What does Absalom mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
אַבְשָׁלוֹם֙ father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 13
אַבְשָׁל֖וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 10
אַבְשָׁל֑וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 10
אַבְשָׁל֔וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 10
אַבְשָׁלֽוֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 7
אַבְשָׁלֹ֔ם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 5
אַבְשָׁל֗וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 4
אַבְשָׁל֣וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 4
אַבְשָׁל֨וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 3
לְאַבְשָׁל֑וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 3
אַבְשָׁל֛וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 3
אַבְשָׁל֥וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 3
אַבְשָׁלֹֽם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 2
אַבְשָׁלֹ֑ם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 2
וְאַבְשָׁלֹ֔ם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 2
לְאַבְשָׁלוֹם֙ father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 2
אַבְשָׁל֜וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 2
לְאַבְשָׁלֹ֑ם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
וְאַבְשָׁלֹ֗ם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
לְאַבְשָׁל֣וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
אַבְשָׁלֹ֛ם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
וְאַבְשָׁל֞וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
בְּאַבְשָׁלֽוֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
וְאַבְשָׁלֹ֣ם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
! אַבְשָׁל֔וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
וְאַבְשָׁלוֹם֙ father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
אַבְשָׁלוֹם֒ father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
אַבְשָׁל֤וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
לְאַבְשָׁלֹֽם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
לְאַבְשָׁל֛וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
אַבְשָׁלֹם֒ father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
וְאַבְשָׁל֗וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
אַ֠בְשָׁלוֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
לְאַבְשָׁלֽוֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
וּכְאַבְשָׁל֗וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
וְאַבְשָׁל֥וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
וְאַבְשָׁל֣וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
לְאַבְשָׁל֔וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
אַבְשָׁלֹ֥ם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
וּלְאַבְשָׁל֧וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1
אַבְשָׁל֬וֹם father-in-law of Rehoboam. / third son of David 1

Definitions Related to Absalom

H53


   1 father-in-law of Rehoboam.
   2 third son of David, killer of first-born son Amnon, also leader of revolt against his father—David.
   Additional Information: Absalom or Abishalom = “my father is peace”.
   

Frequency of Absalom (original languages)

Frequency of Absalom (English)

Dictionary

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Absalom
Only son of David by Maacah, 2 Samuel 3:3 . He was remarkable for his beauty and for his fine head of hair, 2 Samuel 14:25 , which being cut from time to time when it incommoded him, used to weigh 200 shekels by the king's standard, that is, probable about thirty ounces, an extraordinary, but not incredible weight. Ammon, another of the king's sons, having violated his sister Tamar, Absalom caused him to be slain, and then fled to Geshur, where Talmai his grandfather was king. After three years, at the intercession of Joab, David permitted him to return to Jerusalem, and at length received him again into favor, 2 Samuel 14:1-33 . Absalom, however, grossly abused his father's kindness; he soon began to play the demagogue, and by many artful devices "stole the hearts of the people," and got himself proclaimed king in Hebron. David retired from Jerusalem; Absalom followed him; and in the battle, which ensued, the troops of the latter were defeated, and he himself, being caught by his head in a tree, was found and slain by Joab. David was much affected by his death, and uttered bitter lamentations over him, 2 Samuel 18:33 .
His history affords instructive lessons to the young against the sins to which they are prone, particularly vanity, ambition, lawless passions, and filial disobedience.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Absalom
Father of peace; i.e., "peaceful" David's son by Maacah (2 Samuel 3:3 ; Compare 1 Kings 1:6 ). He was noted for his personal beauty and for the extra-ordinary profusion of the hair of his head (2 Samuel 14:25,26 ). The first public act of his life was the blood-revenge he executed against Amnon, David's eldest son, who had basely wronged Absalom's sister Tamar. This revenge was executed at the time of the festivities connected with a great sheep-shearing at Baal-hazor. David's other sons fled from the place in horror, and brought the tidings of the death of Amnon to Jerusalem. Alarmed for the consequences of the act, Absalom fled to his grandfather at Geshur, and there abode for three years (2 Samuel 3:3 ; 13:23-38 ). David mourned his absent son, now branded with the guilt of fratricide. As the result of a stratagem carried out by a woman of Tekoah, Joab received David's sanction to invite Absalom back to Jerusalem. He returned accordingly, but two years elapsed before his father admitted him into his presence (2 Samuel 14:28 ). Absalom was now probably the oldest surviving son of David, and as he was of royal descent by his mother as well as by his father, he began to aspire to the throne. His pretensions were favoured by the people. By many arts he gained their affection; and after his return from Geshur (2 Samuel 15:7 ; marg., RSV) he went up to Hebron, the old capital of Judah, along with a great body of the people, and there proclaimed himself king. The revolt was so successful that David found it necessary to quit Jerusalem and flee to Mahanaim, beyond Jordan; where upon Absalom returned to Jerusalem and took possession of the throne without opposition. Ahithophel, who had been David's chief counsellor, deserted him and joined Absalom, whose chief counsellor he now became. Hushai also joined Absalom, but only for the purpose of trying to counteract the counsels of Ahithophel, and so to advantage David's cause. He was so far successful that by his advice, which was preferred to that of Ahithophel, Absalom delayed to march an army against his father, who thus gained time to prepare for the defence.
Absalom at length marched out against his father, whose army, under the command of Joab, he encountered on the borders of the forest of Ephraim. Twenty thousand of Absalom's army were slain in that fatal battle, and the rest fled. Absalom fled on a swift mule; but his long flowing hair, or more probably his head, was caught in the bough of an oak, and there he was left suspended till Joab came up and pierced him through with three darts. His body was then taken down and cast into a pit dug in the forest, and a heap of stones was raised over his grave. When the tidings of the result of that battle were brought to David, as he sat impatiently at the gate of Mahanaim, and he was told that Absalom had been slain, he gave way to the bitter lamentation: "O my son Absalom, my son, my son Absalom! would God I had died for thee, O Absalom, my son, my son!" (2 Samuel 18:33 . Compare Exodus 32:32 ; Romans 9:3 ).
Absalom's three sons (2 Samuel 14:27 ; comp 18:18) had all died before him, so that he left only a daughter, Tamar, who became the grandmother of Abijah.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Absalom
2 Samuel 14:25 (c) This son of David may be taken as a type of a human being without GOD.
He had developed his body to perfection. Those who observed him could see nothing but physical beauty. From head to foot there was no blemish in him. With all of this, however, his heart was wicked.
He hated his father David who was GOD's chosen king.
He refused and rejected GOD's plan and purpose in regard to Solomon.
He was fit for neither Heaven nor earth, and so he died between the two of them on the tree.
So is the religious hypocrite of today. He presents many aspects of beauty and characteristics of loveliness, yet his heart is not right with GOD.
2 Samuel 15:2 (c) In this passage Absalom is a type of the ingratitude and infidelity of professing Christians who are not really saved. When the test came he proved to be an enemy of GOD's king, and of GOD's program. He did not take his place on GOD's side. He wanted to assert his own sufficiency and his own supremacy.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Absalom
("father of peace".) Third son of David, by Maachah, daughter of Talmai, king of Geshur, a Syrian region N.E. of Palestine, near lake Merom. Polygamy bore its fatal fruits in engendering jealousies among the families by different wives, each with a separate, establishment (2 Samuel 13:8; 2 Samuel 14:24), and in fostering David's own lust, which broke forth in the sad adultery with Bathsheba. Absalom, the fruit of David's polygamy, was made the divine instrument of David's punishment. Amnon, the half brother, violated Tamar, Absalom's whole sister. David, though very wroth, would not punish Amnon, because he was his firstborn by Ahinoam the Jezreelitess. As Simeon and Levi avenged on Hamor their sister Dinah's violation, so Absalom after two years' dark, silent hatred, took vengeance on Amnon at a sheepshearing feast at Baal Hazor to which he invited all the king's sons (2 Samuel 13). Then he fled to his father-in-law at Geshur for three years.
Joab perceiving how the king took to heart Absalom's exile suborned a woman of Tekoa, by an imaginary case, to extort from the king (whose justice would not allow his love for Absalom to let him escape some penalty for Amnon's murder) the admission of the general principle that, in special cases where the life taken could not be recalled, means for restoring the loved and living banished one should be devised; just as God, considering the brevity of man's life, weak and irrecoverable when gone, "as water spilt on the ground, does not take a (sinner's) soul away" (so the Hebrew text of 2 Samuel 14:14 for "neither doth God respect any person"), but deviseth means that His banished be not (for ever) expelled from Him." David yielded, but would not see Absalom, though living at Jerusalem, for two more years. Impatient of delay in his ambitious schemes, he sent for Joab, and, not being heeded, he burnt Joab's grain (as Samson did to the Philistines, Judges 15:4), which drove Joab to intercede with David for Absalom's admission to his presence. possibly he feared the succession of Bathsheba's son to the throne, to which he had the title, being alone of royal descent by his mother's side, also the oldest surviving son (Amnon being slain, and Chileab or Daniel dead, as his name does not occur after 2 Samuel 3:3).
Nathan's mission from Jehovah to David, announcing that the Lord loved the child, and that his name therefore was to be Jedidiah, "beloved of the Lord," implied Jehovah's choice of Solomon as successor to David (2 Samuel 12:24-25). This excited Absalom's fears. At all events, directly after receiving the king's kiss of reconciliation, he began popularity hunting, to the disparagement of his father, whose moral hold on the people had been weakened by his sin with Bathsheba, and who probably as years advanced attended personally to judicial ministrations less than is the usual policy of oriental kings. Absalom intercepted suitors, lamenting that there was no judge appointed to help them to their rights such as he would be. His beauty too, as in Saul's case (1 Samuel 9:2), and his princely retinue, attracted many (2 Samuel 14:25-26, where probably some error of number has crept in: though doubtless 200 shekels after the king's weight is much less weight of hair than ordinary shekels would be; 2 Samuel 15:1-6).
Judah, from jealousy of Israel, with whom they had been merged by David, seems to have been too ready to be seduced from loyalty. Accordingly, Absalom chose Hebron, Judah's old capital, as the head quarters of the revolt. He repaired thither after four (so we ought to read instead of "forty," 2 Samuel 15:7) years, under the hypocritical pretense of a vow like that of pious Jacob (compare 2 Samuel 15:8 with Genesis 28:20-21); David alludes to the hypocrisy of the rebels in Psalms 4:5. Amasa, son of Abigail, David's sister, and Jether, an Ishmaelite, owing to David's neglect of him, and preference of his other sister Zeruiah's sons (probably because of his Ishmaelite fatherhood), was tempted to join the rebellion, and Ahithophel of Giloh also, because of his granddaughter Bathsheba's wrong (2 Samuel 11:8; 2 Samuel 23:34). Both were of Judah; Amasa became Absalom's general, Ahithophel his counselor. This David felt most keenly (Psalms 69:12; Psalms 55:12-14; Psalms 55:20; Psalms 41:9).
By Ahithophel's abominable counsel, Absalom lay with his father's concubines, at once committing his party to an irreconcilable war, and him to the claim to the throne (according to oriental ideas: so Adonijah, 1 Kings 2:13, etc.), and fulfilling God's threatened retribution of David's adultery in kind (2 Samuel 12:11-12). Hushai, David's friend, defeated treachery by treachery. Ahithophel, like his anti-type Judas, baffled, went and hanged himself. Absalom, though well pleased at the counsel of "smiting the king only" and at once, was easily drawn aside by fear of his father's bravery, and by indecision and vanity; all which Hushai acted on in his counsel to summon all Israel, and that Absalom should command in person. He waited to have himself anointed king first (2 Samuel 19:10). He lost the opportunity of attacking his father that night, while weak handed. The battle in Gilead in the wood of Ephraim (called from Ephraim's defeat, Judges 12:4) resulted in the defeat of his cumbrous undisciplined host.
His locks, on which he prided himself (Judges 14:25-26), were the means of his destruction, for they kept him suspended from a terebinth tree until Joab pierced him; and David, whom the unnatural son would have gladly smitten, but who charged Joab, Abishai, and Ittai, his three generals, to spare the youth for his sake, mourned pathetically for his death: "O Absalom, my son, would God I had died for thee; my son, my son!" His grave was a pit, over which the insulting conquerors heaped stones, as over Achan and the king of Ai (Joshua 7:26; Joshua 8:29). After losing his three sons (2 Samuel 14:27; compare Psalms 21:10), he had erected in the king's dale (Genesis 14:17) a pillar to commemorate his name; a sad contrast to this was his dishonored grave. The so-called tomb of Absalom, in the valley of Jehoshaphat outside Jerusalem, betrays its modern origin by Ionic columns; and besides could not have outlasted the various sieges and conquests to which the city has been exposed. David seems to have been a fond but weak father; and Absalom's and Amnon's course showed the evil effects of such indulgence (1 Kings 1:6). Absalom's fair daughter Tamar married Uriel, by whom she had Michaiah or Maachah, wife of Rehoboam and mother of (See ABIJAH.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Absalom
(ab' ssuh luhm) Personal name meaning, “father of peace.” See 2 Samuel 3:3 ; 2 Samuel 13-19 ). Absalom apparently resented being ignored by his father and resented his brother Ammon going unpunished for raping Tamar, Absalom's full sister. Being overindulged and ambitious, Absalom became the spokesman for the people (2 Samuel 15:1-6 ). They, in turn, gladly proclaimed him king in Hebron (2 Samuel 15:10 ), where David was first crowned (2 Samuel 2:4 ). Battle ensued. David left Jerusalem and sent his army to find Absalom but not to hurt him (2 Samuel 15:5 ), but Joab murdered him (2 Samuel 15:14 ). David's lament over Absalom shows the depth of a father's love over the loss of a son as well as regret for personal failures which led to family and national tragedies.
Robert Fricke
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Absalom
Father of peace
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Absalom
(Hebrew: father of peace)
Beloved son of David, renowned for personal beauty (2 Kings 13-18). To avenge his sister's dishonor he killed his elder stepbrother, Amnon. Ambitious to attain the throne, he afterwards plotted against David; pursued by the royal forces, he was caught by his hair to the branches of a tree and there slain. David was inconsolable when he heard of his death.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Absalom
ABSALOM (‘father is peace’). Third son of David, by Maacah, daughter of Talmai, king of Geshur ( 2 Samuel 3:3 ). His sister Tamar having been wronged by her half-brother Amnon, and David having failed to punish the criminal, Absalom assassinated Amnon and fled to Geshur, where he spent three years (ch. 13). Joab procured his recall, but he was not admitted into his father’s presence. In his usual imperious fashion he next compelled Joab to bring about his full restoration ( 2 Samuel 14:29 ff.). Then he assumed the position of heir-apparent ( 2 Samuel 15:1 ; cf. 1 Samuel 8:11 , 1 Kings 1:5 ), and began undermining the loyalty of the people. Four (not ‘forty’) years after his return he set up the standard of rebellion at Hebron, a town which was well-affected towards him because it was his birthplace, and aggrieved against David because it was no longer the metropolis. The old king was taken by surprise, and fled to the east of the Jordan. On entering Jerusalem, Absalom publicly appropriated the royal harem, thus proclaiming the supersession of his father. By the insidious counsel of Hushai time was wasted in collecting a large army. But time was on David’s side. His veterans rallied round him; his seasoned captains were by his side. When Absalom offered battle, near Mahanaim, the king’s only anxiety was lest his son should be slain. This really happened, through Joab’s agency. The father’s natural, but unseasonable, lamentation was cut short by the soldier’s blunt remonstrance ( 2 Samuel 19:5 ff.). On the face of the history it is clear that, if Absalom lacked capacity, he possessed charm. His physical beauty contributed to this: 2 Samuel 14:25-27 is probably a gloss, but certainly rests on a reliable tradition; the polling of the hair was a religious act. According to 2 Samuel 18:18 , Absalom had no son: this is more reliable than the statement in 2 Samuel 14:27 . It is said that later generations, following Proverbs 10:7 , always avoided the name Absalom, preferring the form Abishalom (which appears in 1 Kings 15:2 ; 1 Kings 15:10 ).
J. Taylor.
ABSALOM (in Apocr. [1] ). 1 . The father of Mattathias, one of the captains who stood by Jonathan at Hazor ( 1Ma 11:70 = Jos. [1] Ant . XIII. v. 7). It is perhaps the same Absalom whose son Jonathan was sent by Simon to secure Joppa ( 1Ma 13:11 = Jos. [1] Ant . XIII. vi. 4). 2 . An envoy sent by the Jews to Lysias ( 2Ma 11:17 ).
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Absalom
Son of David. His history we have 2 Samuel 14:1-33; 2Sa 15:1-37; 2Sa 16:1-23; 2Sa 17:1-29; 2Sa 18:1-33. His name was but suited to his character; for he was of a rebellious, turbulent spirit. Ab, the father, Shalom, of peace.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Absalom
The third son of David, by Maacah, daughter of Talmai, king of Geshur. He was remarkable for his beauty and his luxuriant hair. 2 Samuel 14:25,26 . Because of his putting his half-brother Amnon to death he fled from his father and remained at Geshur three years. By the instigation of Joab, Absalom was recalled, but not admitted into the presence of his father until a later period. (This reconciliation was effected at the expense of righteousness, and without any repentance on Absalom's part — a total contrast to God's ministry of reconciliation. 2 Corinthians 5:18-20 ; etc.) It was declared to Davidthat his successor was not yet born. 2 Samuel 7:12 This was told to David by Nathan the prophet, and probably became known to Absalom. Amnon being dead, and perhaps Chileab, his two elder brothers, he might naturally have thought that the throne should have descended to him, and this may have led to his treason. By artful acts of condescension he stole the hearts of the people, and then at Hebron he claimed to be king, and met with much encouragement. The rebellion was so strong that David fled from Jerusalem. Absalom entered the city and was joined by Amasa and Ahithophel. The latter advised Absalom to go in publicly to the concubines of David who were left at Jerusalem, that all hopes of a reconciliation might be abandoned — though this had been foretold as a punishment to David. 2 Samuel 12:11 . By the advice of Hushai the further counsel of Ahithophel of an immediate pursuit was set aside, and David had time to collect an army, and reach a place of safety. A war followed, and Absalom in riding through a wood, was caught by his head in the branches of an oak, and was there put to death by Joab. David's grief was extreme, but he was recalled to his duties by Joab. We read that Absalom had three sons and a daughter, 2 Samuel 14:27 , yet that because he had no son left he raised up a pillar in the king's dale, to keep his name in remembrance: it was called ABSALOM'S PLACE or monument. 2 Samuel 18:18 . A building in the valley of the Kedron partly rock-hewn, is called Absalom's tomb ; but it can have nothing to do with the above 'pillar' unless it has been much added to with comparatively modern architecture. Josephus says that in his day there was an object called Absalom's 'pillar' about 2 stadia from Jerusalem. Apparently Absalom is called ABISHALOM in 1 Kings 15:2 ; cf. 2 Chronicles 11:21 .
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Absalom
I WILL RAISE UP EVIL AGAINST THEE OUT OF THINE OWN HOUSE
POLYGAMY is just Greek for a dunghill. David trampled down the first and the best law of nature in his palace in Jerusalem, and for his trouble he spent all his after-days in a hell upon earth. David's palace was a perfect pandemonium of suspicion, and intrigue, and jealousy, and hatred-all breaking out, now into incest and now into murder. And it was in such a household, if such a cesspool could be called a household, that Absalom, David's third son by his third living wife, was born and brought up. But be not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a patriarch, or a prophet, or a psalmist soweth, that shall he also reap. For he, saint or sinner, that soweth to his flesh shall of the flesh reap corruption.
Maachah, Absalom's mother, was the daughter of a king. And this, taken together with his distinguished appearance and his princely manners, gave Absalom the pre-eminence over all his brethren. Absalom inherited all the handsomeness, manly bearing, and beauty of his father's handsome and manly house. The sacred writer expatiates with evident relish upon Absalom's extraordinary beauty. In all Israel there was none to be so much praised as Absalom for his beauty. From the sole of his foot even to the crown of his head there was no blemish in him. And the hair of his head is a proverb to this day.
A little ring of jealous and scheming parasites, all hateful and hating one another, collected round each one of David's wives. And it was in one of the worst of those wicked little rings that Absalom grew up and got his education. Absalom had a sister, named Tamar, who was as beautiful as a woman as Absalom was as a man. And how her beauty became the occasion of her ruin in that horrible household the sacred historian tells us with sufficient plainness of speech. Suffice it here to say that Absalom determined, sooner or later, to wash off his sister's terrible wrongs in the blood of the wrongdoer. And, then, as the divine vengeance would have it to be, that wrongdoer to one of David's fairest daughters was one of David's favourite sons. The Septuagint frankly tells us that David loved the wrongdoer so much that he could not so much as rebuke him for his brutality. But, after giving his father two full years to avenge his sister's ruin, Absalom took the law into his own hand till Amnon fell, when his heart was merry with wine, under Absalom's revengeful sword. And, then, all the plots and counter-plots connected with Absalom's revenge, and flight, and restoration, and too-late reconciliation to his father; his deep-laid schemes to wrench the kingdom out of his father's hands; and then his defeat and murder by Joab-all that, if we have the courage to look at it, will give us a picture of the men and the times, humiliating beyond all words, and never to be forgotten. David and his wives and concubines and mixed-up children, Tamar and her half-brother Amnon, Absalom and Jonadab, Joab and the wise woman of Tekoa, Ittai and Shimei, Ahithophel and Hushai, and the righteousness and the grace of God reigning over them all. Truly, all Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness; that the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works.
It is this so terrible plain-spokenness of the Bible that makes it so precious to all who are in earnest about themselves and their children. Had this sacred writer not been in earnest in his work, we should have had an altogether different David. And we make an altogether different David to ourselves in spite of the sacred writer, and in spite of all that David himself can say and do. The David that we set up for ourselves has always a halo round his head and a harp in his hand, and his eyes fixed on the heavens. We are willingly ignorant that David had ever any other wife but Solomon's mother, as also that she had ever any other son but Solomon. And, then, our Solomon is always dreaming his dream at Gibeon, and when he is not choosing wisdom for himself he is always writing inspired proverbs about wisdom for his son. While all the time David prevents the night-watches with psalms like this: I will behave myself wisely in a perfect way. O when wilt thou come unto me? I will walk within my house with a perfect heart. I will set no thing of Belial before mine eyes: I hate the work of them that turn aside; it shall not cleave to me, and so on. A David like that in our Bible would have delighted us, and would not have offended and shocked us. No. But then neither would he have been of any real use to us when we went to our Bible for real use. It is when we go to our Bible for real use, for the experiences of men of like passions with ourselves, it is then that we discover and see the pen of God in the Bible life of David. And it is from that pen that I gather these closing lessons out of the life of David and out of the death of Absalom.
'The inconceivable evil of sensuality' was surely never more awfully burned in upon any sinful house than it was upon David's house. David himself is a towering warning to all men, and especially to all godly men against this master abomination. And, all the more that he sinned so terribly against such singular grace. David, to use his own words, was as white as snow as long as he was young, and poor, and struggling up, and oppressed, and persecuted, and with Samuel's horn of oil still sanctifying all the thoughts and all the imaginations of his heart. But no sooner had David sat down on the throne of Israel than his life of sin and shame began. And all the woe upon woe of his after-life, almost every single deadly drop of it, came down out of that day when he first introduced open and unblushing sensuality into his palace in Jerusalem. There was military success, and extended empire, and great wealth, and great and far-sounding glory in David's day in Israel; but beneath it all the whole ground was mined and filled to the lip with gun-powder, and the divine tinder all the time was surely burning its way to the divine vengeance on David's house. Our doctors, our lawyers, our ministers, and many of ourselves, will all subscribe to Newman's strong words in one of his sermons-'The inconceivable evil of sensuality.'
You sometimes hear speak about the historical imagination, and the right and the fruitful uses of the historical imagination. Well, here is the history of young Absalom, and you must bring your imagination to bear upon it. You must read all the chapters about David's manner of life in Jerusalem, and all the chapters in which Absalom's name comes up, and then you must imagine yourself to be Absalom, and to be in his place. I dare not put in words what you will see when you read Second Samuel with your eye upon the object. For one thing, Absalom did not see his father David at all as we see him. He saw him as his enemies then saw him, and as infidels and scoffers see him now. It was impossible that Absalom could look on his father with our admiring eyes. 'It helped me, too,' says Santa Teresa in her happy 'Life of Herself'; 'It helped me much that I never saw my father and my mother respect anything but goodness.' 'It poisoned me at my father,' said Absalom to Ahithophel; 'the life we all led in our several stews.' Yes, polygamy is indeed a dunghill. Only, it is a dunghill with hell at the heart of it. We have nothing like the city of David on this side the Dardanelles. And no real lesson for our day and our household can be got out of Absalom's early life. Unless it is that far-fetched lesson to that fatal house where there is a father who is no father. And to that house where the father and the mother are full of divided lives, divided interests, divided counsels, divided tastes, and divided desires for themselves and their children. The sons and the daughters of such divided fathers and mothers will need neither history nor imagination to see and to feel with poor Absalom. Only, this lesson to such fathers and mothers is all but too late and irrecoverable.
The Hebrew Bible for some unaccountable reason is silent where the Greek Bible speaks out boldly about David, and delivers a great lesson to all of us who are fathers. The law of Moses was plain. It is to be read in the Book of Leviticus to this day. 'It is a wicked thing. And he that does it shall be cut off in the sight of all the people. He shall bear his iniquity.' Well, Amnon did it. Amnon was worse than if he had been the actual murderer of his own sister. But what do we read on this matter in the Septuagint? We literally read this: 'Notwithstanding Amnon's sin David did not trouble the spirit of Amnon his son, because he loved him, and because he was his first-born.' But, not to trouble the spirit of your son for his sin is to trouble other people's spirit all his days, ay, and your own spirit and his too, to the bargain. The Greek Bible has recovered for us one of the lost links in David's downward career, and in the downward career of Absalom his son. For it was David's unwillingness to trouble Amnon that made Absalom in the cause of his sister first a murderer, and then a conspirator, and then, after a life of terrible trouble, himself a mangled corpse under the revengeful and murderous hands of Joab, that other arch-troubler of Israel. 'Praise them openly, reprehend them secretly,' is the second of Lord Burleigh's ten precepts to his son concerning his children. But David did the very opposite of that with Absalom. All Jerusalem heard David for two years reprehending his half-pardoned son Absalom openly, till Absalom was exasperated out of all endurance, and till the last link of sonship was broken for ever between David and Absalom.
But, with all that, it is the terrible cry that comes out of the chamber over the gate of Mahanaim that makes the name of Absalom so well known and so full of the most terrible lessons to us. 'O my son Absalom, my son, my son Absalom! Would God I had died for thee, O Absalom, my son, my son!' Yes, that is love, no doubt. That is the love of a broken-hearted father, no doubt. But the pang of the cry, the innermost agony of the cry, the poisoned point of the dagger in that cry is remorse. I have slain my son! I have murdered my son with my own hands! I neglected my son Absalom from a child! With my own lusts I laid his very worst temptation right in his way. It had been better Absalom had never been born! If he rebelled, who shall blame him? I, David, drove Absalom to rebellion. It was his father's hand that stabbed Absalom through the heart. O Absalom, my murdered son! Would God thy murderer had been in thy place this day. And the king covered his face, and the king cried with a loud voice, O my son Absalom, O Absalom, my son, my son!
Come all you who are fathers and mothers, come to the chamber over the gate of Mahanaim, and let us take counsel together as to how we are to bring up our children to virtue and godliness and everlasting life. Let us read all Holy Writ on this subject together; and after Holy Writ, all other good and true books that in any way bear upon this supreme subject. Let us set ourselves to gather together all our experience and all our observation, and let us counsel and correct and comfort one another concerning this one thing that we do, our children. Let us take time to it, and pains, and pursue it until we succeed in it. Let us search the Scriptures up to the top and down to the bottom for this pearl of great price. Let us set on one side all the fathers and mothers in Israel to whom God hath ever said, I know him that he will command his children and his household after him, and they shall keep the way of the Lord, to do justice and judgment, that the Lord may bring upon Abraham that which He hath spoken of him. And then let us set on the other side David and all those fathers and mothers on whom God took vengeance, and said, Now, therefore, the sword shall never depart from thine house. I will raise up evil against thee out of thine own house. Let us collect into a secret and solemn book all such instances; and let us, husband and wife, minister and people, and one anxious parent with another, let us meet together, and confer together, and pray together, saying, This one thing will we do. Why do men and women combine and consult together about everything else but the thing in which so many are so ignorant, so stupid, and so full of fatal mistakes? If we asked our happy neighbours, they would surely tell us the secret of their success in their children. How did they come so well and so soon to understand their children? How early did they discover what manner of heart was already in their children? And at what age did they begin to deal with the hearts of their children? What amount of time did they set aside and keep sacred for reflection and for prayer to God for their child; naming their child and describing him; and how did God's answer begin to show itself first in the parents and then in the child? When did your child first begin to show some sure signs of saving grace? And how did that grace show itself to your satisfaction and thanksgiving; first in one child and then in another? Tell us about the Sabbath-how it was observed, occupied, and sanctified as your children grew up? About the church also and the Sabbath-school? About the books that were read on Sabbath-days and week days; both by your children alone and of their own accord, as also with you all reading together; one reading and all the rest listening? Things like that. All that you can tell us about such children as yours will be eagerly listened to and attended to. What priceless stores of experience, and observation, and success and defeat are lost all around us just because we do not speak more to one another about our ways with our children; our hopes and our fears; our neglects and our recoveries of neglects; the things that one household is so happy in, and the same things that cause such unavailing remorse in another household. Yes, this whole matter must surely be collected together and made into a science soon, and taught in every true church to every young father and young mother as their very life.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Absalom
the son of David by Maachah, daughter of the king of Geshur; distinguished for his fine person, his vices, and his unnatural rebellion. Of his open revolt, his conduct in Jerusalem, his pursuit of the king his father, his defeat and death, see 2 Samuel 16-18, at large.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Absalom
Absalom (ăb'sa-lom), father of peace. The third son of David, by Maachah, the daughter of Talmai, king of Geshur, born at Hebron. 2 Samuel 3:3; 1 Chronicles 3:2. Absalom revenged the dishonor done to Tamar, his sister, by Amnon, his half-brother, by killing him at a feast, and then fled to his father-in-law, Talmai. 2 Samuel 13:1-39. After three years, by means of Joab, he was enabled to return to Jerusalem, and in two years more fully restored to David's favor. Absalom was now nourishing the ambitious scheme of supplanting his father. He was very beautiful and had extraordinary hair, which when cut every year weighed 200 shekels, the exact equivalent to which in our weights it is not easy to ascertain; or, possibly, the hair was of 200 shekels' value. He took great pains to acquire popularity, and after four years (so we may read, 2 Samuel 15:7) he raised the standard of revolt at Hebron. The history of this rebellion, its first success—there being evidently some ill-feeling in his own tribe of Judah towards David—with the iniquitous conduct of Absalom, and his final defeat, is in 2 Samuel 15:1-37; 2 Samuel 16:1-23; 2 Samuel 17:1-29; 2 Samuel 18:1-33. David wished to spare his unhappy son's life; but, in the rout, his mule carrying him under the thick boughs of an oak, his head was caught; and Joab, being made aware of this, dispatched him. Absalom had three sons and a daughter, but it would seem that his sons died before him, as he erected a pillar to keep his name in remembrance. 2 Samuel 18:18. A monument outside the walls of Jerusalem now bears his name, but it is a structure of comparatively modern date.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Absalom
(d. 840 BCE) Son of King David. Slew his half-brother Amnon to avenge the rape of his sister Tamar. He then fled to avoid their father David’s wrath. Eventually he returned, and later led a revolt against his father, which ended when he was killed by Joab.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Absalom
Absalom, the third son of David, first features in the Bible story when his sister Tamar was raped by Amnon, their older brother by a different mother (2 Samuel 3:2-3; 2 Samuel 13:1-22). Absalom was determined to have his revenge, no matter how long he had to wait. After two full years he found a suitable opportunity, and had Amnon murdered. He then fled into exile (2 Samuel 13:23-27).
After three years without a recognized heir to David in Jerusalem, David’s army commander Joab was worried about the stability of David’s dynasty. He therefore worked out a cunning plan to re-establish Absalom in Jerusalem, without the necessity for Absalom to face trial for murder (2 Samuel 13:38; 2 Samuel 14:1-24). Although Absalom returned from exile, David refused to receive him into the palace. But after two years Absalom forced his way in (2 Samuel 14:28-33).
Over the next four years Absalom built up a following for himself among the country people, particularly those from the south (2 Samuel 15:1-7). He then launched a surprise attack, seizing the throne and forcing David to flee for his life (2 Samuel 15:8-18; 2 Samuel 16:20-23). But one of David’s chief advisers stayed behind as a spy in Absalom’s court. By appealing to Absalom’s vanity, he was able to persuade Absalom to ignore the wise words of Absalom’s chief adviser (2 Samuel 15:32-37; 2 Samuel 17:1-14). As a result Absalom decided to glorify himself in a full-scale battle with David’s army. His troops were no match for David’s hardened soldiers, and he himself was killed (2 Samuel 18:1-15).

Sentence search

Abishalom - ” Another spelling for Absalom (1Kings 15:2,1 Kings 15:10 ). See Absalom
Abishalom - But in 2 Chronicles 11:20 we read that Maachah was the daughter of Absalom; therefore Abishalom appears to be a fuller way of writing Absalom, and refers to the son of David. See Absalom
Hushai - When David fled from Jerusalem, on account of the rebellion of Absalom, and had reached the summit of Olivet, he there met Hushai, whom he sent back to Jerusalem for the purpose of counteracting the influence of Ahithophel, who had joined the ranks of Absalom (2 Samuel 15:32,37 ; 16:16-18 ). It was by his advice that Absalom refrained from immediately pursuing after David. By this delay the cause of Absalom was ruined, for it gave David time to muster his forces
Absalom - Absalom, the third son of David, first features in the Bible story when his sister Tamar was raped by Amnon, their older brother by a different mother (2 Samuel 3:2-3; 2 Samuel 13:1-22). Absalom was determined to have his revenge, no matter how long he had to wait. He therefore worked out a cunning plan to re-establish Absalom in Jerusalem, without the necessity for Absalom to face trial for murder (2 Samuel 13:38; 2 Samuel 14:1-24). Although Absalom returned from exile, David refused to receive him into the palace. But after two years Absalom forced his way in (2 Samuel 14:28-33). ...
Over the next four years Absalom built up a following for himself among the country people, particularly those from the south (2 Samuel 15:1-7). But one of David’s chief advisers stayed behind as a spy in Absalom’s court. By appealing to Absalom’s vanity, he was able to persuade Absalom to ignore the wise words of Absalom’s chief adviser (2 Samuel 15:32-37; 2 Samuel 17:1-14). As a result Absalom decided to glorify himself in a full-scale battle with David’s army
Abishalom - See Absalom
Tamar - Tamar, Daughter of David: (9th century BCE) Daughter of David, sister of Absalom. Absalom killed Amnon to avenge his sister's honor, creating a rift between David and Absalom
Baal-Hazor - ” Village where David's son Absalom held celebration of sheepshearing (2 Samuel 13:23 ). During festivities, Absalom had his employees kill his brother Amnon, who had violated his sister Tamar
Absalom - Absalom apparently resented being ignored by his father and resented his brother Ammon going unpunished for raping Tamar, Absalom's full sister. Being overindulged and ambitious, Absalom became the spokesman for the people (2 Samuel 15:1-6 ). David left Jerusalem and sent his army to find Absalom but not to hurt him (2 Samuel 15:5 ), but Joab murdered him (2 Samuel 15:14 ). David's lament over Absalom shows the depth of a father's love over the loss of a son as well as regret for personal failures which led to family and national tragedies
Ahimaaz - On the occasion of the revolt of Absalom he remained faithful to David, and was of service to him in conveying to him tidings of the proceedings of Absalom in Jerusalem (2Samuel 15:24-37; 17:15-21). He was swift of foot, and was the first to carry to David tidings of the defeat of Absalom, although he refrained, from delicacy of feeling, from telling him of his death (2Samuel 18:19-33)
Absalom - The first public act of his life was the blood-revenge he executed against Amnon, David's eldest son, who had basely wronged Absalom's sister Tamar. Alarmed for the consequences of the act, Absalom fled to his grandfather at Geshur, and there abode for three years (2 Samuel 3:3 ; 13:23-38 ). As the result of a stratagem carried out by a woman of Tekoah, Joab received David's sanction to invite Absalom back to Jerusalem. Absalom was now probably the oldest surviving son of David, and as he was of royal descent by his mother as well as by his father, he began to aspire to the throne. The revolt was so successful that David found it necessary to quit Jerusalem and flee to Mahanaim, beyond Jordan; where upon Absalom returned to Jerusalem and took possession of the throne without opposition. Ahithophel, who had been David's chief counsellor, deserted him and joined Absalom, whose chief counsellor he now became. Hushai also joined Absalom, but only for the purpose of trying to counteract the counsels of Ahithophel, and so to advantage David's cause. He was so far successful that by his advice, which was preferred to that of Ahithophel, Absalom delayed to march an army against his father, who thus gained time to prepare for the defence. ...
Absalom at length marched out against his father, whose army, under the command of Joab, he encountered on the borders of the forest of Ephraim. Twenty thousand of Absalom's army were slain in that fatal battle, and the rest fled. Absalom fled on a swift mule; but his long flowing hair, or more probably his head, was caught in the bough of an oak, and there he was left suspended till Joab came up and pierced him through with three darts. When the tidings of the result of that battle were brought to David, as he sat impatiently at the gate of Mahanaim, and he was told that Absalom had been slain, he gave way to the bitter lamentation: "O my son Absalom, my son, my son Absalom! would God I had died for thee, O Absalom, my son, my son!" (2 Samuel 18:33 . ...
Absalom's three sons (2 Samuel 14:27 ; comp 18:18) had all died before him, so that he left only a daughter, Tamar, who became the grandmother of Abijah
Absalom - Absalom (‘father is peace’). His sister Tamar having been wronged by her half-brother Amnon, and David having failed to punish the criminal, Absalom assassinated Amnon and fled to Geshur, where he spent three years (ch. On entering Jerusalem, Absalom publicly appropriated the royal harem, thus proclaiming the supersession of his father. When Absalom offered battle, near Mahanaim, the king’s only anxiety was lest his son should be slain. On the face of the history it is clear that, if Absalom lacked capacity, he possessed charm. According to 2 Samuel 18:18 , Absalom had no son: this is more reliable than the statement in 2 Samuel 14:27 . It is said that later generations, following Proverbs 10:7 , always avoided the name Absalom, preferring the form Abishalom (which appears in 1 Kings 15:2 ; 1 Kings 15:10 ). ...
Absalom (in Apocr. It is perhaps the same Absalom whose son Jonathan was sent by Simon to secure Joppa ( 1Ma 13:11 = Jos
Talmai - ...
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A king of Geshur, to whom Absalom fled after he had put Amnon to death (2 Samuel 3:3 ; 13:37 ). His daughter, Maachah, was one of David's wives, and the mother of Absalom (1 Chronicles 3:2 )
Shobi - Showed hospitality to David when fleeing from Absalom
Hushai - As David escaped, leaving Jerusalem to his son Absalom, Hushai joined him, mourning (2 Samuel 15:32 ). David sent him back to deceive Absalom (2 Samuel 15:34 ; 2 Samuel 16:16-19 ). His counsel to Absalom bought time for David to establish new headquarters and gather forces for new strategy (2 Samuel 17:1 )
Ahithophel - At the time of Absalom's revolt he deserted David (Psalm 41:9 ; 55:12-14 ) and espoused the cause of Absalom (2 Samuel 15:12 ). David sent his old friend Hushai back to Absalom, in order that he might counteract the counsel of Ahithophel (2 Samuel 15:31-37 ). This end was so far gained that Ahithophel saw he had no longer any influence, and accordingly he at once left the camp of Absalom and returned to Giloh, his native place, where, after arranging his wordly affairs, he hanged himself, and was buried in the sepulchre of his fathers (2 Samuel 17:1-23 )
Shobi - Ammonite who helped David as he fled across Jordan from Absalom (2 Samuel 17:27 )
Baal-Hazor - Where Absalom kept his flocks, 2 Samuel 13:23 , was near Ephraim, a city of Judah, some eight miles east of Jerusalem
ab'Salom - ) Absalom had a sister, Tamar, who was violated by her half-brother Amnon. The natural avenger of such an outrage would be Tamar's full brother Absalom. David, however, would not see Absalom for two more years; but at length Joab brought about a reconciliation. Absalom now began at once to prepare for rebellion. Absalom raised the standard of revolt at Hebron, the old capital of Judah, now supplanted by Jerusalem. The revolt was at first completely successful; David fled from his capital over the Jordan to Mahanaim in Gilead, and Absalom occupied Jerusalem. At last, after being solemnly anointed king at Jerusalem, (2 Samuel 19:10 ) Absalom crossed the Jordan to attack his father, who by this time had rallied round him a considerable force. Here Absalom's forces were totally defeated, and as he himself was escaping his long hair was entangled in the branches of a terebinth, where he was left hanging while the mule on which he was riding ran away from under him
Shobi - Son of Nahash of Rabbah, of the children of Ammon: he sent succour to David when he fled from Absalom
Ahithophel - A native of Giloh, originally one of David's most intimate and valued friends; but upon the defection and rebellion of Absalom, he espoused the cause of that prince, and became one of David's bitterest enemies. Being disappointed that Absalom did not follow his sagacious advice, and foreseeing the issue of the rebellion, he hanged himself, 2 Samuel 15:12 17:1-29 Psalm 55:12-14
Talmai - King of Geshur, father of David's wife Maacah and grandfather of Absalom (2 Samuel 3:3 ; 1 Chronicles 3:2 ). After Absalom murdered his half brother Amnon, he took refuge with his grandfather (2 Samuel 13:37 )
Ithra - seduced, Abigail, daughter of Nahash and sister of Zeruiah, Joab's mother Absalom, probably during the sojourn of David's family with the king of Moab (1 Samuel 22:3-4). (See Absalom
Tamar - Daughter of David and Maachah, violated by Amnon, and avenged by Absalom in the death of Amnon. Daughter of Absalom
Shaveh, Valley of - There Absalom reared for himself a pillar, to keep his name in remembrance; "Absalom's place" (2 Samuel 18:18). (See Absalom. of Olivet, is hardly "the pillar of Absalom," for "the king's dale" was an 'emeq , i
Cheek Bone - Psalm 3:7 (b) David is indicating that GOD has already whipped Absalom and broken his power. He would, therefore, prevent any damage to come from Absalom's insurrection
Absalom - Absalom (ăb'sa-lom), father of peace. Absalom revenged the dishonor done to Tamar, his sister, by Amnon, his half-brother, by killing him at a feast, and then fled to his father-in-law, Talmai. Absalom was now nourishing the ambitious scheme of supplanting his father. The history of this rebellion, its first success—there being evidently some ill-feeling in his own tribe of Judah towards David—with the iniquitous conduct of Absalom, and his final defeat, is in 2 Samuel 15:1-37; 2 Samuel 16:1-23; 2 Samuel 17:1-29; 2 Samuel 18:1-33. Absalom had three sons and a daughter, but it would seem that his sons died before him, as he erected a pillar to keep his name in remembrance
Absalom - By the instigation of Joab, Absalom was recalled, but not admitted into the presence of his father until a later period. (This reconciliation was effected at the expense of righteousness, and without any repentance on Absalom's part — a total contrast to God's ministry of reconciliation. 2 Samuel 7:12 This was told to David by Nathan the prophet, and probably became known to Absalom. Absalom entered the city and was joined by Amasa and Ahithophel. The latter advised Absalom to go in publicly to the concubines of David who were left at Jerusalem, that all hopes of a reconciliation might be abandoned — though this had been foretold as a punishment to David. A war followed, and Absalom in riding through a wood, was caught by his head in the branches of an oak, and was there put to death by Joab. We read that Absalom had three sons and a daughter, 2 Samuel 14:27 , yet that because he had no son left he raised up a pillar in the king's dale, to keep his name in remembrance: it was called Absalom'S PLACE or monument. A building in the valley of the Kedron partly rock-hewn, is called Absalom's tomb ; but it can have nothing to do with the above 'pillar' unless it has been much added to with comparatively modern architecture. Josephus says that in his day there was an object called Absalom's 'pillar' about 2 stadia from Jerusalem. Apparently Absalom is called ABISHALOM in 1 Kings 15:2 ; cf
Baalhazor - Place in or near Ephraim where Absalom had pastures for sheep, and where Amnon was slain
e'Phra-im, the Wood of, - a wood, or rather a forest, on the east of Jordan, in which the fatal battle was fought between the armies of David and of Absalom
Sha'Veh - (plain ) , The valley of, described ( Genesis 14:17 ) as "the valley of the king," is mentioned again in (2 Samuel 18:18 ) as the site of a pillar set up by Absalom
Tamar - A daughter of Absalom, 2 Samuel 14:27
Ahithophel - a native of Giloh, who, after having been David's counsellor, joined in the rebellion of Absalom, and assisted him with his advice. Hushai, the friend of David, was employed to counteract the counsels of Ahithophel, and to deprive Absalom, under a pretence of serving him, of the advantage that was likely to result from the measures which he proposed. Before the last counsel was followed, Hushai's advice was desired; and he recommended their assembling together the whole force of Israel, putting Absalom at their head, and overwhelming David by their number. He probably foresaw Absalom's defeat, and dreaded the punishment which would be inflicted on himself as a traitor, when David was resettled on the throne, A
Sho'bi - ( 2 Samuel 17:27 ) He was one of the first to meet David at Mahanaim on his flight from Absalom
Haggith - Festive; the dancer, a wife of David and the mother of Adonijah (2 Samuel 3:4 ; 1 Kings 1:5,11 ; 2:13 ; 1 Chronicles 3:2 ), who, like Absalom, was famed for his beauty
Geshur - David married Maacah, daughter of the king of Geshur, who became mother of Absalom (1 Samuel 3:3 ), which caused the two lands to be on friendly terms. Absalom later retreated to his mother's homeland (2 Samuel 13:37-38 )
Talmai - Of the Geshur royal family, son of king Ammihud; father of David's wife Maacah (2 Samuel 13:37); grandfather of Absalom. Talmai harboured Absalom, the beautiful son of a beautiful mother, when fleeing after murdering his brother Amnon
Amnon - He is known only by his guilt in violating his sister; for which Absalom, two years after, caused him to be assassinated, 2 Samuel 13:1-39
Baal Hazor - There Absalom had his sheep farm, and invited all David's sons to feast at his sheepshearing, and killed Amnon (2 Samuel 13:23)
Chimham - 1 Kings 2:7 ) of Barzillai the Gileadite, who returned with David from beyond Jordan to Jerusalem after the death of Absalom ( 2 Samuel 19:31 f
Giloh - A city of Judah, Joshua 15:50 ; where Ahithophel, David's counselor dwelt; and where, after his treason against David, and the rejection of his counsel by Absalom, he hung himself, 2 Samuel 15:12 ; 17:23
zi'za - ) ...
Son of Rehoboam by Maachah the granddaughter of Absalom
Cushi - Joab's messenger to David on the death of Absalom
Joab - ...
Joab was instrumental in the reconciliation of David and Absalom (2 Samuel 14:1 ). When Absalom led a rebellion, Joab remained loyal to David. Joab killed Absalom against the clear orders of David (2 Samuel 18:14 ). He also convinced David to end his obsessive grieving for Absalom (2 Samuel 19:4-8 )
Amnon - Forced his half sister Tamar, and was murdered by her brother Absolom (See Absalom
Amnon - Eldest son of David by Ahinoam: he was slain by Absalom for the violence done to his sister Tamar
Mizar - Smallness, a summit on the eastern ridge of Lebanon, near which David lay after escaping from Absalom (Psalm 42:6 )
Amnon - He dishonoured his half-sister Tamar, and was, on that account, slain by her brother Absalom ( 2 Samuel 3:2 ; 2 Samuel 13:1 f
Abish'Alom - ( 1 Kings 15:2,10 ) He is called Absalom in (2 Chronicles 11:20,21 ) This person must be David's son
Absalom - And it was in such a household, if such a cesspool could be called a household, that Absalom, David's third son by his third living wife, was born and brought up. ...
Maachah, Absalom's mother, was the daughter of a king. And this, taken together with his distinguished appearance and his princely manners, gave Absalom the pre-eminence over all his brethren. Absalom inherited all the handsomeness, manly bearing, and beauty of his father's handsome and manly house. The sacred writer expatiates with evident relish upon Absalom's extraordinary beauty. In all Israel there was none to be so much praised as Absalom for his beauty. And it was in one of the worst of those wicked little rings that Absalom grew up and got his education. Absalom had a sister, named Tamar, who was as beautiful as a woman as Absalom was as a man. Suffice it here to say that Absalom determined, sooner or later, to wash off his sister's terrible wrongs in the blood of the wrongdoer. But, after giving his father two full years to avenge his sister's ruin, Absalom took the law into his own hand till Amnon fell, when his heart was merry with wine, under Absalom's revengeful sword. And, then, all the plots and counter-plots connected with Absalom's revenge, and flight, and restoration, and too-late reconciliation to his father; his deep-laid schemes to wrench the kingdom out of his father's hands; and then his defeat and murder by Joab-all that, if we have the courage to look at it, will give us a picture of the men and the times, humiliating beyond all words, and never to be forgotten. David and his wives and concubines and mixed-up children, Tamar and her half-brother Amnon, Absalom and Jonadab, Joab and the wise woman of Tekoa, Ittai and Shimei, Ahithophel and Hushai, and the righteousness and the grace of God reigning over them all. And it is from that pen that I gather these closing lessons out of the life of David and out of the death of Absalom. Well, here is the history of young Absalom, and you must bring your imagination to bear upon it. You must read all the chapters about David's manner of life in Jerusalem, and all the chapters in which Absalom's name comes up, and then you must imagine yourself to be Absalom, and to be in his place. For one thing, Absalom did not see his father David at all as we see him. It was impossible that Absalom could look on his father with our admiring eyes. ' 'It poisoned me at my father,' said Absalom to Ahithophel; 'the life we all led in our several stews. And no real lesson for our day and our household can be got out of Absalom's early life. The sons and the daughters of such divided fathers and mothers will need neither history nor imagination to see and to feel with poor Absalom. The Greek Bible has recovered for us one of the lost links in David's downward career, and in the downward career of Absalom his son. For it was David's unwillingness to trouble Amnon that made Absalom in the cause of his sister first a murderer, and then a conspirator, and then, after a life of terrible trouble, himself a mangled corpse under the revengeful and murderous hands of Joab, that other arch-troubler of Israel. But David did the very opposite of that with Absalom. All Jerusalem heard David for two years reprehending his half-pardoned son Absalom openly, till Absalom was exasperated out of all endurance, and till the last link of sonship was broken for ever between David and Absalom. ...
But, with all that, it is the terrible cry that comes out of the chamber over the gate of Mahanaim that makes the name of Absalom so well known and so full of the most terrible lessons to us. 'O my son Absalom, my son, my son Absalom! Would God I had died for thee, O Absalom, my son, my son!' Yes, that is love, no doubt. I have slain my son! I have murdered my son with my own hands! I neglected my son Absalom from a child! With my own lusts I laid his very worst temptation right in his way. It had been better Absalom had never been born! If he rebelled, who shall blame him? I, David, drove Absalom to rebellion. It was his father's hand that stabbed Absalom through the heart. O Absalom, my murdered son! Would God thy murderer had been in thy place this day. And the king covered his face, and the king cried with a loud voice, O my son Absalom, O Absalom, my son, my son!...
Come all you who are fathers and mothers, come to the chamber over the gate of Mahanaim, and let us take counsel together as to how we are to bring up our children to virtue and godliness and everlasting life
Ahithophel - A native of Giloh, a city of Judah, David's trusted counsellor, 1 Chronicles 27:33-34, who was induced to join the party of Absalom. But by God's providence Hushai's counterplan was preferred by Absalom; and Ahithophel, foreseeing the defeat of the rebellion, retired to his own city and hanged himself. The success of Absalom would probably have been fatal to Bath-sheba; it would certainly have barred Solomon, Ahithophel's great-grandson, from the throne
Ephraim, Wood of - A forest in which a fatal battle was fought between the army of David and that of Absalom, who was killed there (2 Samuel 18:6,8 )
Chimham - 1 Kings 2:7 ), who commended him to David on his return to Jerusalem, after the death of Absalom
King's Dale - This is supposed to be in the valley of the Kidron, where there is still a monument called the Pillar of Absalom, though the existing one cannot be the pillar he erected
Waterspouts - If we regard this psalm as descriptive of David's feelings when banished from Jerusalem by the revolt of Absalom, this word may denote "waterfalls," inasmuch as Mahanaim, where he abode, was near the Jabbok, and the region abounded with rapids and falls
Geshur - David married the daughter of the king of Geshur, and she was the mother of Absalom
Absalom - Ammon, another of the king's sons, having violated his sister Tamar, Absalom caused him to be slain, and then fled to Geshur, where Talmai his grandfather was king. Absalom, however, grossly abused his father's kindness; he soon began to play the demagogue, and by many artful devices "stole the hearts of the people," and got himself proclaimed king in Hebron. David retired from Jerusalem; Absalom followed him; and in the battle, which ensued, the troops of the latter were defeated, and he himself, being caught by his head in a tree, was found and slain by Joab
Ahimaaz - He performed a very important piece of service for David during the war with Absalom. While his father Zadok was in Jerusalem, 2 Samuel 15:29 , Ahimaaz and Jonathan continued without the city, 2 Samuel 17:17 , near En-Rogel, or the fountain of Rogel; thither a maid servant came to tell them the resolution which had been taken in Absalom's council: whereupon they immediately departed to give the king intelligence. But being discovered by a young lad who gave information concerning them to Absalom, that prince sent orders to pursue them: Ahimaaz and Jonathan, fearing to be taken, retired to a man's house at Baharim, in whose court-yard there was a well, wherein they concealed themselves. After the battle, in which Absalom was overcome and slain, 17, Ahimaaz desired leave of Joab to carry the news thereof to David
Baal-Hazor - Having a courtyard, or Baal's village, the place on the borders of Ephraim and Benjamin where Absalom held the feast of sheep-shearing when Amnon was assassinated (2 Samuel 13:23 )
Dale, the King's - Some have identified it with the southern part of the valley of Jehoshaphat, where Absalom reared his family monument (2 Samuel 18:18 )
Maachah - She became one of David's wives, and was the mother of Absalom (2 Samuel 3:3 ). ...
...
The daughter of Abishalom (called Absalom, 2 Chronicles 11:20-22 ), the third wife of Rehoboam, and mother of Abijam (1 Kings 15:2 ). She is called "Michaiah the daughter of Uriel," who was the husband of Absalom's daughter Tamar (2 Chronicles 13:2 )
Beans - Mentioned in 2 Samuel 17:28 as having been brought to David when flying from Absalom
Ahimaaz - During the reign of David, he revealed to him the counsels of Absalom and his advisers in rebellion, 2 Samuel 17:15-21 ; and conveyed to him also the tidings of Absalom's defeat and death, 2 Samuel 18:1-33
Talmai - David married Maacha his daughter, the mother of Tamar and Absalom
mi'Zar - (It is probably a summit of the eastern ridge of Lebanon, not far from Mahanaim, where David lay after escaping from the rebellion of Absalom
Ahimaaz - When Absalom revolted and David had to flee from Jerusalem, Zadok continuing true to David, returned to the city, and Ahimaaz, and Jonathan son of Abiathar, remained at En-rogel; to whom Zadok sent word of the counsel of Ahithophel and of Hushai by a 'wench,' and they hastened to David with the news. On the defeat and death of Absalom, Ahimaaz begged that he might run with the news to David. Joab at first refused; but after Cushi had started, he allowed Ahimaaz to go also; who, being swift of foot, reached David first and told him of the defeat of Absalom, but let Cushi tell of his death
Joab - He was a valiant warrior, and an able general; and his great influence on public affairs was often exerted for good, as in the rebellion of Absalom, and the numbering of Israel, 2 Samuel 18:1-19:42 24:1-25 . But as a man he was imperious, revengeful, and unscrupulous: witness his treacherous assassination of Abner, and of his cousin Amasa, 2 Samuel 3:27 20:9-10 ; his bearing towards David, 2 Samuel 3:39 19:5 , and connivance with him in the matter of Uriah; his slaying Absalom, and conspiring with Adonijah against the divinely appointed heir to the throne; for all which he was at length put to death by order of Solomon, 1 Kings 2:1-46
Cushite -
The messenger sent by Joab to David to announce his victory over Absalom (2 Samuel 18:32 )
Amnon - Absalom caused him to be put to death for his great crime in the matter of Tamar (2 Samuel 13:28,29 )
Amnon - He is known only by his guilt in violating his half-sister Tamar; for which Absalom, two years after, caused him to be assassinated, 2 Samuel 13:1-39, thus also getting an elder brother out of his way to the throne
Ahithophel - Ahithophel led Absalom to show his rebellion was for real by taking over his father's concubines (2 Samuel 16:15-23 ). Hushai, however, persuaded Absalom not to follow Ahithophel's military advice (2 Samuel 17:1 ), this being God's work (2 Samuel 17:14 )
Shaveh, Vale of - It is apparently the same place as ‘the king’s dale’ ( 2 Samuel 18:18 ), in which Absalom set up a pillar or monument
Barzillai - A Gileadite, distinguished for his hospitality and liberality towards David during the revolt of Absalom
e'Phraim, Wood of - A forest on the east of the Jordan where the battle was fought against Absalom, and where he was killed. It is said that the wood devoured more people than the sword, probably referring to swamps, morasses, and pits, for Absalom's body was thrown into a 'great pit
Adonijah - (See ABIATHAR) and Absalom). Very goodly in looks, like Absalom. When David was seemingly too old to offer energetic resistance, Adonijah as now the oldest son, about 35 years old (compare 2 Samuel 3:2-4 with 2 Samuel 5:5), Amnon, Chileab, and Absalom being dead, claimed the throne, in defiance of God's expressed will, and David's oath to Bathsheba that Solomon should inherit the throne (1 Chronicles 22:9-10). Like Absalom (2 Samuel 15:1) he assumed regal state, with chariots, horsemen, and 50 men to run before him (2 Kings 1; 2). " But on David's death he, through the queen mother Bathsheba, now exalted to Special dignity, sought Abishag, David's virgin widow, to be given him, a contemplated incest only second to that perpetrated by Absalom, whom he so much resembled, and also a connection which was regarded in the East as tantamount to a covert claim to the deceased monarch's throne. (See ABNER and (See Absalom
Joab - He considered that the most suitable of David’s sons for the position was Absalom, but Absalom had committed murder and fled to a neighbouring country. Joab therefore worked out a clever plan that enabled Absalom to return from exile without having to stand trial (2 Samuel 14:1-24). ...
Once back in Jerusalem, Absalom heartlessly used Joab to pursue his own ambitions (2 Samuel 14:28-33). When Absalom rebelled against David and seized the throne, Joab again upheld David. He brought the rebellion to a swift end by killing Absalom, even though it was against David’s wishes (2 Samuel 18:2; 2 Samuel 18:5; 2 Samuel 18:9-16). ...
Upon resuming his rule in Jerusalem, David appointed Absalom’s general, Amasa, chief of the army in place of Joab
Absalom - Absalom, the fruit of David's polygamy, was made the divine instrument of David's punishment. Amnon, the half brother, violated Tamar, Absalom's whole sister. As Simeon and Levi avenged on Hamor their sister Dinah's violation, so Absalom after two years' dark, silent hatred, took vengeance on Amnon at a sheepshearing feast at Baal Hazor to which he invited all the king's sons (2 Samuel 13). ...
Joab perceiving how the king took to heart Absalom's exile suborned a woman of Tekoa, by an imaginary case, to extort from the king (whose justice would not allow his love for Absalom to let him escape some penalty for Amnon's murder) the admission of the general principle that, in special cases where the life taken could not be recalled, means for restoring the loved and living banished one should be devised; just as God, considering the brevity of man's life, weak and irrecoverable when gone, "as water spilt on the ground, does not take a (sinner's) soul away" (so the Hebrew text of 2 Samuel 14:14 for "neither doth God respect any person"), but deviseth means that His banished be not (for ever) expelled from Him. " David yielded, but would not see Absalom, though living at Jerusalem, for two more years. Impatient of delay in his ambitious schemes, he sent for Joab, and, not being heeded, he burnt Joab's grain (as Samson did to the Philistines, Judges 14:25-267), which drove Joab to intercede with David for Absalom's admission to his presence. This excited Absalom's fears. Absalom intercepted suitors, lamenting that there was no judge appointed to help them to their rights such as he would be. Accordingly, Absalom chose Hebron, Judah's old capital, as the head quarters of the revolt. Both were of Judah; Amasa became Absalom's general, Ahithophel his counselor. ...
By Ahithophel's abominable counsel, Absalom lay with his father's concubines, at once committing his party to an irreconcilable war, and him to the claim to the throne (according to oriental ideas: so Adonijah, 1 Kings 2:13, etc. Absalom, though well pleased at the counsel of "smiting the king only" and at once, was easily drawn aside by fear of his father's bravery, and by indecision and vanity; all which Hushai acted on in his counsel to summon all Israel, and that Absalom should command in person. ...
His locks, on which he prided himself (1618537779_9), were the means of his destruction, for they kept him suspended from a terebinth tree until Joab pierced him; and David, whom the unnatural son would have gladly smitten, but who charged Joab, Abishai, and Ittai, his three generals, to spare the youth for his sake, mourned pathetically for his death: "O Absalom, my son, would God I had died for thee; my son, my son!" His grave was a pit, over which the insulting conquerors heaped stones, as over Achan and the king of Ai (Joshua 7:26; Joshua 8:29). The so-called tomb of Absalom, in the valley of Jehoshaphat outside Jerusalem, betrays its modern origin by Ionic columns; and besides could not have outlasted the various sieges and conquests to which the city has been exposed. David seems to have been a fond but weak father; and Absalom's and Amnon's course showed the evil effects of such indulgence (1 Kings 1:6). Absalom's fair daughter Tamar married Uriel, by whom she had Michaiah or Maachah, wife of Rehoboam and mother of (See ABIJAH
Lentiles - They were among the provisions brought to David when he fled from Absalom (2 Samuel 17:28 )
Ammihud - ...
...
The father of Talmai, king of Geshur, to whom Absalom fled after the murder of Amnon (2 Samuel 13:37 )
Hushai - Friend and counsellor of David, who, by returning to Jerusalem at the revolt of Absalom, was able to frustrate the advice given by Ahithophel, and thus give David time to escape, and arrange his army for the war
Amnon - Tamar's brother Absalom avenged this outrage by killing Amnon (2 Samuel 13:1-20 )
Absalom's Pillar, - A monument of tomb which Absalom had built during his lifetime in the king's dale, i. The tomb there now, and called by Absalom's name was probably built at a later date
Mahanaim - Many years after this, when he fled from Jerusalem on the rebellion of his son Absalom, David made Mahanaim, where Barzillai entertained him, his headquarters, and here he mustered his forces which were led against the army that had gathered around Absalom. It was while sitting at the gate of this town that tidings of the great and decisive battle between the two hosts and of the death of his son Absalom reached him, when he gave way to the most violent grief (2 Samuel 17:24-27 )
Ahithophel - (See Absalom. Absalom calculated on his adhesion from the first (2 Samuel 15:12); the history does not directly say why, but incidentally it comes out: he was father of Eliam (or by transposition Ammiel, 1 Chronicles 3:5), the father of Bathsheba (2 Samuel 11:3; 2 Samuel 23:34; 2 Samuel 23:39). He failed from no want of shrewdness on his part, but from the folly of Absalom
Tamar - The beautiful sister of Absalom, who was violated and brutally insulted by her half-brother, Amnon ( 2 Samuel 13:1 ff. A daughter of Absalom ( 2 Samuel 14:27 )
Bahurim - When David fled from his son Absalom, a kinsman of Saul named Shimei met him at Bahurim, cursed him, and threw stones at his party. Two messengers taking secret messages about Absalom from the priests hid from Absalom's servants at Bahurim (2 Samuel 17:18 )
Maacah, Maachah - Daughter of Talmai king of Geshur, and one of David's wives, the mother of Absalom. Daughter, or apparently granddaughter of Absalom (or Abishalom), wife of Rehoboam king of Judah, mother of Abijah (or Abijam), and apparently grandmother of Asa king of Judah
Amasa - the son of Ithra and Abigail, David's sister, whom Absalom, when he rebelled against his father, appointed general of his army, 2 Samuel 17:25 . Amasa having thus received the command of Absalom's troops, engaged his cousin Joab, general of David's army, and was worsted. But, after the defeat of Absalom's party, David, being angry at Joab for killing Absalom, pardoned Amasa, and gave him the command of his own army
Cushi - Joab's retainer, a foreigner, probably from his name a Cushite, and so unrecognized by the watchman, and ignorant of David's devoted affection for Absalom, as appears from the abrupt inconsiderateness with which he announced Absalom's death
She'ba - (on oath ), the son of Bichri, a Benjamite, ( 2 Samuel 20:1-22 ) the last chief of the Absalom insurrection
Machir - Son of Ammiel: he gave refuge to Mephibosheth and sent supplies to David when he fled from Absalom
Geshur - A small district of Syria, east of the Jordan and northeast of Bashan; allotted to Manasseh, Deuteronomy 3:14; 2 Samuel 15:8; 1 Chronicles 2:23; Joshua 13:13; David married a daughter of its king, 2 Samuel 3:3; Absalom fled thither after the murder of Amnon, 2 Samuel 13:37
She'ba - (on oath ), the son of Bichri, a Benjamite, ( 2 Samuel 20:1-22 ) the last chief of the Absalom insurrection
Chimham - Apparently the son of Barzillai, the patron of David when he fled to Mahanaim east of the Jordan before Absalom (2 Samuel 19:37 )
hu'Sha-i, - 1 Chronicles 27:33 To him David confided the delicate and dangerous part of a pretended adherence to the cause of Absalom
Barzil'la-i -
A wealthy Gileadite who showed hospitality to David when he fled form Absalom
She'ba - (on oath ), the son of Bichri, a Benjamite, ( 2 Samuel 20:1-22 ) the last chief of the Absalom insurrection
Maacah - A daughter of Talmai, king of Geshur, was taken in battle by David, according to Hebrew tradition, and made one of his wives and bore him Absalom
Joab - When Absalom rebelled Joab adhered to David; and contrary to express orders he put Absalom to death
Mahanaim - ) Here David retreated from the rebellion of Absalom, (2 Samuel 17:24) Jacob gave the name to this spot, from the angels he met there
Lodebar - Here dwelt Machir the Ammonite, who assisted David in his flight from Absalom, and there lived Mephibosheth, Jonathan's lame son
Geshur - In the time of David it was ruled by Talmai, whose daughter he married, and who was the mother of Absalom, who fled to Geshur after the murder of Amnon (2 Samuel 13:37 )
ma'Acah -
The mother of Absalom; also called MAACHAH
Geshur - At least David in his wandering life formed an alliance with Talmai king of Geshur by marrying Maachah his daughter, by whom he had his handsome but worthless son Absalom and his daughter Tamar. ) The wild nature of Absalom accords with the wild home and stock from whence he sprang; there he fled after murdering Amnon
Geshur, Geshuri, Geshurites - One of David's wives, Maachah the mother of Absalom, was daughter of Talmai king of Geshur; and it was here that Absalom found refuge after the murder of Amnon, and remained three years with his grandfather, 2 Samuel 3:3 ; 13:37 ; 15:8
Shaveh - There Absalom raised a monument to himself (2 Samuel 18:18 )
Amasa - Son of Ithra,or Jether, by David's sister Abigail, whom Absalom in his revolt made captain of his army
Lentils, - Lentils formed part of the provisions furnished to David and his followers on the revolt of Absalom
Instead - ...
Absalom made Amasa captain of the hose instead of Joab
Ittai - He was faithful to David at the revolt of Absalom, returned with the king, and had a command in his army
Barzillai - Gileaditeof Rogelim, who liberally supplied David with provisions when he fled from Absalom
Cherethims, Cherethites - They were faithful to David at the revolt of Absalom
am'Asa - (2 Samuel 17:25 ) He joined in Absalom's rebellion, B. (2 Samuel 18:6 ) David, incensed against Joab for killing Absalom, forgave Amasa and appointed him Joab's successor
at'ta-i - ) ...
Second son of King Rehoboam by Maachah the daughter of Absalom
Ahithophel - 'For the counsel of Ahithophel,' says the sacred writer, 'which he counselled in those days, was as if a man had inquired at the oracle of God: so was all the counsel of Ahithophel both with David and with Absalom. So Dryden describes Lord Chancellor Shaftesbury in his Absalom and Ahithophel, that very able but still more truculent and time-serving piece. As thus: And Amnon loved Absalom's sister. … And Absalom's servants did to Amnon as Absalom had commanded. And Absalom fled and went to Geshur, and was there three years. … And Absalom stole the hearts of the men of Israel. … And Absalom sent for Ahithophel the Gilonite, David's counsellor, from his city, even from Giloh. And the conspiracy was strong, and the people increased continually with Absalom. For the counsel of Ahithophel, which he counselled in those days, was as if a man inquired at the oracle of God; so was all the counsel of Ahithophel with Absalom as it had been wont to be with David. ...
Absalom had no head of his own. And with Ahithophel's head like the oracle of God, and with his heart rankling against David like hell, the conspiracy was strong, and the people increased continually with Absalom. Ahithophel was worth ten thousand men to Absalom, and no one knew that better than David. And one told David, saying, Ahithophel is among the conspirators with Absalom. And then David took Hushai, his next astutest counsellor to Ahithophel, and filled him with guile and sent him back to deceive Absalom and to counteract all the counsels of Ahithophel. For at the end of all their cross-counsels we read this report and this reflection of the sacred writer on it all: And Absalom said, The counsel of Hushai the Archite is better than the counsel of Ahithophel. For the Lord had appointed to defeat the good counsel of Ahithophel, to the intent that He might bring evil upon Absalom. Ahithophel gave two of his deepest counsels to Absalom. Ahithophel has been called Judas, and all manner of evil names, for his first counsel that he gave to Absalom. ' For Absalom had said to Ahithophel, Give counsel among you what we shall do. And Ahithophel gave Absalom a counsel that you know already, or if you do not know it you will read it at home. Something, possibly, like this: 'Has not David cast himself completely out of the throne? Has he not destroyed himself? Has he not thrown down the sceptre? Has not the Lord turned against him? And did not the Lord's righteous servant say that the Lord would do this same thing to David that David had done before all Israel and before the sun? I am only counselling Absalom to fulfil as the hand of the Lord what the Lord swore that He would do Himself to David. But whatever may be said about Ahithophel's first counsel, his second counsel to Absalom is pronounced to be good by the sacred writer; but, then, what of that, when the Lord had appointed to defeat it that the Lord might bring evil upon Absalom? When we are working upon Ahithophel in this way, and when our minds and our hearts are full of Ahithophel, we cannot but wish that we had been told some more about him, and especially about his latter end. He has David and Absalom so much on his mind and on his heart that he draws a black border round Ahithophel's deathbed in these terrible words, and then leaves him: And when Ahithophel saw that his counsel was not followed, he saddled his ass, and arose, and gat him home to his own house, to his city, and put his household in order, and hanged himself, and died, and was buried in the sepulchre of his father. ...
Now, as you know, Ahithophel, from that day to this, has been stoned in his grave at Giloh, and all manner of names called at him as he lies there: Deserter, traitor, apostate, Judas Iscariot, suicide, and all manner of evil names, because he left David and joined Absalom. ...
And, then, on the other hand, though it is not written out, I for one shall continue to believe it, that David in his best moments took it all home to himself that Ahithophel was gone over to Absalom. David knew as well as all Jerusalem did what it was that had thrown Ahithophel over to Absalom's side
Kidron, Kedron, Brook - The side of the valley nearest the city is full of Mahometan graves, and on the eastern slope are the graves of the Jews, among which is the erection called the Pillar of Absalom. ...
On the revolt of Absalom David crossed the brook ere he climbed the mount of Olives
Maacah or Maachah - A wife of David, and the mother of Absalom. She is called the "daughter" of Abishalom or Absalom, 1 Kings 15:2 2 Chronicles 11:20-22
ma'Achah - (1 Kings 2:39 ) ...
The daughter, or more probably granddaughter, of Absalom named after his mother; the third and favorite wife of Rehoboam, and mother of Abijah. (1 Chronicles 2:48 ) ...
The daughter of Talmai king of Geshur, and mother of Absalom (1 Chronicles 3:2 ) also called Maacah in Authorized Version of (2 Samuel 3:3 ) ...
The wife of Machir the Manassite
Jonadab - Then, when Absalom had in revenge killed Amnon, and the king was heartbroken at the exaggerated story that all the king's sons were slain, Jonadab practiced the same sycophancy to David; not a word does he breathe of his own abominable share in the matter; no sorrow has he for Amnon whose professed "friend" he was, but whose ruin he hurried; "by the appointment of Absalom this hath been determined from the day that he forced his sister Tamar"; "Amnon only is dead, Amnon only is dead"; "let not my lord the king take the thing to his heart" (2 Samuel 13)
jo'ab - " (1 Chronicles 27:34 ) In the entangled relations which grew up in David's domestic life he bore an important part, successfully reinstating Absalom in David's favor after the murder of Amnon. (2 Samuel 14:1-20 ) When the relations between father and son were reversed by the revolt of Absalom, Joab remained true to the king, taking the rebel prince's dangerous life in spite of David's injunction to spare him, and when no one else had courage to act so decisive a part. "Though he had not turned after Absalom, he turned after Adonijah
Chimham - The "habitation of Chimham" (Jeremiah 41:17 ) was probably an inn or khan, which is the proper meaning of the Hebrew Geruth , Rendered "habitation", established in later times in his possession at Bethlehem, which David gave to him as a reward for his loyalty in accompanying him to Jerusalem after the defeat of Absalom ( 1 Kings 2:7 )
Tekoa, Tekoah - The 'wise woman' Joab employed to speak to the king respecting the return of Absalom was from this city
Jon'Adab - ch (2 Samuel 13:5,6 ) Again, when, in a later stage of the same tragedy, Amnon was murdered by Absalom, and the exaggerated report reached David that all the princes were slaughtered, Jonadab was already aware of the real state of the case
Tamar - The act was avenged by her full brother, Absalom, when he had Amnon murdered (2 Samuel 13:28-29 ). Absalom named his only daughter Tamar
Ephraim, Wood of - ...
The battlefield where Absalom fell, the entanglement of the wood occasioning large slaughter of the Ephraimites, from whence perhaps the wood was named
Ittai - Gittite (from Gath) soldier who demonstrated loyalty to David by accompanying the latter in flight from Jerusalem after the outbreak of a rebellion led by David's son Absalom (2 Samuel 15:19-22 )
en-Rogel - Jonathan and Ahimaaz, the priests' sons, stayed at En-rogel as messengers to relay to David what the priests might learn from Absalom when he took over Jerusalem from his father (2 Samuel 17:17 )
Mahanaim - It served as a refuge twice: for Ishbosheth after Saul's death (2 Samuel 2:8-9 ), and for David when Absalom usurped the throne (2 Samuel 17:24-27 )
Barzillai - After the death of Absalom, Barzillai went across Jordan with the king, but declined to go to court ( 2 Samuel 19:31 ff
Amasa - He commanded the army of the rebel Absalom ( 2 Samuel 17:25 ); but was completely routed by Joab in the forest of Ephraim ( 2 Samuel 18:6-8 )
Mahanaim - It was also to this place that David retired during the usurpation of Absalom, 2 Samuel 17:24 ; and this rebellious son was subdued, and suffered death, not far from this city
Shimel - A Benjamite kinsman of Saul, who insulted king David when fleeing before Absalom, and humbled himself on David's return
Jonadab - Yet he seems to have been long aware of the purpose of Absalom to avenge his sister's dishonor upon Amnon, and very coolly excused the assassination of his friend, 2 Samuel 13:32-35
Ab - Father, found in many compound Hebrew proper names: as Abner, father of light; Absalom, father of peace
Ephraim, Forest of - The densely wooded site of the battle between the forces of King David and the rebel army of Absalom (2Samuel 18:6,2 Samuel 18:8 )
Chimham - Taken by David to court, instead of Barzillai the Gileadite, his father, to whom the king owed a debt of gratitude for help in his flight from Absalom
Ahith'Ophel - (2 Samuel 11:3 ) with 2 Samuel 23:34 Ahithophel joined the conspiracy of Absalom against David, and persuaded him to take possession of the royal harem, ( 2 Samuel 16:21 ) and recommended an immediate pursuit of David
Sheba - A turbulent Benjamite, who after the death of Absalom made a fruitless effort to excite a rebellion in Israel against David
Bahurim - The place where Paltiel, son of Laish, was ordered to relinquish Michal ( 2 Samuel 3:16 ); where Shimei dwelt, who cursed David in his flight ( 2 Samuel 16:5 ); where Ahimaaz and Jonathan hid in the well from Absalom ( 2 Samuel 17:18-19 ); and the home of Azmaveth, one of David’s mighty men ( 1Ch 11:33 , 2 Samuel 23:31 , where Barhumite is written for Baharumite )
Cherethites - They were fiercely loyal to David through the rebellions of Absalom and Sheba, and they supported David’s chosen successor, Solomon, when there was an attempted coup against him (2 Samuel 15:18; 2 Samuel 20:7; 1 Kings 1:38)
Joab - The return of Absalom was brought about by his means, but when Absalom revolted Joab remained faithful to David, and with his own hand slew Absalom
Adoni'Jah - ) After the death of his three brothers, Amnon, Chileab and Absalom, he became eldest son; and when his father's strength was visibly declining, put forward his pretensions to the crown. (1 Kings 1:3 ) This was regarded as equivalent to a fresh attempt on the throne [4]; and therefore Solomon ordered him to be put to death by Benaiah
Adonijah - After the death of Amnon and Absalom, he aspired to the throne, although it was promised to Solomon, his younger brother
Michaiah - Called MAACHAH, daughter of Abishalom, in 1 Kings 15:2 ; and daughter of Absalom in 2 Chronicles 11:20
Shimei - ...
...
A Benjamite of the house of Saul, who stoned and cursed David when he reached Bahurim in his flight from Jerusalem on the occasion of the rebellion of Absalom (2 Samuel 16:5-13 ). After the defeat of Absalom he "came cringing to the king, humbly suing for pardon, bringing with him a thousand of his Benjamite tribesmen, and representing that he was heartily sorry for his crime, and had hurried the first of all the house of Israel to offer homage to the king" (19:16-23)
Abishai - He lifted up his spear against three hundred, and slew them, 2 Samuel 23:18 ; and was with David in the affairs of Shimei, Absalom, and Sheb, 2 Samuel 16:9 18:2 20:6,7
Tekoa, Tekoah - The object of Joab was, by the intervention of this woman, to induce David to bring back Absalom to Jerusalem (2 Samuel 14:2,4,9 )
Ithra - ” He was the father of Amasa, and the general Absalom appointed to replace David's general Joab when he revolted against his father (2 Samuel 17:25 )
Machir - Son of Ammiel of Lodebar, a Gileadite chief; sheltered Mephibosheth, Jonathan's lame son; afterward, influenced probably by David's kindness to the same youth, supplied David with necessaries when fleeing from Absalom (2 Samuel 9:4; 2 Samuel 17:27-29)
en-Rogel - It was outside Jerusalem; and David’s spies, Jonathan and Ahimaaz, were here stationed in quest of news of the revolt of Absalom ( 2 Samuel 17:17 )
Ahithophel - Being Bathsheba’s grandfather, he had been alienated by David’s criminal conduct ( 2 Samuel 11:3 , 2 Samuel 23:34 ), and readily joined Absalom ( 2 Samuel 15:12 )
Enrogel - It was whereJonathan and Ahimaaz stayed in secret, to carry to David any message from Hushai, on the revolt of Absalom; and close to this spring Adonijah called the king's sons together when he exalted himself to succeed David as king
Ammihud - Father of King of Geshur to whom Absalom fled after he killed his brother Amnon (2 Samuel 13:37 )
Ahithophel - " He joined in the rebellion of Absalom, and advised him to go in publicly to David's concubines, and to let him make an immediate attack on David
Abishai - In the rebellion of Absalom he commanded a third of David's army
it'ta-i - He appears only during the revolution of Absalom
Hair - The Jewish men, except Nazarites, Numbers 6:5,9 , and cases like that of Absalom, 2 Samuel 14:26 , cut their hair moderately short, 1 Corinthians 11:14 , and applied fragrant ointments to it, Exodus 30:30-33 Psalm 23:5 Ecclesiastes 9:8
Amasa - His percentage may have led David to show him less favor than his other nephews, and this may have disposed him to join in the rebellion of Absalom. He was the general of Absalom's army, and was defeated by his cousin Joab, 2 Samuel 17:1-18:33
Oak - Absalom was caught by his head in an oak tree, 2 Samuel 18:9
Abisha'i, - ) On the outbreak of Absalom's rebellion he remained true to the king,a nd commanded a third part of the army in the decisive battle against Absalom
Enrogel - It is mentioned in the Bible in connection with the conspiracy of Absalom, 2 Samuel 17:17 , and afterwards with that of Adonijah, 1 Kings 1:9
Maacah - The daughter of Talmai, wife of David, and mother of Absalom ( 2 Samuel 3:5 etc. When she is called ‘daughter’ of Absalom ( 1 Kings 15:2 ; 1Ki 15:10 , 2 Chronicles 11:20 f
Mahanaim - Abner fixed Ishbosheth's residence there, and David took refuge in it when driven out of the western part of his kingdom by Absalom
Tamar - " ...
...
A daughter of Absalom (2 Samuel 14:27 )
Hushai - At the rebellion of Absalom he was induced by David to act as if he favoured the cause of the king’s son
Abijah - His mother Maachah, or Michaiah, was probably the granddaughter of Absalom, 1 Kings 15:2 2 Chronicles 11:20 13:2 ...
4
Bahurim - When David left the summit of Olivet behind and was descending the eastern slopes to the Jordan valley below, in his flight front Absalom, Shimei came forth from Bahurim and ran along the side ("rib") of the hill, abusing David and flinging stones and dust, in a manner common in the East in the case of fallen greatness
Adonijah - After the death of his elder brothers, Amnon and Absalom, he became heir-apparent to the throne
Barzillai - Man from Gilead east of the Jordan who met David at Mahanaim as he fled from Absalom
Spies - David and Absalom both used this stratagem
Ahimaaz - He served as one of David's secret messengers from the court when Absalom rebelled and drove his father from Jerusalem (2 Samuel 15:36 ; 2 Samuel 7:17 ). He was a swift runner, overtaking Cushi to bring tidings to David (2 Samuel 18:19-29 ), but he did not report Absalom's death
Abishai - He led a third of David's troops against David's son Absalom (2 Samuel 18:1 )
Abishai - He had the command of one of the three divisions of David's army at the battle with Absalom (2 Samuel 18:2,5,12 )
Sheba (1) - The division between Israel and Judah already had shown itself under Ishbosheth (2 Samuel 2:4-9), again at the close of Absalom's rebellion (2 Samuel 19:41-43), David felt the greatness of the crisis, "now shall Sheba do us more harm than did Absalom. , which was probably connected with Absalom's rebellion through Maacah his mother, and was famed for worldly wisdom
Pillar - 18:18: “Now Absalom in his lifetime had taken and reared up for himself a pillar … and he called the pillar after his own name: and it is called unto this day, Absalom’s place
Gath - Its inhabitants were called Gittites, Joshua 13:3 ; and David had tow of them in his service, who faithfully adhered to him during the rebellion of Absalom, 2 Samuel 15:18-22
ta'Mar - ...
Daughter of David and Maachah the Geshurite princess, and thus sister of Absalom. ...
Daughter of Absalom, (2 Samuel 14:7 ) became, by her marriage with Uriah of Gibeah, the mother of Maachah, the future queen of Judah or wife of Abijah
Joab - ...
Above all, Joab was a skilled general ; this is seen by the number of victories he gained, namely, over the army of Ishbosheth under the leadership of Abner ( 2 Samuel 2:12-32 ); over the Jebusites ( 1 Chronicles 11:6-9 ); over the Syrians and Ammonites ( 2 Samuel 10:1-19 ; 2 Samuel 11:1 ; 2 Samuel 12:26-29 ); over Absalom ( 2 Samuel 18:5-17 ); over Sheba ( 2 Samuel 20:4-22 ). ); his slaying of Abner [1]; the reconciliation which he brought about between David and Absalom ( 2 Samuel 14:1 ff. ); his slaying of Absalom when he realized his treachery to David ( 2 Samuel 18:14 ff
Maachah - The daughter or more probably the granddaughter of Absalom, and the third wife of Rehoboam, mother to Abijah and grandmother to Asa, 1 Kings 15:2; 2 Chronicles 11:20-22; but the R. " In 2 Chronicles 13:2 she is called "Michaiah, the daughter of Uriel of Gibeah," "Michaiah" being a variation of "Maachah," and Uriel being the husband of Absalom's daughter Tamar
Kidron Valley - David crossed the brook when he fled Jerusalem to escape from Absalom (2 Samuel 15:23 )
Olives, Mount of - ...
David crossed the Mount of Olives when fleeing Absalom (2 Samuel 15:30 )
Ziba - On the insurrection of Absalom, Ziba went with provisions for David, and said that Mephibosheth, hoping to have the kingdom restored to him, had remained in Jerusalem
Abishai - He broke through their host around Bethlehem, and lifted up his spear against 300, and slew them, 2 Samuel 23:14-18 : and was with David in the matters of Shimei, Absalom, and Sheba
Adonijah - 68) this was in eastern countries considered as a pretension to the crown, which agrees with Solomon saying, 'Ask for him the kingdom also,' and explains also the advice given by Ahithophel to Absalom, to go in publicly to his father's wives
Ahimaaz - Zadok the priest's son; the messenger in Absalom's rebellion, with Jonathan, Abiathar's son, to carry tidings from Hushai, David's friend and spy. They narrowly escaped Absalom's servants at Bahurim, the woman of the house hiding them in a well's mouth, over which she spread a covering with ground grain on it, and telling the servants what was true in word, though misleading them: "they be gone over the brook of water. " Though Cushi was later in arriving he announced the fate of Absalom, which Ahimaaz with courtier-like equivocation evaded announcing, lest he should alloy his good news with what would be so distressing to David. Joab, knowing David's fondness for Absalom, had not wished Ahimaaz to go at all on that day, but youths will hardly believe their elders wiser than themselves
za'Dok - When Absalom revolted and David fled from Jerusalem, Zadok and all the Levites bearing the ark accompanied him. When Absalom was dead, Zadok and Abiathar were the persons who persuaded the elders of Judah to invite David to return
Tekoa - From here came the ‘wise woman’ sent by Joab to plead for Absalom ( 2 Samuel 14:2 ; 2 Samuel 14:4 ; 2 Samuel 14:8 ); Rehoboam fortified it ( 2 Chronicles 11:6 ), and apparently it continued to be a fortress ( Jeremiah 6:1 ); Amos ‘was among the herdmen of Tekoa’ ( Amos 1:1 )
Baca - David, to whom Psalm 84 refers, passed through such a valley of drought and tears when, fleeing from Absalom, he went up mount Olivet weeping as he went
Maacah - Wife of David and the mother of Absalom (2 Samuel 3:3 ; 1 Chronicles 3:2 )
Absalom - ...
2 Samuel 15:2 (c) In this passage Absalom is a type of the ingratitude and infidelity of professing Christians who are not really saved
Mahanaim - David fled to this city when Absalom revolted, and remained there till his son's death
Geshur, Geshurites - After the murder of his half-brother Amnon, Absalom took refuge with his maternal grandfather in ‘Geshur of Aram’ ( 2 Samuel 13:37 ; 2 Samuel 15:8 )
Judges - Absalom said moreover, Oh that I were made judge in the land. … And on this manner did Absalom to all Israel that came to the king for judgment’ (cf
Nob - This identification does not meet these conditions, and hence others (as Dean Stanley) think that it was the northern summit of Mount Olivet, the place where David "worshipped God" when fleeing from Absalom ( 2 Samuel 15:32 ), or more probably (Conder) that it was the same as Mizpeh (q
Barzillai - He ministered disinterestedly, sympathizingly, and liberally, to David's wants during the whole time of his stay at, Mahanaim in his flight from Absalom (2 Samuel 17:27-29; 2 Samuel 19:32-40)
Kiss - The customary salutation in the East as a mark of respect or affection (Genesis 27:26; Song of Solomon 1:2; Luke 7:45); hence the token used by the hypocrite to pretend love (2 Samuel 15:5 Absalom; Matthew 26:48 Judas)
Mephibosheth - During the Absalom rebellion Ziba tried unsuccessfully to turn David against Mephibosheth
Mulberry Trees - In Psalms 84:6, "who passing through the valley of Baka, (the Hebrew letter 'Αleph ( א ) final probably being the Hebrew letter Ηe[1] ( ה )) make it a well," the sense is, though in a valley of weeping (where the only waters are those of tears), such as David passed through in his flight from Absalom (2 Samuel 15:30), saints make it a well of ever flowing comfort and salvation (John 4:14; Isaiah 12:3)
Mule - Absalom had hoped to use the mule either to carry him to victory, or else to carry him to safety
Ahimaaz - He, with Jonathan, Abiathar's son, contrived to bring David Intelligence, during Absalom's rebellion, of Ahithophel's counsel, and Hushai's endeavor to counteract it. When the royal forces had gained the victory, he offered to convey the news to David; but his request was refused by Joab because of Absalom's death. In answer, however, to the inquiry respecting Absalom, he, not quite truthfully, replied that he had seen a tumult, but "knew not what it was
Ittai - Last in the host that defiled past David, while standing beneath the olive tree below Jerusalem (2 Samuel 15:18, Septuagint) on the morning of his flight from Absalom, were 600 Gathites who had emigrated with him to Gath (1 Samuel 27:2-3; 1 Samuel 27:8; 1 Samuel 30:9-10), and returned thence. ...
David with characteristic generosity said to Ittai: "Wherefore goest thou also with me? return to thy place, and abide with the king (not that David recognizes Absalom as king, but he means 'with whoever shall prove king,' with the king de facto; whether he be rightful king you as a recent settler here are not called on to decide), for thou art a stranger (not an Israelite) and also an exile (not yet having a fixed fatherland)
Amasa - Captain of Judah's army replacing Joab during Absalom's rebellion against his father David (2 Samuel 17:25 ). When he defeated the rebel forces and Joab murdered Absalom (2 Samuel 18:14 ), David made peaceful overtones to Judah by inviting Amasa as his relative to assume command of his army (2 Samuel 19:13 )
Cherethites And Pelethites - They accompanied David in his retreat from Jerusalem ( 2 Samuel 15:18 ), fought against Absalom ( 2 Samuel 20:7 ; 2 Samuel 20:23 ), acted as Solomon’s bodyguard at his coronation ( 1 Kings 1:38 ; 1 Kings 1:44 )
Jehonathan - He helped King David learn Absalom's plans when Absalom drove his father from Jerusalem
Forest - Forests also provided excellent staging areas for warfare, such as the rebellion of Absalom against David which ended with a battle in the forests of Ephraim (2 Samuel 18:6-8 )
Mahanaim - Here Abner made Ish-bosheth, son of Saul, king ( 2 Samuel 2:8 ), and here David took refuge from his rebel son Absalom ( 2 Samuel 17:24-27 ; 2 Samuel 19:32 )
Appeal - It is not probable, when the kingdom was established, that all causes were tried at Jerusalem; but only cases of appeal from the tribal judges; and it was such that Absalom alludes to in 2 Samuel 15:2,3 : see also Deuteronomy 16:18
Kidron - The two events, however, connected with it, and which give it its greatest interest, are David's crossing it on his flight from Jerusalem when Absalom rebelled, 2 Samuel 15:23; 2 Samuel 15:30; and Christ's crossing it on his way to Gethsemane
Abijah - " The explanation is that Maachah is just a variation of the name Michaiah, and that Abishalom is probably the same as Absalom, the son of David. It is probable that "Uriel of Gibeah" married Tamar, the daughter of Absalom (2Samuel 14:27), and by her had Maachah
Abishai - ...
He commanded one third of David's army at the battle with Absalom (2 Samuel 18), and rescued David when waxing faint and in imminent peril from the giant Ishbi-benob (2 Samuel 21:15-17)
Kidron or Cedron - By this route probably David fled from Absalom, 2 Samuel 15:23 ; and the Savior often passed this way in going to Bethany, Mount Olivet, and Gethsemane, John 18:1-2
Ephraim - ...
The FOREST of Ephraim, where Absalom lost his life, was on the east side of the Jordan, near Mahanaim, 2 Samuel 18:6-8
Dryden, John - The unsettled state of the government caused him to write a series of satires, the first of which, "Absalom and Achitophel," brought down a storm of libels upon him, but merited for him first place among the English satirical poets
John Dryden - The unsettled state of the government caused him to write a series of satires, the first of which, "Absalom and Achitophel," brought down a storm of libels upon him, but merited for him first place among the English satirical poets
Teko'a, - The "wise woman" whom Joab employed to effect a reconciliation between David and Absalom was obtained from this place
Self-Seeking - Micah 2:1-2 ; that it is contrary to the example of all wise and good men: that the most awful examples of the punishment of this sin are recorded in Scripture; as Pharaoh, Achan, Haman, Gehazi, Absalom, Ananias and Sapphira, Judas, and many others
Salem - But the only real links between ‘Salem’ and Jerusalem’ are two in number: (1) the mention of the ‘ King’s Vale ,’ where, apparently, Melchizedek met Abram, which seems to be the place where Absalom reared his memorial ( 2 Samuel 18:18 ): it would presumably be somewhere near Jerusalem, but, pace Josephus, this is not certain
Harosheth of the Gentiles - ...
Unbelieving fear subsequently altered Israel's policy, so that they shrank from battling with the enemy's chariots in plains such as the Jordan valley, beside which Harosheth stood (Joshua 17:16-18; Judges 1:19), and at last adopted chariots in their armies under the kings: 2 Samuel 8:4, David; 2 Samuel 15:1, Absalom; 1 Kings 1:5, Adonijah; 1 Kings 4:26, Solomon
lo-Debar - David later needed the assistance of Machir of Lo-Debar during the rebellion of Absalom (2 Samuel 17:27 )
Forest - The wood of EPHRAIM in which Absalom was slain, on the east of the Jordan
Pillar - Absalom raised up for himself a pillar to keep his name in remembrance because he had no son
Hebron - Hebron was taken by Joshua, Joshua 10:36-37; Joshua 12:10, and the region given to Caleb, Joshua 14:13; was rebuilt and made a Levitical city and a city of refuge, Joshua 20:7; Joshua 21:11; was the royal residence of David, 2 Samuel 2:1-14; 1 Kings 2:11; became the headquarters of the rebellious Absalom, 2 Samuel 15:10; was fortified by Rehoboam and repeopled after the captivity
lo-Debar - David later needed the assistance of Machir of Lo-Debar during the rebellion of Absalom (2 Samuel 17:27 )
Debir - It apparently was near Mahanaim, where first Ish-bosheth and then David while fleeing Absalom, made their headquarters
David, King - At Hebron six sons were born to him, including Amnon, Absalom, and Adonias. His pardon was followed, however, by heavy crosses; Amnon's incest and Absalom's fratricide, rebellion, and death caused him shame and sorrow
Kidron - " David crossed this brook bare-foot and weeping, when fleeing from Absalom (2 Samuel 15:23,30 ), and it was frequently crossed by our Lord in his journeyings to and fro (John 18:1 )
Shimei - Relative of King Saul who cursed and opposed David as he fled from Absalom (2 Samuel 16:1 ). When David returned after Absalom's death, Shimei met him and pleaded for forgiveness and mercy, which David granted because of the festive occasion (2 Samuel 19:1 )
Pillar - Because Absalom had no son to carry on his name, he set up a pillar and carved his name in it (2 Samuel 18:18 )
Tekoa - The wise woman whom Joab suborned to persuade David to restore Absalom belonged to Tekoa (2 Samuel 14)
Amasa - (See Absalom
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - The so-called ‘Tomb of Jehoshaphat,’ which lies near the traditional ‘Tomb of Absalom,’ is an impossible site, for in 1 Kings 22:50 and 2 Chronicles 21:1 it is stated that he was buried in the city of David
Aramean - It was Maacah who bore Absalom (2 Samuel 3:3 )
Ephraim - A forest in which the great battle was fought when Absalom was killed
Abijah - The apparent contradiction in respect to the parentage of this person, as it is given in 1 Kings 15:2 and 2 Chronicles 13:2, may be explained by supposing that his mother Maachah (or Michaiah) was the daughter of Uriel and the granddaughter of Absalom, who is called Abishalom
Concubine - When Absalom revolted against his father, David, he “went in unto his father's concubines in the sight of all Israel” (2 Samuel 16:22 ) on the palace roof
Hebron - When Absalom tried to overthrow David, Hebron was the base from which he launched his rebellion (2 Samuel 15:7-10)
Tent - A “tent” was pitched on top of a house so everyone could see that Absalom went in to his father’s concubines ( Olives - ...
Olivet is mentioned several times in the Old Testament, up its slopes David, fleeing from Jerusalem for fear of Absalom, went wearied and weeping
Abiathar - Being confirmed in the high priesthood on David's accession to the throne, he aided in bringing up the ark to Jerusalem, 1 Corinthians 15:11,12 , and adhered to David during the rebellion of Absalom, 2 Samuel 15:35 , but afterwards was led to follow Adonijah, thus strangely betraying his royal friend in his old age
Numbering of the People - He had fled for some months before Absalom, and had suffered three years' famine on account of the slaughter of the Gibeonites
Joab - He acted apparently from a sense of duty in putting Absalom to death (18:1-14)
Mahanaim - Here David fled from Absalom, for it was then Walled and large enough to contain David's "hundreds" and "thousands
Hanging - Ahithophel, David's counselor, joined the conspiracy of Absalom, David's son (2 Samuel 15:31 )
Trumpet - Joab sounded the trumpet, to give the signal of retreat to his soldiers, in the battle against those of Abner's party, and in that against Absalom; and lastly, in the pursuit of Sheba the son of Bichri
Mephibosheth - ...
Years passed on again, till Absalom by fair speeches and skilful courtesies had stolen the hearts of all Israel, of all of which Mephibosheth was a silent student, eating at David's table continually. And Absalom sent for Ahithophel the Gilonite, David's old counsellor, from his city, even from Giloh. And the conspiracy was strong, for the people increased continually with Absalom, but Mephibosheth still ate at the king's table. And there came a messenger to David, saying, The hearts of the men of Israel are gone after Absalom. A few days after that the great battle was set in the wood of Ephraim, and of Absalom's side there was a great slaughter of twenty thousand men. And it was on that day that David went up to the chamber over the gate of Mahanaim, and wept; and as he went there he said, O my son Absalom; my son, my son Absalom! would God I had died for thee, O Absalom, my son, my son!...
So the king returned and came to Jordan. ' And the ingratitude of Mephibosheth grew at David's table to this high injustice, that he waited for both David and Absalom to be chased out of Jerusalem, that he might take their place
Oak - " Absalom in his flight was caught in the branches of a "great oak" (2 Samuel 18:9 ; RSV marg
Sheba - When David was returning to Jerusalem after the defeat of Absalom, a strife arose between the ten tribes and the tribe of Judah, because the latter took the lead in bringing back the king
Vows - If no redemption took place, the devoted person became a slave of the sanctuary: see the case of Absalom
Tamar (2) - Daughter of David and Maacah; the handsome Absalom's beautiful sister; forced by Amnon at his bad friend Jonadab's abominable suggestion (2 Samuel 13; 1 Chronicles 3:9). (See Absalom; AMNON; JONADAB. Absalom's sole surviving child, beautiful as her aunt and father; married Uriel of Gibeah, and bore Maachah, wife of Rehoboam king of Judah (1 Kings 15:2; 2 Chronicles 11:20-22; 2 Chronicles 13:2), and mother of Abijah (2 Samuel 14:7)
Shimei - Son of Gera, a Benjamite, of the house of Saul: he cursed David, calling him 'a man of Belial,' and threw stones and dust at him, when he was hastening from Jerusalem at the rebellion of Absalom; but made submission on David's return, and was not then punished
Gath - A bodyguard of Gittites was attached to David’s person under the leadership of a certain Ittai; these remained faithful to the king after the revolt of Absalom ( 2 Samuel 15:18 )
Mephib'Osheth - From this time forward he resided at Jerusalem, of Mephibosheth's behavior during the rebellion of Absalom we possess two accounts--his own, (2 Samuel 13:24-30 ) and that of Ziba, (2 Samuel 16:1-4 ) They are naturally at variance with each other
Hair - Both Samson and Absalom were greatly admired for their long locks (Judges 16:13 ; 2 Samuel 14:25-26 )
Forest - It was in this forest that Absalom was slain by Joab
Olives, Olivet, Mount of - David when he hastened from Jerusalem at the rebellion of Absalom ascended Mount Olivet
Mephibosheth - ...
When Absalom revolted, Ziba brought presents to David, and slandered Mephibosheth, saying that he sought the kingdom
Hebron - Here Absalom raised the standard of revolt, 2 Samuel 15:9,10
David - But the most serious event in the history of the reign of David, so far as the internal affairs of the kingdom were concerned, was the rebellion of his son Absalom. Of an ambitious nature, Absalom sought the succession, even at the expense of dethroning his father. ]'>[2] should be read ‘four’] years of suchlike crafty preparation, the rebellion broke out; a feast at Hebron, the old capital, given by Absalom to the conspirators, was the signal for the outbreak. At first Absalom was successful; he attacked Jerusalem, from which David bad to flee; here, following the advice of Ahithophel, he took possession of the royal harem, a sign (in the eyes of the people of those days) of the right of heritage. The most obvious thing to do now would have been for Absalom to pursue David before he had time to gather an army; but, against the advice of Ahithophel, he follows that of Hushai a secret friend of David who succeeds in inducing Absalom to waste time by lingering in Jerusalem. Ahithophel, enraged at the failure of his plans, and probably foreseeing what the final result must be, leaves Absalom and goes to his home in Giloh and hangs himself ( 2 Samuel 17:23 ). The decisive battle follows not long after, in the ‘forest of Ephraim’; Absalom is completely defeated, and loses his life by being caught in a tree by the head whilst fleeing. The touching account of David’s sorrow, on hearing of Absalom’s death, is given in 2 Samuel 18:23-33
Joab - However, Absalom's residence next Joab seems rather to point to the N. ...
Joab next, by the wise woman of Tekoa and her parable, induced the king to restore Absalom, which Joab saw was David's own wish, though justice constrained him to severity. He thus at once ingratiated himself with the reigning king, and with Absalom his probable successor, one less likely to punish Joab for murdering Abner than Solomon. Absalom with characteristic recklessness, when he failed to induce Joab to come to him, set fire to his barley and so forced Joab to mediate for his admission to the king's presence. Possibly Joab at first was disposed to join the rebel; but Absalom's appointment of Amasa to the command "instead of Joab" determined Joab's course (2 Samuel 17:25), and made him thenceforward bitter against Absalom, so that after thrusting three darts through his heart he had his corpse cast into a pit and heaped with stones
Joab - There might have been no 'matter of Uriah,' and no rebellion of Absalom, and none of the many other miseries that so desolated David's house, had he not committed this fatal blunder of letting Joab live. But the sacred writer surely selects and preserves his very best instance of tool turned tyrant and his insolent speech, in the case of Absalom. Joab ran Absalom three times through the heart right in the teeth of David's command to spare and save Absalom alive. There has been enough weeping now for Absalom, said Joab to David. O sacred chronicler, look well to your laurels! If once we take pen in hand, where would you be-Shimei, and Joab, and Absalom, and Ahithophel and all! O Lord, open Thou my lips, and I will show forth Thy praise
Forest - of Jordan near Mahanaim, where the battle with Absalom took place (2 Samuel 18:6; 2 Samuel 18:23), on the high lands, a little way from the valley of the Jordan
Zadok - ...
In a touching scene Zadok with Abiathar carried the ark to go with David in his flight from Absalom (2 Samuel 15:24 ). Zadok's son Ahimaaz was the go-between and was also the first to bring David news of Absalom's defeat (2 Samuel 18:27 )
Abiathar - Mark is not to 1 Samuel 21 at all, but to some later unrecorded incident, such as might have occurred during the flight from Absalom
Hair - The way in which Absalom let his hair grow was no doubt the vanity of a young and handsome man
Mount Olivet - Here it was that David (typically of Christ) went up barefoot and weeping, when he fled from Absalom, as the Lord Jesus went by it when he entered Gethsemane, and passed over the same brook of Kedron
Adonijah - ...
After the death of Absalom, Adonijah became the rightful heir to the throne; there was no sort of doubt about his right, it was taken for granted both by himself and by the people at large (1 Kings 2:15 ). These, naturally on the alert, represent the gathering to David, now very aged, as an attempt to usurp the throne while he is yet alive; Bathsheba reminds David of his promise that Solomon, her son, should succeed him on the throne ( 1 Kings 1:17 ) [1]; David, remembering perhaps the rebellion of Absalom (whom Adonijah seems to have resembled in temperament as well as in outward appearance), is easily prevailed upon to transfer the succession to Solomon ( 1 Kings 1:33 ff
Hebron - It was here also that the rebellious Absalom established himself as king ( 2 Samuel 15:7 ff
Much - Exodus 30 ...
In all Israel, there was none to be so much praised as Absalom
Murder - The sovereign assumed the power of executing or pardoning murderers (2 Samuel 1:15-16, David and the Amalekite slayer of Saul; 2 Samuel 13:39; 2 Samuel 14:7-11, David in respect to Anmon and Absalom; 1 Kings 2:34, Solomon and Joab)
Shimei - When David, fleeing from Absalom, reached the edge of the valley, between the road and Shimei's house, Shimei ran along the ridge over against the road, cursing and throwing stones and dust at him and his mighty men still as he went; and saying, "Come out, come out, thou bloody man and thou man of Belial the Lord hath returned upon thee all the blood of the house of Saul (referring to his hanging up Saul's sons for the Gibeonites, 2 Samuel 21, which in time preceded this; also to his general engagement in wars, 1 Chronicles 22:8), and the Lord hath delivered the kingdom into the hand of Absalom thy son, and behold thou art taken in thy mischief because thou art a bloody man" (2 Samuel 16:5-13)
David - After two years Absalom terribly avenged the crime against Tamar, and put Amnon to death. Absalom, afraid of the consequences of his guilt, fled to Geshur beyond Jordan, where he remained for three years, when he was brought back through the intrigue of Joab (2 Samuel 14 ). ...
Rebellion of Absalom. Absalom, taking full advantage of this state of things, gradually gained over the people, and at length openly rebelled against his father, and usurped the throne. Ahithophel was Absalom's chief counsellor. Absalom was there proclaimed king. Absalom's army was defeated, and himself put to death by the hand of Joab (9-18). He "went up to the chamber over the gate, and wept" (33), giving utterance to the heart-broken cry, "Would God I had died for thee, O Absalom, my son, my son!" Peace was now restored, and David returned to Jerusalem and resumed the direction of affairs. After the suppression of the rebellion of Absalom and that of Sheba, ten comparatively peaceful years of David's life passed away
Hebron - It became the residence also of the rebellious Absalom (2 Samuel 15:10 ), who probably expected to find his chief support in the tribe of Judah, now called el-Khulil
Olves, Mount of - It is first mentioned in connection with David's flight from Jerusalem through the rebellion of Absalom (2 Samuel 15:30 ), and is only once again mentioned in the Old Testament, in Zechariah 14:4
Nahash - Yet we read Nahash's son Shobi (2 Samuel 17:27-29) was one of the three trans-jordanic chieftains who rendered munificent hospitality to David in his hour of need, at Mahanaim, near Jabesh Gilead, when fleeing from Absalom
Judge (Office) - Absalom took advantage of discontent with the legal system to instigate revolt (2 Samuel 15:4 )
Samuel, Second Book of - Absalom is obliged to go into exile, but returns unrepentant; his revolt follows, and David seeks safety in flight. The punishment foretold by Nathan had come to pass, but God had mercy on His anointed; the counsels of Ahithophel are turned to foolishness, and Absalom meets the end he deserved
David - In his first role as king, David acquires the kingdom and assures his tenure in office (the accounts about David and Saul, the rebellions of Absalom and Sheba) and founds a dynasty (the birth of Solomon, the rebellion of Adonijah, the elimination of other contenders and factions). These narratives are intertwined with the theme of David as a man: a husband and father (Michal, Bathsheba, Amnon, Absalom, Solomon, Adonijah). Violence and political intrigue are interspersed in the accounts of David's wars, Saul's attempts on David's life, the violence of Joab and his brothers, the murder of Uriah, fratricide among David's sons, the slaughter of the helpless Absalom, and David's plans for the deaths of his enemies soon after his own death. He omits any account of the rebellion of Absalom and Adonijah and the actions of Amnon and Shimei; he makes no mention of David's sins in connection with Bathsheba and Uriah
David - David, knowing how gracious God was, remained prostrate while the child lived, but the child died; and Absalom's rebellion followed: cf. ...
Sin followed in David's house: the defilement of Tamar, the murder of Amnon, and the flight of Absalom. On Absalom's return he ingratiated himself with the people and rebelled against his father. " David was deeply grieved at the death of Absalom, and had to be reasoned into submitting to what was seemly. The revolt of Sheba followed, and David feared it might be worse than that of Absalom; but by the wisdom of a woman Sheba alone was destroyed. He had signally failed in punishing sin in his family, especially in the case of Amnon and Absalom; yet he counted on the everlasting covenant that God had made with him, ordered in all things and sure
Shimei, Shimeites - As the latter is fleeing before Absalom, Shimei meets him and heaps curses and insults on the fugitive monarch
Allegory - The allegory told by the wise woman of Tekoa in 2 Samuel 14:4-7 similarly opened David's eyes to a new perspective and caused him to spare the life of Absalom
Hebron - Here Absalom set up the standard of revolt
Hair - ...
2 Samuel 14:26 (c) Since Absalom was GOD's enemy, GOD could find little that was good to say about him
Hebron - At Hebron, Absalom began his rebellion, 2 Samuel 15:7-8 , &c
David - The histories of Tamar, Amnon, and Absalom show what anguish must have rent their father's heart. The rebellions of Absalom, Sheba, and Adonijah, the famine and plague that afflicted his people, the crimes of Joab, etc
Hebron - His son, Absalom, launched an abortive revolt against David from Hebron (2 Samuel 15:10 )
Grave - The graves of the infamous dead were often marked with a pile of stones (Achan, Joshua 7:26 ; Absalom, 2 Samuel 18:17 ; the king of Ai and the five Canaanite kings, Joshua 8:29 ; Joshua 10:27 )
Kedron - David crossed it in his flight from Jerusalem when Absalom rebelled (2 Samuel 15:23; 2 Samuel 15:30)
Gilgal - David passed through Gilgal as he fled from Absalom (2Samuel 19:15,2 Samuel 19:40 )
Olives, Mount of - David crossed it when fleeing from Absalom ( 2 Samuel 15:30 )
Beauty - Though the Hebrews did not exalt the human form as did the ancient Greeks, some men are referred to as exceedingly handsome: David (1 Samuel 16:12 ), Absalom (2 Samuel 14:25 ), Daniel (Daniel 1:15 ), Joseph, Jonathan, and even Moses as a child (Exodus 1 )
Gilead - ...
Here David found shelter and hospitality while fleeing from Absalom (2 Samuel 17:22; 2 Samuel 17:27-29)
Abijah - His mother was Maachah (1 Kings 15:2), or Michaiah (2 Chronicles 13:2), doubtless named from her grandmother, Absalom's mother (2 Samuel 3:3). She was daughter of Uriel, of Gibeah, and granddaughter of Abishalom, or Absalom (1 Chronicles 11:20). Uriel had married Tamar, Absalom's beautiful daughter (2 Samuel 14:27)
Ammon, Ammonites, Children of Ammon - ...
On the other hand, Shobi, of Rabbah, brought provisions when David fled from Absalom, 2 Samuel 17:27 , and Zelek, an Ammonite, was one of David's thirty valiant men
Gate - It was such a room into which David climbed and wept over the death of his son Absalom ( Barzillai - From within the walls of his lofty keep in far-off Gilead, Barzillai had watched the ways of God with His people Israel in the south country all through the days of Eli, and Samuel, and Saul, and David, and Joah, and Jonathan, and Mephibosheth, and Absalom, and his humble heart and his hospitable house had always been open to the oppressed, and to the persecuted, and to the poor. And thus it was that when David fled from Jerusalem to escape from Absalom, and when David made his final stand at Mahanaim, Barzillai lost no time in coming down to David's assistance. And, had Absalom succeeded, Barzillai would have been an outlawed and a sequestered man; and all the omens, to those who went by omens, looked that way that day. Let us be Barzillai the next time, if Absalom, and Ahithophel, and Mephibosheth, and all the miserable house of Israel are all arrayed against David
Tree - The wood of Ephraim, where the battle was fought between the forces of Absalom and the servants of David, was probably a place of the same kind; for the sacred historian observes, that the wood devoured more people that day than the sword, 2 Samuel 18:8 . Some have supposed the meaning of this passage to be, that the soldiers of Absalom were destroyed by the wild beasts of the wood; but it can scarcely be supposed, that in the reign of David, when the Holy Land was crowded with inhabitants, the wild beasts could be so numerous in one of the woods as to cause such a destruction
Sol'Omon - Absalom was still the king's favorite son, (2 Samuel 13:37 ; 18:33 ) and was looked on by the people as the destined successor. (2 Samuel 14:13 ; 15:1-6 ) The death of Absalom when Solomon was about ten years old left the place vacant, and David pledged his word in secret to Bath-sheba that he, and no other, should be the heir. At the age of ten or eleven he must have passed through the revolt of Absalom, and shared his father's exile
Burial - ...
Absalom was buried "in the wood" where he was slain (2 Samuel 18:17,18 )
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - Absalom's tomb and Zechariah's, besides Jehoshaphat's, are pointed out, but without good grounds for the tradition. 7:10) says Absalom's monument was two stadia from Jerusalem, probably in the valley of the upper Kedron, where were the judges' tombs, a likely site for his erecting his sepulchral monument. (See Absalom
Kidron (1) - ...
The Valley of the Kidron is mentioned first and last in the Bible at two momentous historical crises, when David crossed it (2 Samuel 15:23 ) amid the lamentations of his people as he fled before Absalom, and when Jesus ‘went forth with His disciples over the brook Kidron’ ( John 18:1 ) for His great and terrible agony before His crucifixion
Necromancy - The "keeping" of a name for Absalom suggests association with the dead (2 Samuel 18:18 )
Grave - Absalom followed the practice of ancient Near Eastern kings when he built himself a monument (2 Samuel 18:18 )
Heart - The king's heart was towards Absalom
Jonathan - Son of Absalom, in the time of Simon the Maccabee ( 1Ma 13:11 )
Thirteen - ...
2sa13 - We read here the tragic story of Amon, his sister Tamar, and the murder by Absalom
Gilgal - ...
When David returned after the overthrow and death of Absalom, Judah gathered at Gilgal
Court - Each house generally had a courtyard surrounded by a wall or else one adjoined several homes: “Nevertheless a lad saw them, and told Absalom: but they went both of them away quickly, and came to a man’s house in Bahurim, which had a well in his court; whither they went down” ( Girdle - A girdle curiously and richly wrought was among the ancient Hebrews a mark of honour, and sometimes bestowed as a reward of merit: for this was the recompense which Joab declared he meant to bestow on the man who put Absalom to death: "Why didst thou not smite him there to the ground? and I would have given thee ten shekels of silver, and a girdle," 2 Samuel 18:11
Abner - This act, involving in oriental idea the suspicion of usurping the succession to the throne (so in the case of Absalom: 2 Samuel 16:21; 2 Samuel 20:3; 1 Kings 2:13-25; (See ABIATHAR, (See ADONIJAH, and (See ABISHAG), called forth a rebuke from even so feeble a person as the nominal king, Ishbosheth
Gilead - Hither David fled from before Absalom, and was succoured, among others, by Barzillai ( 2 Samuel 17:27 ; 2 Samuel 19:31 , 1 Kings 2:7 ), whose descendants are referred to in post-exilic records ( Ezra 2:61 , Nehemiah 7:63 )
Cedron - And this brook was rendered memorable in allusion to Christ, when David, as a type of Jesus, passed it in his ascent to the mount of Olives, when fleeing from his kingdom with his followers barefoot, his head covered, and weeping, and sorrowing, at the instance of Absalom, his unnatural son
Stone - Sometimes they heaped up such a collection of stones upon the burying place of some odious persons, as was none in the case of Achan and Absalom, Joshua 7:26 ; 2 Kings 18:17
David - ...
Family Intrigue Able to rule the people but not his family, David saw intrigue, sexual sins, and murder rock his own household, resulting in his isolation from and eventual retreat before Absalom. Still, David grieved long and deep when his army killed Absalom (2 Samuel 18:19-33 )
Hair (2) - Opinion had changed since the days of Absalom
Teeth - ...
Psalm 3:7 (b) This is a type of the evil power of the wicked Absalom
Watch - 20:3: David put 10 of his concubines who had been defiled by Absalom into a house of confinement (NASB, “under guard”)
Court Systems - David was led to convict himself of his crimes against Uriah and his mistreatment of Absalom (2 Samuel 12:1-6 ; 2 Samuel 14:1-24 ). Absalom was able to take advantage of David's failure to live up to this ideal (2 Samuel 15:1-6 )
Gibeon - ...
Soon after the death of Absalom and David's restoration to his throne his kingdom was visited by a grievous famine, which was found to be a punishment for Saul's violation (2 Samuel 20:5-105 ) of the covenant with the Gibeonites (Joshua 9:3-27 )
Charge - ...
The king gave charge concerning Absalom
Mediator, Mediation - They also use mediators to argue a case or to negotiate terms of peace with a hostile party, as Moses did with Pharaoh on behalf of Israel (Exodus 6:28-12:32 ) and Joab did with David on behalf of Absalom (2 Samuel 14:1-24 ). Both kinds of mediation are sometimes intertwined in the Bible, as when Moses used Aaron to mediate between himself and Pharaoh (Exodus 7:1-2 ) and Joab used the wise woman of Tekoa to mediate his message about Absalom to David (2 Samuel 14:2-20 )
Tombs - ) The so-called "tomb of Absalom" is larger and of the Roman Ionic order, with a frieze of the Roman Doric order. "...
It is now closed by the stones thrown by passers at the tomb of the undutiful Absalom. The architecture is that of "the tomb of Jehoshaphat," and has a Greek pediment of an age later than the debased Roman of "the tomb of Absalom
Mephibosheth - Seventeen years subsequently, in Absalom's rebellion, Ziba rendered important service to David by meeting him as he crossed Olivet, with two strong "he donkeys" (chamor ) ready saddled for the king's use, bread, raisins, fruits, and wine. " Mephibosheth had everything to lose and nothing to gain from Absalom's success. A cripple and a Benjamite could never dream of being preferred by Judah to the handsome Absalom; interest and gratitude bound him to David
Satan - ...
In another instance, David was merciful with members of Saul’s family who cursed him and wished him harm when he fled from Absalom ( Hand - First, the word can mean “side,” where the hand is located: “And Absalom rose up early, and stood beside the way of the gate …” ( Baal - A place where Absalom appears to have had a sheep-farm, and where Amnon was murdered
Sepulchre - Absalom was buried under a heap of stones, 2 Samuel 18:17
Trees - Absalom died in an oak tree
Praise - 23:12) or the beauty of Absalom ( Heaven - Even Absalom hanging by his hair from a tree limb was “between heaven and earth” (2 Samuel 18:9 ; compare 1 Chronicles 21:16 ; Ezekiel 8:3 )
Arms - The BATON, or SCEPTRE (shebet ) used in 2 Samuel 18:14 of the "darts" with which Joab killed Absalom
Heart - 28:29); “… [1] took three darts in his hand, and thrust them through the heart of Absalom …” ( Shimei - For Shimei that day perfected the good work on David that Absalom and Ahithophel had so well begun. And least of all Absalom and Ahithophel and Shimei
Tomb - James and of Absalom
Friend, Friendship - A friend may offer help at the risk of death, as Hushai the Arkite does when he spies for David in the court of Absalom the usurper (2 Samuel 15:32-37 ; 16:16-19 ; 17:5-16 )
Wise, Skilled - Joab hired a “wise” woman to make David change his mind about Absalom ( Righteous, To Be - Absalom, thus, gained a large following by promising justice to the landowner ( Ham - Now, if David's hot anger against Absalom or Solomon had come upon him when he was in that mind, and had he remembered ancient Noah and his wakening from his wine, what would David have done? With the Holy Spirit not taken away from him, David would have recollected his former falls, and lie would have retreated hack upon his own fifty-first psalm. He would have taken Absalom, whom he so much loved, and the angry father and the exasperating son would have kneeled down together, and then David would have said, with weeping, Who can bring a clean thing out of an unclean? Wash me thoroughly from mine iniquity
Pillar - To this category may also be reckoned the memorial pillar which Absalom erected for himself in his own lifetime ( 2 Samuel 18:18 )
Ecclesiastes, the Book of - So the sons of Korah write Psalm 42 as from David's soul, in his trans-jordanic flight from Absalom, so that David is the speaker throughout
David - A rebellion was raised against him by his son Absalom
da'Vid - " (2 Samuel 12:10 ) The outrage on his daughter Tamar, the murder of his eldest son Amnon, and then the revolt of his best-beloved Absalom, brought on the crisis which once more sent him forth as wanderer, as in the days when he fled from Saul. (2 Samuel 15:18 ) The final battle of Absalom's rebellion was fought in the "forest of Ephraim," and terminated in the accident which led to the young man's death; and, though nearly heartbroken at the loss of his son, David again reigned in undisturbed peace at Jerusalem
Jordan - By this lower ford David passed to fight Syria (2 Samuel 10:17), and afterwards in his flight from Absalom to Mahanaim E
Sexuality, Human - Amnon's rape of his half-sister Tamar (2 Samuel 13:11-14 ) resulted in a blood feud between Amnon and Absalom, Tamar's brother. The consequences were Amnon's murder by order of Absalom (13:28-29)
Family Life And Relations - An even more severe example may be seen in Amnon's rape of his half-sister Tamar and his subsequent murder by Absalom (2 Samuel 13:1-29 ). The bond of affection between Joseph and his only full brother Benjamin (Genesis 43:15-16 ) is also echoed in Absalom's concern over his sister's disgrace, contrasted to his cold hatred for his half-brother, Amnon. The distance between the father and his children in a polygynous household may be seen in Absalom's efforts to unseat his father David and kill him (2 Samuel 15:14 ; 17:2-4 )
Transportation And Travel - For instance, David's sons Absalom (2 Samuel 18:9 ) and Solomon (1 Kings 1:33 ) are described as riding mules
Olives, Mount of - The road by which David fled from Absalom across Kedron, and passed through trees to the summit, where was a consecrated spot (an old sanctuary to Εlohim , like Bethel) at which he worshipped God (2 Samuel 15:30; 2 Samuel 15:32)
Sacrifice And Offering - One of the most fruitful occasions of sacrifice was undoubtedly the discharging of a vow, of which those of Jacob ( 1618537779_14 ), Jephthah (see 5 ), Hannah ( 1 Samuel 1:11 ), and Absalom ( 2 Samuel 15:7 ) may be cited as typical specimens, just as in Syria to-day, among fellahin and bedouin alike, similar vows are made to the welys of the local shrines by or on behalf of sick persons, childless women, or to avert or remove plague or other threatened calamity
Sin - The death of the newly born child and the subsequent distractions arising out of the affair of Absalom are looked on as expressions of God’s wrath and of retributive justice (see 2 Samuel 12:10-18 )
Solomon - Adonijah, ‘a very goodly man’ ( 1 Kings 1:6 ), relying on the favour of the people ( 1 Kings 2:15 ) [3], made a bid for the throne, imitating the method of Absalom and taking advantage of David’s senility
Nazirite - This permission followed from the recognition of Absalom as a Nazirite (2 Samuel 14:26)
Nazirite - This permission followed from the recognition of Absalom as a Nazirite (2 Samuel 14:26)
Marriage - the tent pitched for Absalom ( 2 Samuel 16:22 )
Evil - Yahweh "brings evil" upon Absalom by defeating the counsel of Ahithophel (2 Samuel 17:14 )
Jerusalem - North of the city we have the tomb of Helena, the mother of Izates, built in the last century before Christ; and there are a few other objects, as the Tomb of Absalom and that of Jehoshaphat, which certainly belong to ancient times, but whose exact date cannot be determined
Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - ...
When, in his later years, David was driven from Jerusalem by the revolution led by his son, Absalom, the ark was brought along by the priests who fled from the city
Grace - As David flees the city of Jerusalem after hearing that Absalom has been crowned king in Hebron, he takes the ark with him