the Jewish Antichrist tradition, while the ‘great red dragon’ of Revelation 12:3, who is also described as ‘the old serpent, he that is called the Devil and Satan’ (Revelation 12:9), and who is clearly represented as the Antichrist (Revelation 12:4-5; Revelation 12:17), reproduces both the mythical dragon and the later Beliar-Satan conception, now fused into one appalling figure
Temple - But whether it is to be interpreted as a symbol of the primeval Abyss ( Genesis 1:2 ) and of J″ Revelation, the Book of - Sadly, he has more to relate regarding “the beast that comes up out of the Abyss” to “make war” with the people of God (Revelation 11:7 , NAS)
Christ in the Seventeenth Century - The Father is the Abyss; the Son is the first forthgoing of desire in the form of will; the Spirit is the eternal out-breathing of that will
Fire - ’ The expression does not occur in the apocalyptic writings, but in the Book of Enoch ‘the Abyss or fire’ is the doom in store for the fallen angels in the Day of Judgment (x
Fire - ’ The expression does not occur in the apocalyptic writings, but in the Book of Enoch ‘the Abyss or fire’ is the doom in store for the fallen angels in the Day of Judgment (x
Wandering Stars - ’ ἀστέρες πλανῆται are words used to distinguish the planets from the fixed stars; but the regular motion of the planets would supply no fit comparison for the author’s idea, and we must rather see a reference to meteors or shooting stars, whose sudden and terrifying appearance, rapid transit, and speedy disappearance into a darkness rendered more intense by contrast would be a fitting picture of the short-lived fame and hurtful influence of the false teachers, and a prediction of that Abyss of darkness into which they were hurrying
Day of Judgment - The first, which is established at the appearance of Jesus, is confined to the worldly powers, and Satan is then bound and shut up in the Abyss (Revelation 20:1-3)
Revelation, the - Satan is cast into the Abyss (not into the lake of fire yet) for a thousand years
Messiah - The new age, however, is about to be introduced by the Day of Judgment, when wicked persons whether men, rulers, or angels are to be cast into an Abyss of fire
Trinity - Thus we see the Spirit exerted upon this occasion an active effectual energy, by that energy agitating the vast Abyss, and infusing into it a powerful vital principle
Valentinus, Founder of a Gnostic Sect - the Sophia in the kingdom of the Midst, the Sophia from Horus and from the Pleroma, and finally the world of Aeons in the Pleroma from the Abyss, i