What does Abraham mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἀβραὰμ the son of Terah and the founder of the Jewish nation. 44
ἀβραάμ the son of Terah and the founder of the Jewish nation. 29
אַבְרָהָ֖ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 26
אַבְרָהָ֔ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 20
אַבְרָהָ֑ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 18
אַבְרָהָ֛ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 14
אַבְרָהָם֙ friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 13
אַבְרָהָ֜ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 12
לְאַבְרָהָ֥ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 9
אַבְרָהָ֣ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 8
אַבְרָהָֽם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 6
אַבְרָהָ֗ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 5
וְאַ֨בְרָהָ֔ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 4
אַבְרָהָ֥ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 3
לְאַבְרָהָ֖ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 3
לְאַבְרָהָ֛ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 3
לְאַבְרָהָ֨ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 3
לְאַבְרָהָ֔ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 3
אַבְרָהָ֣ם ׀ friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 2
וְאַבְרָהָ֖ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 2
לְאַבְרָהָֽם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 2
לְאַבְרָהָ֑ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 2
וְאַבְרָהָ֣ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 1
: אַבְרָהָ֑ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 1
! אַבְרָהָ֑ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 1
אַבְרָהָ֨ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 1
אַבְרָהָם֮ friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 1
מֵֽאַבְרָהָ֔ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 1
אַבְרָהָ֤ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 1
אַבְרָהָ֧ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 1
! אַבְרָהָ֖ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 1
לְאַבְרָהָ֗ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 1
וְאַבְרָהָ֤ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 1
לְאַבְרָהָם֩ friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 1
אַבְרָהָ֞ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 1
אַבְרָ֫הָ֥ם friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant. 1

Definitions Related to Abraham

G11


   1 the son of Terah and the founder of the Jewish nation.
   Additional Information: Abraham = “father of a multitude”.
   

H85


   1 friend of God and founder of Hebrew nation via God’s elective covenant.
   Additional Information: Abraham = “father of a multitude” or “chief of multitude”.
   

Frequency of Abraham (original languages)

Frequency of Abraham (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ortelius, Abraham
Catholic geographer and cartographer, born Antwerp, Holland, April 14, 1527; died there 1598. In 1564 he published an eight-leaved map of the world, which was followed in 1570 by the first great modern atlas, his Theatrum orbis terrarum, containing an index of ancient and modern place names. He also compiled a valuable list of cartographers and their works, and in 1587 published a still useful dictionary of old geography.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Abraham
Father of a multitude, Genesis 17:4,5 ; the great founder of the Jewish nation. He was a son of Terah, a descendant of Shem, and born in Ur, a city of Chaldea, A.M. 2008, B. C. 1996, Genesis 11:27,28 . Here he lived seventy years, when at the call of God he left his idolatrous kindred, and removed to Haran, in Mesopotamia, Acts 7:2-4 , accompanied by his father, his wife Sarai, his brother Nahor, and his nephew Lot. A few years after, having buried his father, he again removed at the call of God, with his wife and nephew, and entered the land of promise as a nomad or wandering shepherd. Sojourning for a time at Shechem, he built here, as was his custom, an alter to the Lord, who appeared to him, and promised that land to his seed. Removing from place to place for convenience of water and pasturage, he was at length driven by a famine into Egypt, where he dissembled in calling his wife his sister, Genesis 12:1 - 20 . Returning to Canaan rich in flocks and herds, he left Lot to dwell in the fertile valley of the lower Jordan, and pitched his own tents in Mamre, Genesis 13:1-18 . A few years after, he rescued Lot and his friends from captivity, and received the blessing of Melchizedek, Genesis 14:1-24 . Again God appeared to him, promised that his seed should be like the stars for number, and foretold their oppression in Egypt 400 years, and their return to possess the promised land, Genesis 15:1-21 . But the promise of a son being yet unfulfilled, Sarai gave him Hagar her maid for a secondary wife, of whom Ishmael was born, Genesis 16:1-16 . After thirteen years, God again appeared to him, and assured him that the heir of the promise should yet be born of his wife, whose name was then changed to Sarah. He established also the covenant of circumcision, Genesis 17:1-27 . Here, too, occurred the visit of the three angels, and the memorable intercession with the Angel-Jehovah for the inhabitants of Sodom, Genesis 18:1-33 . After this, Abraham journeyed south to Gerah, where he again called Sarah his sister. In this region Isaac was born; and soon after, Hagar and Ishmael were driven out to seek a new home, Genesis 21:1-34 . About twenty-five years after, God put to trial the faith of Abraham, by commanding him to sacrifice Isaac, his son and the heir of the promise, upon Mount Moriah, Genesis 22:1-24 . Twelve years after, Sarah died, and the cave of Machpelag was bought for a burial- place, Genesis 23:1-20 . Abraham sent his steward, and obtained a wife for Isaac from his pious kindred in Mesopotamia, Genesis 24:1-67 . He himself also married Keturah, and had six sons, each one the founder of a distinct people in Arabia. At the age of 175, full of years and honors, he died, and was buried by his sons in the same tomb with Sarah, Genesis 25:1-34 .
The character of Abraham is one of the most remarkable in Scripture. He was a genuine oriental patriarch, a prince in the land; his property was large, his retinue very numerous, and he commanded the respect of the neighboring people: and yet he was truly a stranger and a pilgrim, the only land he possessed being the burial-place he had purchased. Distinguished by his integrity, generosity, and hospitality, he was most of all remarkable for his simple and unwavering faith, a faith that obeyed without hesitation or delay, and recoiled not from the most fearful trial ever imposed upon man, so that he is justly styled "the father of the faithful," that is, of believers. No name in history is venerated by so large a portion of the human race, Mohammedans as well as Jews and Christians. As the ancestor of Christ, in whom all the nations are blessed, and as the father of all believers, the covenant is abundantly fulfilled to him: his seed are as the stars of heaven and with them he shall inherit the heavenly Canaan.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Ibn ezra, r. Abraham ben meir
Rabbi Avraham Ibn Ezra (c. 1089-1164), author of one of the early biblical commentaries
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Abraham
Father of a multitude, son of Terah, named (Genesis 11:27 ) before his older brothers Nahor and Haran, because he was the heir of the promises. Till the age of seventy, Abram sojourned among his kindred in his native country of Chaldea. He then, with his father and his family and household, quitted the city of Ur, in which he had hitherto dwelt, and went some 300 miles north to Haran, where he abode fifteen years. The cause of his migration was a call from God (Acts 7:2-4 ). There is no mention of this first call in the Old Testament; it is implied, however, in Genesis 12 . While they tarried at Haran, Terah died at the age of 205 years. Abram now received a second and more definite call, accompanied by a promise from God (Genesis 12:1,2 ); whereupon he took his departure, taking his nephew Lot with him, "not knowing whither he went" (Hebrews 11:8 ). He trusted implicitly to the guidance of Him who had called him. Abram now, with a large household of probably a thousand souls, entered on a migratory life, and dwelt in tents. Passing along the valley of the Jabbok, in the land of Canaan, he formed his first encampment at Sichem (Genesis 12:6 ), in the vale or oak-grove of Moreh, between Ebal on the north and Gerizim on the south. Here he received the great promise, "I will make of thee a great nation," etc. (Genesis 12:2,3,7 ). This promise comprehended not only temporal but also spiritual blessings. It implied that he was the chosen ancestor of the great Deliverer whose coming had been long ago predicted (Genesis 3:15 ). Soon after this, for some reason not mentioned, he removed his tent to the mountain district between Bethel, then called Luz, and Ai, towns about two miles apart, where he built an altar to "Jehovah." He again moved into the southern tract of Palestine, called by the Hebrews the Negeb; and was at length, on account of a famine, compelled to go down into Egypt. This took place in the time of the Hyksos, a Semitic race which now held the Egyptians in bondage. Here occurred that case of deception on the part of Abram which exposed him to the rebuke of Pharaoh (Genesis 12:18 ). Sarai was restored to him; and Pharaoh loaded him with presents, recommending him to withdraw from the country. He returned to Canaan richer than when he left it, "in cattle, in silver, and in gold" (Genesis 12:8 ; 13:2 . Compare Psalm 105:13,14 ). The whole party then moved northward, and returned to their previous station near Bethel. Here disputes arose between Lot's shepherds and those of Abram about water and pasturage. Abram generously gave Lot his choice of the pasture-ground. (Compare 1Corinthians 6:7.) He chose the well-watered plain in which Sodom was situated, and removed thither; and thus the uncle and nephew were separated. Immediately after this Abram was cheered by a repetition of the promises already made to him, and then removed to the plain or "oak-grove" of Mamre, which is in Hebron. He finally settled here, pitching his tent under a famous oak or terebinth tree, called "the oak of Mamre" (Genesis 13:18 ). This was his third resting-place in the land.
Some fourteen years before this, while Abram was still in Chaldea, Palestine had been invaded by Chedorlaomer, King of Elam, who brought under tribute to him the five cities in the plain to which Lot had removed. This tribute was felt by the inhabitants of these cities to be a heavy burden, and after twelve years they revolted. This brought upon them the vengeance of Chedorlaomer, who had in league with him four other kings. He ravaged the whole country, plundering the towns, and carrying the inhabitants away as slaves. Among those thus treated was Lot. Hearing of the disaster that had fallen on his nephew, Abram immediately gathered from his own household a band of 318 armed men, and being joined by the Amoritish chiefs Mamre, Aner, and Eshcol, he pursued after Chedorlaomer, and overtook him near the springs of the Jordan. They attacked and routed his army, and pursued it over the range of Anti-Libanus as far as to Hobah, near Damascus, and then returned, bringing back all the spoils that had been carried away. Returning by way of Salem, i.e., Jerusalem, the king of that place, Melchizedek, came forth to meet them with refreshments. To him Abram presented a tenth of the spoils, in recognition of his character as a priest of the most high God (Genesis 14:18-20 ).
In a recently-discovered tablet, dated in the reign of the grandfather of Amraphel (Genesis 14:1 ), one of the witnesses is called "the Amorite, the son of Abiramu," or Abram.
Having returned to his home at Mamre, the promises already made to him by God were repeated and enlarged (Genesis 13:14 ). "The word of the Lord" (an expression occurring here for the first time) "came to him" (15:1). He now understood better the future that lay before the nation that was to spring from him. Sarai, now seventy-five years old, in her impatience, persuaded Abram to take Hagar, her Egyptian maid, as a concubine, intending that whatever child might be born should be reckoned as her own. Ishmael was accordingly thus brought up, and was regarded as the heir of these promises (Genesis 16 ). When Ishmael was thirteen years old, God again revealed yet more explicitly and fully his gracious purpose; and in token of the sure fulfilment of that purpose the patriarch's name was now changed from Abram to Abraham (Genesis 17:4,5 ), and the rite of circumcision was instituted as a sign of the covenant. It was then announced that the heir to these covenant promises would be the son of Sarai, though she was now ninety years old; and it was directed that his name should be Isaac. At the same time, in commemoration of the promises, Sarai's name was changed to Sarah. On that memorable day of God's thus revealing his design, Abraham and his son Ishmael and all the males of his house were circumcised (Genesis 17 ). Three months after this, as Abraham sat in his tent door, he saw three men approaching. They accepted his proffered hospitality, and, seated under an oak-tree, partook of the fare which Abraham and Sarah provided. One of the three visitants was none other than the Lord, and the other two were angels in the guise of men. The Lord renewed on this occasion his promise of a son by Sarah, who was rebuked for her unbelief. Abraham accompanied the three as they proceeded on their journey. The two angels went on toward Sodom; while the Lord tarried behind and talked with Abraham, making known to him the destruction that was about to fall on that guilty city. The patriarch interceded earnestly in behalf of the doomed city. But as not even ten righteous persons were found in it, for whose sake the city would have been spared, the threatened destruction fell upon it; and early next morning Abraham saw the smoke of the fire that consumed it as the "smoke of a furnace" (Genesis 19:1-28 ).
After fifteen years' residence at Mamre, Abraham moved southward, and pitched his tent among the Philistines, near to Gerar. Here occurred that sad instance of prevarication on his part in his relation to Abimelech the King (Genesis 20 ). (See Genesis 21:12 ). (See HAGAR ; ISHMAEL .)
At this point there is a blank in the patriarch's history of perhaps twenty-five years. These years of peace and happiness were spent at Beer-sheba. The next time we see him his faith is put to a severe test by the command that suddenly came to him to go and offer up Isaac, the heir of all the promises, as a sacrifice on one of the mountains of Moriah. His faith stood the test (Hebrews 11:17-19 ). He proceeded in a spirit of unhesitating obedience to carry out the command; and when about to slay his son, whom he had laid on the altar, his uplifted hand was arrested by the angel of Jehovah, and a ram, which was entangled in a thicket near at hand, was seized and offered in his stead. From this circumstance that place was called Jehovah-jireh, i.e., "The Lord will provide." The promises made to Abraham were again confirmed (and this was the last recorded word of God to the patriarch); and he descended the mount with his son, and returned to his home at Beer-sheba (Genesis 22:19 ), where he resided for some years, and then moved northward to Hebron.
Some years after this Sarah died at Hebron, being 127 years old. Abraham acquired now the needful possession of a burying-place, the cave of Machpelah, by purchase from the owner of it, Ephron the Hittite (Genesis 23 ); and there he buried Sarah. His next care was to provide a wife for Isaac, and for this purpose he sent his steward, Eliezer, to Haran (or Charran, Acts 7:2 ), where his brother Nahor and his family resided (Genesis 11:31 ). The result was that Rebekah, the daughter of Nahor's son Bethuel, became the wife of Isaac (Genesis 24 ). Abraham then himself took to wife Keturah, who became the mother of six sons, whose descendants were afterwards known as the "children of the east" (Judges 6:3 ), and later as "Saracens." At length all his wanderings came to an end. At the age of 175 years, 100 years after he had first entered the land of Canaan, he died, and was buried in the old family burying-place at Machpelah (Genesis 25:7-10 ).
The history of Abraham made a wide and deep impression on the ancient world, and references to it are interwoven in the religious traditions of almost all Eastern nations. He is called "the friend of God" (James 2:23 ), "faithful Abraham" (Galatians 3:9 ), "the father of us all" (Romans 4:16 ).
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Abraham
The Old Testament . This man, whose name may mean "the father is exalted, " was the first of the great patriarchs of Israel. In the ancient Near East a patriarch was the leader or ancestor of a family, but Abraham exceeded this status by becoming the progenitor of one specific nation, the Hebrews, as well as of other peoples. The story of his life (Genesis 11:27b-25:12 ) appears to comprise one of eleven Mesopotamian tablets underlying Genesis, and in typical fashion probably had a title ("Abram, Nahor and Haran, 11:27b) and a concluding colophon "these are the generations of" (KJV), that is, "family histories of" (25:12). The material was apparently compiled in the time of Isaac at Beer Lahai Roi (Genesis 25:11 ), the finished unit probably comprising a group of smaller tablets linked in a series.
The date of Abraham's birth in Ur "of the Chaldees" (i.e., southern Ur) is not known, but can be computed roughly from archeological evidence at Bab-edh-Dhra, near Sodom. The latter was destroyed about 1900 b.c. No monuments to him have survived, but discoveries at Mari, Nuzi, and elsewhere have shown that his activities were consistent with Middle Bronze Age Mesopotamian life (ca. 2000-1500 b.c.). As such, Abraham emerged from a background of high culture, and was not the illiterate shepherd envisaged by some nineteenth-century literary critics.
Abraham is of profound religious significance because he was the historic ancestor of the twelve tribes, the "seed of Abraham, " who regularly described their God as "the God of Abraham." By virtue of being children of divine promise (Genesis 12:2 ), the Israelites were living proof of God's existence and power in human society. This general promise was made specific by means of a covenant between God and Abraham (Genesis 15:8-18 ; 17:1-14 ), which provided the offspring of the patriarch with a large tract of territory. Abraham was to father many nations (Genesis 17:5 ), and the covenant that was to be established with him and his seed was to be perpetual in nature.
The idea of a covenant, or binding agreement between two parties, was already familiar in the early Middle Bronze Age, and by mutual agreement involved penalties if one of the participants defaulted. It was normally marked by some form of ritual (Genesis 15:9-17 ), which emphasized the solemnity and significance of the occasion. Abraham was instructed to keep the covenant obligations, and as a material token the institution of circumcision was imposed upon him and his descendants. When performed, this procedure constituted formal indication of membership within the Israelite community.
Although coming from a background of polytheism and idolatry at Ur, Abraham had been reared in the faith of the one true God by his father Terah. But when he received the Lord's call at a mature stage of his life, he recognized that he had been chosen to implement a specific part of God's plan for human destiny. He was not to fulfill it alone, because the Lord undertook to go with him (Genesis 12:4 ). He was required to be consistently obedient to God's will, however difficult that might be, and to trust without question the guidance he would receive against the background of the covenant framework. It should be noted that Abraham was not asked to be obedient as a condition of the covenant. Rather, his response in faith was based upon what he already knew about the God of his ancestors, and was thus a matter of free choice. The importance of strict obedience to the Lord's injunctions assumes early prominence in Old Testament theology. Put simply, without unquestioning submission to God's stipulations there could be neither fellowship with the Lord nor blessings poured out upon the covenant people.
The continuing faith Abraham had can be illustrated by reference to four specific occasions in his life. The first was God's command to leave both family and homeland and migrate to a strange country (Genesis 12:1 ). The severing of emotional ties was bound to be costly, yet Abraham went forward without once questioning God's directives, believing instead in God's power to fulfill his promises.
The second occasion actually completed the first, consisting of Abraham's parting company with his nephew Lot (Genesis 13:1-16 ) because of friction between their herdsmen. Although doubtless distressed at withdrawing from a relative, Abraham behaved generously in allowing Lot to choose the territory that he preferred (Genesis 13:8-11 ), whereupon God renewed his promises of land and offspring to the childless Abraham.
The third was yet another occasion when the covenant was confirmed, this time in greater detail (Genesis 17:1-27 ). God promised Abraham a son who would be named Isaac (Genesis 17:16 ), and who would be the inheritor of the everlasting covenant (Genesis 17:19,21 ). It seems that Abraham assumed that Ishmael was to function in that capacity, but when this was denied he acknowledged the Lord's will obediently, and awaited in faith the fulfillment of the promise that all the nations of the earth would be blessed in him (Genesis 18:18 ).
Perhaps the most serious test of Abraham's obedience and faith came when God ordered him to offer up in sacrifice the very one through whom the covenant was to be perpetuated: his son Isaac (Genesis 22:1-2 ). Dutifully and without questioning, Abraham followed the ritual procedure, and at the climactic moment God intervened on behalf of Isaac (Genesis 22:11 ), stating that Abraham had passed the divinely imposed test of submission and faith (Genesis 22:12 ). For such implicit obedience Abraham was to become an example of covenant fidelity. In 2 Chronicles 20:7 (cf. James 2:23 ) Abraham is described as the "friends" of God. As late as New Testament times, he and Sarah were lauded as people who lived and died in an attitude of faith (Hebrews 11:8-18 ).
The New Testament If God's plan for human salvation was to be implemented, the Lord had to be able to trust those whom he called and empowered for this task. Only after testing under difficult conditions did the relative trustworthiness of the servant become apparent. In Abraham's case, his unwavering faith accomplished the fulfillment of the covenant promises in terms of a great nation that would honor him through the centuries as "their father" ( John 8:39 ; Romans 4:16 ). This privilege, however, was not to be restricted to the Jews, but was also shared by adherents to the world religions of Christianity and Islam.
The prophecy whereby all human families would be blessed (or "bless themselves") came to fruition in the work of Jesus Christ, the Messiah of God, who was the long-promised descendant of Abraham (Matthew 1:1 ; Galatians 3:16 ). His atoning death broke the power of sin over human beings and enabled them to be reconciled to God through penitence and faith. The saving work of Christ ushered in the new covenant prophesied by Jeremiah (31:31) and was given definitive shape in the Christian church, a body of believers committed to serve Jesus as king and lord through Acts of obedience and faith. This privileged group is blessed by the assurance of God's love and his saving power that sustain all who trust in him. But while being a recipient of blessing, the Christian church is commanded to fulfill covenant responsibilities (Matthew 28:14 ) in a manner unknown to the covenant people of Old Testament times. It is by this means, however, that the Abrahamic blessings come into effect when both Jewish and Gentile sinners find forgiveness and spiritual rebirth in Christ through the proclamation of the gospel.
The Christian faith thus stands in an unbroken chain of spirituality that has come down through the ages. The new covenant on which the Christian church is founded is based upon an individual's relationship with God in Christ, and not upon the response of a group such as a tribe to the Lord's commands. The atoning work of Christ on Calvary, achieved by a man as fully obedient to God's commands (Philippians 2:8 ) as Abraham ever was, has released a flood of divine grace upon an undeserving world, and has brought the blessed fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22-23 ) into the believer's life.
Paul stressed that the children of God by faith in Jesus were in fact members of Abraham's offspring, and thus heirs according to the promise (Galatians 3:26-29 ). Thus Christians can speak confidently of Abraham as "the father of the faithful, " and praise a merciful God because it was through his fidelity in remote ages that our eternal salvation has become an actuality. Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, and others are no longer shadowy images which, in an earlier age of biblical criticism, were often dismissed as legendary or even mythological. Instead, the participants in the Abrahamic covenant are seen as real persons with whom modern Christians are privileged to join in witness to God's power and his plan of salvation through Christ. While Christians can rejoice in the realization that the blessings of Abraham's covenant have become their very own, it is important for them to remember that, as Jesus taught, the true children of Abraham perform the deeds of Abraham (John 8:39 ).
Dynamic though Abraham's covenant was, sheer physical descent from the revered patriarch did not of itself guarantee an individual's salvation, as John the Baptist pointed out (Matthew 3:9 ). Nor did it imply that there were no unbelievers in ancient Israel (Romans 9:6 ). Only those members whose lives manifested the obedience and trust of the patriarch would participate in covenant blessings. The man who for Paul was the exemplar of faith (Romans 4:16-22 ; Galatians 3:6-12 ) was understood by James to demonstrate that justification by faith is proved in works that issue from such a faith (James 2:20-24 ). The emphasis, however, is upon the genuine nature of the faith rather than such deeds as may result.
R. K. Harrison
See also Israel
Bibliography . G. Bush, Notes on Genesis ; D. Kidner, Genesis ; K. A. Kitchen, Ancient Orient and Old Testament ; F. B. Meyer, Abraham: The Obedience of Faith ; C. F. Pfeiffer, The Patriarchal Age ; A. R. Millard and D. J. Wiseman, Essays on the Patriarchal Narratives .
Chabad Knowledge Base - R. Abraham
"the Angel": Son and disciple of Rabbi DovBer of Mezeritch and study partner of Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi; born in 1740; passed away at age 36 in 1776; known as "the angel" for his saintliness and ascetism.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Abraham
Abraham ("father of a multitude".) Up to Genesis 17:4-5, his being sealed with circumcision, the sign of the covenant, ABRAM (father of elevation). Son of Terah, brother of Nahor and Haran. Progenitor of the Hebrew, Arabs, Edomites, and kindred tribes; the ninth in descent from Shem, through Heber. Haran died before Terah, leaving Lot and two daughters, Milcah and Iscah. Nahor married his niece Milcah: Abraham Iscah, i.e. Sarai, daughter, i.e. granddaughter, of his father, not of his mother (Genesis 20:12). Ur, his home, is the modern Mugheir, the primeval capital of Chaldaea; its inscriptions are probably of the 22nd century B.C. The alphabetical Hebrew system is Phoenician, and was probably brought by Abraham to Canaan, where it became modified. Abraham, at God's call, went forth from Ur of the Chaldees (Genesis 11:31-12).
In Haran Terah died. The statement in Genesis 11:26, that Terah was 70 when he begat Abram, Nahor, and Haran, must apply only to the oldest, Haran. His being oldest appears from the fact that his brothers married his daughters, and that Sarai was only ten years younger than Abraham (Genesis 17:17); the two younger were born subsequently, Abram, the youngest, when Terah was 130, as appears from comparing Genesis 11:31 with Genesis 12:4; Acts 7:3-4; "before he dwelt in Charran Ηaran , while he was in Mesopotamia," in his 60th year, at Ur he received his first call: "Depart from thy land, to a land which I will show thee" (as yet the exact land was not defined). In Haran he received a second call: "Depart from thy father's house unto THE land (Heb., Genesis 12:1( which I will show thee;" and with it a promise, temporal (that God would bless him, and make him founder of a great nation) and spiritual (that in him all families of the earth should be blessed).
The deluge, the revelation to Noah, and the Babel dispersion had failed to counteract the universal tendency to idolatrous apostasy, obliterating every trace of primitive piety. God therefore provided an antidote in separating one family and nation to be the repository of His truth against the fullness of time when it should be revealed to the whole world. From Joshua 24:2; Joshua 24:14-15, it appears Terah and his family served other gods beyond the Euphrates. Silly traditions as to Terah being a maker of idols, and Abraham having been east into a fiery furnace by Nimrod for disbelief in idols, were drawn from this Scripture, and from Ur ("fire"). The second call additionally required that, now when his father was dead and filial duty had been discharged, after the stay of 15 years in Haran, he should leave his father's house, i.e. his brother Nahor's family, in Haran. The call was personally to himself.
He was to be isolated not only from his nation but from his family. Lot, his nephew, accompanied him, being regarded probably as his heir, as the promise of seed and the specification of his exact destination were only by degrees unfolded to him (Hebrews 11:8). Nicolaus of Damascus ascribed to him the conquest of Damascus on his way to Canaan. Scripture records nothing further than that his chief servant was Eliezer of Damascus; he pursued Chedorlaomer to Hobah, on the left of Damascus, subsequently (Genesis 14:15), Abraham entered Canaan along the valley of the Jabbok, and encamped first in the rich Moreh valley, near Sichem, between mounts Ebal and Gerizim. There he received a confirmation of the promise, specifying "this land" as that which the original more general promise pointed to. Here therefore he built his first altar to God. The unfriendly attitude of the Canaanites induced him next to move to the mountain country between Bethel and Ai, where also he built an altar to Jehovah, whose worship was fast passing into oblivion in the world.
Famine led him to Egypt, the granary of the world, next. The record of his unbelieving cowardice there, and virtual lie as to Sarai (See ABIMELECH) is a striking proof of the candor of Scripture. Its heroes' faults are not glossed over; each saint not only falls at times, but is represented as failing in the very grace (e.g. Abraham in faith) for which he was most noted. Probably the Hyksos (akin to the Hebrew), or shepherds' dynasty, reigned then at Memphis, which would make Abraham's visit specially acceptable there. On his return his first visit was to the altar which he had erected to Jehovah before his fall (compare Genesis 13:4 with Hosea 2:7; Revelation 2:5). The greatness of his and Lot's substance prevented their continuing together. The promise of a direct heir too may have influenced Lot, as, no longer being heir, to seek a more fixed home, in the region of Sodom, than he had with Abraham, "dwelling in tents." Contrast the children of the world with the children of God (Hebrews 11:9-10; Hebrews 11:18-16). His third resting place was Mamre, near Hebron ("association", namely, that of Abraham, Mamre, Eshcol, and Aner; next called Kirjath Arba; then it resumed its old name, Hebron, the future capital of Judah). This position, communicating with Egypt, and opening on the pastures of Beersheba, marks the greater power of his retinue now, as compared with what it was when he encamped in the mountain fastness of Ai.
Fourteen years previously Chedorlaomer, king of Elam (the region S. of Assyria, E. of Persia, Susiana), the chief sovereign, with Amrephar of Shinar (Babylon), Arioch of Ellasar (the Chaldean Larissa, or Larsa, half way between Ur, or Mugheir, and Erech, or Warka, in Lower Babylonia), and Tidal, king of nations, attacked Bera of Sodom, Birsha of Gomorrah, Shinab of Admah, and Shemeber of Zeboiim, and the king of Bela or Zoar, because after twelve bears of subordination they "rebelled" (Genesis 14). Babylon was originally the predominant power; but a recently deciphered Assyrian record states that an Elamitie king, Kudur Nakhunta, conquered Babylon 2296 B.C. Kudur Mabuk is called in the inscriptions the "ravager of Syria," so that the Scripture account of Chedorlaomer (from Lagsmar , a goddess, in Semitic; answering to Μabuk in Hamitic) exactly tallies with the monumental inscriptions which call him Αpda martu , "ravager," not conqueror, "of the West." Abraham, with 318 followers, and aided by the Amorite chiefs, Mamre, Eshcol, and Aner, overtook the victorious invaders near Jordan's springs, and attacked them by night from different quarters and routed them, and recovered Lot with all the men and the goods carried off.
His disinterestedness was evinced in refusing any of the goods which Arabian war usage entitled him to, lest the king of worldly Sodom should say, "I have made Abraham rich" (compare Esther 9:15-16; 2 Kings 5:16; contrast Lot, Genesis 13:10-11). Melchizedek, one of the only native princes who still served Jehovah, and was at once king and priest, blessed Abraham in the name of the Most High God, possessor of heaven and earth, and blessed God in Abraham's name, by a beautiful reciprocation of blessing, and ministered to him bread and wine; and Abraham "gave him tithes of all." Immediately after Abraham had refused worldly rewards Jehovah in vision said, "I am ... thy exceeding great reward." The promise now was made more specific: Eliezer shall not be thine heir, but "he that shall come forth out of thine own bowels ... Tell if thou be able to number the stars; so shall thy seed be." His faith herein was called forth to accept what was above nature on the bore word of God; so "it (his faith) was counted to him for righteousness" (Genesis 15).
Hence he passes into direct covenant relation with God, confirmed by the sign of the burning lamp (compare Isaiah 62:1) passing between the divided pieces of a heifer, she goat, and ram, and accompanied by the revelation that his posterity are to be afflicted in a foreign land 400 years, then to come forth and conquer Canaan when the iniquity of the Amorites shall be full. The earthly inheritance was to include the whole region "from the river of Egypt unto the ... river Euphrates," a promise only in part fulfilled under David and Solomon (2 Samuel 8:3; 2 Kings 4:21; 2 Chronicles 9:26). Tyre and Sidon were never conquered; therefore the complete fulfillment remains for the millennial state, when "the meek shall inherit the land," and Psalms 72:8-10 shall be realized; compare Luke 20:37. The taking of Hagar the Egyptian, Sarai's maid, at the suggestion of Sarai, now 75 years old, was a carnal policy to realize the promise in Ishmael.
Family quarreling was the inevitable result, and Hagar fled from Sarai, who dealt hardly with her maid when that maid despised her mistress. Abraham in his 99th year was recalled to the standing of faith by Jehovah's charge, "Walk before Me and be thou perfect" (Genesis 17). God then gave circumcision as seal of the covenant of righteousness by faith, which he had while yet uncircumcised (Romans 4). His name was changed at circumcision from Abram to Abraham (father of many nations), to mark that the covenant was not to include merely his seed after the flesh, the Israelites, but the numerous Gentile nations also, who in his Seed, Christ, should be children of his faith (Galatians 3). Sarai (my princess, or "nobility," Gesenius) became Sarah (princess) no longer queen of one family, but spiritually of all nations (Galatians 3:16). The promise now advances a stage further in explicitness, being definitely assigned to a son to be born of Sarah.
Its temporal blessings Ishmael shall share, but the spiritual and everlasting with the temporal are only to be through Sarah's son. Sarah laughed. more from joy though not without unbelief, as her subsequent laugh and God's rebuke imply (Genesis 18:12-15). Now first, Jehovah, with two ministering angels, reveals Himself and His judicial purposes (Genesis 18) in familiar intercourse with Abraham as "the friend of God" (John 15:15; Psalms 25:14; 2 Chronicles 20:7; James 2:23; Amos 3:7), and accepts his intercession to a very great extent for the doomed cities of the plain. The passionate intercession was probably prompted by feeling for his kinsman Lot, who was in Sodom, for he intercedes only for Sodom, not also for Gomorrah, an undesigned propriety, a mark of genuineness. This epiphany of God contrasts in familiarity with the more distant and solemn manifestations of earlier and later times.
Loving confidence takes the place of instinctive fear, as in man's intercourse with God in Eden; Moses similarly (Exodus 33:11; Numbers 12:8); Peter, James, and John on the mount of transfiguration (Matthew 17). A mile from Hebron stands a massive oak, called "Abraham's oak." His abode was "the oaks of Mamre" (as Genesis 18:1 ought to be translated, not "plains".) A terebinth tree was supposed in Josephus' time to mark the spot. It stood within the enclosure, "Abraham's house." Isaac's birth, beyond nature, the type of Him whose name is Wonderful (Luke 1:35-37, and contrast Mary's joy with Sarah's half incredulous laugh and Zacharias' unbelief, Luke 1:38; Luke 1:45-47; Luke 1:20), was the first grand earnest of the promise. Ishmael's expulsion, though painful to the father who clung to him (Genesis 17:18), was needed to teach Abraham that all ties must give way to the one great end. The full spiritual meaning of it, but faintly revealed to Abraham, appears in Galatians 4:22-31.
When Isaac was 25 years old the crowning trial whereby Abraham's. faith was perfected took place (James 2:21-23). Still it was his faith, not his work, which was "imputed to him for righteousness"; but the faith that justified him was evinced, by his offering at God's command his son, to be not a dead but a living "faith that works by love." Paul's doctrine is identical with James's (1 Corinthians 13:2; Galatians 5:6). The natural feelings of the father, the divine promise specially attached to Isaac, born out of due time and beyond nature, a promise which seemed impossible to be fulfilled if Isaac were slain, the divine command against human bloodshedding (Genesis 9:5-6), —all might well perplex him. But it was enough for him that God had commanded; his faith obeyed, leaving confidently the solution of the perplexities to God, "accounting that God was able to raise Isaac even from the dead" (Hebrews 11:19), "from whence he received him in a figure." The "figure" was: Isaac's death (in Abraham's intention) and rescue from it (2 Corinthians 1:9-10) vividly represented Christ's death and resurrection on the "third" day (Genesis 22:4).
The ram's substitution represented Christ's vicarious death: it was then that Abraham saw Christ's day and was glad (John 8:56). The scene was Moriah (i.e. chosen by Jehovah); others suppose Moreh, three days' journey from Beersheba. His faith was rewarded by the original promises being now confirmed by Jehovah's oath by Himself (Hebrews 6:13; Hebrews 6:17); and his believing reply to his son, "God will provide Himself a lamb," received its lasting commemoration in the name of that place, Jehovah Jireh, "the Lord will provide." His giving up his only and well beloved son (by Sarah) typifies the Father's not sparing the Only Begotten Son who is in the bosom of the Father, in order that He might spare us. Sarah died at Kirjath Arba, whither Abraham had returned from Beersheba. The only possession he got, and that, by purchase from the Hittites, was a burying place for Sarah, the cave of Machpelah, said to be under the mosque of Hebron.
His care that he and his should be utterly separated from idolatry appears in his strict charge to Eliezer as to the choice of Isaac's wife, not to take a Canaanite woman nor yet to bring his son back to Abraham's original home. Abraham being left alone at Isaac's marriage, and having his youthful vigor renewed at Isaac's generation, married Keturah. The children by her, Midian and others, he sent away, lest they should dispute the inheritance with Isaac after his death. He died at 175 years, Isaac and Ishmael joining to bury him beside Sarah. Through his descendants, the Arabs, Israelites, and descendants of Midian, "children of the East," Abraham's name is still widely known in Asia. As "father of the faithful," who left home and all at the call of God, to be a sojourner in tents, he typifies Him who at the Father's call left His own heaven to be a homeless stranger on earth, and to sacrifice Himself, the unspeakably precious Lamb, for us: "the Word tabernacled Greek John 1:14 among us."
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Abraham
Genesis 24:2 (c) In this passage Abraham is a type of the Father who sent His servant (the Spirit) to obtain a bride (Rebecca) for his son Isaac. The servant represents the Holy Spirit, and Isaac represents the Lord JESUS CHRIST. Of course, Abraham represents GOD the Father. Rebecca. represents the Church. The Holy Spirit knocks at the heart's door, tells of the loveliness, the riches and the glory of the Son of GOD, and thus wins the stranger and makes him willing to leave his old haunts and companions to live for and with JESUS CHRIST, the Son.
Romans 4:3 (c) He is a type of the true believer from the standpoint of "faith."
He was called out of idolatry by GOD, and so are we.
He took the path of separation, and so should we.
He obeyed GOD, and walked in a path of obedience, as we should do.
He believed GOD about the "seed" (CHRIST), so do we.
He was made righteous through believing in CHRIST. So are we.
GOD revealed His secrets to Abraham, the man of faith, and so He does today to those who believe His Word.
Abraham was the father of the faithful, and we too who believe GOD should have spiritual children who have faith as we have.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Abraham
(uhb ra haym) Personal name meaning, “father of a multitude.” The first Hebrew patriarch, he became known as the prime example of faith. He was the son of Terah, a descendant of Noah's son, Shem. (Genesis 11:27 ). His childhood was spent in Ur of the Chaldees, a prominent Sumerian city. He was known at the beginning as Abram (“father is exalted”), but this was changed subsequently to Abraham (“father of a multitude”) (Genesis 17:5 ).
Terah, his father, moved to Haran with the family (Genesis 11:31 ) and after some years died there. God called Abram to migrate to Canaan, assuring him that he would father a vast nation. At different times he lived in Shechem, Bethel, Hebron, and Beer-sheba. His wife Sarai's beauty attracted the pharaoh when they moved to Egypt during a famine (Genesis 12:10 ), but God intervened to save her. The trouble arose partly because Abram had claimed her as his sister rather than his wife, and in fact she was his half-sister (Genesis 20:12 ). After returning to Palestine, Abram received further covenantal assurances from God (Genesis 15:1 ). He decided he could produce offspring by taking Sarai's handmaid Hagar as a concubine. Though the union produced a son, Ishmael, he was not destined to become Abram's promised heir. Even after another covenantal assurance (Genesis 17:1-21 ) in which the rite of circumcision was made a covenantal sign, Abram and Sarai still questioned God's promise of an heir.
Then Sarai, whose name had been changed to Sarah (“princess”), had her long-promised son, Isaac (“laughter”), when Abraham was 100 years old. Ishmael's presence caused trouble in the family, and he was expelled with his mother Hagar to the wilderness of Paran. Abraham's faith and obedience were tested by God in Moriah when he was commanded to sacrifice Isaac. God provided an alternative sacrifice, however, saving the boy's life. As a reward for Abraham's faithfulness, God renewed the covenant promises of great blessing and the growth of a mighty nation to father and son.
Subsequently, Sarah died and was buried in the cave of Machpelah (Genesis 23:19 ), after which Abraham sought a bride for Isaac. A woman named Rebekah was obtained from Abraham's relatives in Mesopotamia, and Isaac married her gladly (Genesis 24:67 ). In old age Abraham remarried and had further children, finally dying aged 175 years. Abraham recognized God as the almighty Lord of all and the Author of a covenant by which the Hebrews would become a mighty nation. God Himself was known subsequently as the God of Abraham (Exodus 3:6 ). Through him God had revealed His plan for human salvation (Exodus 2:24 ). The promises to Abraham became assurance for future generations (Exodus 32:13 ; Exodus 33:1 ). Abraham became known as “God's friend forever” (2 Chronicles 20:7 ).
John showed that descent from Abraham did not guarantee salvation (Matthew 3:9 ). See Romans 9:1 . Indeed, foreigners would join him in the kingdom (Matthew 8:11 ). Compare Luke 16:23-30 . Lost sons of Abraham, Jesus invited to salvation (Luke 19:9 ). True children of Abraham do the works of Abraham (John 8:39 ).
For Paul Abraham was the great example of faith (Romans 4:1 ; Galatians 3:1 ). In Hebrews Abraham provided the model for tithing (Hebrews 7:1 ) and played a prominent role in the roll call of faith (Hebrews 11:1 ). James used Abraham to show that justification by faith is proved in works (James 3:21-24 ).
R. K. Harrison
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Anquetil-Duperron, Abraham Hyacinthe
Catholic philologist. Born 1731; died 1805. Journeyed to India to study the language of the Parsees and wrote the first translation of the Avesta.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Abraham
Father of a great multitude
Webster's Dictionary - Abraham-Man
(n.) Alt. of Abram-man
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Abraham
(Hebrew: father of a multitude).
Patriarch, son of Thare and father of Ismael. He left Ur of the Chaldees and came to Haran, where his father died. At the command of God he took up his abode in Chanaan, the land promised to his seed. Famine forced him to Egypt. On his return, he remained in Chanaan whilst Lot chose the country about the Jordan. He rescued Lot, when taken prisoner by the King of Elam, and on his return was met by Melchisedech, King of Salem, who blessed him. God made a covenant with Abraham, changing his name from Abram to Abraham and promised him that his descendants should be as numerous as the stars of heaven. He promised him, moreover, a son by the barren Sara. Then followed the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrha, the escape of Lot, the birth of Isaac, and the covenant with Abimelech. The faith of Abraham is tried by God's command to sacrifice his son Isaac. An angel stays. his hand, and as a reward of his unbounded confidence in God, makes known to him the greatness of his posterity. Sara died at the age of 127. Abraham then married Cetura by whom he had six children. He died at the age of 175.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Abraham
ABRAHAM . Abram and Abraham are the two forms in which the name of the first patriarch was handed down in Hebrew tradition. The change of name recorded in Genesis 17:5 (P [1] ) is a harmonistic theory, which involves an impossible etymology, and cannot be regarded as historical. Of Abraham no better explanation has been suggested than that it is possibly a dialectic or orthographic variation of Abram , which in the fuller forms Abirâm and Aburamu is found as a personal name both in Heb. and Babylonian. The history of Abraham ( Genesis 11:27 to Genesis 25:18 ) consists of a number of legendary narratives, which have been somewhat loosely strung together into a semblance of biographical continuity. These narratives (with the exception of ch. 14, which is assigned to a special source) are apportioned by critics to the three main documents of Genesis, J [2] , E [3] , and P [1] ; and the analysis shows that the biographic arrangement is not due solely to the compiler of the Pent., but existed in the separate sources. In them we can recognize, amidst much diversity, the outlines of a fairly solid and consistent tradition, which may be assumed to have taken shape at different centres, such as the sanctuaries of Hebron and Beersheba.
1 . The account of J [2] opens with the Divine call to Abraham, in obedience to which he separates himself from his kindred and migrates to Canaan ( Genesis 12:1-8 ).
In the proper Jahwistic tradition the starting-point of the Exodus was Harran in Mesopotamia, but in Genesis 11:28 ff. (cf. Genesis 15:7 ) we find combined with this another view, according to which Abraham came from Ur of the Chaldees in S. Babylonia. In passing we may note the remarkable fact that both traditions alike connect the patriarch with famous centres of Babylonian moon-worship.
Arrived in Canaan, Abraham builds altars at Shechem, where he receives the first promise of the land, and Bethel, where the separation from Lot takes place; after which Abraham resumes his southern journey and takes up his abode at Hebron (ch. 13). This connexion is broken in Genesis 12:10-20 by the episode of Abraham’s sojourn in Egypt, which probably belongs to an older stratum of Jahwistic tradition representing him as leading a nomadic life in the Negeb. To the same cycle we may assign the story of Hagar’s flight and the prophecy regarding Ishmael, in ch. 16; here, too, the home of Abraham is apparently located in the Negeb. In ch. 18 we find Abraham at Hebron, where in a theophany he receives the promise of a son to be born to Sarah, and also an intimation of the doom impending over the guilty cities of the Plain. The destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, and the deliverance of Lot, are graphically described in ch. 19, which closes with an account of the shameful origins of Moab and Ammon. Passing over some fragmentary notices in ch. 21, which have been amalgamated with the fuller narrative of E [3] , we come to the last scene of J [2] ’s record, the mission of Abraham’s servant to seek a bride for Isaac, told with such dramatic power in ch. 24. It would seem that the death of Abraham, of which J [2] ’s account has nowhere been preserved, must have taken place before the servant returned. A note is appended in Genesis 25:1 ff. as to the descent of 16 Arabian tribes from Abraham and Keturah.
2 . Of E [3] ’s narrative the first traces appear in ch. 15, a composite and difficult chapter, whose kernel probably belongs rather to this document than to J [2] . In its present form it narrates the renewal to Abraham of the two great promises on which his faith rested the promise of a seed and of the land of Canaan and the confirmation of the latter by an impressive ceremony in which God entered into a covenant with the patriarch. The main body of Elohistic tradition, however. Is found in chs. 20 22. We have here a notice of Abraham’s arrival in the Negeb, followed by a sojourn in Gerar, where Sarah’s honour is compromised by the deliberate concealment of the fact that she is married (ch. 20) a variant form of the Jahwistic legend of Genesis 12:10-20 . The expulsion of Hagar, recorded in Genesis 21:9-21 , is an equally obvious parallel to J [2] ’s account of the flight of Hagar in ch. 16, although in E [3] the incident follows, while in J [2] it precedes, the births of both Ishmael and Isaac. The latter part of ch. 21 is occupied with the narrative of Abraham’s adventures in the Negeb especially his covenant with Abimelech of Gerar which leads up to the consecration of the sanctuary of Beersheba to the worship of Jahweh. Here the narrative has been supplemented by extracts from a Jahwistic recension of the same tradition. To E [3] , finally, we are indebted for the fascinating story of the sacrifice of Isaac in ch. 22, which may be fairly described as the gem of this collection.
3 . In P [1] , the biography of Abraham is mostly reduced to a chronological epitome, based on the narrative of J [2] , and supplying some gaps left by the compiler in the older document. There are just two places where the meagre chronicle expands into elaborately circumstantial description. The first is the account, in ch. 17, of the institution of circumcision as the sign of the covenant between God and Abraham, round which are gathered all the promises which in the earlier documents are connected with various experiences in the patriarch’s life. The second incident is the purchase of the cave of Machpelah after the death of Sarah, recorded at great length in ch. 23: this is peculiar to P [1] , and was evidently of importance to that writer as a guarantee of Israel’s perpetual tenure of the land of Canaan.
4 . Such is, in outline, the history of Abraham as transmitted through the recognized literary channels of the national tradition. We have yet to mention an episode, concerning which there is great diversity of opinion, the story of Abraham’s victory over the four kings, and his interview with Melchizedek, in ch. 14. It is maintained by some that this chapter hears internal marks of authenticity not possessed by the rest of the Abrahamic tradition, and affords a firm foothold for the belief that Abraham is a historic personage of the 3rd millennium b.c., contemporary with Hammurabi (Amraphel?) of Babylon ( c [18] . 2300). Others take a diametrically opposite view, holding that it is a late Jewish romance, founded on imperfectly understood data derived from cuneiform sources. The arguments on either side cannot he given here; it must suffice to remark that, even if convincing proof of the historicity of ch. 14 could be produced, it would still he a question whether that judgment could be extended to the very different material of the undisputed Hebrew tradition. It is much more important to inquire what is the historical value of the tradition which lies immediately behind the more popular narratives in which the religious significance of Abraham’s character is expressed. That these are history in the strict sense of the word is a proposition to which no competent scholar would assent. They are legends which had circulated orally for an indefinite time, and had assumed varied forms, before they were collected and reduced to writing. The only question of practical moment is whether the legends have clustered round the name of a historic personality, the leader of an immigration of Aramæan tribes into Palestine, and at the same time the recipient of a new revelation of God which prepared the way for the unique religious history and mission of Israel. It cannot be said that this view of Abraham has as yet obtained any direct confirmation from discoveries in Assyriology or archæology, though it is perhaps true that recent developments of these sciences render the conception more intelligible than it formerly was. And there is nothing, either in the tradition itself or in our knowledge of the background against which it is set, that is inconsistent with the supposition that to the extent just indicated the figure of Abraham is historical. If it be the essence of legend, as distinct from myth, that it originates in the impression made by a commanding personality on his contemporaries, we may well believe that the story of Abraham, bearing as it does the stamp of ethical character and individuality, is a true legend, and therefore has grown up around some nucleus of historic fact.
5 . From the religious point of view, the life of Abraham has a surprising inner unity as a record of the progressive trial and strengthening of faith. It is a life of unclouded earthly prosperity, broken by no reverse of fortune; yet it is rooted in fellowship with the unseen. ‘He goes through life,’ it has been well said, ‘listening for the true tôrâ , which is not shut up in formal precepts, but revealed from time to time to the conscience; and this leaning upon God’s word is declared to be in Jahweh’s sight a proof of genuine righteousness.’ He is the Father of the faithful, and the Friend of God. And that inward attitude of spirit is reflected in a character of singular loftiness and magnanimity, an unworldly and disinterested disposition which reveals no moral struggle, but is nevertheless the fruit of habitual converse with God. The few narratives which present the patriarch in a less admirable light only throw into bolder relief those ideal features of character in virtue of which Abraham stands in the pages of Scripture as one of the noblest types of Hebrew piety.
J. Skinner.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Abraham Ortelius
Catholic geographer and cartographer, born Antwerp, Holland, April 14, 1527; died there 1598. In 1564 he published an eight-leaved map of the world, which was followed in 1570 by the first great modern atlas, his Theatrum orbis terrarum, containing an index of ancient and modern place names. He also compiled a valuable list of cartographers and their works, and in 1587 published a still useful dictionary of old geography.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Abraham Anquetil-Duperron
Catholic philologist. Born 1731; died 1805. Journeyed to India to study the language of the Parsees and wrote the first translation of the Avesta.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Abraham Men
Name given in contempt in Reformation days to the poor who were forced to wander and beg alms after the dissolution of the monasteries in England, originating probably from the Gospel parable of Lazarus, the poor man received into Abraham's bosom.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Abraham de Georgiis And Companions
Syrian martyrs in Mazua, Abyssinia, April 30, 1595; cause opened, 30 Janunary 1899.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Abraham in Liturgy
The patriarch Abraham is specifically mentioned in the Roman Martyrology (October 9,); in the Litany for the Dying; in the Breviary, at Quinquagesima, Shrove Tuesday, Passion Sunday, and in the Magnificat, Benedictus and Psaltery; in the Missal, in the third Prophecy on Holy Saturday, Epistle of the thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost, Offertory of the Mass for the Dead, blessing in a Nuptial Mass, and in the Canon of the Mass; in the Pontifical, in the preface of the consecration of an altar, blessing of a cemetery, and blessing and coronation of a king.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Abraham
See Abram
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Abraham
Son of Terah and grandson of Nahor, the seventh descendant from Shem. His name was at first ABRAM, 'father of elevation;' but was altered by God into ABRAHAM, 'father of a multitude.' In this name (Abraham) the blessing of the Gentiles is secured by God. The family dwelt in Ur of the Chaldees, and were idolaters. Joshua 24:2 . Abraham was the first to receive a definite call from God to leave not only the idolatrous nation to which his ancestors belonged, but to leave his kindred and his father's house and to go into a land that God would show him. God would bless him and make him a blessing, and bless all who blessed him and would curse all who cursed him. Genesis 12:1-3 . He thus became the depositary of God's promise and blessing. Abraham at first only partially obeyed the call: he left Ur and went to dwell at Haran, in Mesopotamia (Charran in Acts 7:4 ), but with his father and kindred; and did not enter Canaan until the death of his father. When in the land God promised that unto his seed He would give the land. Abraham built an altar, and called upon the name of Jehovah. A famine occurring in the land Abraham went to sojourn in Egypt, and for want of faith he called Saraihis sister and she was taken into the house of Pharaoh, but the Lord protected her, and Abraham with his wife was sent away with a rebuke. When near Bethel he could again call on the name of the Lord. He had now become so rich in cattle that disputes arose between his herdsmen and those of Lot, and Abraham asked Lot to choose where he would sojourn, if he went to the right Abraham would go to the left; and they separated. Again Jehovah declared that as far as Abraham's eye could reach in all directions the land should belong to his seed. The next recorded event is that Lot was taken prisoner and carried to the north. Abraham pursued the enemy and recovered all. He refused to take even a thread of the spoil from the king of Sodom: he would not be made rich from such a source; but he was blessed by Melchisedec, king of Salem, the priest of the most high God, who brought forth bread and wine: to whom Abraham gave tenths of all. See MELCHISEDEC. God now revealed Himself to Abraham as His shield and exceeding great reward.
When Abraham lamented to God that he had no son, God declared that he should have a son, and that his seed should be as the stars of the heaven for multitude. Abraham believed God, and it was counted to him for righteousness. This is the first time that faith is spoken of. Still he asked whereby should he know that his seed should possess the land, and was told to take a heifer, a she goat, and a ram, all of three years old, a turtle dove and a young pigeon. These he divided in the midst, except the birds, and laid them one against another. When the sun went down a smoking furnace and a burning lamp passed between the pieces: type of the fire that consumes the dross, and a light for the path. The same day God made a covenant with Abraham that to his seed should the land be given from the river of Egypt to the great river Euphrates : cf. Jeremiah 34:18,19 : it had been ratified in death, a type of Christ. When Abraham had fallen into a deep sleep, he was informed that his seed should be in a strange land, and be afflicted 400 years. Genesis 15 See ISRAEL IN EGYPT.
Abraham had believed that God would give him a son, but now he waits not God's time, and at Sarai's suggestion he associates with Hagar, a bondmaid, and Ishmael is born, Genesis 16 . — a figure of the law, that is, man's attempt to possess the blessing by his own effort.
God now reveals Himself to Abraham as 'the almighty God,' a name which signifies that all resource is in God Himself. 'God talked with him,' and made a covenant with him according to that name. It is now that his name is changed from Abram, because he was to be a father of many nations. Abraham was to walk before the Almighty God and be perfect, and was to keep the covenant by having all the males circumcised (a figure of no confidence in the flesh), which he at once put into practice. Sarai's s name was altered to Sarah, for she was to be a princess and should have a son.
Abraham entertained three visitors: on two leaving him the third is spoken of as the Lord who asks, "shall I hide from Abraham the thing which I do?" According to John 15:14,15 , this gives the key to Abraham being called "the friend of God." 2 Chronicles 20:7 ; Isaiah 41:8 ; James 2:23 . God opened His mind to him, and Abraham was emboldened to plead for the righteous in Sodom.
Abraham's faith again fails him and at Gerar he once more calls Sarah his sister, which might have led to sin had not God protected her, and Abraham is again rebuked.
Isaac is born, and conflict ensues between that which is a type of the flesh and the Spirit: Hagar and her son Ishmael are cast out. Genesis 21 : cf. Galatians 4:22-31 . God then tried the faith of Abraham by telling him to offer up his son Isaac for a burnt offering. Abraham obeyed, and, but for the intervention of the angel of the Lord, would have killed his son, believing "that God was able to raise him up even from the dead." After the death and resurrection in figure of Isaac, the unconditional promise is confirmed to Abraham that in his seed — which is Christ — should all the nations of the earth be blessed. Genesis 22:18 ; Galatians 3:14-18 . If any are Christ's, they are Abraham's seed, and heirs according to promise. Galatians 3:29 . The promise is sure to all the seed, "not only to that which is of the law, but to that also which is of the faith of Abraham, who is the father of us all." Romans 4:16 .
Abraham was by faith so much a stranger (Hebrews 11:9 ) that, on the death of Sarah, he had to buy a piece of ground of the children of Heth, to secure a sepulchre in the land. Genesis 23 . He was so careful that Isaac should not marry one of the daughters of the Canaanites that he sent his servant (Eliezer perhaps) to his own kindred to seek a bride for Isaac, being convinced that God would send His angel and prosper the mission, which resulted in Rebecca being the wife of Isaac. Genesis 24 .
Abraham had another wife, Keturah, and concubines by whom he had sons; but to these he gave gifts and sent them eastward, so that Isaac and his seed might peacefully dwell in the promised land. Abraham died at the age of 175, and was buried with Sarah.
The history of Abraham in Genesis divides itself into three parts. a. Genesis 12 - 14., his public walk and testimony as called of God. b. Genesis 15 - 21., his private and domestic history with God, illustrating the growth of soul, etc. c. Genesis 22 - 25. give in type a prophetical outline of events: namely, the sacrifice of Christ; the setting aside of Israel for a time; the call of the bride; and the final settlement of the nations in blessing in the end of the days.
The nation of Israel was descended from Abraham, and we know how zealously they contended for the relationship, though alas, they had not and have not the same faith. Still the land was given to them, and when God's set time comes they will surely be brought back to their 'fatherland' and after trial and discipline will be blessed therein.
Abraham being the father of Ishmael and the other sons sent into the East it is not to be wondered at that he is a personage of universal fame in that immense quarter of the world, and that there are numerous traditions concerning him. It can hardly be doubted that their relationship to Abraham will yet be found in their favour during the millennium when the promise that his seed should be 'as the sand of the sea shore' will have its fulfilment.
To the Christian the life of this patriarch is worthy of the deepest attention, in view of the varied manifestations whereby God revealed Himself to him, whether in the formation of his character under those manifestations, or in the Christian's connections with him in the way of faith, or with respect to the unconditional promises made to him as to the possession of the land of Palestine both in the past and in the future.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Abraham
ABRAHAM MY FRIEND
I DID not know before that God had ever needed a friend. I did not know, I could not have believed, that any mortal man could possibly have befriended Almighty God. I need a friend. I need companionship. I need advice and counsel and correction. I need to be cheered and comforted. I often feel lonely. I often despond. I often miss my way in life. I often commit myself to rash, ill-considered, and irretrievable steps. I often hurt both myself and other men with me. And, therefore, I need near me a faithful friend. A friend to speak to me in time, and with wisdom, and with both sympathy and encouragement. A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity. And there is a friend that sticketh closer than a brother. Faithful are the wounds of such a friend. Ointment and perfume rejoice the heart: so doth the sweetness of a man's friend by hearty counsel. Iron sharpeneth iron: and so doth a man sharpen the countenance of his friend. Bacon needed a friend. The principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness of the heart. You may take sarza to open the liver, steel to open the spleen, flower of sulphur for the lungs, castoreum for the brain; but no receipt openeth the heart but a true friend-a true friend to whom you may impart griefs, joys, fears, hopes, suspicions, counsels, and whatsoever lieth upon the heart to oppress it. And our own Edward Irving, a great student of Bacon, often sorely needed a wise friend, as we see in his sad life and read in his superb sermons. The great office of a friend is to try our thoughts by the measure of his judgments; to task the wholesomeness of our designs and purposes by the feelings of his heart; to protect us from the solitary and selfish part of our nature; to speak to and to call out those finer and better parts of our nature which the customs of this world stifle; and to open up to us a career worthy of our powers. 'Now,' adds the most eloquent of all our Presbyterian preachers, 'as every man hath these four attributes-infirmity of judgment, selfishness of disposition, inactivity and inertness of nature, and adversity of fortune,-so every man needeth the help of a friend, and should do his endeavour to get one.' For all these four attributes Solomon needed a friend, and Bacon, and Irving, and you, and I,-but, surely, not God. And yet it stands written out in more scriptures than one that Almighty God endeavoured to get a true friend in Abraham, and got one.
Now, of no mortal man but of Abraham alone does Almighty God ever speak and say, He was My friend. God employs many gracious, beautiful, and endearing names in speaking of the patriarchs, and prophets, and psalmists, and other saints of His in Israel; but it is of Abraham alone that God testifies to Israel and says, Thou art the seed of Abraham, My friend. Now, I wonder if we can get at what was in the Divine Mind, and at what He put into the prophet's mind in that so remarkable and unparalleled expression. Can we put our finger on anything in Abraham's life and say, Here, and here, and here, that wonderful man proved himself to be the friend of God? We have only a few short chapters to cover the long life of Abraham. I wonder shall we find enough in those chapters to satisfy us why Isaiah, and James, and then why both Jew and Mussulman and Christian, all unite in calling Abraham what they call no other man-the friend of God? Let us try.
Well then, we see this, to begin with, that God appeared and asked of Abram a service; a kind of service, and an amount and a degree of service, that He has never needed to ask the like of it again of any other man, if we except the Man Christ Jesus. God had for long-from the fall-been looking out for some man with mind enough and with heart enough to be made the father and the founder of a family into which He could send His Son. God promised His Son to Adam and Eve; but generations and generations had to pass before the fulness of time came. And all those successive generations had to be filled with all that with which our Bible is filled from Genesis to the Gospels. And the foundations of all that had first to be laid in some elect, called, believing, obedient, godly-minded, heavenly-minded man. Only, where was the man to be found who had all the qualifications needful for this supreme post? The long-looked-for man was found at last in Abram, Terah's choice son, in Ur of the Chaldees. To Terah's son, first of all good men on the face of the earth, was God able to say, Get thee out of thy kindred; walk before Me, and be thou perfect. And Abram believed God. Abram believed God with such a depth, and with such a strength, and with such a promptitude, and with such a perseverance that by Abram's faith the foundations of the whole Church of God on earth and in heaven were laid in him. No doubt, the beginning and the middle and the end of that friendship was all in God. No doubt, Abram would have protested against, and would have repudiated the name of friend of God with fear and with shame. But that does not alter the fact. It is still God's way to impute to us what He docs for us: and to reward us for what we let Him do in us. God works in us both to will and to do; but, at the same time, He holds that we work out our own salvation. And so it was in the beginning of His ways with Abraham. God chose Abraham, and called him, and blessed him. But at the same time, God always has made much of the fact that Abraham had the mind and the heart to do what he did both for God and for all the families of the earth. And that immense venture of faith and of love on the part of Abraham, to call it a venture, was so original, so unheard of, and so full of all the great qualities of a godly heart and a heavenly life, that Abraham has ever since been called, not only the father of the faithful, but also the foremost and topmost friend of God. You understand, then, and will take home the lesson. Abraham had the heart to choose, and to prefer, and to venture for God, and for the will and the call of God, before everything else in this world. Abraham immediately, unquestioningly, cheerfully, joyfully arose and went out to do and to be all that God had asked him to do and had promised him to be. Till, as Butler has it, God justified Abraham's taste, and supported his cause, and acknowledged and claimed him as His friend: him, and his seed after him.
Edward Irving says that it is part of the office and service of a true friend to call out, and to prepare a scope for those finer feelings of the heart which are chilled and driven back upon the heart in this cold, distrustful, selfish world. Now, if that is true, and if God's heart and our hearts are in the same image in that also; if His heart also is chilled and shut up within itself in this same selfish world; then Abraham's so pressing intercession for Sodom was the part of a true friend to God. Humanly speaking, Sodom and Gomorrah would have been destroyed, and God's heart which was so full of answer to intercessory prayer would never have been discovered, had it not been for Abraham's so friendly part performed that day both to God and to the doomed cities of the plain. And while Abraham was seeking first his own ends and the ends of the two cities in his persevering prayer, he was at the same time without knowing it serving God's greatest ends still more. For God's greatest ends always are that His great Name may be known; His great grace helped down and experienced; and His great heart drawn out to all its depth; and that, too, by persevering and importunate prayer. You are a good man's best friend when you provide him with, and press upon him, opportunity upon opportunity of doing good. And Abraham was the opportune and importunate friend of the Hearer of Prayer when he said, Peradventure, and peradventure, and peradventure, and peradventure, and again, peradventure, and when God in friendly answer reduced the price of Sodom from fifty righteous men to ten. And the Lord went His way as soon as He had left communing with Abraham; and Abraham returned to his place.
Honest Joseph Hall counts up ten trials of Abraham's faith and friendship through which God saw good to pass His friend. And the last of the ten was more terrible to Abraham than all the rest taken together. If any of you is a father, and has a son of your old age; a son of much faith and of much prayer on your part, and of much pure miracle on God's part; then add to that, that your only son is the one and only instrument and chosen vessel of all God's remaining promises to you: and then, that he lies at the point of death. I do not add that he is to die under your hand like Isaac. I only add that he is to die with your consent and surrender and approval. If any of you that is a father or a mother has, or has had, a child like that, then you are the seed of Abraham, the friend of God. For, how you lay all night on the earth before God. How you would neither eat bread nor drink water. How you pleaded and promised and protested; how you vowed and swore and despaired. Then you will know something of how God did tempt Abraham. I do not understand this dark dispensation of God-all the seed of Abraham are often compelled to say. All is dark as midnight to me. Why should my dear, pure, inoffensive, so indispensable, and so promising son be taken away from me in the bloom of his beautiful youth? But God knows. God gave him, and it is God's place to take him when He pleases. I do not understand it. But God's understanding is infinite and unfathomable, and He does nothing of caprice, or of arrogance, or of hard-heartedness, or of oversight, or of neglect. And, when I come to myself, and think of it, if I had ten sons, and all of them were Isaacs, I would build the ten altars with my own hand. In His will is my tranquillity of mind, and my strength of heart, and my submission, and my obedience-so all Abraham's seed are called on and are enabled to say.
Abraham withheld not Isaac from his Friend on one of the mountains of Moriah; and in the same country, two thousand years after, God was not to be outdone by Abraham in the seal of His friendship to Abraham and to his seed for ever. And the bare mention of that brings God, and His friendship to us and our friendship to Him, two thousand miles nearer us and two thousand miles more possible to us than Abraham's too splendid faith and too wonderful love. With all that has been said I have difficulty in believing what has been said. No; not exactly in believing it, but in what we call realising it. For all that we have read and heard in Abraham's history,-that any mortal man should be able to befriend Almighty God, still remains a very startling thing to say about Almighty God. But not about Jesus Christ. We could have befriended Him ourselves. And I think, nay, I feel sure, we would have done it too. Multitudes of men and women who were as weak and as evil and as unbelieving as we are, will be led out at the last day to receive the thanks of the Father because they befriended His friendless Son. The women of Galilee who ministered to Him of their substance will be brought forward; Martha will be brought forward, and the woman at the well; the owner of the ass's colt, and the owner of the upper room, and the owner of Gethsemane; Simon the Cyrenian also, who helped Him to carry His cross; the soldier also who gave Him some of his vinegar to drink; and Joseph of Arimathea, and Nicodemus, and the women with their spices, and the angel who rolled away the stone. O!-you start up and exclaim: O! if my lot had only been cast in Galilee, or in Samaria, or in Judea, or in Jerusalem! O! you cry, how you envy the men and the women to whom the Father will say, Inasmuch as ye did it to Him, ye did it to Me! But, as you still cry that, this scripture comes up into my mind. You will remember it when I repeat it: 'Ye are My friends if ye do whatsoever I command you.' And again: 'Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.' And again, in the same kind: 'Henceforth I call you not servants, but I have called you friends.' And then, to His Father, this: 'Neither pray I for these alone, but for them also which shall believe on Me through their word.' Well then, we do not need, we have no temptation now, to challenge the wisdom and the love that cast our lot two thousand years after Christ; as the same wisdom and love cast Abraham's lot two thousand years before Christ. Abraham believed the word of the Lord in his day; and if we believe in our day through the word of the disciples, then are we Abraham's seed, and need envy neither Abraham our father nor any of our brethren. Abraham laid down his life and the life of Isaac at the call of God. And Jesus Christ, Son of God, and Son of Abraham, laid down His life at the same call. But our call, our first call, is not yet to lay down our life, but to take Him as our Friend who has laid down His life for ours. Now, what do you all say to that? Are you His friends on that footing? A friend gives full scope to his friend's love and goodness. Have you given Jesus Christ full scope to His life and death for you? Has this Man laid down His life for you? He has, if you have ever asked Him to do it. He has if you have ever come up to His cross and said over Him, He gave Himself here for me. He has, if you have ever said, I lay my sin and my death on Jesus Christ. Did it ever come to this terrible pass with you, your life or His? And how did that terrible pass end? When was it? Where was it? How long ago was it? When did it take place last? Has it taken place today? Is it taking place every day? Then you need envy neither Abraham nor any other man. Your day is the best of days for you. Your call is the best of calls for you. And you will be brought forward among the very first and the very best as that sinner who has adorned the doctrines of the death of Christ, and of the heart of God to sinners, as no other sinner has done from Abraham's day to the day of judgment. Does that amazing Man still stand offering me His death for me, and His living and everlasting friendship to boot? Then, this moment; then, in this house, and on the spot, I am His friend, and He is my friend.
All that is most commendable to speak, and most consoling to hear. It is very blessed to speak and to hear about Christ and His friendship to death in the sanctuary tonight; but it will all die out of our hearts in the shop, in the office, in the kitchen, in the drawing-room, and in the dining-room tomorrow. So it will. But, then, that is not all that our Lord says about how we are to make friends with Him, and to keep up that friendship. He is very practical and matter-of-fact in His friendship. 'Ye are My friends,' he goes on to say, 'if ye do whatsoever I command you.' Well then, take the thing by that handle. Try that door. Strike up, and keep up, the friendship on that plain, pedestrian footing. You cannot attain to His cross, you complain. His blood is too remote, too transcendental, too, somehow, spiritual, and too altogether heavenly for you. I wonder at you. But let that pass. Try this commonplace way. Do this and that which He commands you to do, and you will be as much-ay, and more, His friend than if you preached and prayed and praised His blood and righteousness day and night, and did nothing else. Do this for one thing that He so pointedly commands. Shut your door tonight. And if you have no door to call your own, yet you have a heart with doors. Enter your heart, then, and pray to your Father, whose true temple is the praying man's heart. And see if He does not one day tell all the world who took His Son in earnest, and who did not. O, how easy on that footing is the friendship of God! O, how impossible it is to get past it! And then, do this tomorrow-tomorrow when the lights shall all be out in the church, and when the preacher's voice shall be silent, and when the Chaldeas and the Sodoms and the Egypts of this world shall have all men's choices and friendships-do this. God has the day prepared, and has filled it full for this purpose. All tomorrow love your enemies, and your rivals-that is to say, try to do it. Work at it. Enter into the strait gate of it. Bless them that curse you. Do good to them, and to their wives and children, who hate you, with, or without cause. Ye are My friends, says the Son of God, if ye do that. Then, again, if you are a father with a sick son, or a son in a sudden accident; or a son who has not succeeded at school, or at college, or in life; or a son who has brought grey hairs here and there upon you, till all men mark it. How you deal with that son of yours will prove, or will disprove, you a friend of God as much and as surely as if your name had been Abraham, and your son's name Isaac. Or, if God needs you or your son to go abroad on any mission of His, as He needed Abraham, then go. Be like noble old Terah, go half the way with your elect and expatriated son, till God arises out of His place and comes to meet you, and says to you-As sure as I live, all the land on which thou standest will I give to thee and to thy seed with thee, because thou hast not withheld thyself or thy son from Me. Or, if it is this. If there is a famine of bread and water where corn and wine had been promised and expected; or if the laughters and the shouts of baptized children are silent where they would have been as the voices of God's angels to you,-what then? Then thy God will descend into thine heart, and He will ask: Am I not more to thee than sons and daughters? Is My love not better to thee than corn and wine? Am I, and My salvation, and that city of Mine which hath foundations, not more to be desired by thee than all else that I could give thee? Till you will find it in your bereaved and broken heart to say to Him henceforth and continually, Whom have I in heaven but Thee? And there is none upon earth that I desire beside Thee. My flesh and my heart faileth; but God is the strength of my heart, and my portion for ever.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Abraham
ABRAHAM.—It is noteworthy that while in the Synoptic Gospels references to the patriarch Abraham are comparatively frequent, and his personality and relation to Israel form part of the historical background which they presuppose, and of the thoughts and conceptions which are their national inheritance, in the Gospel of St. John his name does not appear except in ch. 8. In the Synoptists he is the great historical ancestor of the Jews, holding a unique place in their reverence and affections; he is their father, as they are each of them his children (Matthew 3:9 || Luke 3:8, Luke 13:16; Luke 16:24; Luke 16:30; Luke 19:9). To this the introductory title of St. Matthew’s Gospel testifies; it is ‘the book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham.’ And in the genealogical record that follows, his name stands at the head (Matthew 1:2), and through equally graduated stages,—epochs marked by the name of Israel’s most famous king, and by the nation’s most bitter humiliation (Matthew 1:17),—the ascent of the Christ is traced to the great fountain and source of all Jewish privilege and life. It is otherwise in the genealogy of St. Luke; and the difference indicates the different standpoints of Jewish and Gentile thought. Here the historian records no halting-places in his genealogy, but carries it back in an uninterrupted chain, of which the patriarch Abraham forms but one link (Luke 3:34), to its ultimate source in God. See art. Genealogies.
Other references in the Synoptists are on the same plane of thought, and presuppose a prevalent and accepted faith, which not only knew Abraham as the forefather and founder of their national life in the far-off ages of the past, but realized that in some sort or other he was still alive; and it was believed that to be with him, to be received into his bosom (Luke 16:22) was the highest felicity that awaited the righteous man after death. Both St. Matthew and St. Mark bear emphatic testimony to this belief, in their narrative of the incident of our Lord’s solution of the dilemma presented by the Sadducees with their tale of the seven brothers. Jesus quotes Exodus 3:6 in proof of the fact of the patriarchs’ resurrection and continued existence (Matthew 22:32 || Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37), inasmuch as the Divine sovereignty here asserted over Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob necessarily implies the conscious life of those who are its subjects. In the Songs of Mary and Zacharias, again (Luke 1:46-55; Luke 1:68-79), Abraham is the forefather of the race, the recipient of the Divine promises (confirmed by an oath, Luke 1:73) of mercy and goodwill to himself and his descendants (cf. Galatians 3:16; Galatians 3:18, Hebrews 6:13, Acts 7:17, Romans 4:13); and his name is a pledge that the same mercy will not overlook or cease to care for his children (Luke 1:55). And, finally, to be with Abraham and his great sons, to ‘sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven’ (Matthew 8:11), is the desire and reward of the faithful Israelite. This reward, however, Christ teaches, is not confined to the Jews, the sons of Abraham according to the flesh, still less is it one to which they have any right by virtue of the mere fact of physical descent from him; it is one that will be enjoyed by ‘many’ faithful ones from other lands, even to the exclusion of the ‘sons of the kingdom,’ if they prove themselves, like His present opponents, faithless and unworthy (Luke 13:28).
The expression ‘Abraham’s bosom’ (Luke 16:22) or ‘bosoms’ (Luke 16:23)* [1] is hardly to be understood as conveying the idea of an eminent or unusual degree of happiness. It is practically equivalent to ‘Paradise.’ And the new condition of blessedness in which Lazarus finds himself is pre-eminent only in the sense that it is so striking a reversal of the relations previously existing between Dives and himself. The parable says nothing of any superior piety or faith exhibited by Lazarus, which might win for him a more exalted position than others. As far as his present and past are concerned, it but sets forth retributive justice redressing for him and Dives alike the unequal balance of earth. ‘Abraham’s bosom,’ like the Hades in which the rich man lifts up his eyes, is part of the figurative or pictorial setting of the parable, and indicates no more than a haven of repose and felicity, the home and resting-place of the righteous with Abraham, who is the typical example of righteousness. The parable is on the plane of popular belief, and of set purpose employs the imagery which would be most familiar and intelligible to the hearers.† [2]
In conformity with the general character of St. John’s Gospel, the references to Abraham there would seem to imply a more mystical, less matter of fact and as it were prosaic manner of regarding the great patriarch. He is spoken of in the 8th chapter alone, in the course of a discussion with Jews who are said to be believers in Jesus (John 8:31). Here also Abraham is the father of the Jews, and they are his children, his seed (John 8:37; John 8:39; John 8:56); and this position they claim with pride (John 8:33; John 8:39; John 8:53). It is a name and position, however, which Christ declares is belied by their conduct, in that, though nominally Abraham’s seed, they do not Abraham’s works, in particular when they conceive and plot the death of an innocent man (John 8:39-40). To the charge itself they have no answer, except to reassert their sonship, in this instance of God Himself (John 8:41 f.), and to repeat the offensive imputation of demoniacal possession (John 8:42). But with almost startling abruptness, taking advantage of a phrase quietly introduced, which they interpret to imply freedom from physical death for those who accept Christ’s teaching, they interrupt with the assertion that Abraham died ‘and the prophets’ (John 8:52), in apparent contradiction to the tenor and assumption of the language which a moment before they had employed. Probably they meant no more than that he and they, like all other men, had passed through the gate of death which terminates life on earth; and were more intent on gaining a dialectic advantage than on weighing the implications of their own words. But, in spite of them, for the few moments that are left the discourse preserves the high level of other-worldliness, to which Christ’s last words have raised it; and gives occasion for one of the most striking and emphatic assertions in which He is recorded to have passed beyond the boundaries and limitations of mere earthly experience. Abraham has seen His day (John 8:56). And by silence He concedes and affirms the half-indignant, half-contemptuous and protesting question of the Jews; He has seen Abraham, and is greater even than their father (John 8:53; John 8:57). The climax is reached in John 8:58,—in a brief sentence, which, if it did not bear so evidently the stamp of simplicity and truth, would be said to have been constructed with the most consummate skill and the finest touch of artistic feeling and insight. ‘Before Abraham came into being,’—the speaker gathers up and utilizes Jewish belief in its past and reverence for its head,—‘I am.’ Abraham ἐγένετο; Christ is. Thus was conveyed the answer to their question, ‘Art thou greater?’ (John 8:53); and thus was reasserted with emphasis the measureless distance between Himself and the greatest of the Jews, and a fortiori, as it would appear to the company around, of the whole human race.
It is remarkable and suggestive that in the only notice of the patriarch Jacob that is contained in the Fourth Gospel, ch. John 4:5 f., John 4:12, the same question is addressed by the woman of Samaria to Christ: ‘Art thou greater than our father Jacob,’—the Dispenser of the new water with its marvellous properties than the actual giver of the well? It was natural and inevitable that one of the questions that more particularly forced itself upon the attention of His contemporaries should be the relation of the Teacher, who had arisen in their midst and who claimed so great things, not only to the earlier prophets, but to the patriarchs and ancestors of the Jewish nation. See further art. Jacob.
The figure of Abraham, therefore, in the Gospels is idealized, and invested with a simple grandeur as the head and founder of the race in the indistinct ages of the past, to whom are owing its present privileges, and around whom gather its future hopes. There is, however, no indication of hero-worship, as in the case of the more or less mythical ancestors of other peoples. This conception, moreover, apart from St. John’s Gospel, is purely patriarchal. The characteristic Pauline presentation of Abraham as the father of the faithful in a moral and spiritual sense, as the type and pattern of all righteousness and obedience, as it is developed in the Epistles to the Romans and Galatians, is absent (cf. also Hebrews 11:8 ff., James 2:21; James 2:23). References to the details of his history are not indeed wanting in the remaining books of the New Testament, but they are all, as it were, with a moral and didactic purpose: Galatians 4:22, the two covenants; Hebrews 7:1 ff., Abraham and Melchizedek; Romans 4:18 f. and Hebrews 11:8; Hebrews 11:17, faith exhibited in the abandonment of his fatherland, in the birth and offering up of Isaac; Acts 7:2; Acts 7:16, the same abandonment of his country and the purchase of a tomb from the sons of Emmor in Sychem; cf. 1 Peter 3:6, with a possible reference to Genesis 18:12.
Later Hebrew literature discussed especially this aspect of his character, and the historical view was superseded by the ethical or theological. Cf., for example, Pirke Aboth v. 4, of the ten testings or trials (נסיונוח) of Abraham, and Taylor, loc.; ‘Testament of Abraham,’ ed. M. R. James, and Studies, ii. 2.
Literature.—The authorities cited above, with articles on ‘Abraham’ in Bible Dictionaries, and the Commentaries.
A. S. Geden.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Abraham
(a) (1813-1638 BCE) The first of the three Patriarchs; the first Jew. He discovered G-d on his own and rejected the idolatry of his contemporaries. G-d commanded him to travel from his Mesopotamian homeland to Canaan, where He bequeathed the land to his descendants in the Covenant between the Parts. He successfully withstood ten tests with which G-d challenged him, including the Binding of Isaac incident. Husband of Sarah and Hagar, father of Ishmael and Isaac--his heir. (b) A common Jewish name.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Abraham
ABRAHAM.—It is noteworthy that while in the Synoptic Gospels references to the patriarch Abraham are comparatively frequent, and his personality and relation to Israel form part of the historical background which they presuppose, and of the thoughts and conceptions which are their national inheritance, in the Gospel of St. John his name does not appear except in ch. 8. In the Synoptists he is the great historical ancestor of the Jews, holding a unique place in their reverence and affections; he is their father, as they are each of them his children (Matthew 3:9 || Luke 3:8, Luke 13:16; Luke 16:24; Luke 16:30; Luke 19:9). To this the introductory title of St. Matthew’s Gospel testifies; it is ‘the book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham.’ And in the genealogical record that follows, his name stands at the head (Matthew 1:2), and through equally graduated stages,—epochs marked by the name of Israel’s most famous king, and by the nation’s most bitter humiliation (Matthew 1:17),—the ascent of the Christ is traced to the great fountain and source of all Jewish privilege and life. It is otherwise in the genealogy of St. Luke; and the difference indicates the different standpoints of Jewish and Gentile thought. Here the historian records no halting-places in his genealogy, but carries it back in an uninterrupted chain, of which the patriarch Abraham forms but one link (Luke 3:34), to its ultimate source in God. See art. Genealogies.
Other references in the Synoptists are on the same plane of thought, and presuppose a prevalent and accepted faith, which not only knew Abraham as the forefather and founder of their national life in the far-off ages of the past, but realized that in some sort or other he was still alive; and it was believed that to be with him, to be received into his bosom (Luke 16:22) was the highest felicity that awaited the righteous man after death. Both St. Matthew and St. Mark bear emphatic testimony to this belief, in their narrative of the incident of our Lord’s solution of the dilemma presented by the Sadducees with their tale of the seven brothers. Jesus quotes Exodus 3:6 in proof of the fact of the patriarchs’ resurrection and continued existence (Matthew 22:32 || Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37), inasmuch as the Divine sovereignty here asserted over Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob necessarily implies the conscious life of those who are its subjects. In the Songs of Mary and Zacharias, again (Luke 1:46-55; Luke 1:68-79), Abraham is the forefather of the race, the recipient of the Divine promises (confirmed by an oath, Luke 1:73) of mercy and goodwill to himself and his descendants (cf. Galatians 3:16; Galatians 3:18, Hebrews 6:13, Acts 7:17, Romans 4:13); and his name is a pledge that the same mercy will not overlook or cease to care for his children (Luke 1:55). And, finally, to be with Abraham and his great sons, to ‘sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven’ (Matthew 8:11), is the desire and reward of the faithful Israelite. This reward, however, Christ teaches, is not confined to the Jews, the sons of Abraham according to the flesh, still less is it one to which they have any right by virtue of the mere fact of physical descent from him; it is one that will be enjoyed by ‘many’ faithful ones from other lands, even to the exclusion of the ‘sons of the kingdom,’ if they prove themselves, like His present opponents, faithless and unworthy (Luke 13:28).
The expression ‘Abraham’s bosom’ (Luke 16:22) or ‘bosoms’ (Luke 16:23)* [1] is hardly to be understood as conveying the idea of an eminent or unusual degree of happiness. It is practically equivalent to ‘Paradise.’ And the new condition of blessedness in which Lazarus finds himself is pre-eminent only in the sense that it is so striking a reversal of the relations previously existing between Dives and himself. The parable says nothing of any superior piety or faith exhibited by Lazarus, which might win for him a more exalted position than others. As far as his present and past are concerned, it but sets forth retributive justice redressing for him and Dives alike the unequal balance of earth. ‘Abraham’s bosom,’ like the Hades in which the rich man lifts up his eyes, is part of the figurative or pictorial setting of the parable, and indicates no more than a haven of repose and felicity, the home and resting-place of the righteous with Abraham, who is the typical example of righteousness. The parable is on the plane of popular belief, and of set purpose employs the imagery which would be most familiar and intelligible to the hearers.† [2]
In conformity with the general character of St. John’s Gospel, the references to Abraham there would seem to imply a more mystical, less matter of fact and as it were prosaic manner of regarding the great patriarch. He is spoken of in the 8th chapter alone, in the course of a discussion with Jews who are said to be believers in Jesus (John 8:31). Here also Abraham is the father of the Jews, and they are his children, his seed (John 8:37; John 8:39; John 8:56); and this position they claim with pride (John 8:33; John 8:39; John 8:53). It is a name and position, however, which Christ declares is belied by their conduct, in that, though nominally Abraham’s seed, they do not Abraham’s works, in particular when they conceive and plot the death of an innocent man (John 8:39-40). To the charge itself they have no answer, except to reassert their sonship, in this instance of God Himself (John 8:41 f.), and to repeat the offensive imputation of demoniacal possession (John 8:42). But with almost startling abruptness, taking advantage of a phrase quietly introduced, which they interpret to imply freedom from physical death for those who accept Christ’s teaching, they interrupt with the assertion that Abraham died ‘and the prophets’ (John 8:52), in apparent contradiction to the tenor and assumption of the language which a moment before they had employed. Probably they meant no more than that he and they, like all other men, had passed through the gate of death which terminates life on earth; and were more intent on gaining a dialectic advantage than on weighing the implications of their own words. But, in spite of them, for the few moments that are left the discourse preserves the high level of other-worldliness, to which Christ’s last words have raised it; and gives occasion for one of the most striking and emphatic assertions in which He is recorded to have passed beyond the boundaries and limitations of mere earthly experience. Abraham has seen His day (John 8:56). And by silence He concedes and affirms the half-indignant, half-contemptuous and protesting question of the Jews; He has seen Abraham, and is greater even than their father (John 8:53; John 8:57). The climax is reached in John 8:58,—in a brief sentence, which, if it did not bear so evidently the stamp of simplicity and truth, would be said to have been constructed with the most consummate skill and the finest touch of artistic feeling and insight. ‘Before Abraham came into being,’—the speaker gathers up and utilizes Jewish belief in its past and reverence for its head,—‘I am.’ Abraham ἐγένετο; Christ is. Thus was conveyed the answer to their question, ‘Art thou greater?’ (John 8:53); and thus was reasserted with emphasis the measureless distance between Himself and the greatest of the Jews, and a fortiori, as it would appear to the company around, of the whole human race.
It is remarkable and suggestive that in the only notice of the patriarch Jacob that is contained in the Fourth Gospel, ch. John 4:5 f., John 4:12, the same question is addressed by the woman of Samaria to Christ: ‘Art thou greater than our father Jacob,’—the Dispenser of the new water with its marvellous properties than the actual giver of the well? It was natural and inevitable that one of the questions that more particularly forced itself upon the attention of His contemporaries should be the relation of the Teacher, who had arisen in their midst and who claimed so great things, not only to the earlier prophets, but to the patriarchs and ancestors of the Jewish nation. See further art. Jacob.
The figure of Abraham, therefore, in the Gospels is idealized, and invested with a simple grandeur as the head and founder of the race in the indistinct ages of the past, to whom are owing its present privileges, and around whom gather its future hopes. There is, however, no indication of hero-worship, as in the case of the more or less mythical ancestors of other peoples. This conception, moreover, apart from St. John’s Gospel, is purely patriarchal. The characteristic Pauline presentation of Abraham as the father of the faithful in a moral and spiritual sense, as the type and pattern of all righteousness and obedience, as it is developed in the Epistles to the Romans and Galatians, is absent (cf. also Hebrews 11:8 ff., James 2:21; James 2:23). References to the details of his history are not indeed wanting in the remaining books of the New Testament, but they are all, as it were, with a moral and didactic purpose: Galatians 4:22, the two covenants; Hebrews 7:1 ff., Abraham and Melchizedek; Romans 4:18 f. and Hebrews 11:8; Hebrews 11:17, faith exhibited in the abandonment of his fatherland, in the birth and offering up of Isaac; Acts 7:2; Acts 7:16, the same abandonment of his country and the purchase of a tomb from the sons of Emmor in Sychem; cf. 1 Peter 3:6, with a possible reference to Genesis 18:12.
Later Hebrew literature discussed especially this aspect of his character, and the historical view was superseded by the ethical or theological. Cf., for example, Pirke Aboth v. 4, of the ten testings or trials (נסיונוח) of Abraham, and Taylor, loc.; ‘Testament of Abraham,’ ed. M. R. James, and Studies, ii. 2.
Literature.—The authorities cited above, with articles on ‘Abraham’ in Bible Dictionaries, and the Commentaries.
A. S. Geden.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Abraham
Originally called Abram, Abraham received his new name from God in confirmation of God’s promise that he would be father of a multitude of people (Genesis 17:5-7). In fulfilment of this promise, Abraham became the physical father of the Israelite nation (Matthew 3:9; John 8:37). Because he accepted God’s promise by faith, he is also the spiritual father of all who accept God’s promises by faith, regardless of their nationality. As God in his grace declared Abraham righteous, so he declares righteous all who trust in him (Genesis 15:6; Romans 4:11).
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Sentence search

Hagar - She became Abraham’s concubine due to Sarah’s childlessness at that point in time. Mother of Abraham’s eldest son, Ishmael. She and Ishmael were banished from Abraham’s household because of Ishmael’s potentially negatively influence on Isaac. The midrash also identifies her as Keturah, the wife Abraham took after Sarah’s passing
Mamre - ” Main area of habitation for Abraham and his family. It apparently was named after an Amorite (Mamre) who helped Abraham defeat the evil king, Chedorlaomer (Genesis 14:1-24 ). It was just east of Mamre that Abraham purchased a cave (Machpelah) for a family burial plot. See Abraham ; Machpelah
Abram - ” The name of Abraham (“father of a multitude”) in Genesis 11:26-17:4 . See Abraham
Nimrod - According to the Midrash, he deified himself and cast Abraham into a fiery furnace when he refused to renounce his faith in monotheism. (Abraham was miraculously saved. ) Also according to the Midrash, he was Amraphel, one of the four kings whom Abraham battled (Genesis 14)
Nahor - Father of Terah, and grandfather to Abraham. Abraham had a brother also of this name
Sarah - the wife of Abraham, and his sister, as he himself informs us, by the same father, but not the same mother, Genesis 20:12 . See Abraham
Sepulchre - First mentioned as purchased by Abraham for Sarah from Ephron the Hittite (Genesis 23:20 ). This was the "cave of the field of Machpelah," where also Abraham and Rebekah and Jacob and Leah were burried (79:29-32). In Acts 7:16 it is said that Jacob was "laid in the sepulchre that Abraham bought for a sum of money of the sons of Emmor the father of Sychem. , our fathers]'>[1] were carried over into Sychem, and laid in the sepulchre that Abraham bought for a sum of money of the sons of Emmor [2] of Sychem. " In this way the purchase made by Abraham is not to be confounded with the purchase made by Jacob subsequently in the same district. Of this purchase by Abraham there is no direct record in the Old Testament
Iscah - Same as Sarai, and Abraham, according to Jewish tradition (Josephus, Abraham
Lot - (Abraham's nephew): Son of Haran, nephew of Abraham. He accompanied Abraham on his journey to Canaan and on his subsequent travels. When he was taken captive, Abraham rushed to his aid, battling four kings to secure his freedom
Isaac - —Named (1) in our Lord’s genealogy, Matthew 1:2, Luke 3:34; (2) in such collocations as ‘sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob’ (Matthew 8:11), ‘see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob’ (Luke 13:28), ‘the God of Abraham and of Isaac and of Jacob’ (Matthew 22:32, Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37). See Abraham, and Fathers
na'Hor - (snorting ), the name of two persons in the family of Abraham. ) ...
Grandson of the preceding son of Terah and brother of Abraham and Haran. ) The order of the ages of the family of Terah is not improbably inverted in the narrative; in which case Nahor instead of being younger than Abraham, was really older. He married Milcah, the daughter of his brother Haran; and when Abraham and Lot migrated to Canaan, Nahor remained behind in the land of his birth, on the eastern side of the Euphrates
Isaac - —Named (1) in our Lord’s genealogy, Matthew 1:2, Luke 3:34; (2) in such collocations as ‘sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob’ (Matthew 8:11), ‘see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob’ (Luke 13:28), ‘the God of Abraham and of Isaac and of Jacob’ (Matthew 22:32, Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37). See Abraham, and Fathers
Macpelah - The field and cave purchased by Abraham for a family tomb. Sarah was first buried there, Genesis 23:1-20 ; and afterwards Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, with Rebekah, Leah, etc
Sodom - the capital of Pentapolis, which for some time was the residence of Lot, the nephew of Abraham. See Abraham , See LOT , and See DEAD SEA
Abram - (See Abraham)
Abram - See Abraham
Ishmael - (1727-1590 BCE) Son of Abraham and Hagar. Banished together with his mother from Abraham’s household because of his potentially negatively influence on Isaac
Ephron - A Hittite, dwelling at Hebron in the time of Abraham, Genesis 23:1 - 20 . The charming account of his transaction with Abraham, and the frequent subsequent mention of his name, point him out as a prince in the land
Jokshan - ” Son of Abraham by Keturah and ancestor of Arabian tribes in wilderness east of Jordan (Genesis 25:2-3 ). He links the Jews and Arabs together as belonging to a common ancestor—Abraham
Phichol - He witnessed covenants between his commander and Abraham (Genesis 21:32 ) and Isaac (Genesis 26:26-28 ). See Abimelech ; Abraham ; Covenant ; Isaac
Phichol - He witnessed covenants between his commander and Abraham (Genesis 21:32 ) and Isaac (Genesis 26:26-28 ). See Abimelech ; Abraham ; Covenant ; Isaac
Abraham - He was known at the beginning as Abram (“father is exalted”), but this was changed subsequently to Abraham (“father of a multitude”) (Genesis 17:5 ). ...
Then Sarai, whose name had been changed to Sarah (“princess”), had her long-promised son, Isaac (“laughter”), when Abraham was 100 years old. Abraham's faith and obedience were tested by God in Moriah when he was commanded to sacrifice Isaac. As a reward for Abraham's faithfulness, God renewed the covenant promises of great blessing and the growth of a mighty nation to father and son. ...
Subsequently, Sarah died and was buried in the cave of Machpelah (Genesis 23:19 ), after which Abraham sought a bride for Isaac. A woman named Rebekah was obtained from Abraham's relatives in Mesopotamia, and Isaac married her gladly (Genesis 24:67 ). In old age Abraham remarried and had further children, finally dying aged 175 years. Abraham recognized God as the almighty Lord of all and the Author of a covenant by which the Hebrews would become a mighty nation. God Himself was known subsequently as the God of Abraham (Exodus 3:6 ). The promises to Abraham became assurance for future generations (Exodus 32:13 ; Exodus 33:1 ). Abraham became known as “God's friend forever” (2 Chronicles 20:7 ). ...
John showed that descent from Abraham did not guarantee salvation (Matthew 3:9 ). Lost sons of Abraham, Jesus invited to salvation (Luke 19:9 ). True children of Abraham do the works of Abraham (John 8:39 ). ...
For Paul Abraham was the great example of faith (Romans 4:1 ; Galatians 3:1 ). In Hebrews Abraham provided the model for tithing (Hebrews 7:1 ) and played a prominent role in the roll call of faith (Hebrews 11:1 ). James used Abraham to show that justification by faith is proved in works (James 3:21-24 )
Abram - (see Abraham
Sarah - At the time of her marriage to Abraham in Mesopotamia, Sarah’s name was Sarai and Abraham’s was Abram. God gave them their new names (Abraham meaning ‘father of a multitude’, Sarah meaning ‘princess’) to confirm to them that they would be the parents of a multitude of people, the nation Israel (Genesis 11:29; Genesis 17:5-6; Genesis 17:15-16; Isaiah 51:2). From Mesopotamia God directed Abraham and Sarah into Canaan, the land that he promised would be Israel’s eventual homeland (Genesis 12:1; Genesis 12:5-8). ...
Abraham accepted God’s promise by faith and, because of this, God accepted him as righteous (Genesis 15:6). (For details of the New Testament teaching on faith in the lives of Abraham and Sarah see Abraham. ) However, Abraham’s faith failed on occasions. ...
God had promised that Abraham and Sarah, in spite of their many years without children, would in due course produce a son through whom God’s promises would be fulfilled. The older they grew, the less likely it seemed that Sarah would bear a child, so Sarah suggested that Abraham obtain the desired son through their slave-girl, Hagar. Sarah had to share Abraham’s faith (Genesis 18:10-14). The next year, when Abraham was about a hundred years old and Sarah about ninety, Sarah gave birth to Isaac, the son whom God had promised (Genesis 17:17; Genesis 17:19; Genesis 17:21; Genesis 21:1-5). The faith of Abraham and Sarah had been tested constantly for twenty-five years (cf. When it appeared again, Sarah said to Abraham that he should drive out Hagar and her son from the household (Genesis 21:10). Although Sarah respected Abraham as head of the household, she also had a role in family decisions, and in this case God told Abraham to do as Sarah suggested (Genesis 21:12; cf
Melchizedek - ...
Old Testament When Abraham returned from the Valley of Siddim where he defeated Chedorlaomer, king of Elam, and the kings aligned with Kedorlaomer, Melchizedek greeted Abraham with bread and wine. He blessed Abraham in the name of “God Most High. ” In return, Abraham gave Melchizedek a tenth of everything. ...
Melchizedek and Abraham both worshiped the one true God. Abraham also appeared to recognize the role of Melchizedek as a priest
Abram - High father, afterwards named Abraham
Machpelah - ” Burial place located near Hebron for Sarah (Genesis 23:19 ), Abraham (Genesis 25:9 ), Isaac, Rebekah, Jacob, Leah, and probably other members of the family. After Sarah's death Abraham purchased the field of Machpelah and its cave as a sepulcher. The owner, Ephron the Hittite, offered it to Abraham for free, but the patriarch refused the gift and paid the fair price of 400 shekels of silver. Both Ephron and Abraham expected a purchase to be made
Jehovah Jireh - (See Abraham; ISAAC. In Genesis 22:8 Abraham had said, "Elohim will provide for Himself a Lamb. " He perceives he has uttered an unconscious prophecy, and that the Elohim in whom he trusted has proved Himself JEHOVAH , in covenant with His people; so that the phrase became a Hebrew proverb, "In the mount (as He provided for Abraham in his' extremity) Jehovah will provide" (for us also in our every extremity). The meaning of Mori-jah," the seeing of Jehovah," implies that it originated in this saying of Abraham, and that "Moriah" in Genesis 22:2 is used by anticipation. It is no valid objection that Abraham "saw the place afar off," whereas the temple mount is not conspicuous from a distance (whence Moriah is connected by some with Moreh and "the natural altar on the top of Mount Gerizim", which the Samaritans make the place of the sacrifice); for what is meant in Genesis 22:4 is only that he saw it at some little distance, as far off as the place admitted. ) The distance, two days' journey from Beersheba, would bring Abraham and his party to Jerusalem, whereas Gerizim could not be reached in three days
Abraham - His name was at first ABRAM, 'father of elevation;' but was altered by God into Abraham, 'father of a multitude. ' In this name (Abraham) the blessing of the Gentiles is secured by God. Abraham was the first to receive a definite call from God to leave not only the idolatrous nation to which his ancestors belonged, but to leave his kindred and his father's house and to go into a land that God would show him. Abraham at first only partially obeyed the call: he left Ur and went to dwell at Haran, in Mesopotamia (Charran in Acts 7:4 ), but with his father and kindred; and did not enter Canaan until the death of his father. Abraham built an altar, and called upon the name of Jehovah. A famine occurring in the land Abraham went to sojourn in Egypt, and for want of faith he called Saraihis sister and she was taken into the house of Pharaoh, but the Lord protected her, and Abraham with his wife was sent away with a rebuke. He had now become so rich in cattle that disputes arose between his herdsmen and those of Lot, and Abraham asked Lot to choose where he would sojourn, if he went to the right Abraham would go to the left; and they separated. Again Jehovah declared that as far as Abraham's eye could reach in all directions the land should belong to his seed. Abraham pursued the enemy and recovered all. He refused to take even a thread of the spoil from the king of Sodom: he would not be made rich from such a source; but he was blessed by Melchisedec, king of Salem, the priest of the most high God, who brought forth bread and wine: to whom Abraham gave tenths of all. God now revealed Himself to Abraham as His shield and exceeding great reward. ...
When Abraham lamented to God that he had no son, God declared that he should have a son, and that his seed should be as the stars of the heaven for multitude. Abraham believed God, and it was counted to him for righteousness. The same day God made a covenant with Abraham that to his seed should the land be given from the river of Egypt to the great river Euphrates : cf. When Abraham had fallen into a deep sleep, he was informed that his seed should be in a strange land, and be afflicted 400 years. ...
Abraham had believed that God would give him a son, but now he waits not God's time, and at Sarai's suggestion he associates with Hagar, a bondmaid, and Ishmael is born, Genesis 16 . ...
God now reveals Himself to Abraham as 'the almighty God,' a name which signifies that all resource is in God Himself. Abraham was to walk before the Almighty God and be perfect, and was to keep the covenant by having all the males circumcised (a figure of no confidence in the flesh), which he at once put into practice. ...
Abraham entertained three visitors: on two leaving him the third is spoken of as the Lord who asks, "shall I hide from Abraham the thing which I do?" According to John 15:14,15 , this gives the key to Abraham being called "the friend of God. God opened His mind to him, and Abraham was emboldened to plead for the righteous in Sodom. ...
Abraham's faith again fails him and at Gerar he once more calls Sarah his sister, which might have led to sin had not God protected her, and Abraham is again rebuked. God then tried the faith of Abraham by telling him to offer up his son Isaac for a burnt offering. Abraham obeyed, and, but for the intervention of the angel of the Lord, would have killed his son, believing "that God was able to raise him up even from the dead. " After the death and resurrection in figure of Isaac, the unconditional promise is confirmed to Abraham that in his seed — which is Christ — should all the nations of the earth be blessed. If any are Christ's, they are Abraham's seed, and heirs according to promise. The promise is sure to all the seed, "not only to that which is of the law, but to that also which is of the faith of Abraham, who is the father of us all. ...
Abraham was by faith so much a stranger (Hebrews 11:9 ) that, on the death of Sarah, he had to buy a piece of ground of the children of Heth, to secure a sepulchre in the land. ...
Abraham had another wife, Keturah, and concubines by whom he had sons; but to these he gave gifts and sent them eastward, so that Isaac and his seed might peacefully dwell in the promised land. Abraham died at the age of 175, and was buried with Sarah. ...
The history of Abraham in Genesis divides itself into three parts. ...
The nation of Israel was descended from Abraham, and we know how zealously they contended for the relationship, though alas, they had not and have not the same faith. ...
Abraham being the father of Ishmael and the other sons sent into the East it is not to be wondered at that he is a personage of universal fame in that immense quarter of the world, and that there are numerous traditions concerning him. It can hardly be doubted that their relationship to Abraham will yet be found in their favour during the millennium when the promise that his seed should be 'as the sand of the sea shore' will have its fulfilment
sa'Rah -
The wife and half-sister, (Genesis 20:12 ) of Abraham, and mother of Isaac. Abraham's), to Sarah, princess (for all the race), was made at the same time that Abram's name was changed to Abraham, --on the establishment of the covenant of circumcision between him and God. Sarah's history is of course that of Abraham. [1] She died at Hebron at the age of 127 years, 28 years before her husband and was buried by him in the cave of (B
Tha'ra, - Terah the father of Abraham
Nahor - Brother of Abraham, grandfather of Rebecca and Laban
a'Bram - (a high father ), the earlier name of Abraham
Nahor - Son of Serug, and grandfather of Abraham. Son of Terah and brother of Abraham
Ur - The memorable spot from whence the Lord called Abraham when an idolater. Sweet thought to the believer! It is JEHOVAH'S grace, and not man's deserts, even in the instance of an Abraham, that is the sole cause of salvation
Chedorlaomer - King of Elam, in Persia, in the time of Abraham. Lot was among his captives, but was rescued by Abraham; who promptly raised a force from his captives, but was rescued by Abraham; who promptly raised a force from his own dependents and his neighbors, pursued the enemy, and surprised and defeated them, Genesis 14:1-24
Arphaxad - Seven generations followed him before Abraham, while he lived till after the settlement of Abraham in the land of promise and the rescue of Lot from the four kings
Keturah - the name of Abraham's second wife. Abraham married Keturah, when he was one hundred and forty years of age, and by her he had six sons, Zimram, Jokshan, Medan, Midian, Ishbak, and Shuah. Some chronologers, as Bishop Clayton, Hallet, &c, thinking it improbable that Abraham should marry again at such an advanced age, have dislocated the chronology of this period, by supposing that Abraham took Keturah as a concubine, in consequence of his wife Sarah's barrenness, even before he left Charran; and that Keturah's children were among the souls born to him and Lot during their residence in that country. But it seems evident from the whole tenor of the history, that Abraham was childless until the birth of Ishmael, Genesis 15:2-3 ; that he had no other son than Ishmael when he received the promise of Isaac, Genesis 17:18 ; and that Isaac and Ishmael jointly, as his eldest sons, celebrated his funeral, Genesis 25:9 . Beside, Abraham himself was born when his father Terah was one hundred and thirty years of age. Abraham settled the sons of Keturah in the east country of Arabia, near the residence of Ishmael
sa'ra-i - (my princess ) the original name of Sarah wife of Abraham
Tebah - Son of Nahor, the brother of Abraham
Abrahamic - ) Pertaining to Abraham, the patriarch; as, the Abrachamic covenant
Midian - The fourth son of Abraham and Keturah, Genesis 25:2
Keturah - Incense, the wife of Abraham, whom he married probably after Sarah's death (Genesis 25:1-6 ), by whom he had six sons, whom he sent away into the east country. She is styled "Abraham's concubine" (1 Chronicles 1:32 ). Through the offshoots of the Keturah line Abraham became the "father of many nations
Medan - Contention, the third son of Abraham by Keturah (Genesis 25:2 )
Shinab - King of Admah in the days of Abraham
Akedah - �the binding�); Abraham�s preparation of Isaac as a sacrifice ...
Keturah - Woman Abraham married after Sarah's passing
Bera - King of Sodom in the days of Abraham, Genesis 14:1-24
Jokshan - Son of Abraham and Keturah
Binding of isaac - �the binding�); Abraham�s preparation of Isaac as a sacrifice ...
Nahor - —Grandfather of Abraham, named in our Lord’s genealogy, Luke 3:34
Mamre - an Amorite, brother of Aner and Eshcol, and friend of Abraham, Genesis 14:13 . It was with these three persons, together with his own and their domestics, that Abraham pursued and overcame the kings after their conquest of Sodom and Gomorrah. In Genesis 23:19 , it is said, that "Abraham buried Sarah in the cave of the field of Machpelah, before Mamre: the same is Hebron in the land of Canaan. " The city probably derived its name from that Mamre who joined Abraham in the pursuit of Chedorlaomer, and the rescue of Lot, Genesis 14. Here Abraham dwelt after his separation from Lot; here he received from God himself a promise of the land, in which he was then a stranger, for his posterity; here he entertained the angels under an oak, and received a second promise of a son; and here he purchased a burying place for Sarah; which served also as a sepulchre for himself and the rest of his family
Lot - Son of Haran, and nephew to Abraham. His history we have interspersed with that of Abraham, from Genesis 11:27-32; Genesis 12:1-20; Genesis 13:1-18; Genesis 14:1-24; Genesis 15:1-21; Genesis 16:1-16; Genesis 17:1-27; Genesis 18:1-33; Genesis 19:1-36
Sara - (Hebrew: princess) ...
Stepsister and wife of Abraham (Genesis 12:20). She gave birth to Isaac when she was 90 years of age, prevailed upon Abraham to expel Agar and Ismael (21) and died at the age of 127 in Hebron (23), where she was buried in the narrow cave of Macpelah
Targum - ...
And Abraham stretched forth his hand, and took the knife to immolate his son. And the angel of the Lord called him from the heavens and said, Abraham, Abraham. And Abraham lifted up his eyes after these [1] and looked, and behold a ram caught in a tree by his horns. And Abraham went and brought the ram, and offered him for a burnt offering instead of his son. ...
And Abraham stretched out his hand and took the knife to slay his son. The eyes of Abraham were intent upon the eyes of Isaac; and the eyes of Isaac were intent upon the angels on high. Isaac beheld them, but Abraham saw them not. And the angel of the Lord called him from the heavens, and said to him, Abraham, Abraham. Then Abraham lifted up his eyes and looked, and behold a ram, which had been created between the evenings of the foundation of the world, was caught in the entanglement of a tree by his horns. So Abraham went and took him, and offered him for a burnt offering instead of his son
Hobah - A place north of Damascus, visited by Abraham, Genesis 14:15 ; now unknown
Kenizzites - Mentioned only once as people in the land promised to Abraham
Zimran - Vine-dressers; celebrated, one of the sons of Abraham by Keturah (Genesis 25:2 )
me'Dan - (contention ), a son of Abraham and Keturah
Jokshan - Snarer, the second son of Abraham and Keturah (Genesis 25:2,3 ; 1 Chronicles 1:32 )
Terah - —Father of Abraham; named as a link in our Lord’s genealogy (Luke 3:34)
Avinu - �our father�); often used in reference to the Patriarchs, as in �Avraham (Abraham) Avinu�...
Lettushim - An Arab tribe (as the plural ending implies), sprung from Abraham by Keturah
Avot - Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, from whom the entire Jewish nation descended; the husbands of the Matriarchs
Mambre, Vale of - When Abraham was dismissed from Egypt by the Pharao, he went with his nephew Lot towards Bethel, where they separated, and Abraham "came and dwelt by the vale of Mambre, which is in Hebron, and he built there an altar to the Lord" (Genesis 13)
Machpelah - Both a field and a cave which Abraham bought of the children of Heth for a burying place. It was near Hebron; Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, Rebekah, Jacob and Leah were buried there
Vale of Mambre - When Abraham was dismissed from Egypt by the Pharao, he went with his nephew Lot towards Bethel, where they separated, and Abraham "came and dwelt by the vale of Mambre, which is in Hebron, and he built there an altar to the Lord" (Genesis 13)
Nahor -
The father of Terah, who was the father of Abraham (Genesis 11:22-25 ; Luke 3:34 ). ...
...
A son of Terah, and elder brother of Abraham (Genesis 11:26,27 ; Joshua 24:2 , RSV). A correspondence was maintained between the family of Abraham in Canaan and the relatives in the old ancestral home at Haran till the time of Jacob
Leummim - ” Descendants of Abraham and Keturah
Patriarchs - The: Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, from whom the entire Jewish nation descended; the husbands of the Matriarchs
Cave of machpelah - The cave in Hebron, Israel, wherein are buried Adam, Eve, Abraham, Sara, Isaac, Rebecca, Jacob and Leah
Birsha - Son of wickedness, a king of Gomorrah whom Abraham succoured in the invasion of Chedorlaomer (Genesis 14:2 )
Machpelah - The cave that Abraham bought for a burying place, Genesis 23:9
Mamre - The hallowed spot where the Lord appeared unto Abraham
Adbeel - ” Son of Ishmael and grandson of Abraham (Genesis 25:13 )
Zimran - Son of Abraham and Keturah
Medan - Son of Abraham and Keturah
Charan - Former residence of Abraham�s family; where Jacob met and married his wives and lived for 20 years
Sarah - Or SARA, the wife of Abraham, the daughter of his father by another mother, Genesis 20:12 . Most Jewish writers, however, and many interpreters, identify her with Iscah, the sister of Lot, and Abraham's niece, Genesis 11. When God made a covenant with Abraham, he changed the name of Sarai or my princess, into that of Sarah, or princess; and promised Abraham a son by her, which was fulfilled in due time. ...
The most prominent points of her history as recorded in the Bible are, her consenting to Abraham's unbelieving dissimulation while near Pharaoh and Abimelech; her long-continued barrenness; her giving to Abraham her maid Hagar as a secondary wife; their mutual jealousy; and her bearing Isaac in her old age, "the child of promise," Genesis 12:1-23:20 . She died in the valley of Hebron, and Abraham came to Beer-sheba to mourn for her, after which he bought a field of Ephron the Hittite, wherein was a cave hewn in the rock, called Machpelah, where Sarah was buried, Genesis 23:9
Ishmael - The son of Abraham and the Egyptian Agar. In his boyhood he and his mother were sent into the wilderness by Abraham at the request of Sara his wife, a request to which he was directed by God to accede
Hebrew - The name some derive from ʾêber, "beyond, on the other side," Abraham and his posterity being called Hebrews in order to express a distinction between the races east and west of the Euphrates. It may also be derived from Eber, or Heber, one of the ancestors of Abraham
Shuhite - Probably a descendant of Shuah, son of Abraham
Ketu'Rah - (incense ), the wife of Abraham after the death of Sarah
Hobah - Hiding-place, a place to the north of Damascus, to which Abraham pursued Chedorlaomer and his confederates (Genesis 14:15 )
Midian - Strife, the fourth son of Abraham by Keturah, the father of the Midianites (Genesis 25:2 ; 1 Chronicles 1:32 )
Ishmael - The son of Abraham and Hagar
Shi'Nab - God ), the king of Admah in the time of Abraham
Letushim - ” Descendants of Abraham and Keturah (Genesis 25:3 )
Shuah - Sonof Abraham and Keturah
Terah - (1883-1678 BCE) Idolatrous father of Abraham
Jok'Shan - (fowler ), a son of Abraham and Keturah, ( Genesis 25:2,3 ; 1 Chronicles 1:32 ) whose sons were Sheba and Dedan
Abraham's Bosom - Abraham their forefather was believed by the Jews to be in the highest place of happiness, and their writings show that 'to be with Abraham' and to be in his bosom were terms they used to express the highest security and happiness
Phichol - Chief captain of Abimelech, king of the Philistines, in the times of Abraham and Isaac
Iscah - Daughter of Haran, the brother of Abraham. According to Josephus the Jews believed she was Sarai, Abraham's wife
Ical - ) Relating to the patriarch Abraham
Medan - A son of Abraham and Keturah, Genesis 25:2
Sarah - Princess, the wife and at the same time the half-sister of Abraham (Genesis 11:29 ; 20:12 ). This name was given to her at the time that it was announced to Abraham that she should be the mother of the promised child. Her death, at the age of one hundred and twenty-seven years (the only instance in Scripture where the age of a woman is recorded), was the occasion of Abraham's purchasing the cave of Machpelah as a family burying-place. " (See Abraham
Eliezer - Of Damascus, the lawful heir of Abraham, should he die childless, Genesis 15:2 . But as the name of the latter is not given; as Abraham had near relatives, Lot and others; and as there is no evidence that he ever lived in Damascus, some think Eliezer must have been a near relative of Abraham residing at Damascus; and that "steward of my house" and "born in my house"-literally son of my house, Genesis 15:2,3 -mean the same thing, the lawful family heir
Terah - The son of Nahor, and father of Nahor, Haran, and Abraham, Genesis 11:24 , begot Abraham at the age of seventy-two years, in Ur of the Chaldeans. Upon Abraham's first call to remove into the land of promise, Terah and all his family went with him as far as Haran, in Mesopotamia, about B. Scripture intimates plainly that Terah had fallen into idolatry, or had for a time mingled some idolatrous practices with the worship of the true God, Joshua 24:2,14 ; and some think that Abraham himself at fist did the same thing; but that afterwards God, being gracious to him, convinced him of the vanity of this worship, and that he undeceived his father Terah
Moriah - The land in which was situated the mount on which Abraham was told to offer his son Isaac. On the third day after leaving Beer-sheba, Abraham saw the mount afar off, and it was doubtless some lonely spot suitable for such an incident
Sarah, Sarai, Sara - Wife of Abraham and mother of Isaac. Abraham said she was the daughter of his father but not of his mother, therefore he called her 'sister'; but God preserved her in His mercy to Abraham, who had, through fear, denied his true relationship to her in the land of Egypt and before Abimelech. Sarah, being barren, gave to Abraham her Egyptian handmaid Hagar, who, when she had conceived, despised her mistress. ...
When God promised Abraham that a son should be born to him of Sarah, He altered her name from Sarai to Sarah, which signifies 'princess. Though it was grievous to Abraham, God bade him do what Sarah desired
Abraham - God made a covenant with Abraham, changing his name from Abram to Abraham and promised him that his descendants should be as numerous as the stars of heaven. The faith of Abraham is tried by God's command to sacrifice his son Isaac. Abraham then married Cetura by whom he had six children
Terah - Son of Nahor, and father of Abraham
Keturah - Wife or concubine of Abraham by whom he had six sons, Midian being the most noted
Mamre - All three united their forces to aid Abraham in the rescue of Lot, Genesis 14:1-24 . The cave of Machpelah was adjacent to Mamre on the east, Genesis 23:17,19 49:30 ; and from the heights nearby, Abraham could see the smoking plain of Sodom, Genesis 19:27,28
Nachor - Abraham's grandfather. Abraham's brother. (See Abraham. She formed a tie between Abraham's seed and the original Mesopotamian family. Laban, with polytheistic notions, distinguishes between his god "the god of Nahor" and "the God of Abraham," Jacob's God (Genesis 31:3; Genesis 31:5; Genesis 31:19; Genesis 31:29; Genesis 31:42; Genesis 31:49; Genesis 31:53; Joshua 24:2), "the God of Abraham and the Fear of Isaac
Eliezer (abraham's servant) - (a) Trusted servant of Abraham, native of Damascus
Phicol - Commander of Abimelech's forces in disputes with Abraham (Genesis 21:22-32 ) and Isaac (Genesis 26:26-31 )
Ishbak - A son of Abraham by Keturah ( Genesis 25:2 = 1 Chronicles 1:32 )
ho'Bah - (hiding-place ), the place to which Abraham pursued the kings who had pillaged Sodom
se'Rug - (branch ), son of Reu and great grandfather of Abraham
Bildad - the Shuhite, one of Job's friends, thought by some to have descended from Shuah, the son of Abraham, by Ketura h, Job 2:11 ; Job 8;...
Shur, Wilderness of - Earlier, Sarah's handmaid, Hagar, had come toward Shur after her expulsion from the clan of Abraham (Genesis 16:7 ). Abraham lived near Shur (Genesis 20:1 )
Beer-Lahairoi - After Sarai had Abraham put Hagar out of the house, an angel appeared to her announcing the birth of a son. Isaac lived there after his father Abraham died (Genesis 25:11 )
Ages of the World - ...
YEARS...
* The first, from the creation to the flood containing a period of 1656...
* The second, from Noah to Abraham 425...
* The third, from Abraham to the going forth of Israel from Egypt 430...
* The fourth, from the departure from Egypt to Solomon's temple 479...
* The fifth from Solomon's in the captivity in Babylon 424...
* The sixth, from the going into Babylon to the coming of Christ 584...
Paddan-Aram - ” The land from where Abraham journeyed to Canaan. Later, Abraham sent his steward to Paddan-Aram to seek a wife for Isaac (Genesis 24:1-9 ), and Jacob fled there and married into Laban and Rebekah's branch of the patriarchal family (Genesis 28:2-5 )
Ur - The country of Terah, and the birthplace of Abraham, Genesis 11:28,31 15:7 . The city of Orfah, to which the Jews make pilgrimages as the birthplace of Abraham, is a flourishing town of 30,000 inhabitants, seventy-eight miles south-west of Diarbekir
Medan - Son of Abraham and Keturah
Eshcol - Brother of Aner and Mamre, and one of the three Amorite allies of Abraham when he pursued the kings who had carried off Lot
Abida - ” A grandson of Abraham and ancestor of the Midianites (Genesis 25:4 ; 1 Chronicles 1:33 )
Ish'Bak - (left behind ), a son of Abraham and Keturah, ( Genesis 25:2 ; 1 Chronicles 1:32 ) and the progenitor of a tribe of northern Arabia
Phichol - Apparently the title borne by the "captain of the host" of the king of Gerar, in the time of Abraham and Isaac, Genesis 21:22 ; 26:26
Sem - He lived to be 600 years old, gave his name to the Semitic race, and was a direct ancestor of Abraham (Genesis 10,11)
Abraham's Bosom - Abraham’S BOSOM . It was natural for the Jews to represent Abraham as welcoming his righteous descendants to the bliss of heaven. He was reclining at the feast next to Abraham (cf. Other Jewish writings occasionally represent Abraham as in a way overseeing the entrance of souls into Paradise. ‘Abraham’s Bosom,’ therefore, may very fairly be said to be a synonym for Paradise, where the righteous dead live in eternal bliss
Heber - From him some have supposed that Abraham and his descendants derived the appellation of Hebrews. But others have suggested, with greater probability, that Abraham and his family were thus called, because they came from the other side of the Euphrates into Canaan; Heber signifying in the Hebrew language one that passes, or, a passage, that is, of the river Euphrates. Such were Abraham and his family among the Canaanites; and his posterity, learning and using the language of the country, still retained the appellation originally given them, even when they became possessors and settled inhabitants
Abraham - Genesis 24:2 (c) In this passage Abraham is a type of the Father who sent His servant (the Spirit) to obtain a bride (Rebecca) for his son Isaac. Of course, Abraham represents GOD the Father. ...
GOD revealed His secrets to Abraham, the man of faith, and so He does today to those who believe His Word. ...
Abraham was the father of the faithful, and we too who believe GOD should have spiritual children who have faith as we have
Hagar - God promised Abraham and Sarah they would have a son through whom God would build a nation that would be his people. When Sarah was unable to bear children for Abraham, she suggested he try to produce a son through their Egyptian slave-girl, Hagar. Any child so born would legally belong to Abraham and Sarah (Genesis 16:1-3). ...
Abraham followed Sarah’s suggestion, with the result that Hagar bore him a son, Ishmael. This resulted in the expulsion of Hagar and Ishmael from Abraham’s household (Genesis 21:8-14). Just as Abraham’s household had no place for the slave Hagar, so God’s family has no place for those who are slaves to the law (Galatians 4:21-31)
Kadmonites - One of the ancient peoples who possessed the land promised to Abraham
Emim - A gigantic and warlike race, who in the time of Abraham occupied the country beyond the Jordan, afterwards possessed by the Moabites, Genesis 14:5 Deuteronomy 2:10
Isaac - ” Only son of Abraham by Sarah and a patriarch of the nation of Israel. Old Testament Isaac was the child of a promise from God, born when Abraham was 100 years old and Sarah was 90 (Genesis 17:17 ; Genesis 21:5 ). God directed Abraham to comply, saying that it would be through Isaac that his descendants would be reckoned (Genesis 21:8-13 ; compare Romans 9:7 ). Abraham's test of faith was God's command to sacrifice Isaac (Genesis 22:1-19 ). Isaac passed her off as a sister at Gerar (as Abraham had done). ...
Though less significant than Abraham and Jacob, Isaac was revered as one of the Israelite patriarchs (Exodus 3:6 ; 1 Kings 18:36 ; Jeremiah 33:26 ). Isaac's sacrifice by Abraham (Hebrews 11:17-18 ; James 2:21 ), in which he was obedient to the point of death, serves as a type looking forward to Christ and as an example for Christians
Hebrew - Designation of Abraham and of his descendants. Hence it is applied to Abraham's descendants through Isaac and Jacob in distinction to the name of Israelites (from the name of Israel given to Jacob), which is their covenant name, the name of promise. ...
It is not very clear why Abraham was called a Hebrew. It is generally supposed to be derived from his ancestor Eber or Heber; but it will be seen from Genesis 11:17-26 that there were five generations between Eber and Abraham, so by this derivation many others might have been called Hebrews. In scripture the name is not applied to any except to Abraham and his descendants, and only to those who descended through Isaac and Jacob, to the exclusion of the children of Ishmael and Esau. Abraham was bidden to leave his country and his kindred and to go into the land of Canaan, and the word Hebrew is not employed until Abraham had left his country and was in the land of Canaan. The name was therefore characteristic, and the people of the land could go to Abraham the 'sojourner' and tell him that Lot had been taken prisoner. The above characteristic was doubtless subsequently lost, and nothing seen in it but the natural descent from Abraham through Isaac and Jacob; the same persons being mostly called Israelites
Sarah - ) (See Abraham; ISAAC. ) Sarah is Iscah, sister of Milcah and Lot (called "brother of Abraham. As Nahor married his niece Milcah, so Abraham (Genesis 11:27), the youngest brother of the three, his niece Sarah, "daughter," i. She was thenceforward to be princess not merely of Abraham and his seed, but of all families of the earth. ...
"At the set time the Lord visited Sarah as He had said, and the Lord did unto Sarah as He had spoken"; "God hath made me to laugh," said Sarah, "all that hear will laugh with me," namely, in joy as Abraham laughed (Genesis 17:17), not in incredulity, as in Genesis 18:12-15. Under God's prompting, Sarah, seeing Hagar's son "mocking" at Isaac the son of the promise during the feast for the latter when weaned (see the spiritual sense Galatians 4:22-31), said to Abraham, "cast out this bondwoman," etc. "Sarah obeyed Abraham, calling him lord," and so is a pattern of a meek and quiet spirit to all wives (1 Peter 3:6; Genesis 18:12). She was 127 when she died at Hebron, 28 years before Abraham, and was buried in the cave of Machpelah, bought from Ephron the Hittite; her "shrine" is shown opposite Abraham's, with Isaac's and Rebekah's on one side, Jacob's and Leah's on the other
Chronology - Hence in constructing a system of Biblecal chronology, the plan has been adopted of reckoning the years from the ages of the patriarchs before the birth of their first-born sons for the period from the Creation to Abraham. The same system of variations is observed in the chronology of the period between the Flood and Abraham. 220 1000 870 | From the birth of | Terah to the birth | of Abraham. 130 70 72 ...
The Septuagint fixes on seventy years as the age of Terah at the birth of Abraham, from Genesis 11:26 ; but a comparison of Genesis 11:32 and Acts 7:4 with Genesis 12:4 shows that when Terah died, at the age of two hundred and five years, Abraham was seventy-five years, and hence Terah must have been one hundred and thirty years when Abraham was born. Thus, including the two years from the Flood to the birth of Arphaxad, the period from the Flood to the birth of Abraham was three hundred and fifty-two years. ...
The next period is from the birth of Abraham to the Exodus. These years are regarded by some as dating from the covenant with Abraham (Genesis 15 ), which was entered into soon after his sojourn in Egypt; others, with more probability, reckon these years from Jacob's going down into Egypt
Abraham - In the ancient Near East a patriarch was the leader or ancestor of a family, but Abraham exceeded this status by becoming the progenitor of one specific nation, the Hebrews, as well as of other peoples. ...
The date of Abraham's birth in Ur "of the Chaldees" (i. As such, Abraham emerged from a background of high culture, and was not the illiterate shepherd envisaged by some nineteenth-century literary critics. ...
Abraham is of profound religious significance because he was the historic ancestor of the twelve tribes, the "seed of Abraham, " who regularly described their God as "the God of Abraham. This general promise was made specific by means of a covenant between God and Abraham (Genesis 15:8-18 ; 17:1-14 ), which provided the offspring of the patriarch with a large tract of territory. Abraham was to father many nations (Genesis 17:5 ), and the covenant that was to be established with him and his seed was to be perpetual in nature. Abraham was instructed to keep the covenant obligations, and as a material token the institution of circumcision was imposed upon him and his descendants. ...
Although coming from a background of polytheism and idolatry at Ur, Abraham had been reared in the faith of the one true God by his father Terah. It should be noted that Abraham was not asked to be obedient as a condition of the covenant. ...
The continuing faith Abraham had can be illustrated by reference to four specific occasions in his life. The severing of emotional ties was bound to be costly, yet Abraham went forward without once questioning God's directives, believing instead in God's power to fulfill his promises. ...
The second occasion actually completed the first, consisting of Abraham's parting company with his nephew Lot (Genesis 13:1-16 ) because of friction between their herdsmen. Although doubtless distressed at withdrawing from a relative, Abraham behaved generously in allowing Lot to choose the territory that he preferred (Genesis 13:8-11 ), whereupon God renewed his promises of land and offspring to the childless Abraham. God promised Abraham a son who would be named Isaac (Genesis 17:16 ), and who would be the inheritor of the everlasting covenant (Genesis 17:19,21 ). It seems that Abraham assumed that Ishmael was to function in that capacity, but when this was denied he acknowledged the Lord's will obediently, and awaited in faith the fulfillment of the promise that all the nations of the earth would be blessed in him (Genesis 18:18 ). ...
Perhaps the most serious test of Abraham's obedience and faith came when God ordered him to offer up in sacrifice the very one through whom the covenant was to be perpetuated: his son Isaac (Genesis 22:1-2 ). Dutifully and without questioning, Abraham followed the ritual procedure, and at the climactic moment God intervened on behalf of Isaac (Genesis 22:11 ), stating that Abraham had passed the divinely imposed test of submission and faith (Genesis 22:12 ). For such implicit obedience Abraham was to become an example of covenant fidelity. James 2:23 ) Abraham is described as the "friends" of God. In Abraham's case, his unwavering faith accomplished the fulfillment of the covenant promises in terms of a great nation that would honor him through the centuries as "their father" ( John 8:39 ; Romans 4:16 ). ...
The prophecy whereby all human families would be blessed (or "bless themselves") came to fruition in the work of Jesus Christ, the Messiah of God, who was the long-promised descendant of Abraham (Matthew 1:1 ; Galatians 3:16 ). It is by this means, however, that the Abrahamic blessings come into effect when both Jewish and Gentile sinners find forgiveness and spiritual rebirth in Christ through the proclamation of the gospel. The atoning work of Christ on Calvary, achieved by a man as fully obedient to God's commands (Philippians 2:8 ) as Abraham ever was, has released a flood of divine grace upon an undeserving world, and has brought the blessed fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22-23 ) into the believer's life. ...
Paul stressed that the children of God by faith in Jesus were in fact members of Abraham's offspring, and thus heirs according to the promise (Galatians 3:26-29 ). Thus Christians can speak confidently of Abraham as "the father of the faithful, " and praise a merciful God because it was through his fidelity in remote ages that our eternal salvation has become an actuality. Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, and others are no longer shadowy images which, in an earlier age of biblical criticism, were often dismissed as legendary or even mythological. Instead, the participants in the Abrahamic covenant are seen as real persons with whom modern Christians are privileged to join in witness to God's power and his plan of salvation through Christ. While Christians can rejoice in the realization that the blessings of Abraham's covenant have become their very own, it is important for them to remember that, as Jesus taught, the true children of Abraham perform the deeds of Abraham (John 8:39 ). ...
Dynamic though Abraham's covenant was, sheer physical descent from the revered patriarch did not of itself guarantee an individual's salvation, as John the Baptist pointed out (Matthew 3:9 ). Meyer, Abraham: The Obedience of Faith ; C
Ishmaelites, Ishmeelites - Descendants of Ishmael the son of Abraham
Kenizzites - an ancient people of Canaan, whose land God promised to the descendants of Abraham, Genesis 15:19
Eph'Ron - (fawn-like ), the son of Zochar, a Hittite, from whom Abraham bought the field and cave of Machpelah
Ashu'Rim - (steps ), a tribe descended from Dedan, the grandson of Abraham
Phi'Chol - (strong ), chief captain of the army of Abimelech, king of the Philistines of Gerar in the days of both Abraham, ( Genesis 21:22,32 ) and Isaac
Serug - Reu's son, great grandfather of Abraham (as to his age, see CHRONOLOGY); in the Hebrew 230 years, 30 before begetting Nahor, 200 afterward; but in Septuagint 130 before begetting Nahor, making 330. One of many systematic variations lengthening the interval between the flood and Abraham from 292 to 1172, or as the Alexandrinus manuscript 1072
Amraphel - King of Shinar in the time of Abraham
Gulf - Term used by the KJV and REB for the gorge or pit separating the rich man's place of torment from Lazarus' place of comfort in the presence of Abraham (Luke 16:26 )
Ephron - Abraham bought it from Ephron for 400 shekels of silver (Genesis 23; 25; 49)
Shem - Progenitor of Abraham
Ephron - Son of Zohar, a Hittite, and from whom Abraham bought the field of Mamre, containing the cave of Machpelah
Beer-Sheba - The well of an oath; So called, because here it was that Abraham made a covenant with Abimelech
Abram - אברם , a high father; and Abraham, אברהם father of a great multitude, the son of Terah, born at Ur, a city of Chaldea, A. Abraham's PERSONAL history. Chaldea, the native country of Abraham, was inhabited by a pastoral people, who were almost irresistibly invited to the study of the motions of the heavenly bodies, by the peculiar serenity of the heavens in that climate, and their habit of spending their nights in the open air in tending their flocks. During the three hundred and fifty years which elapsed between the deluge and the birth of Abraham, this and other idolatrous superstitions had greatly corrupted the human race, perverted the simple forms of the patriarchal religion, and beclouded the import of its typical rites. The family of Abraham was idolatrous, for his "fathers served other gods beyond the flood," that is, the great river Euphrates; but whether he himself was in the early period of his life an idolater, we are not informed by Moses. " Whilst Abraham was still sojourning in Ur, "the God of glory" appeared to him, and said unto him, "Get thee out of thy country and from thy kindred, and go into the land which I shall show thee;" and so firm was his faith in the providence and care of God, that although the place of his future abode was not indicated, nor any information given of the nature of the country, or the character of its inhabitants, he nevertheless promptly obeyed, and "went out, not knowing whither he went. " Terah his father, Nahor his brother, and Lot his nephew, the son of Haran his deceased brother, accompanied him; a circumstance which indicates that if the family had formerly been idolatrous it had now received the faith of Abraham. They first migrated to Haran, or Charran, in Mesopotamia, a flat, barren region westward of Ur; and after a residence there of a few years, during which Terah had died, Abraham left Haran to go into Palestine, taking with him Sarah his wife, who had no child, and Lot, with his paternal property. Abraham, leading his tribe, first settled at Sechem, a valley between the mountains Ebal and Gerizim, where God appeared to him and promised to give him the land of Canaan, and where, as in other places in which he remained any time, he built an altar to the Lord. Here it may be observed, that the migrations of Abraham and his sons show the manner in which the earth was gradually covered with people. A few of these nomadic tribes appear to have made the circuit of the same region, seldom going far from their native seats; which would probably have been the case with Abraham, had he not received the call of God to depart to a distant country. Abraham, knowing the dissolute character of the Egyptians, directed Sarah to call herself his sister, which she was, although by another mother; fearing that if they knew her to be his wife, they would not only seize her, but kill him. In this affair Abraham has been blamed for want of faith in God; but it was perhaps no more than an act of common prudence, as the Seraglio of the Egyptian monarch was supplied by any means, however violent and lawless. This led to inquiry, and on discovering that he was detaining another man's wife by violence, he sent her back, and dismissed Abraham laden with presents. After the famine Abraham returned to Canaan, and pitched his tents between Bethel and Hai, where he had previously raised an altar. Lot returning to the plain of the Jordan, which before the destruction of Sodom was as "the garden of God," and Abraham to Mamre, near Hebron, after receiving a renewal of the promise, that God would give him the whole land for a possession. The separation of Abraham and Lot still farther secured the unmingled descent of the Abrahamitic family. This intelligence being brought to Abraham, he collected the men of his tribe, three hundred and eighteen, and falling upon the kings by night, near the fountains of Jericho, he defeated them, retook the spoil, and recovered Lot. To him Abraham gave a tithe of the spoil. " Still the fulfilment of the promise of a son was delayed; and Sarah, perhaps despairing that it would be accomplished in her person, and the revelation which had been made merely stating that his son should be the fruit of Abraham's body, without any reference to her, she gave to him, according to the custom of those times, one of her hand-maids, an Egyptian, to be his secondary wife, who brought forth Ishmael. Children born in this manner had the privileges of legitimacy; but fourteen years afterward, when Abraham was a hundred years old, and Sarah ninety, the Lord appeared to him again, established his covenant with him and with his seed, changed his name to Abraham, "the father of many nations," promised that Sarah herself should bring forth the son to whom the preceding promises had referred; instituted circumcision as the sign of the covenant; and changed the name of his wife from Sarai, my princess, to Sarah, the princess, that is, of many people to descend from her. At this time Abraham occupied his former encampment near Hebron. Abraham, with true Arabian hospitality, received and entertained them. As Abraham accompanied them toward the valley of the Jordan, the same divine person, for so he manifestly appears, announced the dreadful ruin impending over the licentious cities among which Lot had taken up his abode. No passage, even in the sacred writings, exhibits a more exalted view of the divine condescension than that in which Abraham is seen expostulating on the apparent injustice of involving the innocent in the ruin of the guilty: "Shall the city perish, if fifty, if forty-five, if forty, if thirty, if twenty, if ten righteous men be found within its walls?" "Ten righteous men shall avert its doom. Sarah having conceived, according to the divine promise, Abraham left the plain of Mamre, and went south to Gerar, where Abimelech reigned; and again fearing lest Sarah should be forced from him, and himself be put to death, her beauty having been, it would appear, preternaturally continued, notwithstanding her age, he here called her, as he had done in Egypt, his sister. Abimelech took her to his house, designing to marry her; but God having, in a dream, informed him that she was Abraham's wife, he returned her to him with great presents. This year Sarah was delivered of Isaac; and Abraham circumcised him, according to the covenant stipulation; and when he was weaned, made a great entertainment. Sarah, having observed Ishmael, son of Hagar, mocking her son Isaac, said to Abraham, "Cast out this bondwoman and her son, for Ishmael shall not be heir with Isaac. " After great reluctance, Abraham complied; God having informed him that this was according to the appointments of his providence, with respect to future ages. About the same time, Abimelech came with Phicol, his general, to conclude an alliance with Abraham, who made that prince a present of seven ewe lambs out of his flock, in confirmation that a well he had opened should be his own property; and they called the place Beer-sheba, or "the well of swearing," because of the covenant there ratified with oaths. Here Abraham planted a grove, built an altar, and for some time resided Genesis 21:21 . 2133,) God, for the final trial and illustration of Abraham's faith, directed him to offer up his son Isaac. Abraham took his son, and two servants, and went toward Mount Moriah. When within sight of the mountain, Abraham left his servants, and ascended it with his son only; and there having bound him, he prepared for the affecting sacrifice; but when he was about to give the blow, an angel from heaven cried but to him, "Lay not thine hand upon the lad, neither do thou any thing to him. " Abraham, turning, saw a ram entangled in the bush by his horns; and he offered this animal as a burnt- offering, instead of his son Isaac. Twelve years afterward, Sarah, wife of Abraham, died in Hebron. Abraham came to mourn and to perform the funeral offices for her. And here Abraham buried Sarah, with due solemnities, according to the custom of the country, Genesis 23. Abraham, having grown old, sent Eliezer, his steward, into Mesopotamia, with directions to obtain a young woman of his own family, as a wife for his son Isaac. Eliezer executed his commission with fidelity, and brought back Rebecca, daughter of Bethuel, grand-daughter of Nahor, and, consequently, Abraham's niece, whom Isaac married. Abraham afterward married Keturah; by whom he had six sons, Zimran, Jokshan, Medan, Midian, Ishbak, and Shuah; who became heads of different people, which dwelt in Arabia, and around it. From the personal history of Abraham we may now proceed to the consideration of the TYPICAL circumstances which were connected with it. Abraham himself with his family may be regarded as a type of the church of God in future ages. Not that many scattered patriarchal and family churches did not remain: such was that of Melchizedec; and such probably was that of Nahor, whom Abraham left behind in Mesopotamia. But a visible church relation was established between Abraham's family and the Most High, signified by the visible and distinguishing sacrament of circumcision, and followed by new and enlarged revelations of truth. Both were done by Abraham. The numerous natural posterity promised to Abraham was also a type of the spiritual seed, the true members of the church of Christ, springing from the Messiah, of whom Isaac was the symbol. Paul expressly distinguishes between the fleshly and the spiritual seed of Abraham; to the latter of which, in their ultimate and highest sense, the promises of increase as the stars of heaven, and the sands of the sea shore, are to be referred, as also the promise of the heavenly Canaan. The intentional offering up Isaac, with its result, was probably that transaction in which Abraham, more clearly than in any other, "saw the day of Christ, and was glad. " This could be a figure of nothing but the resurrection of our Lord; and, if so, Isaac's being laid upon the altar was a figure of his sacrificial death, scenically and most impressively represented to Abraham. The place, the same ridge of hills on which our Lord was crucified; the person, an only son, to die for no offence of his own; the sacrificer, a father; the receiving back, as it were, from death to life; the name impressed upon the place, importing, "the Lord will provide," in allusion to Abraham's own words to Isaac, "the Lord will provide a lamb for a burnt-offering;" all indicate a mystery which lay deep beneath this transaction, and which Abraham, as the reward of his obedience, was permitted to behold. But Abraham appears before us invested with a MYSTIC character, which it is of great importance rightly to understand. Paul, "was preached to Abraham, saying, In thee shall all nations be blessed. " "Abraham believed in God, and it was accounted to him for righteousness;" in other words, he was justified. Wherever that sign was it declared the doctrine, and offered the grace, of this covenant—free justification by faith, and its glorious results—to all the tribes that proceeded from Abraham. This same grace is offered to us by the Gospel, who become "Abraham's seed," his spiritual children with whom the covenant is established, through the same faith, and are thus made "the heirs with him of the same promise. Abraham is also exhibited to us as the representative of true believers; and in this especially, that the true nature of faith was exhibited in him. This great principle was marked in Abraham with the following characters:—An entire unhesitating belief in the word of God;—an unfaltering trust in all his promises;—a steady, regard to his almighty power, leading him to overlook all apparent difficulties and impossibilities in every case where God had explicitly promised;—and habitual and cheerful and entire obedience. The Apostle has described faith in Hebrews 11:1 ; and that faith is seen living and acting in all its energy in Abraham. ...
A few miscellaneous remarks are suggested by some of the circumstances of Abraham's history:—...
1. Hence, after Abraham had performed this part of the ceremony, the symbol of the Almighty's presence, "a smoking furnace, and a burning lamp, passed between the pieces," Genesis 15:18 , and so both parties ratified the covenant. The intentional offering up of Isaac is not to be supposed as viewed by Abraham as an act sanctioned by the Pagan practice of human sacrifice. The immolation of human victims, particularly of that which was most precious, the favourite, the first-born child, appears to have been a common usage among many early nations, more especially the tribes by which Abraham was surrounded. But the Mosaic religion held human sacrifices in abhorrence; and the God of the Abrahamitic family, uniformly beneficent, had imposed no duties which entailed human suffering, had demanded no offerings which were repugnant to the better feelings of our nature. The command to offer Isaac as a "burnt offering," was for these reasons a trial the more severe to Abraham's faith. Isaac, so miraculously bestowed, could be as miraculously restored; Abraham, such is the comment of the Christian Apostle, "believed that God could even raise him up from the dead. The wide and deep impression made by the character of Abraham upon the ancient world is proved by the reverence which people of almost all nations and countries have paid to him, and the manner in which the events of his life have been interwoven in their mythology, and their religious traditions. One of the most pleasing of these is the following, but it proceeds upon the supposition that he was educated in idolatry: "As Abraham was walking by night from the grotto where he was born, to the city of Babylon, he gazed on the stars of heaven, and among them on the beautiful planet Venus. ‘Behold,' said he, within himself, ‘the God and Lord of the universe!' but the star set and disappeared, and Abraham felt that the Lord of the universe could not thus be liable to change. Shortly after, he beheld the moon at the full: ‘Lo,' he cried, ‘the Divine Creator, the manifest Deity!' but the moon sank below the horizon, and Abraham made the same reflection as at the setting of the evening star
Eldaah - ” Son of Midian and grandson of Abraham thus original ancestor of clan of Midianites (Genesis 25:4 )
Abida - Or Abi'dah, father of knowledge; knowing, one of the five sons of Midian, who was the son of Abraham by Keturah (1 Chronicles 1:33 ), and apparently the chief of an Arab tribe
Chesed - ” Son of Nahor, the brother of Abraham (Genesis 22:22 )
Serug - A descendant of Shem, and an ancestor of Abraham, Genesis 11:20-23 ; Luke 3:35
Lot - Son of Haran the brother of Abraham. He seems to have accompanied Abraham. without having a like faith in Abraham's God. When their flocks and herds had so increased that they could no longer dwell together, Abraham bade his nephew choose whither he would turn. ...
Though rescued by Abraham he did not profitby the discipline, but returned to dwell in the guilty city; whereas Abraham would not accept so much as a shoe latchet from its king. Though God delivered him, he is a solemn instance of a righteous man dwelling needlessly amid gross wickedness; his course being the strongest contrast to that of Abraham
Shemeber - After having been reconquered by him, he was rescued by Abraham (Genesis 14:2 )
Bera - ” King of Sodom in days of Abraham and Lot (Genesis 14:2 )
Serug - ” Ancestor of Abraham (Genesis 11:20 ) and thus of Jesus (Luke 3:35 ) and city twenty miles northwest of Harran mentioned in Assyrian texts
Melchizedek - When Abraham was returning from victory over a group of invaders, he was met by Melchizedek, the ruler of the Canaanite city-state of Salem. ) Like Abraham, Melchizedek was a worshipper of the Most High God. In fact, he was God’s priest, and he reminded Abraham that God was the one who had given Abraham victory. Abraham acknowledged this by offering to God a costly sacrifice, which he presented through God’s priest (Genesis 14:17-20; Hebrews 7:1-4)
Dedan - Descendant of Abraham and Keturah, probably inhabiting the borders of Idumaea. It is more than once in these prophecies associated with Edom, so that it was probably connected with the descendants of Abraham
Sarah - The wife and half-sister, Genesis 20:12, of Abraham, and mother of Isaac. Abraham's), to Sarah, princess, was made when Abram's name was changed to Abraham
Aner -
A Canaanitish chief who joined his forces with those of Abraham in pursuit of Chedorlaomer (Genesis 14:13,24 )
Eber - The great-grandson of Shem, Genesis 10:21; Genesis 10:24; Genesis 11:14-17; 1 Chronicles 1:19, and the ancestor of Abraham in the seventh generation
Hagar - Sarah's Egyptian handmaid, given to Abraham, and the mother of Ishmael. " Fifteen years later, at the feast made by Abraham on the occasion of the weaning of Isaac, Ishmael was seen to mock, and Sarah besought Abraham to cast out Hagar and her son; being instructed by God he did so. Being the seed of Abraham according to promise, that is, being 'of Christ,' or 'Christ's,' the gospel and new covenant blessings have come to believers through Him, and they are reckoned as of God's city, Jerusalem above, that is free
Ishbak - ” Son of Abraham and Keturah (Genesis 25:2 )
Chedorlao'Mer, - (handful of sheaves ), a king of Elam, in the time of Abraham, who with three other chiefs made war upon the kings of Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, Zeboim and Zoar, and reduced them to servitude
be'Thuel - (dweller in God ), the son of Nahor by Milcah; nephew of Abraham, and father of Rebekah, ( Genesis 22:22,23 ; 24:15,24,47 ; 28:2 ) In (Genesis 25:20 ) and (Genesis 28:5 ) he is called "Bethuel the Syrian
Jokshan - Son of Abraham and Keturah (Genesis 25:2-3; 1 Chronicles 1:32); father of Sheba and Dedan
Abraham - Abraham . Abram and Abraham are the two forms in which the name of the first patriarch was handed down in Hebrew tradition. Of Abraham no better explanation has been suggested than that it is possibly a dialectic or orthographic variation of Abram , which in the fuller forms Abirâm and Aburamu is found as a personal name both in Heb. The history of Abraham ( Genesis 11:27 to Genesis 25:18 ) consists of a number of legendary narratives, which have been somewhat loosely strung together into a semblance of biographical continuity. ]'>[2] opens with the Divine call to Abraham, in obedience to which he separates himself from his kindred and migrates to Canaan ( Genesis 12:1-8 ). Genesis 15:7 ) we find combined with this another view, according to which Abraham came from Ur of the Chaldees in S. ...
Arrived in Canaan, Abraham builds altars at Shechem, where he receives the first promise of the land, and Bethel, where the separation from Lot takes place; after which Abraham resumes his southern journey and takes up his abode at Hebron (ch. This connexion is broken in Genesis 12:10-20 by the episode of Abraham’s sojourn in Egypt, which probably belongs to an older stratum of Jahwistic tradition representing him as leading a nomadic life in the Negeb. 16; here, too, the home of Abraham is apparently located in the Negeb. 18 we find Abraham at Hebron, where in a theophany he receives the promise of a son to be born to Sarah, and also an intimation of the doom impending over the guilty cities of the Plain. ]'>[2] ’s record, the mission of Abraham’s servant to seek a bride for Isaac, told with such dramatic power in ch. It would seem that the death of Abraham, of which J [1] , the biography of Abraham is mostly reduced to a chronological epitome, based on the narrative of J Jokshan - Son of Abraham and Keturah, and father of Sheba (Saba) and Dedan ( Genesis 25:2 , 1 Chronicles 1:32 )
Aner - Amorite confederate with Abraham against Chedorlaomer
Nahor - Grandson of the preceding and brother of Abraham and Haran ( Genesis 11:25-27 cf. Laban, in making a covenant with Jacob, swears by the ‘God (of Abraham and the God of Nahor’ ( Genesis 31:53 ). While Abraham appears as the common ancestor of the Israelites and Edomites, Nahor is represented as the father of the Aramæans
Scriptural Patriarchs - With Abraham there begins another list of patriarchs of the Abrahamites. First there are the three great patriarchs, to whom all render special praise: Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
Altar in Scripture - , those of Noe and Abraham, altars erected for the worship of idols, altars of holocaust and of incense, of the Tabernacle and of the Temple, and the altar described in the Apocalypse
Scripture, Altar in - , those of Noe and Abraham, altars erected for the worship of idols, altars of holocaust and of incense, of the Tabernacle and of the Temple, and the altar described in the Apocalypse
Seed, Seedtime - In NT it is especially frequent in the phrase ‘the seed of Abraham’ a favourite Pauline equivalent for ‘Israel’ (cf. ‘seeds’ in Genesis 13:15 ; Genesis 17:8 , that the Messiah in person is denoted and not Abraham’s progeny in general. Paul’s meaning is that the Messiah was clearly in view in the promises made to Abraham. Israel was the type of Christ, and in Him the seed of Abraham was summed up. ‘seed of Abraham’ to denote those united to Christ by faith ( Galatians 3:7 ; Galatians 3:28 ), the spiritual Israel or ‘Israel of God’ ( Romans 2:29 , Galatians 6:16 )
Buz - Son of Nahor, brother of Abraham (Genesis 22:21 )
Shinar - Amraphel was king of Shinar in the days of Abraham, Genesis 14:1
Henoch - The name of (1) a son of Cain; (2) a nephew of Abraham; (3) a son of Ruben; (4) a patriarch, son of Jared and father of Mathusala, who according to Saint Paul "was translated that he should not see death
Ishmael - Of several men named Ishmael in the Bible, the best known is the son born to Abraham through his Egyptian slave-girl, Hagar. He was born as a result of Abraham and Sarah’s failure of faith, when, feeling that Sarah could not produce the son God had promised them, they arranged for Abraham to produce the son through Hagar (Genesis 16:1-3). But he was not the son that God had promised to Abraham as the one through whom he would build his covenant people. God’s promises would be fulfilled through Isaac, the son who was later born to Abraham and Sarah (Genesis 17:15-19). ...
When conflict arose between Sarah and Hagar, Hagar and Ishmael were forced to leave Abraham’s household and establish their own independent existence (Genesis 21:8-21)
Jehovah-Jireh - The name Abraham gave to the place where the Lord provided a sacrifice in place of Isaac
Kadmonites - Orientals, the name of a Canaanitish tribe which inhabited the north-eastern part of Palestine in the time of Abraham (Genesis 15:19 )
Zimran - A son of Abraham and Keturah, Genesis 25:2 = 1 Chronicles 1:32
Shu'ah -
Son of Abraham by Keturah
Posterity - ) The race that proceeds from a progenitor; offspring to the furthest generation; the aggregate number of persons who are descended from an ancestor of a generation; descendants; - contrasted with ancestry; as, the posterity of Abraham
Zimran - Oldest son of Abraham by Keturah (Genesis 25:2)
Epher - Son of Midian, being the son of Abraham and Keturah
Gerar - A city and district in the south of Palestine, and near Gaza, Genesis 10:19; visited by Abraham, Genesis 20:1; by Isaac, Genesis 26:1; Asa pursued the defeated Ethiopians to it
Terah - The father of Abraham, who left Ur to go to Canaan, but died at Haran, in Mesopotamia
Abimelech - ...
Among the Philistines...
After the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, Abraham and Sarah moved through the south of Canaan and settled in the Philistine district of Gerar. Abraham, fearing that the Philistine king Abimelech might kill him in order to take Sarah for his own wife, preserved his life by saying that Sarah was his sister (Genesis 20:1-2; Genesis 20:13; cf. Abimelech did indeed take Sarah, but before he had any sexual relation with her, God warned him that she was Abraham’s wife (Genesis 20:3-7). Abimelech avoided God’s judgment by giving Sarah back to Abraham, along with compensation for the damage he had done to Sarah’s honour (Genesis 20:8-18). ...
Abraham remained in the region by Abimelech’s permission (Genesis 20:15), but his increasing prosperity made Abimelech wary. At Abimelech’s suggestion, the two men made a treaty to ensure peaceful cooperation; but before entering the treaty, Abraham insisted that Abimelech’s herdsmen return to him a well they had seized. The arrangement was sealed by Abimelech’s acceptance of a gift from Abraham (Genesis 21:22-32). ...
Eighty or so years later, when Abraham’s son Isaac settled for a time in Gerar, he created tension with a later Abimelech through the same sort of deceit as Abraham’s (Genesis 26:1; Genesis 26:7-11). This made Abimelech fear him, and on Abimelech’s suggestion the two men renewed the treaty between the former Abimelech and Abraham (Genesis 26:26-32)
Abraham - ABRAHAM. —It is noteworthy that while in the Synoptic Gospels references to the patriarch Abraham are comparatively frequent, and his personality and relation to Israel form part of the historical background which they presuppose, and of the thoughts and conceptions which are their national inheritance, in the Gospel of St. Matthew’s Gospel testifies; it is ‘the book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham. Here the historian records no halting-places in his genealogy, but carries it back in an uninterrupted chain, of which the patriarch Abraham forms but one link (Luke 3:34), to its ultimate source in God. ...
Other references in the Synoptists are on the same plane of thought, and presuppose a prevalent and accepted faith, which not only knew Abraham as the forefather and founder of their national life in the far-off ages of the past, but realized that in some sort or other he was still alive; and it was believed that to be with him, to be received into his bosom (Luke 16:22) was the highest felicity that awaited the righteous man after death. Jesus quotes Exodus 3:6 in proof of the fact of the patriarchs’ resurrection and continued existence (Matthew 22:32 || Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37), inasmuch as the Divine sovereignty here asserted over Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob necessarily implies the conscious life of those who are its subjects. In the Songs of Mary and Zacharias, again (Luke 1:46-55; Luke 1:68-79), Abraham is the forefather of the race, the recipient of the Divine promises (confirmed by an oath, Luke 1:73) of mercy and goodwill to himself and his descendants (cf. And, finally, to be with Abraham and his great sons, to ‘sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven’ (Matthew 8:11), is the desire and reward of the faithful Israelite. This reward, however, Christ teaches, is not confined to the Jews, the sons of Abraham according to the flesh, still less is it one to which they have any right by virtue of the mere fact of physical descent from him; it is one that will be enjoyed by ‘many’ faithful ones from other lands, even to the exclusion of the ‘sons of the kingdom,’ if they prove themselves, like His present opponents, faithless and unworthy (Luke 13:28). ...
The expression ‘Abraham’s bosom’ (Luke 16:22) or ‘bosoms’ (Luke 16:23)*
The figure of Abraham, therefore, in the Gospels is idealized, and invested with a simple grandeur as the head and founder of the race in the indistinct ages of the past, to whom are owing its present privileges, and around whom gather its future hopes. The characteristic Pauline presentation of Abraham as the father of the faithful in a moral and spiritual sense, as the type and pattern of all righteousness and obedience, as it is developed in the Epistles to the Romans and Galatians, is absent (cf. , Abraham and Melchizedek; Romans 4:18 f. 4, of the ten testings or trials (נסיונוח) of Abraham, and Taylor, loc. ; ‘Testament of Abraham,’ ed. —The authorities cited above, with articles on ‘Abraham’ in Bible Dictionaries, and the Commentaries
Abraham - ABRAHAM. —It is noteworthy that while in the Synoptic Gospels references to the patriarch Abraham are comparatively frequent, and his personality and relation to Israel form part of the historical background which they presuppose, and of the thoughts and conceptions which are their national inheritance, in the Gospel of St. Matthew’s Gospel testifies; it is ‘the book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham. Here the historian records no halting-places in his genealogy, but carries it back in an uninterrupted chain, of which the patriarch Abraham forms but one link (Luke 3:34), to its ultimate source in God. ...
Other references in the Synoptists are on the same plane of thought, and presuppose a prevalent and accepted faith, which not only knew Abraham as the forefather and founder of their national life in the far-off ages of the past, but realized that in some sort or other he was still alive; and it was believed that to be with him, to be received into his bosom (Luke 16:22) was the highest felicity that awaited the righteous man after death. Jesus quotes Exodus 3:6 in proof of the fact of the patriarchs’ resurrection and continued existence (Matthew 22:32 || Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37), inasmuch as the Divine sovereignty here asserted over Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob necessarily implies the conscious life of those who are its subjects. In the Songs of Mary and Zacharias, again (Luke 1:46-55; Luke 1:68-79), Abraham is the forefather of the race, the recipient of the Divine promises (confirmed by an oath, Luke 1:73) of mercy and goodwill to himself and his descendants (cf. And, finally, to be with Abraham and his great sons, to ‘sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven’ (Matthew 8:11), is the desire and reward of the faithful Israelite. This reward, however, Christ teaches, is not confined to the Jews, the sons of Abraham according to the flesh, still less is it one to which they have any right by virtue of the mere fact of physical descent from him; it is one that will be enjoyed by ‘many’ faithful ones from other lands, even to the exclusion of the ‘sons of the kingdom,’ if they prove themselves, like His present opponents, faithless and unworthy (Luke 13:28). ...
The expression ‘Abraham’s bosom’ (Luke 16:22) or ‘bosoms’ (Luke 16:23)*
The figure of Abraham, therefore, in the Gospels is idealized, and invested with a simple grandeur as the head and founder of the race in the indistinct ages of the past, to whom are owing its present privileges, and around whom gather its future hopes. The characteristic Pauline presentation of Abraham as the father of the faithful in a moral and spiritual sense, as the type and pattern of all righteousness and obedience, as it is developed in the Epistles to the Romans and Galatians, is absent (cf. , Abraham and Melchizedek; Romans 4:18 f. 4, of the ten testings or trials (נסיונוח) of Abraham, and Taylor, loc. ; ‘Testament of Abraham,’ ed. —The authorities cited above, with articles on ‘Abraham’ in Bible Dictionaries, and the Commentaries
Mamre -
An Amoritish chief in alliance with Abraham (Genesis 14:13,24 ). ) where Abraham dwelt (Genesis 23:17,19 ; 35:27 ); called also in Authorized Version (13:18) the "plain of Mamre," but in Revised Version more correctly "the oaks
Lot - Son of Aran and nephew of Abraham. At the time of the pillage of the latter he was captured and carried away but was soon rescued by Abraham
Daughter - ...
1 Peter 3:6 (b) This name is given to the descendants of Abraham who enjoyed the faith of Abraham, and practiced it
Hagar - An Egyptian woman, the bond-servant of Sarah, whom the latter gave as a concubine to Abraham, and Hagar despised her mistress. On her return she gave birth to Ishmael, and Abraham was then 86 years old
Eber - The line of descent through Joktan produced many of the Arab tribes (Genesis 10:26-30), and the line through Peleg produced those tribes of Mesopotamia to which Abraham belonged (Genesis 11:16-26). The name ‘Hebrew’, by which Abraham and his descendants were known, was taken from the name ‘Eber’ (Genesis 10:21; Genesis 14:13; Genesis 39:17; Exodus 1:22; see HEBREW)
Patriarch - As applied to Bible characters, the term usually denotes either the forefathers of the human race or the progenitors of Israel-Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and his twelve sons. ’ In 4 Maccabees 7:19 reference is made to ‘our patriarchs Abraham, Isaac and Jacob’ (cf. In the NT the term is applied to Abraham (Hebrews 7:4), to the sons of Jacob (Acts 7:8 f
Tithe - ...
Note: Hebrews 7:4-9 shows the superiority of the Melchizedek priesthood to the Levitical, in that (1) Abraham, the ancestor of the Levites, paid "tithes" to Melchizedek ( Genesis 14:20 ); (2) Melchizedek, whose genealogy is outside that of the Levites, took "tithes" of Abraham, the recipient himself of the Divine promises; (3) whereas death is the natural lot of those who receive "tithes," the death of Melchizedek is not recorded; (4) the Levites who received "tithes" virtually paid them through Abraham to Melchizedek
Hebrew - Abraham was a Hebrew, being descended from Shem through Eber (Genesis 11:10-26; Genesis 14:13). The descendants of Abraham, therefore, were also Hebrews (Genesis 39:17; Genesis 40:15; Genesis 43:32). ...
In time the meaning of the name ‘Hebrew’ became more restricted in that it applied only to those who were descendants of Abraham through Isaac and Jacob
Lot - When Abraham and his household moved from Mesopotamia into Canaan, his nephew Lot went with him. He also went with Abraham into Egypt, and then back into Canaan (Genesis 11:26-31; Genesis 12:1-5; Genesis 12:10; Genesis 13:1). ...
Like Abraham, Lot was a wealthy owner of sheep and cattle. When trouble arose between Abraham’s and Lot’s workers, the two households separated. Only swift action by Abraham rescued him (Genesis 14:1-3; Genesis 14:12-16)
Oak, Abraham's - An oak in the vale of Mamre, Chanaan (Quercus pseudo-coccifera), alleged to be the same near which Abraham camped on several occasions, and which is probably the one referred to by Josephus (Jewish Antiquities, 1,10, No
Phicol - He entered into an alliance with Abraham with reference to a certain well which, from this circumstance, was called Beersheba (q
Asshurim - The Asshurim, Letushim, Leummim ( Genesis 25:3 ) were Arabian tribes, supposed to be descended from Abraham and Keturah through Dedan
Hanoch - A grandson of Abraham by Keturah, and third of the sons of Midian ( Genesis 25:4 )
Arphaxad - From Arphaxad in a direct line proceeded Heber, Abraham, Jacob, and consequently all the people of Israel (Genesis 10)
Abraham's Oak - An oak in the vale of Mamre, Chanaan (Quercus pseudo-coccifera), alleged to be the same near which Abraham camped on several occasions, and which is probably the one referred to by Josephus (Jewish Antiquities, 1,10, No
Gerar - An ancient town or place of the Philistines in the times of Abraham and Isaac, Genesis 10:19 20:1 26:1,6,17
Gezireh, Mesopotamia, Iraq, Diocese of - There has been no bishop since Philip Abraham, shot by the Turks, 1915
Jeho'Vah-ji'Reh - (Jehovah will see or provide ), the name given by Abraham to the place on which he had been commanded to offer Isaac, to commemorate the interposition of the angel of Jehovah, who appeared to prevent the sacrifice, ( Genesis 22:14 ) and provided another victim
Genesis - God chose to work through Abraham, one of the few surviving believers. He promised to make from Abraham a nation, to make that nation his people, and to give them Canaan as a national homeland. One of these was a man from Mesopotamia named Abram, later renamed Abraham (11:10-26). ...
After God announced to Abraham his promise of blessing (11:27-12:3), Abraham and his household moved into Canaan. (For a map and other details relevant to Abraham’s varied experiences see Abraham. )...
God made a covenant with Abraham, in which he promised to give him a multitude of descendants (15:1-21); but the birth of Ishmael had no part in the fulfilment of that promise (16:1-16). God then confirmed the covenant with Abraham, giving the rite of circumcision as the sign and seal of the covenant (17:1-27). God tested the faith and obedience of Abraham, but Abraham proved himself totally committed to God, no matter what the circumstances (22:1-23:20). In accordance with God’s will, the blessing of Abraham passed to Jacob instead of to Esau. He knew that just as God’s promise to Abraham of a nation had been largely fulfilled, so his promise of a homeland would also be fulfilled
Heth - Abraham bought his family burial ground from “sons of” or descendants of Heth (Genesis 23:1 )
Hobah - to Genesis 14:16 , Abraham pursued the defeated army of Chedorlaomer
Aner - One of the three Hebronite chiefs who helped Abraham against the four invading kings (Genesis 14:13; Genesis 14:24)
Haran - Son of Terah, and brother of Abraham, and father of Lot
Gerar - It was visited by both Abraham and Isaac
Haran - Son of Terah, and brother of Abraham, and father of Lot
he'Brew - The name is also derived from Eber, "beyond, on the other side," Abraham and his posterity being called Hebrews in order to express a distinction between the races east and west of the Euphrates. It may also be derived from Heber , one of the ancestors of Abraham
Laban - After the father of Abraham migrated to the region of Paddan-aram in northern Mesopotamia, some of the family settled there. Others, such as Abraham and Lot, moved south into Canaan (Genesis 11:31-32; Genesis 12:1-5). He shared with his father in giving permission for his sister, Rebekah, to marry Abraham’s son, Isaac (Genesis 24:15; Genesis 24:29; Genesis 24:50-51)
Patriarch - to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as ancestors of the Israelites, and to the twelve sons of Jacob
Zimran - ” Son of Abraham and Keturah and ancestor of an Arabian tribe (Genesis 25:2 ; 1 Chronicles 1:32 ), possibly identified with Zabram, located somewhere west of Mecca on the Red Sea, and with Zimri (Jeremiah 25:25 )
Aner - An ally of Abraham in the battle against the coalition of kings in Genesis 14:1
Hebrew - ...
The name is derived, according to some, from Eber (Genesis 10:24 ), the ancestor of Abraham. It is the more probable origin of the designation given to Abraham coming among the Canaanites as a man from beyond the Euphrates (Genesis 14:13 ). , that it is from the Hebrew word 'Abhar , "To pass over," whence 'Ebher , In the sense of a "sojourner" or "passer through" as distinct from a "settler" in the land, and thus applies to the condition of Abraham ( Hebrews 11:13 )
Melchisedec, Melchizedek - He came forth to meet Abraham after he had rescued Lot and those taken with him. Melchisedec brought forth bread and wine, and blessed Abraham, and Abraham gave to him tithes of all
Melchizedek - ...
Melchizedek and Abraham . Melchizedek of Salem came out to pronounce a blessing on Abraham who was on his way back to Hebron after rescuing Lot from Kedorlaomer, king of the East (Genesis 14:18-24 ). As they ate, Melchizedek pronounced a blessing on Abraham in the name of God Most High. ...
The willingness with which Abraham acceded to Melchizedek as a priest of God Most High is a most interesting aspect of this narrative. This name apparently connoted the same meaningful theology to Abraham as the name "God Almighty" (Exodus 6:3 ). Abraham also equated God with "Creator of heaven and earth" (Genesis 14:22 ; cf. ...
Second, the references to being "without father or mother" (7:3) and to being an "order forever" (7:3,16, 17,24) are to be understood as referring to the kind of priestly order rather than to the longevity of a particular priest of Abraham's time
Cethites - When Abraham came to Chanaan, he found a Hethite colony clustered around Hebron (Genesis 23; 26)
Dale, the King's - ), near the Dead Sea, where the king of Sodom met Abraham (Genesis 14:17 )
Hanoch - Son of Midian and grandson of Abraham and thus one of the Midianites (Genesis 25:4 )
Hobah - Place 'on the left hand,' that is, to the north of Damascus, to which Abraham pursued the kings who had captured Lot
Hethites - When Abraham came to Chanaan, he found a Hethite colony clustered around Hebron (Genesis 23; 26)
Hebrew - ) An appellative of Abraham or of one of his descendants, esp
Medan - The third son of Abraham by Keturah, Genesis 25:2
Jehovah-Jireh - Jehovah will provide, the name given by Abraham to the place where he had been on the point of slaying his son Isaac, Genesis 22:14
Patriarch - This term is usually applied to (1) the antediluvian fathers of the human race; (2) the three great progenitors of Israel Abraham, Isaac, Jacob (see sep
Lot - ” Lot was the son of Haran and nephew of Abraham (Genesis 11:27 ). When Abraham left Haran for Canaan, he was accompanied by Lot and Lot's household (Genesis 12:10-20 ). ...
After traveling throughout Canaan and into Egypt, Abraham and Lot finally settled between Bethel and Ai, about ten miles north of Jerusalem (Genesis 13:3 ). Abraham and Lot acquired herds and flocks so large that the land was unable to support both (Genesis 13:2 ,Genesis 13:2,13:5 ). In addition, the herdsmen of Abraham and Lot did not get along (Genesis 13:7 ). Thus, to secure ample pasturelands for their flocks and to avoid any further trouble, Abraham suggested they separate. Abraham allowed Lot to take his choice of the land. Lot took advantage of Abraham's generosity and chose the well-watered Jordan Valley where the city of Sodom was located (Genesis 13:8-12 ). ...
Some interesting details of the split between Abraham and Lot remind the reader of earlier events in Genesis. This detail not only recalls Abraham's nearly disastrous journey to Egypt to avoid the famine in Canaan (Genesis 12:5 ) but also foreshadows the journey that Jacob and his family would later make (Genesis 42-50 )—a journey that did have disastrous consequences (Exodus 1:8-14 ). Abraham, upon hearing of Lot's fate, gathered an army and rescued his nephew (Genesis 14:13-16 ). God had already told Abraham that He intended to destroy Sodom and Gomorrah ( Genesis 18:20 ). Abraham interceded on behalf of Sodom, that if ten righteous men were found in Sodom that God would not destroy the city (Genesis 18:32 ). Abraham had rescued Lot, again, ( Genesis 19:29 ; compare Genesis 12:4 )
Shibah - In Genesis 21:22-31 we have another account, according to which the well was dug by Abraham and received its name from the oath between Abraham and Abimelech. Perhaps the name, however, was already in existence before Abraham’s time, and the writer simply gives a more or less plausible explanation of its derivation
Terah - He had three sons, Haran, Nahor, and Abraham, and one daughter, Sarah. Terah afterwards migrated with Abraham (probably his youngest son) and Lot (his grandson), together with their families, from Ur, intending to go with them to Canaan; but he tarried at Haran, where he spent the remainder of his days, and died at the age of two hundred and five years (Genesis 11:24-32 ; Joshua 24:2 )
Nahor - Son of Serug, father of Terah, and grandfather of Abraham (Genesis 11:22-26 ). Son of Terah and brother of Abraham (Genesis 11:26 ). City in Mesopotamia where Abraham's servant sought and found a wife for Isaac (Genesis 24:10 ); this in keeping with the ancient custom of marrying within one's family
he'Bron - It was a well-known town when Abraham entered Canaan, 3800 years ago. (Joshua 15:13,14 ; 21:13 ) Sarah died at Hebron; and Abraham then bought from Ephron the Hittite the field and cave of Machpelah, to serve as a family tomb (Genesis 23:2-20 ) The cave is still there, and the massive walls of the Haram or mosque, within which it lies, form the most remarkable object in the whole city. Abraham is called by Mohammedans el-Khulil , "the Friend," i. This, say some, is the very tree beneath which Abraham pitched his tent, and it still bears the name of the patriarch
Isaac - (a) (1713-1533 BCE) Second of the three Patriarchs, son of Abraham and Sarah, husband of Rebecca, father of Jacob and Esau
e'Phah - Son of Midian, being the son of Abraham and Keturah, and referred to by Isaiah as the head of a tribe
Ashes - Thus Abraham calls himself "dust and ashes
Heth - Ephron, who was an inhabitant of that city, was of the race of Heth; and in the time of Abraham the whole city were of the family of Heth
Vouchsafe - 1: ὁμολογέω (Strong's #3670 — Verb — homologeo — hom-ol-og-eh'-o ) "to agree," is found in the best texts in Acts 7:17 , and rendered "vouchsafed," RV, with reference to God's promise to Abraham; some mss
e'Phah - Son of Midian, being the son of Abraham and Keturah, and referred to by Isaiah as the head of a tribe
Lot - Abraham was the father of the faithful. Lot was singularly happy in having a grandfather like Terah, and an uncle like Abraham. All men are not gifted as Abraham was gifted. All men are not called as Abraham was called. And the most part of our young men cannot do a wiser or a better thing for a long time to come than just to follow their fathers and their other forerunners like Terah and Abraham. Had Lot just held on as he began; had he kept close to Abraham, and had he been content to share Abraham's prospects and prosperity and peace, Lot would have lived a pure and a happy life; he would have escaped many sorrows, and, instead of being scarcely saved; saved indeed, but saved with the fire and brimstone of Sodom and Gomorrah smouldering in his skirts; he would have gone down to a truly patriarchal grave, an elder of a good report and a father of a blameless name. He left Chaldea and came to Haran with the Abrahamic emigration. When Abraham rose up and left Haran and entered the land of promise Lot went all the way with him. Wherever Abraham went, Lot went. Where Abraham built an altar, Lot either offered at that altar or he built another like it for himself. When the Lord spoke to Abraham, the uncle never hid from the nephew any word of the Lord that could either guide him in his behaviour or confirm him in his pilgrimage. When the terrible famine fell on Canaan, Abraham took Lot down to Egypt with him; and after the famine passed off, Lot returned to the land of promise with his chastened uncle. ...
I am not sure that Egypt had not been a sore temptation to Lot as well as to Abraham. And Abraham's fall in Egypt, and, especially, Abraham's fast-growing indifference to his fast-growing wealth, would be a secret delight to Lot. And then, that Abraham and Sarah with all their wealth had no son! Why, let Lot just wait on a few years and the whole of the immense family inheritance will be his. He will be the undisputed heir of Terah, and Abraham, and Sarah, and all. True, there was that Eliczer of Damascus, and some other men who were deep in Abraham's confidence, and much trusted by him,-but blood is thicker than water, and Lot will live in hope. ...
It was Lot's highest interest to behave himself well before Abraham, and to do nothing that would lead Abraham to suspect his nephew's false and sordid heart. And had Abraham not been a weak, old, unworldly soul; had Abraham not borne all things, and believed all things, and hoped all things, and endured all things, Lot would soon have reaped as he had sown. But Abraham was what he was, and Lot had his profit out that. Abraham had come up out of Egypt overwhelmed with shame and broken in his heart; and one result of all that was that he was overwhelmed with shame at his increasing prosperity also. Abraham, after Egypt, was the first father of all those who since his day have every day said, He hath not dealt with us after our sins, nor rewarded us according to our iniquities. Every new acre of pasture land, and every new well of water for his cattle, and every new time of stocktaking, only made Abraham confess himself more and more a stranger and a pilgrim with God on the earth. They removed the landmarks; they drew off the water; they picked constant quarrels with Abraham's patient herdmen, till the strife between the two camps was the scandal of the whole country round. Hear, then, what the first peacemaker in the Bible said, and go and say and do likewise, 'And Abraham took Lot and said to him, Let there be no strife, I pray thee, between me and thee, and between my herdmen and thy herdmen; for we be brethren. ' O my friends, labour to have a heart created within you that will make it simply impossible for you ever to do to anybody what Lot did that day to Abraham. Abraham chose household peace; while Lot chose good pasture ground at the cost of disgrace, and shamelessness, and all unhandsomeness and ingratitude, and got Sodom to the boot of the bargain. Abraham, though the older man, and the man, moreover, with all the title-deeds to all the land of Canaan in his hands, put all that wholly aside and placed himself on an equality with his dependent nephew; placed himself under Lot, indeed, and gave him his choice. ...
Just when Lot is beginning to make the acquaintance of the men of Sodom, and is finding them, as he was sure he would find them, not so bad as they were reported; just as he was opening accounts for his tent and his camp with the merchants of Sodom, the Lord is hastening down to redress the wrong and to recognise and recompense Abraham. And thus it is that we go on to read that the Lord said to Abraham, after that Lot was departed from him, 'Lift up now thine eyes, and look from the place where thou art, northward, and southward, and eastward, and westward. Then Abraham removed his tent, and came and dwelt in the land of Mamre, and built there an altar to the Lord. ' With all that, then, which is it to be with you? The plain of Jordan with Lot, or the plain of Mamre with Abraham? A family altar with the father of the faithful, or a seat at sunset in the gate of Sodom with Lot?...
Lot was not long in getting a lesson that would have brought a less besotted sinner to his senses. But as Lot's guardian angel would have it, one of Lot's herdmen escaped; and how his heart would sink as he came near Abraham's encampment at Hebron! But to whom else could he go? His own conscience of the past bitterly upbraided him as he told Abraham the disaster; but Abraham had something else to do than to trample on a fallen man. Abraham fell upon the sleeping camp, and Lot was a free man next morning with all his goods
Ishmael - Son of Abraham and Hagar the bondmaid of Sarah. Abraham prayed that Ishmael might live before God, but typically he represents the seed of Abraham according to the flesh, hence though God answered that He would bless Ishmael, and multiply him exceedingly, he should also beget twelve princes, and God would make him a great nation; yet the covenant should be established with Isaac. When Ishmael was thirteen years old Abraham circumcised him, and all the men of his house. In this act Abraham acknowledged in faith that the blessing asked for his natural seed could not be had through the strength of the flesh: all the mercies of God are secured in resurrection. ...
At the 'great feast' when Isaac, the child born after the Spirit, was weaned, Ishmael mocked, and Sarah besought Abraham to cast out both mother and son. This was grievous to Abraham, but God, having approved the suggestion, he rose early in the morning, and providing them with some bread and a bottle of water he sent them away. God was with the lad, for he was the seed of Abraham; he dwelt in the wilderness and became an archer
Genesis, Theology of - Genesis has the following structure:...
Prologue...
Primeval History...
1:1-11:26...
Transition...
Genealogy...
11:27-32...
Threat...
The Abraham Cycle...
12:1-25:11...
Transition...
Genealogy...
24:12-18...
Threat...
The Jacob Cycle...
25:19-35:22b...
Transition...
Genealogy...
35:22c-36:40...
Threat...
The Joseph Cycle...
37:1-46:7...
Transition...
Genealogy...
46:8-27...
Resolution...
Settlement in Egypt...
46:28-50:26...
The "Primeval History" (Genesis 1:1-11:26 ) sets the stage for the whole of the book. Although the ancestors are Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and the twelve, the literary narrative concentrates on Abraham, Jacob, and Joseph. It is a divine call that first takes Abraham away from his homes in Ur and Haran to Canaan (12:1-5). By divine intervention Abraham is repeatedly delivered and even prospers, as in his sojourn to Egypt (12:10-20). This "gospel" is built around Abraham. In the first text (12:1-9), Abraham receives the command to abandon his homeland with the promise that his offspring will be a great nation. In the second text (15:1-21), God makes a covenant with Abraham. God identifies himself, then rejects the suggestion that Eliezer of Damascus might be Abraham's heir, and promises Abraham many descendants and the land of Canaan. Abraham believes, offers a sacrifice, and hears a prophecy concerning his offspring of dark days of slavery followed by the possession of the promised land. God again identifies himself to Abraham and again promises many offspring and the possession of Canaan. He rejects the suggestion that Ishmael may be the heir, and demands that Abraham and all his male descendants undergo circumcision as the sign of the covenant. Abraham obeys. The fourth text (22:1-19), like the first, begins with God commanding Abraham to leave his home, only this time it is to take his son up a mountain and sacrifice him to God. Abraham obeys, only he is prevented from carrying out the sacrifice by the angel of the Lord and sacrifices a ram instead. Through these stories the Israelites learned that they were heirs of a covenant between Yahweh and Abraham. They also saw, vividly portrayed in the life of Abraham, the importance of faith and obedience to Yahweh. Most of these are brief references to the promises given "to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob" (e. First and foremost, Christ is regarded as descended from Abraham and as the fulfillment of all the promises (Matthew 1:1-2 ; cf. The line of the promise was narrowed to the line of Seth (Genesis 5 ), Shem (9:26-27), Abraham (12:1-3), Isaac (26:2-5), Jacob (28:10-17), and Judah (49:10). His case for justification by grace through faith to a great degree rests upon the story of Abraham and in particular on SPACE 46:28-503 , which records that Abraham believed God and that God reckoned his faith as righteousness. In Romans 4:18-25 he compares the faith of Abraham in the promised son to the faith of Christians in Jesus and the resurrection. James, by contrast, emphasizes the obedience of Abraham in offering up his son Isaac for sacrifice (2:21). ...
Hebrews uses Genesis 14:17-20 to demonstrate the supremacy of Christ's priesthood (the order of Melchizedek) to that of the Levites, since Levi was in effect in the loins of Abraham when he gave the tithe to Melchizedek (7:1-10). On a less complex level, Hebrews also refers to Abel, Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph as examples of persevering faith (11:4-22). Garrett...
See also Abraham ; Adam ; Create, Creation ; Eve ; Fall, the ; Flood, the ...
Bibliography
Epher - Son of Midian, grandson of Abraham through his wife Keturah, and clan father among the Midianites (Genesis 25:4 )
Isaac - The heir of promise, son of Abraham by his wife Sarah, born when his father was 100 years old. Abraham had smiled incredulously when the promise was renewed to him and Sarah designated as the mother of the promised seed, and Sarah laughed derisively afterwards when she heard the reiterated word. Isaac's life was far less stirring than that of his father Abraham, or that of his son Jacob. Isaac stands forth the model of that loving submission which those who become sons and heirs of God ought to pay to their heavenly parent, as inheritors of his father Abraham's faith
Moriah - This was "the land of Moriah" to which Abraham went to offer up his son Isaac (Genesis 22:2 ). Here also, one thousand years after Abraham, David built an altar and offered sacrifices to God
Isaac - God promised Abraham and Sarah that, in spite of their old age, they would produce a child through whom God would carry on the process of fulfilling his covenant promises. ...
Isaac and his father...
It was entirely contrary to nature that a couple as old as Abraham and Sarah should produce a child, but this proved that it was the work of God (Genesis 18:10-14; Genesis 21:5). God had made a promise, and Abraham and Sarah had acted on it in faith. )...
Abraham’s faith was further tested when God told him to sacrifice Isaac (by that time a youth; Genesis 22:6), the only person through whom God’s promises to him could be fulfilled. Abraham obeyed, believing that God was able to bring Isaac back from death. In a sense Abraham did receive Isaac back from death, when God provided a lamb as a sacrificial substitute for him (Genesis 22:1-2; Genesis 22:12-13; Hebrews 11:17-19; James 2:21-23). ...
In seeking a wife for Isaac, Abraham insisted that she come not from the Canaanites (who were under God’s judgment) but from his relatives in Paddan-aram. Since Isaac himself was not to leave the land promised to him (Canaan), Abraham sent his most senior servant to find the wife for him (Genesis 24:2-6). Later Isaac passed on the blessing of the Abrahamic covenant to Jacob knowingly and willingly (Genesis 28:3-4)
Kenizzite -
The name of a tribe referred to in the covenant God made with Abraham (Genesis 15:19 )
Medan - ” Third son of Abraham and Keturah (Genesis 25:2 ; 1 Chronicles 1:32 ) and ancestor of a little-known Arab tribe
Hanoch, Henoch - Son of Midian, and grandson of Abraham and Keturah
Chedorlaomer - This was one of the four confederated kings, who made war upon the five kings of the pentapolis of Sodom; and who, after having defeated them, and made themselves masters of a great booty, were pursued and dispersed by Abraham, Genesis 14
Patriarchs - This name is given to the ancient fathers, chiefly those who lived before Moses, as Adam, Lamech, Noah, Shem, &c, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, the sons of Jacob, and heads of the tribes
Keturah - The wife of Abraham, after the death of Sarah, Genesis 25:1-6
Jehovah-Jireh - , will provide, the name given by Abraham to the scene of his offering up the ram which was caught in the thicket on Mount Moriah
Kedar - ” The second son of Ishmael and a grandson of Abraham (Genesis 25:13 ; 1 Chronicles 1:29 ). See Abraham ; Ishmael
Gerar - Chief city of the Philistines in Abraham's and Isaac's time; now Khirbet el Gerar. The fertile region between the two deserts of Kadesh and Shut; resorted to therefore by Abraham and Isaac in time of famine. ) The people were pastoral in the times of Abraham, but warlike, with a regular "chief captain of the army," Phichol (the "mouth of all," implying a commanding voice as commander-in-chief
Gerar - A place mentioned in Genesis 10:19 in the boundary of the Canaanite territory near Gaza, wheres Abraham sojourned and came in contact with a certain ‘Abimelech king of Gerar’ ( Genesis 20:1 ). Possibly there were two Gerars: the Abrahamic Gerar has also been identified with Wady Jerâr , 13 miles W. The problem, like that of the mention of Philistines in connexion with this place in the time of Abraham, has not yet been solved
Look - 15:5, where it is used in the sense of “take a good look,” as God commands Abraham: “Look now toward heaven, and [1] the stars. … Look unto Abraham your father
Moriah - Here, also, Abraham is supposed to have been directed to offer his son Isaac, Genesis 22:1-2 . Moriah implies "vision;" and the "land of Moriah," mentioned in the above passage in the history of Abraham, was probably so called from being seen "afar off
Haran - The eldest son of Terah, brother of Abraham, and father of Lot, Milcah, and Iscah. Here, after leaving Ur, Abraham dwelt till is father Terah died; and to this old homestead Isaac sent for a wife, and Jacob fled from the wrath of Esau, Genesis 11:31,32 ; 12:5 ; 24:1-67 ; 27:43 ; 28:10 ; 29:4
Jehovah - See Exodus 3:14 , I AM THAT I AM, the meaning of which see under the article Exodus 6:3 , God says, "I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, by the name of God Almighty; but by my name Jehovah was I not known to them;" yet the appellation Jehovah appears to have been known from the beginning, Genesis 4:2 . We have reason to believe that God himself, who named man Adam, named himself Genesis 17:1 26:11 ; or, "I am Jehovah, the God of Abraham," etc
Melchizedek - The apostle there points out the superiority of his priesthood to that of Aaron in these several respects, (1) Even Abraham paid him tithes; (2) he blessed Abraham; (3) he is the type of a Priest who lives for ever; (4) Levi, yet unborn, paid him tithes in the person of Abraham; (5) the permanence of his priesthood in Christ implied the abrogation of the Levitical system; (6) he was made priest not without an oath; and (7) his priesthood can neither be transmitted nor interrupted by death: "this man, because he continueth ever, hath an unchangeable priesthood
Jehovah-Jireh - " (Genesis 22:14) And the general acceptation of the words in the esteem of believers is, that the Lord will do by all of that character as he did by Abraham, and in every critical moment manifest his grace towards them, in proof that he doth both see and provide for them. Abraham saith, "to this day in the mount of the Lord shall it be seen;" by which it appears, that the mount of the Lord was to be the place where this provision and sight of JEHOVAH was to be seen. Surely there was a prophecy in these words relating to the very spot of Abraham's mercy, as well as the mercy itself. And was not this with an eye to the Lamb of God, in after-ages to be provided for the whole church, as well as the ram the Lord had then provided for Abraham's burnt offering? Recollect that this mount Moriah was near the spot, if not the very spot itself, afterwards called mount Calvary. And as Abraham's offering was wholly typical, surely nothing could be more suited to the expression in calling the place JEHOVAH Jireh. As if Abraham had said, Here shall be one day seen the wonders of redemption! Here God will, indeed, provide himself a lamb for a burnt offering!...
ha'Gar - (flight ), an Egyptian woman, the handmaid or slave of Sarah, ( Genesis 16:1 ) whom the latter gave as a concubine to Abraham, after he had dwelt ten years in the land of Canaan and had no children by Sarah. 4, and Sarah, with the anger, we may suppose, of a free woman rather than of a wife, reproached Abraham for the results of her own act. On her return she gave birth to Ishmael, and Abraham was then eighty-six years old
Lot - The son of Haran, brother of Abraham. He was born in Ur, and went with Abraham to Haran, and thence to Canaan. He accompanied Abraham in much of his wandering. 14) he was carried away captive, and rescued by Abraham
Kirjath-Arba - The city of Arba, Arba being its founder, or the city of Four—Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Adam having been buried there—is mentioned Genesis 23:2; Genesis 35:27; Joshua 14:15; Joshua 15:13; Joshua 15:54; Joshua 20:7; Joshua 21:11; Judges 1:10; Nehemiah 11:25
Grove - In Genesis 21:33 , a tree planted in Beersheba by Abraham
Bethuel -
The son of Nahor by Milcah; nephew of Abraham, and father of Rebekah (Genesis 22:22,23 ; 24:15,24,47 )
Iscah - Thus she was an intimate part of the ancestral family of Abraham (Genesis 11:29 )
Keturah - A secondary wife or concubine taken by Abraham, whether in Sarah's lifetime or afterward is uncertain (Genesis 25:1; 1 Chronicles 1:28; 1 Chronicles 1:32)
Negeb - The region features prominently in the Old Testament story from the time of Abraham onwards (Genesis 13:1; Numbers 13:25-29; 1 Samuel 30:14)
Buz - The second son of Nahor and Milcah, and nephew of Abraham ( Genesis 22:21 )
Arioch - King of Ellasar, who joined alliance against Sodom and Gomorrah (Genesis 14:1 ) but was eventually defeated by Abraham
Allegory - The passage does not mean that Abraham having two sons was an allegory: it was history, but that history had an allegorical application, which Paul, by the Holy Ghost, fully explains
no'Dab - It is probable that Nodab, their ancestor, was the son of Ishmael, being mentioned with two of his other sons in the passage above cited, and was therefore a grandson of Abraham
Isaac - As Isaac was the patriarch that stood between Abraham and Jacob, it may seem remarkable that so little is recorded of him, especially as the promise given to Abraham, of all nations being blessed through his seed, was confirmed to Isaac. He was 'the son of promise,' born when Abraham was a hundred years old, and 'the son of the freewoman,' in contrast to 'the son of the bondwoman. Abraham's faith was tried when told to offer up this son of promise, called his 'only son,' as being a type of Christ. Abraham obeyed, and Isaac heard that beautiful utterance of faith, "My son, God will provide himself a lamb. ...
As Isaac thus became in principle a risen or heavenly man, he must not return for a wife to the country from whence he had been separated by death and resurrection, as also by the call of Abraham; a bride must be fetched for him from thence, and she must be one of the same 'kindred:' a remarkable type of the heavenly Christ, and of those given to Him of the Father: they are heavenly as He is heavenly. Abraham had several sons; but he gave all that he had to Isaac, in which Isaac is again a type of Christ, who will possess all things. God confirmed the blessing promised to Abraham, both as to Isaac's seed possessing all those countries, and also as to all the nations of the earth being blessed in his seed. He was thus again in the truth of his calling within the limits of the land of promise: there the Lord again appeared to him, and told him not to fear, He would bless him for his father Abraham's sake. God is constantly referred to as the God of Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob: it was through them the blessings to Israel flowed, and through them came the Seed — Christ — in whom all nations of the earth are being blessed
Padan-Aram - Padan-aram (pâ'dan-â'ram), the low highland, where Abraham got a wife for bis son Isaac, Genesis 25:20; Genesis 28:2; Genesis 28:5; Genesis 28:7, and Jacob found his wives, and where Laban lived
Shem - Through his line came Abraham and the covenant of blessing
Shuah - A son of Abraham and Keturah, Genesis 25:2 , 1 Chronicles 1:32
Ephron - ), which Abraham bought for 400 shekels of silver (Genesis 23:8-17 ; 25:9 ; 49:29,30 )
Covering of the Eyes - , Abimelech's present of 1,000 pieces of silver to Abraham) is for thee a covering of the eyes
Fatness - The gentile believer had become a sharer in the spiritual life and blessing bestowed by Divine covenant upon Abraham and his descendants as set forth under the figure of "the root of (not 'and') the fatness of the olive tree
Kirjath-Arba - , of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Adam, who were all, as they allege, buried there
Sarah - (a) (1803-1677 BCE) First of the four Matriarchs, wife of Abraham
Agar - (Hebrew: wandering) ...
Handmaid of Sara (Genesis 16; 21; Galatians 4) by whom Abraham begot Ismael
Bow Down, to - An act of respect between man and man, very common in the East, as Abraham bowed down himself before the people of the land when he bought a burying place for his dead
Concubine - Such were Hagar and Keturah, the concubines of Abraham; and such concubines were allowed by the Roman laws
Latchet - Genesis 14:23 (c) Abraham thus shows his disdain for the slightest favor which might be offered him by an idolatrous king
Jethro - See Exodus 18:10,11 , and some infer that he was a descendant of Abraham, through Midian, Genesis 25:2
Bildad - A descendant of Abraham by Keturah, Genesis 25:1,2
Circumcision - ...
Meaning of circumcision...
The first person God commanded to be circumcised was Abraham. God had made a covenant with Abraham to be his God, to give him a multitude of descendants who would be his special people, and to give those people Canaan as their homeland. God required that Abraham, his household, and all his descendants throughout future generations be circumcised if they were to be his people according to the covenant (Genesis 17:9-13; Acts 7:8). ...
Abraham believed God’s promises and acted upon his commands. The law of Moses set out regulations for those who had already become God’s people as a result of the covenant he had made with Abraham. Abraham was saved by faith, and that occurred before the law was given and at a time when he was still uncircumcised. ...
Abraham may be the physical father of the Israelites, but more importantly he is the spiritual father of all who are saved by faith, whether or not they are Israelites and whether or not they are circumcised (Romans 4:11-12). ...
No longer necessary...
Circumcision was a sign of God’s covenant with Abraham, and that covenant reached its fulfilment in Jesus Christ. Through him, the one descendant of Abraham to whom all the promises pointed, people of all nations can receive the blessings of God’s salvation (Genesis 12:1-3; Luke 1:54-55; Luke 1:72-73; Romans 4:16-17; Galatians 3:6-9; Galatians 3:16; Galatians 3:29)
Hagar - Flight, or, according to others, stranger, an Egyptian, Sarah's handmaid (Genesis 16:1 ; 21:9,10 ), whom she gave to Abraham (q. In obedience to the heavenly visitor she returned to the tent of Abraham, where her son Ishmael was born, and where she remained (16) till after the birth of Isaac, the space of fourteen years. This was accordingly done, although with reluctance on the part of Abraham (Genesis 21:14 )
Machpelah - The tract containing the field and cave in the end of Ephron's field, which Abraham bought as his burying ground from Ephron and the sons of Heth (Genesis 23:9); his only possession in the land of promise. ) The sepulchers of Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, Rebekah, Jacob, and Leah are shown on the mosque floor; but the real sepulchers are in the cave below the floor; the cave opens to the S
Ephron - The Hittite from whom Abraham purchased the field or plot of ground in which was the cave of Machpelah ( Genesis 23:1-20 ). The purchase is described with great particularity; and the transactions between Ephron and Abraham are conducted with an elaborate courtesy characteristic of Oriental proceedings
Haran - the eldest son of Terah, and brother to Abraham and Nahor. HARAN, otherwise called Charran, in Mesopotamia, a city celebrated for having been the place to which Abraham removed first, after he left Ur, Genesis 11:31-32 , and where Terah was buried
Peleg - ” Descendant of Shem (Genesis 10:25 ), ancestor of Abraham (Genesis 11:16-19 ; 1Chronicles 1:19,1 Chronicles 1:25 ) and Jesus (Luke 3:35 ). Though Peleg's descendants are only traced through Abraham, Peleg is recognized as the ancestor of all the Semitic peoples of Mesopotamia, while his brother Joktan was ancestor of the Arabian Semites
Ishmael -
Abraham's eldest son, by Hagar the concubine (Genesis 16:15 ; 17:23 ). He was born at Mamre, when Abraham was eighty-six years of age, eleven years after his arrival in Canaan (16:3; 21:5). On the occasion of the weaning of Isaac his rude and wayward spirit broke out in expressions of insult and mockery (21:9,10); and Sarah, discovering this, said to Abraham, "Expel this slave and her son. " Influenced by a divine admonition, Abraham dismissed Hagar and her son with no more than a skin of water and some bread. He was about ninety years of age when his father Abraham died, in connection with whose burial he once more for a moment reappears
Abraham - ...
Abraham ("father of a multitude". Nahor married his niece Milcah: Abraham Iscah, i. The alphabetical Hebrew system is Phoenician, and was probably brought by Abraham to Canaan, where it became modified. Abraham, at God's call, went forth from Ur of the Chaldees (Genesis 11:31-12). His being oldest appears from the fact that his brothers married his daughters, and that Sarai was only ten years younger than Abraham (Genesis 17:17); the two younger were born subsequently, Abram, the youngest, when Terah was 130, as appears from comparing Genesis 11:31 with Genesis 12:4; Acts 7:3-4; "before he dwelt in Charran Ηaran , while he was in Mesopotamia," in his 60th year, at Ur he received his first call: "Depart from thy land, to a land which I will show thee" (as yet the exact land was not defined). Silly traditions as to Terah being a maker of idols, and Abraham having been east into a fiery furnace by Nimrod for disbelief in idols, were drawn from this Scripture, and from Ur ("fire"). Scripture records nothing further than that his chief servant was Eliezer of Damascus; he pursued Chedorlaomer to Hobah, on the left of Damascus, subsequently (Genesis 14:15), Abraham entered Canaan along the valley of the Jabbok, and encamped first in the rich Moreh valley, near Sichem, between mounts Ebal and Gerizim. Abraham in faith) for which he was most noted. Probably the Hyksos (akin to the Hebrew), or shepherds' dynasty, reigned then at Memphis, which would make Abraham's visit specially acceptable there. The promise of a direct heir too may have influenced Lot, as, no longer being heir, to seek a more fixed home, in the region of Sodom, than he had with Abraham, "dwelling in tents. His third resting place was Mamre, near Hebron ("association", namely, that of Abraham, Mamre, Eshcol, and Aner; next called Kirjath Arba; then it resumed its old name, Hebron, the future capital of Judah). " Abraham, with 318 followers, and aided by the Amorite chiefs, Mamre, Eshcol, and Aner, overtook the victorious invaders near Jordan's springs, and attacked them by night from different quarters and routed them, and recovered Lot with all the men and the goods carried off. ...
His disinterestedness was evinced in refusing any of the goods which Arabian war usage entitled him to, lest the king of worldly Sodom should say, "I have made Abraham rich" (compare Esther 9:15-16; 2 Kings 5:16; contrast Lot, Genesis 13:10-11). Melchizedek, one of the only native princes who still served Jehovah, and was at once king and priest, blessed Abraham in the name of the Most High God, possessor of heaven and earth, and blessed God in Abraham's name, by a beautiful reciprocation of blessing, and ministered to him bread and wine; and Abraham "gave him tithes of all. " Immediately after Abraham had refused worldly rewards Jehovah in vision said, "I am . Abraham in his 99th year was recalled to the standing of faith by Jehovah's charge, "Walk before Me and be thou perfect" (Genesis 17). His name was changed at circumcision from Abram to Abraham (father of many nations), to mark that the covenant was not to include merely his seed after the flesh, the Israelites, but the numerous Gentile nations also, who in his Seed, Christ, should be children of his faith (Galatians 3). Now first, Jehovah, with two ministering angels, reveals Himself and His judicial purposes (Genesis 18) in familiar intercourse with Abraham as "the friend of God" (John 15:15; Psalms 25:14; 2 Chronicles 20:7; James 2:23; Amos 3:7), and accepts his intercession to a very great extent for the doomed cities of the plain. A mile from Hebron stands a massive oak, called "Abraham's oak. It stood within the enclosure, "Abraham's house. Ishmael's expulsion, though painful to the father who clung to him (Genesis 17:18), was needed to teach Abraham that all ties must give way to the one great end. The full spiritual meaning of it, but faintly revealed to Abraham, appears in Galatians 4:22-31. ...
When Isaac was 25 years old the crowning trial whereby Abraham's. " The "figure" was: Isaac's death (in Abraham's intention) and rescue from it (2 Corinthians 1:9-10) vividly represented Christ's death and resurrection on the "third" day (Genesis 22:4). ...
The ram's substitution represented Christ's vicarious death: it was then that Abraham saw Christ's day and was glad (John 8:56). Sarah died at Kirjath Arba, whither Abraham had returned from Beersheba. ...
His care that he and his should be utterly separated from idolatry appears in his strict charge to Eliezer as to the choice of Isaac's wife, not to take a Canaanite woman nor yet to bring his son back to Abraham's original home. Abraham being left alone at Isaac's marriage, and having his youthful vigor renewed at Isaac's generation, married Keturah. Through his descendants, the Arabs, Israelites, and descendants of Midian, "children of the East," Abraham's name is still widely known in Asia
Ishbak - ) Son of Abraham and Keturah (Genesis 25:2; 1 Chronicles 1:32)
Moriah - The place where Abraham was directed to offer Isaac as a sacrifice
Ephah - A son of Midian, descended from Abraham and Keturah ( Genesis 25:4 = 1 Chronicles 1:33 ), the eponymous ancestor of an Arabian tribe whose identity is uncertain
Hospitality - This was a striking feature of oriental life, as seen practised by Abraham in Genesis 18:2-8 , and it continues in these days to a partial extent
Thread - Abraham would not receive it
Nahor - son of Terah, and brother of Abraham, Genesis 11:26
Nahor - Son of Terah, and brother of Abraham and Haran
Kenizzites - An ancient people of Canaan, whose land God promised to the descendants of Abraham, Genesis 15:19
Midian, Midianites - Personal and clan name meaning, “strife” ...
Midian was the son of Abraham by his concubine Keturah (Genesis 25:2 ). Abraham sent him and his brothers away to the east, leading to the assocation of the Midianites with the “children of the east” (Judges 6:3 ). Since the caravan in the passage is described as Ishmaelite, it is possible that these two groups descended from Abraham had become interrelated
Hamor - Abraham bought only a burying place, Jacob a dwelling place, which long after was also Joseph's burial place (Joshua 24:32) referred to by Stephen (Acts 7:16). "Jacob and our fathers were carried over into Sychem and laid in a sepulchre that Abraham bought . ...
Stephen with elliptical brevity sums up from six chaps, of Old Testament in one sentence the double purchase (by Abraham from Ephron the Hittite, Genesis 23; and by Jacob from the children of Hamor), the double burial place (Abraham's cave of Machpelah and Jacob's ground near Shechem), and the double burial (of Jacob in the cave of Machpelah, and of Joseph in the ground at Shechem), just because the details were familiar to both himself and the Jewish council; not, as rationalism objects, because he was ignorant of or forgot the historical facts so notorious from the Old Testament
Patriarchs - Abraham (Hebrews 7:4), Jacob's sons (Acts 7:8-9), David (Acts 2:29). The "patriarchal dispensation" is the covenant between God and the godly seed, Seth, Noah, Abraham, and their descendants; the freedom of intercourse with God is simple and childlike, as contrasted with the sterner aspect of the Mosaic dispensation. All nations were to be blessed in Abraham
i'Saac - (laughter ), the son whom Sara bore to Abraham, in the hundredth year of his age, at Gerar. ) In his infancy he became the object of Ishmael's jealousy; and in his youth the victim, in intention, of Abraham's great sacrificial act of faith. In reference to the offering up of Isaac by Abraham, the primary doctrine taught are those of sacrifice and substitution, as the means appointed by God for taking away sin; and, as co-ordinate with these, the need of the obedience of faith, on the part of man, to receive the benefit. (Hebrews 11:17 ) The animal which God provided and Abraham offered was in the whole history of sacrifice the recognized type of "the Lamb of God, that taketh away the sins of the world
Isaac - Laughter, Genesis 17:17 18:12 21:6 , one of the patriarchal ancestors of the Hebrew nation and of Christ, son of Abraham and Sarah, B. Trained in the fear of God to early manhood, he showed a noble trust and obedience in his conduct during that remarkable trail of faith which established Abraham as the "father of the faithful;" and in his meek submission to all the will of God, prefigured the only-begotten Son of the Father. At the age of one hundred and eighty, he died, and was buried in the tomb of Abraham by his two sons
Abraham - ABRAHAM MY FRIEND...
I DID not know before that God had ever needed a friend. And yet it stands written out in more scriptures than one that Almighty God endeavoured to get a true friend in Abraham, and got one. ...
Now, of no mortal man but of Abraham alone does Almighty God ever speak and say, He was My friend. God employs many gracious, beautiful, and endearing names in speaking of the patriarchs, and prophets, and psalmists, and other saints of His in Israel; but it is of Abraham alone that God testifies to Israel and says, Thou art the seed of Abraham, My friend. Can we put our finger on anything in Abraham's life and say, Here, and here, and here, that wonderful man proved himself to be the friend of God? We have only a few short chapters to cover the long life of Abraham. I wonder shall we find enough in those chapters to satisfy us why Isaiah, and James, and then why both Jew and Mussulman and Christian, all unite in calling Abraham what they call no other man-the friend of God? Let us try. And so it was in the beginning of His ways with Abraham. God chose Abraham, and called him, and blessed him. But at the same time, God always has made much of the fact that Abraham had the mind and the heart to do what he did both for God and for all the families of the earth. And that immense venture of faith and of love on the part of Abraham, to call it a venture, was so original, so unheard of, and so full of all the great qualities of a godly heart and a heavenly life, that Abraham has ever since been called, not only the father of the faithful, but also the foremost and topmost friend of God. Abraham had the heart to choose, and to prefer, and to venture for God, and for the will and the call of God, before everything else in this world. Abraham immediately, unquestioningly, cheerfully, joyfully arose and went out to do and to be all that God had asked him to do and had promised him to be. Till, as Butler has it, God justified Abraham's taste, and supported his cause, and acknowledged and claimed him as His friend: him, and his seed after him. Now, if that is true, and if God's heart and our hearts are in the same image in that also; if His heart also is chilled and shut up within itself in this same selfish world; then Abraham's so pressing intercession for Sodom was the part of a true friend to God. Humanly speaking, Sodom and Gomorrah would have been destroyed, and God's heart which was so full of answer to intercessory prayer would never have been discovered, had it not been for Abraham's so friendly part performed that day both to God and to the doomed cities of the plain. And while Abraham was seeking first his own ends and the ends of the two cities in his persevering prayer, he was at the same time without knowing it serving God's greatest ends still more. And Abraham was the opportune and importunate friend of the Hearer of Prayer when he said, Peradventure, and peradventure, and peradventure, and peradventure, and again, peradventure, and when God in friendly answer reduced the price of Sodom from fifty righteous men to ten. And the Lord went His way as soon as He had left communing with Abraham; and Abraham returned to his place. ...
Honest Joseph Hall counts up ten trials of Abraham's faith and friendship through which God saw good to pass His friend. And the last of the ten was more terrible to Abraham than all the rest taken together. If any of you that is a father or a mother has, or has had, a child like that, then you are the seed of Abraham, the friend of God. Then you will know something of how God did tempt Abraham. I do not understand this dark dispensation of God-all the seed of Abraham are often compelled to say. In His will is my tranquillity of mind, and my strength of heart, and my submission, and my obedience-so all Abraham's seed are called on and are enabled to say. ...
Abraham withheld not Isaac from his Friend on one of the mountains of Moriah; and in the same country, two thousand years after, God was not to be outdone by Abraham in the seal of His friendship to Abraham and to his seed for ever. And the bare mention of that brings God, and His friendship to us and our friendship to Him, two thousand miles nearer us and two thousand miles more possible to us than Abraham's too splendid faith and too wonderful love. For all that we have read and heard in Abraham's history,-that any mortal man should be able to befriend Almighty God, still remains a very startling thing to say about Almighty God. ' Well then, we do not need, we have no temptation now, to challenge the wisdom and the love that cast our lot two thousand years after Christ; as the same wisdom and love cast Abraham's lot two thousand years before Christ. Abraham believed the word of the Lord in his day; and if we believe in our day through the word of the disciples, then are we Abraham's seed, and need envy neither Abraham our father nor any of our brethren. Abraham laid down his life and the life of Isaac at the call of God. And Jesus Christ, Son of God, and Son of Abraham, laid down His life at the same call. Did it ever come to this terrible pass with you, your life or His? And how did that terrible pass end? When was it? Where was it? How long ago was it? When did it take place last? Has it taken place today? Is it taking place every day? Then you need envy neither Abraham nor any other man. And you will be brought forward among the very first and the very best as that sinner who has adorned the doctrines of the death of Christ, and of the heart of God to sinners, as no other sinner has done from Abraham's day to the day of judgment. How you deal with that son of yours will prove, or will disprove, you a friend of God as much and as surely as if your name had been Abraham, and your son's name Isaac. Or, if God needs you or your son to go abroad on any mission of His, as He needed Abraham, then go
Shuah - Son of Abraham (Genesis 25:2 ) and possibly thought of as original ancestor of the Suhu mentioned in Assyrian sources as living on the Euphrates River below the mouth of the Chabur
Meekness - The cultivation of this spirit is enjoined (Colossians 3:12 ; 1 Timothy 6:11 ; Zephaniah 2:3 ), and is exemplified in Christ (Matthew 11:29 ), Abraham (Genesis 13 ; 16:5,6 ) Moses (Numbers 12:3 ), David (Zechariah 12:8 ; 2 Samuel 16:10,12 ), and Paul (1 Corinthians 9:19 )
Lie - Mention is made of the lies told by good men, as by Abraham (Genesis 12:12,13 ; 20:2 ), Isaac (26:7), and Jacob (27:24); also by the Hebrew midwives (Exodus 1:15-19 ), by Michal (1 Samuel 19:14 ), and by David (1 Samuel 20:6 )
Ephah - The first of Midian's sons, grandson of Abraham (Genesis 25:4; 1 Chronicles 1:33; Isaiah 60:6), "the dromedaries of Ephah" E
Epher - The name of the second of the sons of Midian mentioned in Genesis 25:4 , 1 Chronicles 1:33 , and recorded as one of the descendants of Abraham by his wife Keturah ( Genesis 25:1 )
Haran - From Ur the ancestors of Abraham emigrated to Haran (Genesis 11:31)
Concubine - Such were Hagar and Keturah, the concubines of Abraham and such concubines were allowed by the Roman laws
Israelites - the descendants of Israel, who were first called Hebrews by reason of Abraham, who came from the other side of the Euphrates; and afterward Israelites, from Israel, the father of the twelve tribes; and, lastly, Jews, particularly after their return from the captivity of Babylon; because the tribe of Judah was then much stronger and more numerous than the other tribes, and foreigners had scarcely any knowledge but of this tribe
Avraham avinu - "Abraham our Father
Admah - In the war that followed all were carried away including Lot, but Abraham pursued and recovered all
Carrying Away - ...
B — 1: μετοικίζω (Strong's #3351 — Verb — metoikizo — met-oy-kid'-zo ) akin to A, is used of the removal of Abraham into Canaan, Acts 7:4 , and of the carrying into Babylon, 7:43
Abimelech -
The Philistine king of Gerar in the time of Abraham (Genesis 20:1-18 ). By an interposition of Providence, Sarah was delivered from his harem, and was restored to her husband Abraham. As a mark of respect he gave to Abraham valuable gifts, and offered him a settlement in any part of his country; while at the same time he delicately and yet severely rebuked him for having practised a deception upon him in pretending that Sarah was only his sister. A few years after this Abimelech visited Abraham, who had removed southward beyond his territory, and there entered into a league of peace and friendship with him. Isaac sought refuge in his territory during a famine, and there he acted a part with reference to his wife Rebekah similar to that of his father Abraham with reference to Sarah
Isaac - the son of Abraham and Sarah, was born in the year of the world 2108. The life of Isaac, for the first seventy-five years of it, is so blended with that of his illustrious father, that the principal incidents of it have been already noticed under the article Abraham. " At an early period of life he was the object of the profane contempt of Ishmael, the son of the bond woman, by whom he was persecuted; and as in the circumstances attending his birth there was something typical of the birth of Abraham's greater Son, the Messiah, the promised Seed; so, in the latter instance, we contemplate in him a resemblance of real Christians, who, as Isaac was, are "the children of promise," invested in all the immunities and blessings of the new covenant; but, as then, "he that was born after the flesh persecuted him that was born after the Spirit, even so it is now," Galatians 4:29 . Abraham was commanded to offer up his beloved son in sacrifice, Genesis 22:1 . This remarkable transaction, so far as Abraham was concerned in it, has already been considered under the article Abraham. How strikingly calculated is this remarkable history to direct our thoughts to a more exalted personage, whom Isaac prefigured; and to a more astonishing transaction represented by that on Mount Moriah! Behold Jesus Christ, that Seed of Abraham, in whom all the families of the earth were to be blessed, voluntarily going forth, in obedience to the command of his heavenly Father, and laying down his life, as a sacrifice for the sins of the world. In a few years afterward, he who had mourned for his mother, was called to weep over his father's grave; and in that last act of filial duty, it is pleasing to find the two rival brothers, Isaac and Ishmael, meeting together for the interment of Abraham. After the death of Abraham, "God blessed his son Isaac;" but, though the latter had now been married twenty years, Rebekah was childless. Here the Lord appeared to him, and renewed to him the covenant which he had made with Abraham, promising to be his God, and to make him a blessing to others. He then died at the age of a hundred and eighty years, and was buried with Abraham by his sons Esau and Jacob, Genesis 35
Mediator - The very fact of a mediator acting between two, is used by the apostle to show that God's acting with Abraham was on a different principle. "A mediator is not of one, but God is one," and He made to Abraham personally an unconditional promise
Emims - In the time of Abraham they occupied the country east of Jordan, afterwards the land of the Moabites (Genesis 14:5 ; Deuteronomy 2:10 )
Bildad - sprung from Shuah, Abraham's son by Keturah, who was sent eastward by Abraham and founded an Arab tribe (Genesis 25:2) Syccea, in Arabia Deserta, E
Ur - Though it is mentioned in the Bible only as the place from which Abraham originally came (Genesis 11:27-31; Genesis 15:7; Nehemiah 9:7), it was an important city in the ancient world
Heber (1) - The father of Peleg and ancestor of Abraham (Genesis 10:24; Genesis 10:25); marking that Arphaxad's descendants were now crossing over or beyond the great rivers on their way to Mesopotamia and thence to Canaan
Manoah - In the prediction of his son's birth and achievements, we see the Angel of the covenant, who appeared to Abraham, Gideon, etc
Friend - Abraham is signally honored in being called "the friend of God," Isaiah 41:8 James 2:23
Hittites - Descendants of Heth, Genesis 10:15 , a Canaanite tribe dwelling near Hebron in the time of Abraham, Genesis 15:20,21 , and subdued in the Israelitish invasion, Exodus 3:8 Joshua 3:10
Bethel - Nearby Abraham twice offered sacrifice (Genesis 12,13)
Hobah - Town in Syria to which Abraham pursued the coalition of eastern kings, who kidnapped Lot (Genesis 14:15 ). It symbolizes Abraham's ability to drive his enemies completely out of the land of promise
Terah - The father of Abraham, Nahor, and Haran ( Gen 11:24-32 , 1 Chronicles 1:25 , Numbers 33:27-28 )
Moreh - Here at this "plain," or rather (RSV) "oak," of Moreh, Abraham built his first altar in the land of Palestine; and here the Lord appeared unto him
Bildad - He is called "the Shuhite," probably as belonging to Shuah, a district in Arabia, in which Shuah, the sixth son of Abraham by Keturah, settled (Genesis 25:2 )
Pottery - Earthenware is mentioned in connection with the history of Melchizedek (Genesis 14:18 ), of Abraham (18:4-8), of Rebekah (27:14), of Rachel (29:2,3,8,10)
Perizzites - " They were to be driven out of the land by the descendants of Abraham (Genesis 15:20 ; Exodus 3:8,17 ; 23:23 ; 33:2 ; 34:11 )
Ishmaelite - See Ishmael ; Abraham
Galeed - Probably Nahor's family originally spoke Aramaic, and Abraham and his descendants learned Hebrew, a kindred dialect, in the land of Canaan
Eber - Son of Salah, great grandson of Shem (Genesis 10:21-24; 1 Chronicles 1:19; Numbers 24:24, where the "Eber" whom "ships from Chittim shall afflict" represents not the Hebrew, but in general the western descendants of Shem, sprung from Arphaxad, Lud, and Aram; the posterity of Abraham who descended from Eber through Peleg, and also the descendants of Eber through Joktan
Kain - According to Arabian tradition, Abraham watched the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah from a nearby hill
Bildad - One of Job's friends, 'the Shuhite,' perhaps a descendant of Shuah the son of Abraham and Keturah
ur of the Chaldees - City or district somewhere near the Euphrates, from whence Abraham was called of God
Abimelech - Kings by this name appear in the Bible from the times of Abraham through King David
Table of Nations - Fourth, Genesis 10:1 provides the basis for understanding Abraham, introducing his world and his relationship to that world. The descendants of Shem (Genesis 10:21-31 ) are especially important because Abraham comes from the line of Shem. Thus Abraham is a Shemite...
or Semite
Patriarchs, the - Israel's founding fathers—Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob and the twelve sons of Jacob (Israel). The growth of the Hebrew nation was promised specifically to Abraham in the patriarchal covenant (Genesis 15:1 ; Genesis 17:1 ), along with the provision of a land in which Abraham's offspring would dwell. Since several generations elapsed before this situation developed, the covenant with Abraham must be regarded as promissory. The promises made to Abraham established the concept of a people descended through Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, who would be in a special historical and spiritual relationship with God. ...
Abraham, or Abram as he was called in the earlier chapters of Genesis, was a ninth-generation descendant of Shem, son of Noah. He promised Abraham and Sarah a son. Sarah subsequently bore Abraham the promised son: Isaac. ...
To test Abraham's faith, God ordered him to sacrifice Isaac as a burnt offering on a mountain in Moriah, some distance from Beersheba. Whatever his own misgivings, Abraham obeyed God's instructions, and at the last moment a sacrificial ram was provided, while God's angel praised Abraham for his obedience and faith. ...
Although advanced in years, Abraham married a woman named Keturah, who bore him six children. Before his death Abraham gave gifts to his concubine's sons, and sent them away from Canaan. ...
At an early period, Abraham had testified that God was the Most High God (Genesis 14:22 ), the righteous Judge of humankind (Genesis 15:14 ), and the Guarantor of the covenant of promise. See Abraham ; Nuzi . ...
The line of descent by which the covenant was to be perpetuated consisted solely of Abraham's son Isaac; through him the covenant promises were continued. ” It commemorated the occasion when both Abraham and Sarah laughed at God's promise to provide them with a son in their old age (Genesis 17:17-19 ; Genesis 18:9-15 ). ...
We have very little information about the maturing years of Isaac except that he was used as the supreme test of Abraham's faith in the covenant promises. ...
Isaac's life, though less spectacular than Abraham's, was nevertheless marked by divine favor. The situation improved slightly for Rachel when Jacob, following Abraham's example, had two sons by Bilhah, Rachel's maid (Genesis 30:3-8 ). Despite his apparent materialism, Jacob was a person of deep spirituality who, like Abraham, was esteemed highly by his pagan neighbors. All such dates do not allow time for the patriarchal traditions to have developed and make it impossible for Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob to be fitted realistically into an already-known chronology
Abimelech - King of Gerar of the Philistines, who took Sarah into his harem; but being warned of God in a dream, he restored her to Abraham, and gave him 1,000 pieces of silver as a "covering of the eyes" for Sarah, that is, as an atoning present, and to be a testimony of her innocence in the eyes of all. He afterwards made a league with Abraham, Genesis 20:1-18
Rebekah - As the wife of Isaac, Rebekah had an important part in God’s development of a people for himself according to the promise he gave to Abraham (Genesis 22:15-18; Genesis 24:3-4; Genesis 24:67). Upon her death, she was buried in the burial ground that Abraham had bought for his family (Genesis 49:31)
Ephron - A Hittite who sold the cave of Machpelah to Abraham (Genesis 23:8-20 ). Abraham was also buried in the cave with Sarah (Genesis 25:9-10 )
Coin - Probably the silver ingots used in the time of Abraham may have been of a fixed weight, which was in some way indicated on them. The "pieces of silver" paid by Abimelech to Abraham (Genesis 20:16 ), and those also for which Joseph was sold (37:28), were proably in the form of rings
Zaccheus - The Lord Jesus observed, when speaking of the salvation that was then to come to his house, "for so much as he also is a son of Abraham. " (Luke 19:1-10) Now if Zaccheus was, as is Generally supposed, a Gentile by birth, this sonship in Abraham must have been as Paul speaks of it, spiritually. "If ye be Christ, then are ye Abraham's seed, and heirs according to the promise
Mount Gerizim - (Deuteronomy 11:29-30) There should seem to have been a special design in this appointment of the Lord by Moses; for here it was, beside the plains of Moreh, that Abraham first came, at the call of God, when he left Haran. (See Genesis 12:1-6) So that though Moses himself had never been there, nor ever would, yet here blessings should immediately, on their arrival, be pronounced, to Israel's fidelity, in the very spot where, in ages before, the Lord had first revealed himself to their father Abraham
Beer-Sheba - According to the first, the well was dug by Abraham, and the name given, Genesis 21:31; the other narrative ascribes the origin of the name to Isaac instead of Abraham
Fathers - ...
The fathers praised are Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Israel, Moses, Aaron, Phinehas, Joshua, Caleb, the Judges, Samuel, Nathan, David, Solomon, Elijah, Elisha, Hezekiah, Isaiah, Josiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Job, the Twelve, Zerubbabel, Joshua the priest, Nehemiah. Among these distinguished ancestors or ‘fathers’ a group of three was early singled out for special notice—Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. God is several times described in the OT as ‘the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob’ or ‘Israel’ (Exodus 3:6; Exodus 3:16, 1 Kings 18:36, 1 Chronicles 29:18, 2 Chronicles 30:6). ’ It is assumed that Abraham, Isaac and Jacob were ‘the fathers’ par excellence. ...
The thought that the great goodness of some of the fathers, especially of Abraham, was helpful to their sinful descendants, which found expression in the phrase zakkûth ’âbôth ‘merit of the fathers’ so often met with in the Talmud, can be traced as far back as the time of Christ and the Apostles. ’ (Romans 11:28); and evidently lurks in the proud boast of being the seed of Abraham or children of Abraham (Matthew 3:9, Luke 3:8, John 8:33; John 8:39 etc
Jacob - ), in John 4:6, and his place in the genealogies of Matthew and Luke (Matthew 1:2, Luke 3:34), Jacob is mentioned in the Gospels only as one of the three patriarchs (Matthew 8:11 ‘Many shall come from the east and the west; and shall sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob …’ cf. , Matthew 22:32 || Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37 ‘I am the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob’). It was denounced by John the Baptist (see Abraham, and cf. He names the sanctuary the house of God (Genesis 28:22), and, in contrast to Abraham the father of Ishmael, and Isaac the father of Esau, Jacob inherits the promise in his children (49)
Jacob - ), in John 4:6, and his place in the genealogies of Matthew and Luke (Matthew 1:2, Luke 3:34), Jacob is mentioned in the Gospels only as one of the three patriarchs (Matthew 8:11 ‘Many shall come from the east and the west; and shall sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob …’ cf. , Matthew 22:32 || Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37 ‘I am the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob’). It was denounced by John the Baptist (see Abraham, and cf. He names the sanctuary the house of God (Genesis 28:22), and, in contrast to Abraham the father of Ishmael, and Isaac the father of Esau, Jacob inherits the promise in his children (49)
Shaveh - ” Place where the king of Sodom met Abraham on the latter's return from defeating the coalition of kings (Genesis 14:17 )
Ai - A royal city of the Canaanites, east of Bethel, near which Abraham once sojourned and built an altar, Genesis 12:8 ; 13:3
Bowing - Abraham "bowed himself to the people of the land" (Genesis 23:7 ); so Jacob to Esau (Genesis 33:3 ); and the brethren of Joseph before him as the governor of the land (Genesis 43:28 )
Tamarisk - Abraham planted a tamarisk at Beer-sheba (Genesis 21:33 ), and Saul was buried beneath one at Jabesh-gilead (1 Samuel 31:13 )
Consecration - The race of Abraham and the tribe of Levi were thus consecrated (Exodus 13:2,12,15 ; Numbers 3:12 )
Amraphel - Hearing the news, Abraham assembled an army, defeated the coalition, and rescued Lot (Genesis 14:1-9 )
Abimelech - There are several of this name in the word of God: and it must be confessed, that a goodly name; compounded of Melech, king, my father; meaning, the king is my father were two kings of Gerar of this name, and son, in the days of Abraham and Isaac
Silver - It is first mentioned in Scripture in the history of Abraham, Genesis 13:2 20:16 23:16 , and was used in constricting the tabernacle, Exodus 26:19,32 , and afterwards the temple, 1 Chronicles 29:4
Keturah - ” In Genesis 25:1 Keturah is called Abraham's wife, while 1 Chronicles 1:32 calls her a concubine. She was Abraham's second wife, apparently taken after Sarah's death. ...
Keturah bore six sons (daughters rarely are listed) to Abraham, the most notable being Midian
Terah - ” The father f Abraham, Nahor, and Haran (Genesis 11:26 )
Mahalath - Granddaughter of Abraham and daughter of Ishmael who married Esau (Genesis 28:9 )
Jethro - It is highly probable, too, that he was a descendant of Abraham by Keturah, the mother of Midian, Genesis 25:2; but what was the nature of his office as priest—or prince, as some say it should be rendered—we know not
Eliezer - Abraham represents the Father; Isaac the son representing the Lord JESUS; Eliezer represents the Holy Spirit
Aner - One of the three Amorite chieftains, the other two being Mamre and Eshcol, who were in covenant with Abraham ( Genesis 14:13 ; Genesis 14:24 )
Circumcision - It was a sign of the covenant God made with Abraham (Genesis 17:12; Romans 4:11)
Abraham in Liturgy - The patriarch Abraham is specifically mentioned in the Roman Martyrology (October 9,); in the Litany for the Dying; in the Breviary, at Quinquagesima, Shrove Tuesday, Passion Sunday, and in the Magnificat, Benedictus and Psaltery; in the Missal, in the third Prophecy on Holy Saturday, Epistle of the thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost, Offertory of the Mass for the Dead, blessing in a Nuptial Mass, and in the Canon of the Mass; in the Pontifical, in the preface of the consecration of an altar, blessing of a cemetery, and blessing and coronation of a king
Hasten, Make Haste - Mâhar occurs approximately 70 times in the Hebrew Bible; it appears twice in the first verse in which it is found: “And Abraham hastened into the tent unto Sarah, and said, Make ready quickly three measures of fine meal …” ( Pharaoh - Josephus says, that all the kings of Egypt, from Minaeus, the founder of Memphis, who lived several ages before Abraham, always had the name of Pharaoh, down to the time of Solomon, for more than three thousand three hundred years
Abrahamites - Also the name of a sect in Bohemia, as late as 1782, who professed the religion of Abraham before his circumcision, and admitted no scriptures but the decalogue and the Lord's prayer
Hebron - (Hebrew: league) ...
Ancient royal city of Chanaan, famous in biblical history; mentioned in Old Testament (Genesis 13), when Abraham went to the vale of Mambre, a name given to Hebron
Patriarch - It is usually applied to the progenitors of the Israelites, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and the sons of Jacob, or to the heads of families before the flood as the antediluvian patriarchs
Faithful - " Thus in Galatians 3:9 , believers are said to be blessed with Abraham, because of his preeminent distinction above all man for steadfast faith in God
Circumcision - God enjoined Abraham to use circumcision, as a sign of his covenant. In obedience to this order, Abraham, at ninety-nine years of age, was circumcised: also his son Ishmael, and all the males of his property, Genesis 17:10 . These people, as well as the Israelites, sprung from Abraham. The Idumeans, though descended from Abraham and Isaac, were not circumcised till subdued by John Hircanus. They say that Mohammed commanded it out of respect to Abraham, the head of his race. That the covenant with Abraham, of which circumcision was made the sign and seal, Genesis 17:7-14 , was the general covenant of grace, and not wholly, or even chiefly, a political and national covenant, may be satisfactorily established. The first engagement in it was, that God would "greatly bless" Abraham; which promise, although it comprehended temporal blessings, referred, as we learn from St. "That the promise might be sure to all the seed, not only to that which is by the law, but to that also which is by the faith, of Abraham, who is the father of us all," —of all believing Gentiles as well as Jews. The third stipulation in God's covenant with the patriarch, was the gift to Abraham and to his seed of "the land of Canaan," in which the temporal promise was manifestly but the type of the higher promise of a heavenly inheritance. The next promise was, that God would always be "a God to Abraham and to his seed after him," a promise which is connected with the highest spiritual blessings, such as the remission of sins, and the sanctification of our nature, as well as with a visible church state. The final engagement in the Abrahamic covenant was, that in Abraham's "seed, all nations of the earth should be blessed;" and this blessing, we are expressly taught by St. Paul, was nothing less than the justification of all nations, that is, of all believers in all nations, by faith in Christ: "And the Scripture, foreseeing that God would justify the Heathen by faith, preached before the Gospel to Abraham, saying, In thee shall all nations be blessed. So then they who are of faith are blessed with believing Abraham;" they receive the same blessing, justification, by the same means, faith, Galatians 3:8-9 . This covenant with Abraham, therefore, although it respected a natural seed, Isaac, from whom a numerous progeny was to spring; and an earthly inheritance provided for this issue, the land of Canaan; and a special covenant relation with the descendants of Isaac, through the line of Jacob, to whom Jehovah was to be "a God," visibly and specially, and they a visible and "peculiar people;" yet was, under all these temporal, earthly, and external advantages, but a higher and spiritual grace embodying itself under these circumstances, as types of a dispensation of salvation and eternal life, to all who should follow the faith of Abraham, whose justification before God was the pattern of the justification of every man, whether Jew or Gentile, in all ages. " And as this rite was enjoined upon Abraham's posterity, so that every "uncircumcised man-child whose flesh of his foreskin was not circumcised on the eighth day," was to be "cut off from his people, by the special judgment of God, and that because "he had broken God's covenant," Genesis 17:14 ; it therefore follows that this rite was a constant publication of God's covenant of grace among the descendants of Abraham, and its repetition a continual confirmation of that covenant, on the part of God, to all practising it in that faith of which it was the ostensible expression. As the covenant of grace made with Abraham was bound up with temporal promises and privileges, so circumcision was a sign and seal of the covenant in both its parts,—its spiritual and its temporal, its superior and inferior provisions. The spiritual promises of the covenant continued unrestricted to all the descendants of Abraham, whether by Isaac or by Ishmael; and still lower down, to the descendants of Esau as well as to those of Jacob. Circumcision was practised among them all by virtue of its divine institution at first; and was extended to their foreign servants, and to proselytes, as well as to their children; and wherever the sign of the covenant of grace was by divine appointment, there it was a seal of that covenant, to all who believingly used it; for we read of no restriction of its spiritual blessings, that is, its saving engagements, to one line of descent from Abraham only. The temporal blessings and external privileges comprised under general expressions in the covenant with Abraham, were explained and enlarged under that of Moses, while the spiritual blessings remained unrestricted as before. It was a confirmation of the temporal blessings of the Abrahamic covenant, now, by a covenant of peculiarity, made over to them, while it was still recognized as a consuetudinary rite which had descended to them from their fathers, and as the sign and seal of the covenant of grace, made with Abraham and with all his descendants without exception. The covenant with Abraham prescribed circumcision as an act of faith in its promises, and as a pledge to perform its conditions on the part of his descendants. But the object on which this faith rested, was "the Seed of Abraham," in whom the nations of the earth were to be blessed: which Seed, says St. Nor could circumcision be continued in this view by any, without an implied denial that Jesus was the Christ, the expected Seed of Abraham. Circumcision also as an institution of Moses, who continued it as the sign and seal of the Abrahamic covenant both in its spiritual and temporal provisions, but with respect to the latter made it also a sign and seal of the restriction of its temporal blessings and peculiar religious privileges to the descendants of Israel, was terminated by the entrance of our Lord upon his office of Mediator, in which office all nations were to be blessed in him. He declares that in Christ there is neither circumcision nor uncircumcision; that neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircumcision, but "faith that worketh by love;" faith in the Seed of Abraham already come and already engaged in his mediatorial and redeeming work; faith, by virtue of which the Gentiles came into the church of Christ on the same terms as the Jews themselves, and were justified and saved. ) It might be taken in the simple view of its first institution, as the sign and seal of the Abrahamic covenant; and then it was to be condemned as involving a denial that Abraham's Seed, the Christ, had already come, since, upon his coming, every old covenant gave place to the new covenant introduced by him. ) It might be practiced and enjoined as the sign and seal of the Mosaic covenant, which was still the Abrahamic covenant with its spiritual blessings, but with restriction of its temporal promises and special ecclesiastical privileges to the line of Jacob, with a law of observances which was obligatory upon all entering that covenant by circumcision. " See Abraham , and See BAPTISM
Hebron - City and district in which Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob dwelt, about twenty-two miles south of Jerusalem. There also Sarah died, and was buried in the cave of Machpelah, as were also Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Rebekah, and Leah
Shechem - Stephen’s address we read that Jacob and the fathers were carried over unto Shechem and laid in the sepulchre that Abraham bought of the sons of Hamor in Shechem (Acts 7:16). Jacob was buried at Machpelah (Genesis 50:13), which Abraham bought from the sons of Heth (23)
Keeper - What the Lord said to Abraham is in effect said, and from the same cause, to all his seed: "Fear not, Abraham, I am thy shield, and thine exceeding great reward
Melchizedek - King of righteousness, king of Salem, and also priest of the most high God, in which capacity he blessed Abraham, and received tithes at his hand, Genesis 14:18-20 . But the safest and most probable opinion is that which considers Melchizedek as a righteous and peaceful king, a worshiper and priest of the most high God, in the land of Caanan; a friend of Abraham, and of a rank elevated above him
Sarah - Sarah was the wife of Abraham, and also his half-sister ( Genesis 12:13 ; Genesis 20:12 ); her parentage is not given further. She was taken as wife by the king of Egypt and also by Abimelech king of Gerar, and afterwards restored to Abraham ( Genesis 12:10-20 ; Genesis 12:20 ). Through jealousy Sarah illtreated Hagar , her handmaid, the concubine of Abraham, and finally drove her away with her son Ishmael ( Genesis 16:1-16 , Genesis 21:8-21 )
Impute, Imputation - God reckoned righteousness to believing Abraham (Genesis 15:16 ). This means that God credited to Abraham that which he did not have in himself (Romans 4:3-5 ). This does not mean that God accepted Abraham's faith instead of righteousness as an accomplishment meriting justification. Rather, it means that God accepted Abraham because he trusted in God rather than trusting in something that he could do
Christ, Genealogy of - Saint Matthew's list is divided artificially into three equal parts of 14 names each, with several intentional omissions: from Abraham the father of the chosen people to David the king, to whose family the promise was made (2 Kings 7); David and the royal line after him to the Babylonian captivity; the descendants of the royal line from the captivity to Joseph, the legal father of Our Lord. Saint Luke proceeds in reverse order; he starts from Joseph and goes, beyond Abraham, back to Adam the father of the human race, in accord with the character of his Gospel; and he merely enumerates the names without grouping them according to a thesis or point, as is the case in Saint Matthew. , those between Abraham and David, then Salathiel and Zorobabel after the captivity, and Joseph the foster-father of Christ; the others are absent from Matthew's list, or the persons are different
Sodom - But Abraham took some of his guards and workmen, defeated the invaders and recaptured Lot. Abraham acknowledged that God was the one who had given him victory, and he refused to accept any reward from the king of Sodom (Genesis 14). God determined to destroy the cities, but Abraham asked God to withhold his judgment if ten righteous people could be found
Genealogy of Christ - Saint Matthew's list is divided artificially into three equal parts of 14 names each, with several intentional omissions: from Abraham the father of the chosen people to David the king, to whose family the promise was made (2 Kings 7); David and the royal line after him to the Babylonian captivity; the descendants of the royal line from the captivity to Joseph, the legal father of Our Lord. Saint Luke proceeds in reverse order; he starts from Joseph and goes, beyond Abraham, back to Adam the father of the human race, in accord with the character of his Gospel; and he merely enumerates the names without grouping them according to a thesis or point, as is the case in Saint Matthew. , those between Abraham and David, then Salathiel and Zorobabel after the captivity, and Joseph the foster-father of Christ; the others are absent from Matthew's list, or the persons are different
Circumcision - God commanded Abraham to use circumcision, as a sign of his covenant; and in obedience to this order, the patriarch, at ninety-nine years of age, was circumcised, as also his son Ishmael, and all the male of his household, Genesis 17:10-12 . ...
All the other nations sprung from Abraham besides the Hebrews, as the Ishmaelites, the Arabians, etc. But there is no proof that it was practiced upon infants, or became a general, national, or religious custom, before God enjoined it upon Abraham
Gerizim - " Smith's Bible Dictionary identifies Gerazim with the mount on which Abraham offered Isaac, (see Moriah); it is objected to the temple mount being the site of Isaac's offering that "Abraham lifted up his eyes, and saw the place afar off," whereas the temple mount is not conspicuous from afar; also the Samaritans identify the site of the sacrifice with the natural altar on Gerazim. ) But Genesis 22:4 means simply that Abraham saw the spot at such a distance as the place admitted. Abraham had uttered an unconscious prophecy, Genesis 22:8, "God will provide (or 'see') a lamb. "...
The meaning of "Moriah" "what Jehovah has made one see", alluding to "the mount of the vision of Jehovah" (Genesis 22:14), favors the view that the name "Moriah" in Genesis 22:2 is used by anticipation, and originated in Abraham's words, Genesis 22:14
Circumcision - In compliance with the divine command, Abraham, though ninety-nine years of age, was circumcised on the same day with Ishmael, who was thirteen years old (17:24-27). Our Lord was circumcised, for it "became him to fulfil all righteousness," as of the seed of Abraham, according to the flesh; and Paul "took and circumcised" Timothy (Acts 16:3 ), to avoid giving offence to the Jews. ...
It sealed the promises made to Abraham, which related to the commonwealth of Israel, national promises. ...
But the promises made to Abraham included the promise of redemption (Galatians 3:14 ), a promise which has come upon us. The covenant with Abraham was a dispensation or a specific form of the covenant of grace, and circumcision was a sign and seal of that covenant
Resurrection - " God said, "I AM the God of Abraham" when Abraham was dead; but God is the God of the living, Abraham must therefore live again and already lives in God's sure purpose, not a disembodied spirit, which would be no restoration of man in his integrity, but as heir of an abiding city suited to man with perfect body, soul, and spirit (1 Thessalonians 5:23; Hebrews 11:8-16). This can only be fulfilled by Abraham rising and, in integrity of parts, inheriting the antitypical Canaan. Abraham's soul now receives blessings from God, but will only "live unto God" when he receives again the body. " So Manasseh ben Israel, "God said to Abraham, I will give to thee and to thy seed after thee the land wherein thou art a stranger; but Abraham did not possess that land; wherefore it is of necessity that they should be raised up to enjoy the good promises, else God's promise would be vain
Eshcol - An Amorite prince near Hebron, who joined Abraham in Pursuing the eastern host who had ravaged Sodom and taken Lot captive, Genesis 14:13-14
Eshcol - The brother of Mamre and Aner, the Amorite confederates of Abraham, who assisted the patriarch in his pursuit and defeat of Chedorlaomer’s forces ( Genesis 14:13 ; Genesis 14:24 )
Keturah - Abraham’s wife ( Genesis 25:1-4 ), or concubine ( 1 Chronicles 1:32 f. Abraham, Esau, Hagar)
Zacchaeus - On being called a sinner, Zacchaeus said "The half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have taken anything from any man by false accusation, I restore fourfold," showing apparently that he had a tender conscience and a generous heart; but the Lord declared that He had brought salvation to the house; for though a tax-gatherer, he was a son of Abraham
Dedan - A north Arabian people, according to Genesis 10:7 descended from Cush, and according to Genesis 25:3 from Abraham through Keturah
Shoelatchet - Genesis 14:23 (c) Abraham uses this figure to tell the king that he would have nothing whatever from him, whether it be the least thing, or the greatest
Gomor'Rah - (submersion ), one of the five "cities of the plain" or "vale of Siddim" that under the irrespective kings joined battle there with Chedorlaomer ( Genesis 14:2-8 ) and his allies by whom they were discomfited till Abraham came to the rescue
Abram - Abram (â'bram), high father, afterwards named Abraham (â'bra-ham), father of a multitude, Genesis 17:4-5, the great founder of the Jewish nation, as well as of the Ishmaelites and other Arabian tribes. The covenant was now made more definite: Sarai was included in the promise; the names of the pair were changed to Abraham and Sarah; and the sign of circumcision was added, to be a token throughout all generations that God had been with and was blessing Abraham his friend. The Lord held again mysterious conference with Abraham, before Sodom was destroyed, and Abraham, perhaps in consequence of that catastrophe, journeyed south-west into the land of the Philistines at Gerar; and there the evil step in Egypt was repeated. At length God's time was come; and Sarah bare Abraham a son (probably at Gerar) in his old age. Once Sarah had laughed incredulously at the idea of her having a son, and Abraham had laughed too, his faith, strong as it was, being then inclined to fix on Ishmael as the heir of his name and blessing. It was very grievous to Abraham; but God commanded him to yield; and Hagar and Ishmael went forth, a sign of the call of the Gentiles, and proving the best means of fulfilling the promise that Ishmael should become a great nation. To comprehend it, we must bear in mind that Abraham lived among idolaters, who ruthlessly made their children pass through the fire. Many a time must Abraham have seen from afar the smoke of sacrifices, and known that human victims were offered there. Their obedience, then, they would say, was far deeper and more meritorious than Abraham's easy service. The sacrifice was stayed by the angel of Jehovah, the promises were again confirmed to him, the spiritual blessings in them being prominently exhibited; and, with gratitude which even the sacred historian does not attempt to describe, Abraham returned to Beer-sheba. The rest of Abraham's history is comparatively scanty. Some, misled by Ephron's courteous speech, have fancied that he really intended to offer his field to Abraham for a gift. Abraham then took care that his son Isaac should not marry into the idolatrous famines around. Be it as it may, Abraham sent away his other sons with gifts into the east, that they might not interfere with Isaac, to whom his great inheritance belonged
Abraham - When Ishmael was thirteen years old, God again revealed yet more explicitly and fully his gracious purpose; and in token of the sure fulfilment of that purpose the patriarch's name was now changed from Abram to Abraham (Genesis 17:4,5 ), and the rite of circumcision was instituted as a sign of the covenant. On that memorable day of God's thus revealing his design, Abraham and his son Ishmael and all the males of his house were circumcised (Genesis 17 ). Three months after this, as Abraham sat in his tent door, he saw three men approaching. They accepted his proffered hospitality, and, seated under an oak-tree, partook of the fare which Abraham and Sarah provided. Abraham accompanied the three as they proceeded on their journey. The two angels went on toward Sodom; while the Lord tarried behind and talked with Abraham, making known to him the destruction that was about to fall on that guilty city. But as not even ten righteous persons were found in it, for whose sake the city would have been spared, the threatened destruction fell upon it; and early next morning Abraham saw the smoke of the fire that consumed it as the "smoke of a furnace" (Genesis 19:1-28 ). ...
After fifteen years' residence at Mamre, Abraham moved southward, and pitched his tent among the Philistines, near to Gerar. " The promises made to Abraham were again confirmed (and this was the last recorded word of God to the patriarch); and he descended the mount with his son, and returned to his home at Beer-sheba (Genesis 22:19 ), where he resided for some years, and then moved northward to Hebron. Abraham acquired now the needful possession of a burying-place, the cave of Machpelah, by purchase from the owner of it, Ephron the Hittite (Genesis 23 ); and there he buried Sarah. Abraham then himself took to wife Keturah, who became the mother of six sons, whose descendants were afterwards known as the "children of the east" (Judges 6:3 ), and later as "Saracens. ...
The history of Abraham made a wide and deep impression on the ancient world, and references to it are interwoven in the religious traditions of almost all Eastern nations. He is called "the friend of God" (James 2:23 ), "faithful Abraham" (Galatians 3:9 ), "the father of us all" (Romans 4:16 )
Patriarch - A name employed in the New Testament with reference to Abraham (Hebrews 7:4 ), the sons of Jacob (Acts 7:8,9 ), and to David (2:29). But the expression "the patriarch," by way of eminence, is applied to the twelve sons of Jacob, or to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
Beersheba - This name, signifying well of the oath, was given to the place where Abraham and Abimelech made a covenant not to molest each other, and confirmed it by an oath. It afterwards became the dwelling place of Abraham and of Isaac, who also digged a well there, and a city is spoken of as bearing the same name
Shur - Hagar fleeing from Abraham, then in southern Palestine, reached a fountain "in the way to Shur" (Genesis 16:7). Abraham settled for a time between the two deserts of Kadesh and Shur, and finally sojourned at Gerar (Genesis 20:1)
Eliezer - a native of Damascus, and the steward of Abraham's house. It seems that Abraham, before the birth of Isaac, intended to make him his heir:—"One born in my house," a domestic slave, "is mine heir,"...
Genesis 15:1-3 . In the earliest period of the patriarchal history, we find Abraham complaining for want of children; and declaring that either Eliezer of Damascus, or probably one born from him in his house, was his heir, to the exclusion of Lot, his favourite nephew, and all the other collateral branches of his family
Machpelah - The name of a locality in which, according to the Priestly narrative of the Hexateuch, were situated a field and a cave purchased by Abraham from Ephron the Hittite, to serve as a burial-place for himself and his family ( Genesis 23:17-18 ). Here Sarah was buried by her husband; and subsequently Abraham himself, Isaac, Rebekah, Leah, and Jacob were laid to rest in the same spot ( Genesis 49:31 ). Abraham, cf. side are those of Abraham and Sarah; whilst at the opposite end of the enclosure are those of Jacob and Leah
Genealogy of the Lord Jesus - According to the distinctive character of Matthew in which Christ is emphatically the Messiah and Son of David, the genealogy commences with Abraham; whereas in Luke, in which Christ is displayed as the Son of man, the list is traced up to "Adam who was the son of God. " Both lists are the same from Abraham to David; then they differ until they reach Salathiel and Zorobabel, which names are in both lists; and then they again differ. ...
There is more difficulty as to the genealogy in Luke: is it the lineal line of Joseph or Mary? Women are never quoted as forming a line of succession, yet Christ is spoken of as the 'seed' of the woman, Genesis 3:15 ; 'come of woman,' Galatians 4:4 ; 'the seed of Abraham,' Hebrews 2:16 ; 'the seed of David according to flesh,' Romans 1:3 ; 2 Timothy 2:8 ; 'the offspring of David. And as the Lord was not really the son of Joseph, these scriptures can only be fulfilled through His mother, who must have been a lineal descendant of David and Abraham
a'Braham - ) His family, a branch of the descendants of Shem, was settled in Ur of the Chaldees, beyond the Euphrates, where Abraham was born. This most important crisis in Abram's life, when he was 99 years old, is marked by the significant change of his name to Abraham, "father of a multitude;" while his wife's from Sarai became Sarah. Three men stood before Abraham as he sat in his tent door in the heat of the day. Abraham accompanied them, and is represented as an interlocutor in a dialogue with Jehovah, in which he pleaded in vain to avert the vengeance threatened to the devoted cities of the plain. (1618449090_34 ) In remarkable contrast with Abraham's firm faith with regard to the magnificent fortunes of his posterity stand the incident which occurred during his temporary residence among the Philistines in Gerar, whither he had for some cause removed after the destruction of Sodom. At length he receives the strange command to take Isaac, his only son, and offer him for a burnt offering at an appointed place Abraham hesitated not to obey. " (Hebrews 11:19 ) The sacrifice was stayed by the angel of Jehovah, the promise of spiritual blessing made for the first time, and Abraham with his son returned to Beersheba, and for a time dwelt there. The remaining years of Abraham's life are marked by but few incidents. After Isaac's marriage with Rebekah and his removal to Lahai-roi, Abraham took to wife Keturah, by whom he had six children, Zimran, Jokshan, Medan, Midian, Ishbok and Shuah, who became the ancestors of nomadic tribes inhabiting the countries south and southeast of Palestine. Abraham lived to see the gradual accomplishment of the promise in the birth of his grandchildren Jacob and Esau, and witnessed their growth to manhood
Israel in Egypt - Exodus 12:40 says "the sojourning of the children of Israel, who dwelt in Egypt, was four hundred and thirty years;" and Galatians 3:17 declares that the law was given four hundred and thirty years after the promise to Abraham. The promise to Abraham was long before Israel went into Egypt, and the law was given after they came out; so that according to this passage their sojourning in Egypt must have been much less than four hundred years. ...
Age of Abraham when Isaac was born 100...
" " Abraham, when the promise was given 75...
25...
" " Israel when Jacob was born 60...
" " Jacob when he stood before Pharaoh 130...
" " Sojourn of Israel in Egypt 215...
430...
If then this be the correct period, how does it agree with Genesis 15:13 and Exodus 12:40 ? In Genesis 15:13 and Acts 7:6 , nothing is said about Egypt : "Thy seed shall be a stranger in a land that is not theirs. " This was said to Abraham, and may include the whole period from the birth of Isaac to the Exodus, which according to the above was four hundred and five years — thus agreeing with the round number of four hundred years. It is better to take the four hundred and thirty years as including the sojourn of Abraham (after the promise), and of Isaac, and of Jacob, though strictly speaking Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were not 'children of Israel
Mamre - A name found several times in connexion with the history of Abraham. ]'>[1] ), and Genesis 14:13 (from an independent source) with the addition of ‘the Amorite’; ( b ) in the expression ‘which is before Mamre,’ in descriptions of the cave of Machpelah, or of the field in which it was ( Genesis 23:17 ; Genesis 23:19 ; Genesis 25:9 ; Genesis 49:30 ; Genesis 50:13 ), and in Genesis 35:27 , where Mamre is mentioned as the place of Isaac’s death; ( c ) in Genesis 14:24 as the name of one of Abraham’s allies, in his expedition for the recovery of Lot. The ‘terebinths of Mamre’ are the spot at which Abraham pitched his tent in Hebron. 7) to the present day, terebinths or oaks called by the name of Abraham have been shown at different spots near Hebron; but none has any real claim to mark the authentic site of the ancient ‘Mamre. 4), in speaking of the ‘Abraham’s Oak’ of Constantine’s day (2 miles N
Hagar - Abraham gave up Hagar, in violation of eastern custom, to Sarai's ill usage; so Hagar fled toward her native land Egypt, by the way through the wilderness toward Shur, probably Suez. In either view the words show Hagar was now no pagan, but had become in some degree a believer in the God of Abraham. The history typifies the truth that the spiritual seed of Abraham by promise, Gentile as well as Jewish believers, take the place of the Jews the natural seed, who imagined that to them exclusively belonged the kingdom of God. Abraham, at God's command, did what Sarah said, though grievous to him. wandered with her child (15 years was childhood when human life was so long, he was old enough to "mock") in the wilderness of Beersheba; the water was spent in the bottle, and she cast him, soon worn out as a growing lad, under a shrub, having previously led him by the hand (for Genesis 21:14 means that Abraham put the bread and bottle, but not also the child, "on her shoulder"; so Genesis 21:18, "hold him in thine hand". Hagar "took him a wife out of Egypt," the land of idols and worldliness; untaught by the piety of Abraham and by God's mercy to herself
Nahor - One of the patriarchs, father of Terah and grandfather of Abraham
Bersabee - This locality is the cradle of the Hebrew race, connected with memories of Agar, Ismael, and Abraham (Genesis 21), of Isaac (Genesis 26), Jacob who was born there, and his sons (Genesis 28,46)
Flour - Grain reduced to the form of meal is spoken of in the time of Abraham (Genesis 18:6 )
Shur - ( Genesis 16:7 ) Abraham afterward "dwelled between Kadesh and Shur, and sojourned in Gerar
Shi'Nar - It may be suspected that Shinar was the name by which the Hebrews originally knew the lower Mesopotamian country where they so long dwelt, and which Abraham brought with him from "Ur of the Chaldees
Beersheba - This locality is the cradle of the Hebrew race, connected with memories of Agar, Ismael, and Abraham (Genesis 21), of Isaac (Genesis 26), Jacob who was born there, and his sons (Genesis 28,46)
Moriah - It was on this rock that Abraham would have sacrificed Isaac as a burnt offering, but God intervened and provided a ram (Genesis 22:2 ,Genesis 22:2,22:13 )
Downward - In a course of lineal descent from an ancestor, considered as a head as, to trace successive generations downward from Adam or Abraham
Galeed - ) Apparently Nahor's family originally spoke Syriac, and Abraham and his family acquired Hebrew in Canaan, where the Hebrew was indigenous when he first settled there, the Hamitic Canaanites having learned it from an earlier Semitic race
Perizzites - Thus, in the time of Abraham and Lot, the Canaanite and Perizzite were in the land, Genesis 13:7 ; Joshua 17:15
Ai - Abraham pitched his tent between Hai and Bethel
Perizzites - In several places of Scripture, the Canaanites and Perizzites are mentioned as the chief people of the country; as in the time of Abraham and Lot, Genesis 13:7
Hagar - Stranger, an Egyptian bondmaid in the household of Sarah, Genesis 12:16 , who, being barren, gave her to Abraham for a secondary wife, that by her, as a substitute, she might have children in accordance with the customs of the East in that age
Septuagint - ...
The Septuagint chonology makes fifteen hundred years more from the creation to Abraham, than the present Hebrew copies of the Bible
Paarai - There was a tradition among the Rabbins, as it is related by Jerome in his questions on Genesis, that Arbe, the original name of Hebron, was so called because it means four, and Adam, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were buried there
Patriarchs - The title is chiefly confined to the heads of families before the law; for when we speak of the patriarchs without particularizing by name it is generally understood of those before the flood, and afterwards confined to the persons and families of Abraham, Issac, Jacob, and their tribe
Beersheba - Called so from the oath of peace between Abraham and Abimelech, king of the Philistines (Genesis 21:31), else from the seven (sheba' ) ewe lambs slain there: indeed sheba' , an oath, is from the custom of binding one's self by seven things, as Abraham made the seven ewe lambs a pledge of his covenant with Abimelech. ...
The well dug by Abraham and secured to him by oath had been covered and lost. Seven (sheba' which also may explain the name) wells are at the place, so that a different one may have been named by Isaac from that named by Abraham. Abraham planted here a" grove" ('eshel ) (distinct from the idol grove, Asheerah, or Astarte Baal), or tree, the tamarisk, long living, of hard wood, with long, clustering, evergreen leaves, as a type of the ever enduring grace of the faithful, covenant keeping God (Genesis 21:33), "and called on the name (the self manifested character and person) of Jehovah, the everlasting God. The dispensation of the promise, which began with Abraham's call from Ur to Canaan, ended on the last night of the sojourn of his grandson Israel in Canaan
Friend - " The title, "the friend of God," is principally given to Abraham: "Art not thou our God, who gavest this land to the seed of Abraham, thy friend, for ever?" And in Isaiah 41:8 , "But thou Israel art the seed of Abraham, my friend. " "And the Scripture was fulfilled, which saith, Abraham believed God, and it was imputed to him for righteousness; and he was called the friend of God," James 2:23 . This title was given him, not only because God frequently appeared to him, conversed familiarly with him, and revealed his secrets to him, "Shall I hide from Abraham that thing which I do?" Genesis 18:17 ; but also because he entered into a covenant of perpetual friendship both with him and his seed
Property - ” However, the rather small lot belonged to Abraham and his descendants as a burial site: “And the field, and the cave that is therein, were made sure unto Abraham for a possession of a burying place by the sons of Heth” ( Machpelah - A field in Hebron containing the cave which Abraham bought of Ephron the Hittite as a burial-place for his family. That cave became the burial-place of Abraham and Sarah, Isaac and Rebekah, Jacob and Leah
Hittites - In God's covenant with Abraham their territory was to be possessed by his descendants. On the death of Sarah, Abraham bought the field and cave of Machpelah from the Hittites
Mesopotamia - This was the home of the patriarchs who proceeded Abraham-Terah, Heber, Peleg, etc. Here Abraham and Sarah were born, and the wives of Isaac, and Jacob, and most of the sons of Jacob, the heads of the twelve tribes
Beersheba - Originally Beersheba was the name given to a well that Abraham dug in the dry southern region of Palestine known as the Negeb. Abraham, Hagar, Isaac, Jacob and the sons of Jacob all at some time either lived in or passed through Beersheba (Genesis 21:14; Genesis 22:19; Genesis 26:23; Genesis 28:10; Genesis 46:1-5)
Hebron - ...
After his separation from Lot, Abraham moved to Hebron. Abraham apparently remained at Mamre until after the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah. From them Abraham purchased a field with a burial plot inside a nearby cave. Abraham and Sarah, Isaac and Rebekah, and Jacob and Leah were buried there (Genesis 23:19 ; Genesis 25:9 ; Genesis 35:29 ; Genesis 49:31 ; Genesis 50:13 )
Chronology - It will be seen thatthere are about 1400 years difference from the birth of Seth to the Call of Abraham. )...
From the Flood to the Call of Abraham … … … … … … … 427...
(This is found in the same manner, and putting Terah's age at 130 when Abraham...
was born, that is, adding 60 years to Genesis 11:26 : where only one date is given ...
for Terah's three sons. Abraham may not have been the eldest, and may have been ...
born long after. )...
From the Call of Abraham to the Exodus … … … … … … … 430...
(This is obtained from Exodus 12:40 and Galatians 3:17 . ...
1996 Abraham born. ...
1921 Call of Abraham
Hexateuch - The term was coined by source critics impressed with the supposed similarity of sources behind Joshua and the Pentateuch as well as the need for fulfillment of the promise of land to Abraham in the conquest of Cannan
Shem - He died at the age of six hundred years, having been for many years contemporary with Abraham, according to the usual chronology
Gerar - Abraham sojourned here, and perhaps Isaac was born in this place
Memphis - It was the administrative centre of the first king to unite Upper and Lower Egypt (about 3000 BC), and was capital of Egypt for much of the period before Abraham
Walking - Thus the Lord commanded Abraham: "I am the Almighty God, walk before me, and be thou perfect. " (Genesis 17:1) Where it is blessed to observe that the Lord in the precept gives the ability to perform, and gives his glorious name as the security for Abraham's doing it
Example - ...
Abraham, the model of faith
Calf - ...
A calf was kept by the affluent, ready for any special meal, such as was presented tender and good to the angels by Abraham, Genesis 18:7 ; which is also described as 'the fatted calf' in the parable of the Prodigal Son
Zoar - It was attacked by Chedolaomer, but apparently delivered by Abraham (Genesis 14:17 )
Judaism - The religious doctrines and rites of the Jews, the descendants of Abraham
Genesis - The general divisions of the book are as follows: ...
the creation of the world and early history of mankind (1-11), including the Fall, the promise of a Redeemer, and the Deluge; ...
the early history of the Jews (12-50), including Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph
Sheba - Son of Jokshan, and grandson of Abraham by Keturah, Genesis 25:3
pa'Dan-a'Ram - (Genesis 48:7 ) Abraham obtained a wife for Isaac from Padan-aram
Citizenship - In fact, the development of the idea may be traced from the record of Abraham's experience to the writings of the apostolic fathers. ...
Abraham viewed himself as a stranger (ger [ Genesis 23:4 ). Peter describes Christians in the same language used to describe Abraham in the Septuagint. Abraham and the other patriarchs lived as strangers and exiles on earth, seeking the city designed, built, and prepared for them by God (11:8-16)
Angel of the Lord - The angel of the Lord appears to Abraham. He stops Abraham from sacrificing Isaac and commends him because he has not withheld his only son from God (Genesis 22:11-18 ). Abraham identifies the angel as God, calling the place "The Lord Will Provide
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - Abraham and David in Matthew's Gospel are singled out to prove the fulfillment in Christ of the promises made to Abraham 2,000 years previously, and to David 1,000. ...
Matthew downward, from Abraham the father of the Jews (naturally, but of the Gentiles also spiritually: Genesis 17:5; Romans 4:16-17); Luke upward, to Adam, "who was the son of God" and the father of Gentiles and Jews alike. From Abraham to David both agree, thenceforward the names differ. The period from Abraham to David is that of patriarchs; from David to the Babylonian captivity that of kings; from the captivity to Christ private individuals. Abraham and ending with David, the receivers of the promise; the second adumbrates Christ's eternal kingdom through the temporary kingdom of David's line; the third period is that of expectation
Kenites - There were some in the land when it was promised to Abraham. The Midianites sprung from Midian, the son of Abraham and Keturah, Genesis 25:2 ; so these Kenites were probably a branch of the Midianites
Hebron - Abraham pitched his tent under the oaks of Mamre, near Hebron, Genesis 13:18, and he bought the cave of Machpelah, as a burial-place. A pool is still shown over which tradition says that David hung the murderers of Ishbosheth, and the tomb of Abner and Ishbosheth is also pointed out within an Arab house, and the mosque is known to conceal the noted cave of Machpelah, the burial-place of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob and their wives except Rachel
Chaldea - ...
In the time before Abraham, the Babylonian rulers were mainly of Sumerian descent and their capital was the Chaldean city of Ur, from which Abraham originally came (Genesis 11:28; Acts 7:4)
Siddim, Vale of - God afterwards, on account of their wickedness, "overthrew those cities, and all the plain, and all the inhabitants of the cities;" and the smoke of their destruction "went up as the smoke of a furnace" (19:24-28), and was visible from Mamre, where Abraham dwelt
Gerar - Abraham and Isaac made treaties with the king of Gerar (Genesis 20:1 ; Genesis 26:1 )
Kiriath-Arba - Others point to the nearby cave of Machpelah where, according to Jewish tradition, Adam, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were buried—thus, “city of four
Laban - The elder branch of Abram's family remained at Haran, in Mesopotamia, when Abraham removed to the land of Canaan
Abimelech - King of Gerar, who took Sarah for himself, thinking she was Abraham's sister rather than his wife (Genesis 20:1 ). He restored her to Abraham after a nighttime dream of God. Probably the same as 1, a king who disputed the ownership of a well at Beersheba with Abraham and then made a covenant of peace with him (Genesis 21:22-34 )
Circumcision - The rite appointed by God to be a token of the covenant that He made with Abraham and his seed, and also the seal of the righteousness of his faith. Every male in Abraham's house was to be circumcised, and afterwards every male of his seed on the eighth day after birth. Abraham is shown to be 'the father of circumcision,' that is, of all that believe as the truly separated people of God
Aramean - (ar uh mee' an) consisted of the loose confederation of towns and settlements spread over what is now called Syria as well as in some parts of Babylon from which Jacob and Abraham came (Deuteronomy 26:5 ). Deuteronomy 26:5 contains what has become an important confession for Jews—”A wandering Aramean was my father” (RSV)—which claims Aramean lineage for Jacob and by extension for Abraham
Ishmael - Genesis 16:1-16 21:1-34 , son of Abraham and Hagar, B. Subsequently they, with the descendants of Joktan, the fourth from Shem, Genesis 10:26-29 , and Jokshan, the son of Abraham by Keturah, Genesis 25:3 , and perhaps also of some of the brethren of Joktan and Jokshan, occupied the whole peninsula of Arabia
Eber - from Haran ( Genesis 11:31 ), in Aram-naharaim the home of Abraham and Nahor ( Genesis 24:4 ; Genesis 24:7 ; Genesis 24:10 ). Why Eber is not the immediate, but the sixth ancestor of Abraham, and why many other tribes besides the Hebrews are reckoned as his descendants, is perhaps to be explained (König) by the fact that, though the Israelites were in a special sense ‘Hebrews,’ it was remembered that their ancestors had long made the region ‘across’ the Euphrates their resting-place, and many other tribes (Peleg, Joktan, etc
Mediator - Here the contrast is between the promise given to Abraham and the giving of the Law. But with the promise to Abraham, all the obligations were assumed by God, which is implied in the statement, "but God is one
Hebron - Abraham, Isaac and Jacob all lived in the region at various times, and Abraham bought a piece of ground there for a family burial place (Genesis 13:18; Genesis 18:1; Genesis 23:2; Genesis 23:17-20; Genesis 25:9; Genesis 35:27; Genesis 37:14; Genesis 50:13)
Ishmaelites - the descendants of Ishmael, the son of Abraham by Hagar, his Egyptian bond-maid. Hagar, deriving encouragement from this circumstance, returned to the house of Abraham, and was soon delivered of her promised son. After the birth of Isaac, Abraham was persuaded by his wife to dismiss Hagar and her son; and the patriarch probably provided for their subsistence in some distant situation, where they could not encroach on the patrimony of Isaac
Judaism - the religious doctrines and rites of the Jews, the descendants of Abraham. With Abraham Judaism may be said in some sense, to have begun; but it was not till the promulgation of the law upon Mount Sinai, that the Jewish economy was established, and that to his posterity was committed a dispensation which was to distinguish them ever after from every other people on earth. They used circumcision as a seal of the covenant which God had made with Abraham
Heir - The land of Canaan, again, was promised to Abraham and his seed (Genesis 13:14-15). These assurances given to Adam and to Abraham were absolutely fulfilled in Christ, who, as the firstborn of all creation, Himself both the Agent of the Creator’s work and summing up in His own Person all created objects (Colossians 1:15-17), enjoys an eternal and incorruptible inheritance. ...
The title of ‘heir,’ then, passes on to those who have obtained the blessing of Divine sonship in Baptism or Regeneration, corresponding spiritually to the promise made to Abraham. We, then, being made children of God through faith in Christ, are heirs according to the promise made to Abraham, who was accepted through faith in God’s word against all appearances
Exodus, the, - The common chronology makes it extend from the call of Abraham to the exodus, one-half of it, or 215 years, being spend in Egypt. Paul says in (Galatians 3:17 ) that from the covenant with (or call of) Abraham the giving of the law (less than a year after the exodus) was 430 years. But in (Genesis 15:13,14 ) it is said that they should be strangers in a strange land,a nd be afflicted 400 years, and nearly the same is said in (Exodus 12:40 ) But, in very truth, the children of Israel were strangers in a strange land from the time that Abraham left his home for the promised land, and during that whole period of 430 years to the exodus they were nowhere rulers in the land. 7 (C) If we make the 430 years to include only the bondage in Egypt, we must place the whole chronology of Abraham and the immigration of Jacob into Egypt some 200 years earlier, or else the Exodus 200 years later, or B
Melchizedek - Described as king of Salem and priest of God Most High ( ‘El ‘Elyôn ), who met Abraham on his return from the slaughter of Chedorlaomer and his allies, refreshed him and his servants with bread and wine, blessed him, and received from him a tenth of the spoil he had taken ( Genesis 14:18-20 ). ...
The historical character of the narrative in which Melchizedek is mentioned has been questioned on the ground of certain improbabilities which it contains; but though the events related have received no corroboration from other sources, the names of two of the kings who fought against Abraham, viz. At an earlier date persons belonging to other tribes than that of Levi were sometimes priests: David’s sons ( 2 Samuel 8:18 ); and Ira the Jairite ( 2 Samuel 20:26 ), who belonged to Manasseh ( Numbers 32:41 ); but the author of Psalms 110:1-7 , in seeking a type for the combination in the same person of both the regal and priestly offices, had to go outside the limits of Israel, and found what he wanted in the priest-king of Salem, who was all the more adapted for the purpose by reason of the deference paid to him by so illustrious a personage as Abraham. He then proceeds to show the superiority of Christ’s priesthood over that of the Jewish priests, the descendants of Aaron, and seeks to illustrate it by the superiority of Melchizedek over Abraham, as he gathers it from Genesis 14:1-24 . He explains Melchizedek’s name to mean ‘king of righteousness,’ and his title of ‘king of Salem’ to mean ‘king of peace’; and then, arguing from the silence of the record respecting his parentage, birth, and death, describes him as ‘without father, without mother, without genealogy, having neither beginning of days nor end of life, but made like unto the Son of God,’ and affirms him to have been greater than Abraham, since he blessed him (‘for without any dispute the less is blessed of the better’) and received from him (and through him from his unborn descendants the Levitical priests) a tithe of his spoils ( Hebrews 7:1-16 ). It was in virtue of His personality that our Lord made, and makes, His appeal to the world; and to the authoritativeness of His attitude in regard to the current teaching of the Jewish religious teachers of His day ( Matthew 5:21-48 , Mark 7:1-28 ) a distant analogy is, in fact, afforded by the superior position which in Genesis seems to be ascribed to Melchizedek in respect of Abraham, the ancestor of the Jewish race
Eber - The ancestor of Abraham and the Hebrew people, and a descendant of Shem (Genesis 10:21-25 ; Genesis 11:14-17 )
Isaac - (Hebrew: in a few places) ...
The son of Abraham and Sara
Ephah -
One of the five sons of Midian, and grandson of Abraham (Genesis 25:4 )
Kadmonite - The sons of the concubines of Abraham were sent to live in the “east country” (Kedem) away from Isaac (Genesis 25:6 )
Both - ...
And Abraham took sheep and oxen, and gave them to Abimelech and both of them made a covenant
Arpachshad - ARPACHSHAD was, according to Genesis 10:22 , the third son of Shem, and, according to Genesis 11:10 , he was the second in the line of descent from Shem to Abraham
Gospel - This gospel is said to have been preached to Abraham, by the promise, "in thee shall all nations be blessed
Almighty - The name was particularly related to Abraham and the patriarchs (Genesis 17:1 ; Genesis 28:3 ; Genesis 35:11 ; Genesis 49:25 )
Horse - No mention is made of horses as forming any part of the possessions of the patriarchs; nor are any noticed among the presents Abraham received from the kings of Egypt and Gerar
Build - Sarah desires Abraham to take Hagar to wife, that by her she may be builded up, that is, have children to uphold her family, Genesis 16:2
Beersheba - or the well of the oath; so named from a well which Abraham dug in this place, and the covenant which he here made with Abimelech, king of Gerar, Genesis 20:31
Kenite - Their land was promised to Abraham
Paran - Ishmael made his home there after Abraham was forced to send Hagar and him away (Genesis 21:21 )
Spoil - A portion of what was thus gained was devoted to the Lord of hosts as early as the time of Abraham, Genesis 14:20 ; and under the Mosaic legislation a definite rule for this purpose was established, Numbers 31:26-47 1 Chronicles 26:27
Zaccheus - He showed sincere penitence and faith in the Savior, who in turn promised him salvation as a child of Abraham by faith, Galatians 3:7 , as he also seems to have been by birth
Gold - Abraham was rich in it, and female ornaments were early made of it, Genesis 13:2 24:22,35
Abram - But when the Lord added the Ha to it, and made it Abraham, this became still more honourable; for his name now, in the literal sense of it, was, a father of many nations. And all this became greatly increased in point of honour, on account of the covenant entailed on Abraham's seed, even Christ, (See Galatians 3:16. By this express act of divine grace, Abraham and Sarah, both possessed in their name an everlasting symbol, or token of JEHOVAH'S glorious favour. ...
May I not venture to suggest, that perhaps it was on this account, of the honour done to their father Abraham's name, by taking into it a part of JEHOVAH'S, that the children of Abraham, in every age of the church, have been so anxious to call their descendants by names, which either took in some of the letters of JEHOVAH'S name, or had an allusion to the Lord. ...
I cannot dismiss these observations on Abraham's name until that I have requested the reader to connect with the review, the sweet consideration, that all true believers in Jesus take part in the same. They have a new name given them, as well as Abraham their father, when, like him, they are by regeneration made "new creatures in Christ Jesus. " They are interested in all the rich promises of God in Christ; and being Christ's children, by adoption and by grace: then are they "Abraham's seed, and heirs according to the promise. ...
I know not how to turn away from this subject, concerning our great father Abraham, who in any, and in every view, opens a constant source for improvement, without offering a short observation more, in respect to that circumstance in his life, when compelled by famine to go down into Egypt, he begged Sarah to call herself his sister, and not his wife. And when he hath so done I request him to attend to a short observation which I would offer upon Abraham's conduct, in this particular. In vain would be Abraham's remonstrances, or the humblest petitions. And here Abraham's faith became as illustrious as before. "The Lord plagued Pharaoh and his house with great plagues, because of Sarah Abraham's wife. So that when the whole subject is properly considered and taken into one complete view, so far was the faith of the patriarch from being lessened by the exercise, as in the first blush of the history it seemed to appear, that by the means Abraham adopted, he still threw himself with confidence on the Lord, to save his beloved Sarah from ruin, and his life from danger; and without this trust in the Lord, and dependence on the Lord's interposition, Abraham could not but well know, that whether he had called Sarah, sister, or wife, the peril was the same. If the reader will turn to the twentieth chapter of Genesis, and peruse a similar situation, into which Abraham and Sarah were afterwards brought at Gerar, he will there behold the patriarch's modest apology for calling his beloved Sarah his sister, rather than his wife. When Abimelech, the king of Gerar, remonstrated with Abraham for calling Sarah sister, and not wife, and said, "What sawest thou, that thou hast done this thing?" Abraham answered, "Because I thought, Surely the fear of God is not in this place; and they will slay me for my wife's sake. )...
But what I am more particularly earnest to impress upon the reader's mind, respecting this history of Abraham, (and indeed the sole purpose for which I have introduced the subject in this place) is, that the act itself was founded in faith and reliance upon the Lord. Abraham was well aware of his critical situation. And let it be remembered, that in those journies the patriarch was prosecuting, they were by the Lord's command, and not Abraham's pleasure
Theophany - The Lord appears to Abraham on his arrival in the land, wherein God promised the land to Abraham and his descendants (Genesis 12:7-9 ); God reaffirmed his promises of land and progeny when Abraham was ninety-nine years old (Genesis 17:1 ), and on the Plains of Mamre on his way to destroy Sodom (Genesis 18:1 ). ...
In a looser sense, God's promise of the land to Abraham (Genesis 15 ), as well as his commission that Abraham sacrifice Isaac (Genesis 22 ), could be considered theophanies
Genesis, Book of - ...
A new dealing of God commences in the call of Abraham to leave his country and his kindred. In Abraham and Lot we have types of the heavenly man having power over the world, and the earthly-minded one mixing with the world. Isaac must not go to Mesopotamia, the country from whence the heirs of promise had been called out, therefore Abraham sent his steward to obtain a wife for his son — as the Holy Spirit is here now, gathering a bride for Christ. From Isaac spring Jacob and Esau: Jacob obtains his two wives Rachel and Leah, and with them and their maids he begets the heads of the twelve tribes, who are to possess the land as promised to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. See Abraham, ISAAC, JACOB, JOSEPH
Chronology - For some divine purpose connected with the mystical sense of numbers the generations are condensed into fourteen (the double of the sacred seven) in each of the three periods, from Abraham to David, from David to the captivity, and thence to Christ. Again, the length of generations varies: Abraham, at a time when life was so much longer than now, implies a generation was about 100 years (Genesis 15:16, compare Genesis 15:13), "the fourth generation" answering to "four hundred years. Paul, in Galatians 3:16-17, dates this period from God's promise to Abraham. ...
Abraham probably means (Genesis 15:16), "in the fourth generation they (i. Thus, 430 back to the promise to Abraham (Genesis 15) will bring the promise to 2082 B. Stewart takes Peleg's birth, 2698 or (correcting Terah's age at Abraham's birth) 2758. Abraham was perhaps youngest son of Terah; for Terah was 70 when he began having sons, and died at 205 years old (Genesis 11:26; Genesis 11:32), and Abraham was 75 when he left Haran (Genesis 12:4). This would make Terah survive Abraham's migration 60 years, if Abraham were the oldest (Genesis 11:26). ...
Therefore, Terah was probably 130 years old when Abraham was born, and died when Abraham was 75, at his migration from Haran. Haran, the older brother of Abraham, was father of Iscah = Sarah (Genesis 11:27-29). Since Milcah married her uncle Nahor, so Iscah, = Sarai, her uncle Abraham; hence, he calls her his sister, as granddaughter of (i. She was only ten years younger than Abraham (Genesis 17:17), which shows Abraham was Terah's YOUNGEST son
Hagar - Sarah therefore complained to Abraham, and said, "Cast out this bond-woman and her son, for the son of this bond-woman shall not be heir with my son Isaac. And the thing was very grievous in Abraham's sight, because of his son Ishmael;" but God approved of Sarah's advice, and again excluded Ishmael from the special covenant of grace: "For in Isaac shall thy seed be called: nevertheless, the son of the bond-woman will I make a nation also, because he is thy seed. " See Abraham and See ISHMAEL . The rabbins say she was Pharaoh's daughter; but Chrysostom asserts that she was one of those slaves which Pharaoh gave to Abraham, Genesis 12:16 . Philo thinks that Hagar embraced Abraham's religion, which is very probable. They call her in eminency, Mother Hagar, and maintain that she was Abraham's lawful wife; the mother of Ishmael, his eldest son; who, as such, possessed Arabia, which very much exceeds, say they, both in extent and riches, the land of Canaan, which was given to his younger son Isaac
Covenant - The first covenant with the Hebrews was made when the Lord chose Abraham and his posterity for his people; a second covenant, or a solemn renewal of the former, was made at Sinai, comprehending all who observe the law of Moses. Thus God covenanted with Noah, Abraham, and David, Genesis 9:8,9 17:4,5 Psalm 89:3,4 , and gave them faith in the Savior afterwards to be revealed, Romans 3:25 Hebrews 9:15 . ...
In common discourse, we usually say the old and new testaments, or covenants-the covenant between God and the posterity of Abraham, and that which he has made with believers by Jesus Christ; because these two covenants contain eminently all the rest, which are consequences, branches, or explanations of them
Covenant - God enjoined upon Abraham the rite of circumcision, but His promise to Abraham, here called a "covenant," was not conditional upon the observance of circumcision, though a penalty attached to its nonobservance. Hebrews 7:22 ); Hebrews 8:9 ; 9:20 ; (d) by metonymy, the token of the covenant, or promise, made to Abraham, Acts 7:8 ; (e) by metonymy, the record of the covenant, 2 Corinthians 3:14 ; Hebrews 9:4 ; cp
Medan - One of the sons of Abraham and Keturah ( Genesis 25:2 = 1 Chronicles 1:32 )
Jethro - Yahwistic faith probably is traceable at least as far back as Abraham
Diviner's Oak - The tree is perhaps that associated with Abraham (Genesis 12:6 ), Jacob (Genesis 35:4 ), and Joshua (Joshua 24:26 )
Bethuel - Nephew of Abraham and son of Nahor (Genesis 22:22 )
Kenizzite - Clan God promised Abraham the Israelites would dispossess (Genesis 15:19 )
Shinar, Plain of - The King of Shinar opposed Abraham (Genesis 14:1 )
Pharoah - Indeed we find a Pharaoh in the days of Abraham
Father - Abraham was the father of the Israelites
Devise - 15:6, where it was said of Abraham: “He believed the Lord; and he reckoned it to him as righteousness” (RSV)
Zamzummim - or ZUZIM, a gigantic race of people, who, together with the Rephaim and Emim, men of like stature, occupied, in the time of Abraham, the country east of Jordan and the Dead Sea, where they were routed by Chedorlaomer, and from which they were afterward expelled by the Ammonites, Deuteronomy 2:20-21
Turtle-Dove - Before the giving of the law, Abraham offered birds, which he divided the other victims he left the birds entire, Genesis 15:9
Ger'Izim - [1] According to the traditions of the Samaritans it was here that Abraham sacrificed Isaac, that Melchizedek met the patriarch, that Jacob built an altar, and at its base dug a well, the ruins of which are still seen
Moriah - In Genesis 22:2 Abraham was commanded to go ‘into the land of the Moriah ,’ and to sacrifice Isaac upon ‘one of the mountains’ which God would tell him of. The Targumists emphasized the worship of Abraham at the spot, perhaps connecting the name with the verb ‘to fear’ which is equally impossible. And it may have been owing to this that the Samaritans claimed Gerizim as Abraham’s mountain (cf
Ur - Of the Chaldees (Genesis 11:28; Genesis 11:31; Genesis 15:7; Nehemiah 9:7), from which Terah, Abraham, and Lot were called. One district was "Ibra," perhaps related to "Hebrew," Abraham's designation. " The derivation from Ur, "fire," led to the Koran and Talmud legends that Abraham miraculously escaped out of the flames into which Nimrod or other idolatrous persecutors threw him
Beersheba - A halting-place of Abraham ( Genesis 21:31 ), where Hagar was sent away ( Genesis 21:14 ), and where he made a covenant with Abimelech, from which the place is alleged to take its name (‘well of the covenant,’ according to one interpretation). It was an important holy place: here Abraham planted a sacred tree ( Genesis 21:33 ), and theophanies were vouchsafed to Hagar ( Genesis 21:17 ), to Isaac ( Genesis 26:24 ), to Jacob ( Genesis 46:2 ), and to Elijah ( 1 Kings 19:5 )
Cave - ), which Abraham purchased from the sons of Heth (Genesis 25:9,10 ). It was the burying-place of Sarah and of Abraham himself, also of Isaac, Rebekah, Leah, and Jacob (Genesis 49:31 ; 50:13 )
Abimelech - ]'>[1] ( Genesis 20:1-18 ) he took Sarah into his harem, but on learning that she was Abraham’s wife, restored her uninjured and made ample amends. Subsequently he entered into a covenant with Abraham ( Genesis 21:22 ff. , exonerates Abraham from blame, and omits the other two narratives! 2
Abimelech - A king of Gerar, and contemporary with Abraham, who took Sarah into his harem, and thought to make her his wife; but being warned of God in a dream of Sarah's relationship to Abraham, that she was not his sister, but his wife, he restored her to her husband, with a present of a thousand pieces of silver, as "a covering of the eyes" for Sarah; that is, as an atoning present, and to be a testimony of her innocence in the eyes of all
Heir - The NT usage may be analyzed as under: "(a) the person to whom property is to pass on the death of the owner, Matthew 21:38 ; Mark 12:7 ; Luke 20:14 ; Galatians 4:1 ; (b) one to whom something has been assigned by God, on possession of which, however, he has not yet entered, as Abraham, Romans 4:13,14 ; Hebrews 6:17 ; Christ, Hebrews 1:2 ; the poor saints, James 2:5 ; (c) believers, inasmuch as they share in the new order of things to be ushered in at the return of Christ, Romans 8:17 ; Galatians 3:29 ; 4:7 ; Titus 3:7 ; (d) one who receives something other than by merit, as Noah, Hebrews 11:7 . 1), "is used of Issac and Jacob as participants with Abraham in the promises of God, Hebrews 11:9 ; of husband and wife who are also united in Christ, 1 Peter 3:7 ; of Gentiles who believe, as participants in the Gospel with Jews who believe, Ephesians 3:6 ; and of all believers as prospective participants with Christ in His glory, as recompense for their participation in His sufferings, Romans 8:17
Abraham - After this, Abraham journeyed south to Gerah, where he again called Sarah his sister. About twenty-five years after, God put to trial the faith of Abraham, by commanding him to sacrifice Isaac, his son and the heir of the promise, upon Mount Moriah, Genesis 22:1-24 . Abraham sent his steward, and obtained a wife for Isaac from his pious kindred in Mesopotamia, Genesis 24:1-67 . ...
The character of Abraham is one of the most remarkable in Scripture
Abimelech - A divine warning that death would be the penalty of keeping her, but that Abraham's intercession as a prophet would follow the restoring of her, led him to give her back with a present of a thousand pieces of silver (131 British pounds). With delicate sarcasm (in the English KJV) he reproved Abraham's deception. Abimelech some years after repaired, with Phichol his chief captain, to Abraham to form a treaty of friendship. He restored the well dug by Abraham, but seized by Abimelech's herdsmen. The wells dug by Abraham, being supposed to give a proprietary right in the soil, were stopped by the Philistines, and opened again by Isaac, and the virgin soil yielded to his culture one hundred fold. At Beersheba Abimelech with Ahuzzath his friend, and Phichol his captain, renewed the treaty of friendship with Isaac, originally made by his father with Abraham, and for the same reason (notwithstanding his past bad treatment of Isaac in sending him away), namely, he saw the Lord was with Isaac
Lord - ” 'Âdôn basically describes the one who occupies the position of a “master” or “lord” over a slave or servant: “And the servant put his hand under the thigh of Abraham his master …” ( Abraham her “lord. The covenant found a fuller expression and application when God revealed Himself to Abraham ( Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, hath sent me unto you: this is my name for ever, and this is my memorial unto all generations. Go, and gather the elders of Israel together, and say unto them, The Lord [2] God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob, appeared unto me, saying, I have surely visited you, and seen that which is done to you in Egypt: And I have said, I will bring you up out of the affliction of Egypt unto the land of the Canaanites …” ( Montcalm, Louis Joseph Gozon, Marquis de - The Battle of the Plains of Abraham when both Montcalm and Wolfe met death, is considered by its results as having saved Canada from the French Revolution
High Place - Abraham also built an altar on a mountain (12:7,8)
Ashes - 'Dust and ashes' was the figure Abraham used of himself before Jehovah, Genesis 18:27 ; and Job said he had become like them by the hand of God
Eshcol -
A young Amoritish chief who joined Abraham in the recovery of Lot from the hands of Chedorlaomer (Genesis 14:13,24 )
Louis Gozon - The Battle of the Plains of Abraham when both Montcalm and Wolfe met death, is considered by its results as having saved Canada from the French Revolution
Hospitality - Exemplified in Abraham, Genesis 18; Lot, Genesis 19; Reuel, Exodus 2:20; Manoah, Judges 13:15; the old man of Gibeah (its inhospitality is instanced as a sign of how lost to all right feeling its people were), Judges 19:17-21
Leah - Leah died in Palestine and was buried in the cave at Machpelah, where lay the remains of Abraham, Isaac, and their wives
Seed - (Jeremiah 31:27) And it is used in a spiritual sense when the faithful in Christ Jesus are called the seed of Abraham, (Galatians 3:29) And yet in a still more peculiar, personal, and eminent manner when considered in relation to our union with Christ; "I will pour my Spirit (saith JEHOVAH to Christ) upon thy seed, and my blessing upon thine offspring
Gozon, Louis Joseph, Marquis de Montcalm - The Battle of the Plains of Abraham when both Montcalm and Wolfe met death, is considered by its results as having saved Canada from the French Revolution
Shaveh, Valley of - "The king's dale," where Melchizedek and the king of Sodom met Abraham (Genesis 14:17)
Haran - The brother of Abraham, and the father of Lot
Circumcision - A Jewish rite which Jehovah enjoined upon Abraham, the father of the Israelites, as the token of the covenant, which assured to him the promise of the Messiah
Cities - " The earliest description of a city, properly so called, is that of Sodom, (Genesis 19:1-22 ) Even before the time of Abraham there were cities in Egypt, (Genesis 12:14,15 ; Numbers 13:22 ) and the Israelites, during their sojourn there, were employed in building or fortifying the "treasure cities" of Pithom and Raamses
Lot - lot), a covering; veil, the son of Haran, and nephew of Abraham (Genesis 11:27 ). On the death of his father, he was left in charge of his grandfather Terah (31), after whose death he accompanied his uncle Abraham into Canaan (12:5), thence into Egypt (10), and back again to Canaan (13:1). Not many years after the separation he was taken captive by Chedorlaomer, and was rescued by Abraham (Genesis 14 )
Canaan (2) - God promised this land to the children of Israel, the posterity of Abraham, as their possession. The land of Canaan was called the land of Israel, 1 Samuel 13:19, because it was occupied by the descendants of Jacob or Israel; the holy land, Zechariah 2:12; the land of promise, Hebrews 11:9, because it was promised to Abraham and his posterity as their possession; the land of Judah, Jeremiah 39:10, because Judah was the leading tribe; the land of the Hebrews, Genesis 40:15, or the descendants of Eber, an ancestor of Abraham
Isaac - ...
The only son of Abraham by Sarah. The next memorable event in his life is that connected with the command of God given to Abraham to offer him up as a sacrifice on a mountain in the land of Moriah (Genesis 22 ). (See Abraham
Aram - This was the territory to which the father of Abraham came when he migrated with his family from Babylonia. ...
Abraham later moved to Canaan, but the rest of his relatives remained in Aram (Genesis 12:1; Genesis 12:4-5). When Abraham wanted to obtain a wife for his son Isaac from among his relatives, he had to send his servant back to Aram to fetch Rebekah (Genesis 24:10; Genesis 25:20)
Inheritance - ...
The focus of the inheritance concept in the Old Testament is God's promise to Abraham. ...
Who Are the Heirs? Three major characters dominate the inheritance usage in the New Testament: Abraham, Christ, and the believer. The New Testament continues the focus on Abraham as a central figure of the inheritance metaphor. The initial promise to Abraham of the land of Canaan ( Hebrews 11:8 ) is broadened to include "the world" (Romans 4:13 ). While the fact of Abraham's inheritance is significant, the New Testament concentrates on the means by which he received the inheritance: God's promise and Abraham's faith, not by works of the law (Romans 4:14 ; Galatians 3:18 ). It follows naturally that Christians are also heirs along with Abraham and Christ (Galatians 3:29 ). They receive their inheritance by faith as did Abraham (1618449090_21 ) and share in the inheritance with Christ as sons (Romans 8:17 )
the Angel of the Lord - "—JEHOVAH appeared unto Abraham in the plains of Mamre. Abraham lifted up his eyes, and three men, three persons in human form, "stood by him. And J...
EHOVAH said, "Shall I hide from Abraham the thing that I do?" Appearances of the same personage occur to Isaac and to Jacob under the name of "the God of Abraham, and of Isaac. "The Angel of the Lord called to Abraham a second time from heaven, and said, By myself have I sworn, saith the Lord, (JEHOVAH,) that since thou hast done this thing, in blessing will I bless thee. " The Angel of the Lord appeared to Moses in a flame of fire; but this same Angel "called to him out of the bush, and said, I am the God of thy fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob; and Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look upon God
Isaac - (See Abraham; ISHMAEL. ) "laughter," because Abraham laughed in joy at the promise of his birth, type of the annunciation of Messiah's birth (Genesis 17:17); and Sarah too, with some degree of incredulity because of the improbability at her age (Genesis 18:12), but at his birth with thankful joy toward God, saying "God hath made me to laugh, so that all that hear will laugh with me" (Genesis 21:6-7; compare Isaiah 54:1). Born at Gerar when Abraham was 100 years old. His living still after the three days (Genesis 22:4) in which he was dead in Abraham's purpose prefigures the Messiah's resurrection on the third day. ...
Thus Abraham had the wonderful honour of representing the Father, and Isaac, the only son of the promise, was the most remarkable of all the types of the Son Messiah. Abraham herein had the glimpse which he had desired of Messiah's day "and was glad" (Isaac meaning "laughter flowing from gladness") (John 8:56); not that he fully comprehended the anti-typical meaning. ...
By this work "Abraham's faith was made perfect" (James 2:21-23), not was vivified, but attained its crowning development. Abraham's trustful loving obedience to the true God, at the cost of the greatest self-sacrifice, was by the test shown to be at least equal to that of idolaters to their false gods. Not in blind credulity, for Abraham had now long experience that God can order nothing wrong or harsh to His people, but in faith "accounting that God was able to raise His son even from the dead," he obeyed. ...
He reverenced his father amidst all his wildness, and finally joined with Jacob in paying the last mark of respect at his father's grave, even as Isaac and Ishmael had met at Abraham's Burial. Isaac lived to see Jacob whom he had sent with his blessing (for faith at last prevailed over his partiality, and he gave Jacob the blessing of Abraham, Genesis 28:1; Genesis 28:4) to seek a wife in Padan-aram return with a large family to him at Hebron (Genesis 35:27),...
Before he died at 180; the longest lived of the three patriarchs, the least migratory, the least prolific, and the least favored with revelations. ), unlike Abraham and Jacob, of tender affections, he was a man of suffering rather than action; having the divine favor so markedly that Abimelech and his officers said, "we saw certainly that the Lord was with thee" (Genesis 26:28). ...
As Abraham foreshadows the unsettled early history of the nation, and Jacob their commercial unwarlike later course, so Isaac their intermediate days of peace and separation from the nations in their fertile land of promise. As Abraham is associated with morning prayer, and Jacob associated with night prayer, so Isaac with evening prayer (Genesis 19:27; Genesis 28:11; Genesis 28:32; Genesis 24:63)
Exodus, Book of - The time comprised in this book, from the death of Joseph to the erection of the tabernacle in the wilderness, is about one hundred and forty-five years, on the supposition that the four hundred and thirty years (12:40) are to be computed from the time of the promises made to Abraham (Galatians 3:17 )
Teil Tree - "The terebinth of Mamre, or its lineal successor, remained from the days of Abraham till the fourth century of the Christian era, and on its site Constantine erected a Christian church, the ruins of which still remain
Mill - For grinding corn, mentioned as used in the time of Abraham (Genesis 18:6 )
Famine - The first mentioned in Scripture was so grievous as to compel Abraham to go down to the land of Egypt (Genesis 26:1 )
Rebecca - Even within the family of Abraham, to whom the promises were given, God more than once made choice, rejecting Ishmael and accepting Isaac, loving Jacob and hating Esau (Romans 9:7; Romans 9:13)
Hara - (See Abraham
Lot - (Λώτ)...
Lot, the nephew, and for a time the companion, of Abraham, is thrice over called ‘righteous’ in 2 Peter 2:7-8
Seed - ) Progeny; offspring; children; descendants; as, the seed of Abraham; the seed of David
Job - The opinions of Job and his Mends are thus interesting as showing a phase of patriarchal religion outside of the family of Abraham, and not controlled by the legislation of Moses
Baker - In Egypt the king had a man-servant who is called his 'chief baker,' Genesis 40:1-22 ; Genesis 41:10 ; but in Israel the baking was done by the women of each house, as Abraham called to Sarah to prepare cakes upon the hearth, Genesis 18:6 ; and Samuel said that if the Israelites had a king he would take their daughters to be bakers
Jethro - Some have thought, that he had a knowledge of the God of Israel, else Moses would not have been allied to him; and they that are of that opinion say, that he was descended from Midian, the son of Abraham, and Keturah
Reprove - ” The context indicates, however, that Abraham, Sarah’s husband, deserved being “reproved” in our modern meaning of the word, but that Sarah actually was “cleared” (NASB)
Sister - Sarah is called sister to Abraham, Genesis 12:13 ; Genesis 20:12 , though only his niece according to some, or sister by the father's side according to others
Concubine - Thus Abraham, by Sarah his wife, had Isaac, his heir; but, by his two concubines, Hagar and Keturah, he had other children, whom he did not make equal to Isaac
Dedan - A people of northern Arabia, descended from Dedan, a descendant of Abraham and Keturah
Cave - ...
Abraham buried Sarah in the cave of the field of Machpelab
Laban - A rich herdsman of Mesopotamia, son of Bethuel, and grandson of Mahor, Abraham's brother, Genesis 24:28-31 . His character is shown in the gladness with which he gave his sister Rebekah in marriage to the only son of his rich uncle, Abraham, Genesis 24:30,50 ; and in his deceitful and exacting treatment of Jacob his nephew and son-inlaw, against which Jacob defended himself by cunning as well as fidelity
Tempt - God did tempt Abraham
Hit'Tits - Abraham bought from the "children of Heth" the field and the cave of Machpelah, belonging to Ephron the Hittite
Zacchae'us - ( Luke 19:1-10 ) Zacchaeus was a Jew, as may be inferred from his name and from the fact that the Saviour speaks of him expressly as "a son of Abraham
the Rich Man And Lazarus - To go no further than Abraham in the history now open before us. Abraham was a very rich man. One of the finest chapters in all the Old Testament turns upon Abraham and his great riches. So rich was Abraham that his mere overflow was quite enough to make Lot his nephew a rich man also. Only, though Abraham in his generosity could make Lot a rich man, he could not make him a gentleman. Abraham might have turned upon Lot and might have said to him that every horn and hoof that Lot possessed he possessed through his uncle's liberality. But what did Abraham as a matter of fact say? He said these immortal words to Lot. " What a Christian gentleman was Abraham, and that too such a long time before the day of Christ! And what an abominable mind his nephew in his greed exhibited! And the root of the whole contrast lay in this. Abraham had begun life believing God. Once get Abraham's humble, noble, heavenly, mind, and then set your heart upon making riches as much as you like. Well, Lazarus who now lies in Abraham's bosom, had his own temptations as he lay at the rich man's gate. For just when the previous night was at its darkest, and just before the dawn, the angels came down and carried Lazarus up into Abraham's bosom. And in hell he lift up his eyes, being in torments, and seeth Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom. And he cried, and all hell heard him, Father Abraham, have mercy on me, for I am tormented in this flame. And all hell listened till it heard Abraham's answer. And Abraham said, Son, remember! And the smoke of their torment went up, as never before, when they all began again to remember. Else, if they had, do you think I would have been where I now am! O Father Abraham: pity my poor brothers, and send and deliver them from those dumb dogs that eat and drink till they cannot bark. "Testify!" and again he says-"Testify!"...
Son, remember, testified Abraham, that thou in thy lifetime receivedst thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things. And some day soon-the day is at the door-the same angels that carried up Lazarus to Abraham's bosom will come and carry you up to be for ever with the Lord, and to be for ever like Him
Hyksos - These probably came initially for reasons of economic distress, such as famine, as did Abraham (Genesis 12:10 ). Unlike Abraham, many groups stayed in Egypt as permanent settlers
Concubine - This in some degree palliates, though it does not justify, the concubinage of Nahor, Abraham, and Jacob. Abraham sent them away with gifts during his lifetime, so as not to interfere with the rights of Isaac, the son of the promise
Before - Abraham bowed before the people of the land. Psalms 119 ...
Before Abraham was, I am
Money - We have no evidence of the use of coined money before the return from the Babylonian captivity; but silver was used for money, in quantities determined by weight, at least as early as the time of Abraham; and its earliest mention is in the generic sense of the price paid for a slave. ( Genesis 17:13 ) The 1000 pieces of silver paid by Abimelech to Abraham, ( Genesis 20:16 ) and the 20 pieces of silver for which Joseph was sold to the Ishmaelites, ( Genesis 37:28 ) were probably rings such as we see on the Egyptian monuments in the act of being weighed. In the first recorded transaction of commerce, the cave of Machpelah is purchased by Abraham for 400 shekels of silver
Promise - Reference is often made (a) to the great fundamental promises given to Abraham, relating to the birth of Isaac, the blessing of his descendants, and the inheritance of the land of Canaan (e. Paul is the chief exponent of the meaning of the promise given to Abraham and his seed. They who receive the blessings are those who belong to Christ: ‘if ye are Christ’s, then are ye Abraham’s seed, heirs according to promise’ (Galatians 3:29). Particular emphasis is laid on the fact that the promise is of grace, and not of works of the law; ‘for this cause it is of faith, that it might be according to grace; to the end that the promise may be sure to all the seed; not to that only which is of the law, but to that also which is of the faith of Abraham, who is the father of us all’ (Romans 4:16). Among the Messianic blessings the promise is sometimes identified with the gift of the Holy Ghost: ‘that upon the Gentiles might come the blessing of Abraham in Christ Jesus; that we might receive the promise of the Spirit’ (Galatians 3:14; also Acts 2:39, Ephesians 1:13)
Jew - The Hebrew people were descended directly from Abram, Genesis 12:1, through Isaac and Jacob, and are frequently called the "seed of Abraham," Psalms 105:6; John 8:37, or "children of Abraham," Galatians 3:7, or "children of Israel," Exodus 1:13. God, to carry out his purpose and preserve his church, called Abraham to leave his father's house and his country, and separated him and his household from the rest of mankind; gave him special promises, made covenants with him, and constituted him the "Father of the Faithful" to the world. "The gospel preached unto Abraham," before the giving of the law: "In thee shall all nations be blessed" was the first proclamation "that God would justify the heathen through faith. Nothing can more conclusively show the hand of God in directing the history of the world, and in controlling the affairs of nations, than the prophecies and the facts connected with the history of Abraham and of his descendants. It was fulfilled in the advent of the Son of God, born of the seed of Abraham. The fearful prophecies of God concerning the descendants of Abraham, Tittered before they entered the promised land, have been continually in progress of fulfillment to the letter
Covenant - In his sovereign will God chose one man, Abraham, promising him a multitude of descendants who would become a nation, receive Canaan as their homeland, and be God’s channel of blessing to the world (Genesis 12:1-3; Genesis 15:18-21; Genesis 17:2-8; Acts 3:25). ...
God confirmed his promise to Abraham by a covenant ceremony. But in Abraham’s case, only God (symbolized by a smoking fire-pot and a flaming torch) passed between the halves of the animal. ...
Abraham, however, had a responsibility to respond to God’s grace, and his response would determine whether he would enjoy the covenant benefits. The rite of circumcision, which God gave as the sign and seal of the covenant, gave Abraham and his descendants the opportunity to demonstrate such faith and obedience. )...
Developed through Israel...
Once the promised nation existed and was on the way to its promised homeland, God renewed the covenant made earlier with Abraham, this time applying it to the whole nation. As in the covenant with Abraham, so in the covenant with his descendants, the central blessing was communion with God; for he was their God and they were his people (Genesis 17:7; Exodus 6:7; Leviticus 26:12). ...
All this ceremonial procedure emphasized once more that the covenant with Israel, following the covenant with Abraham, was based on divine grace, not human effort (Genesis 15:17). The promised offspring of Abraham through whom God would send his salvation to the world was Jesus the Messiah (Genesis 12:3; Genesis 12:7; Romans 5:15-21; Galatians 3:29). God gave David this promise by means of a covenant that followed on from his earlier covenants, namely, those with Abraham and with the nation Israel (2 Samuel 7:12-17; 2 Samuel 23:5; Psalms 89:3-4; Psalms 89:28-37). The Abrahamic covenant led to the Sinaitic covenant, which in turn led to the Davidic covenant, which led finally to Jesus Christ, the Saviour of the world (Luke 1:32-33; Luke 1:72-73; Acts 13:17-23)
Hagar - ” The personal servant of Sarah, who was given as a concubine to Abraham and became the mother of Ishmael (Genesis 16:1-16 ; Genesis 21:8-21 ; Genesis 25:12 ; Galatians 4:24-25 )
ur of the Chaldees, - UR OF THE CHALDEES , whence Abraham set out upon his journey to Canaan ( Genesis 11:28-31 ; Genesis 15:7 , Nehemiah 9:7 ), is usually identified with the well-known city of Uru in southern Babylonia, the site of which is marked by the mounds of Muqayyar. The difficulty may perhaps be explained by the supposition that the narrative incorporates variant traditions with regard to Abraham’s origin; the fact that Uru and Harran were both of them centres of moon-worship is possibly significant
Eliezer -
"Of Damascus," the "steward" (RSV, "possessor") of Abraham's house (Genesis 15:2,3 ). It was probably he who headed the embassy sent by Abraham to the old home of his family in Padan-aram to seek a wife for his son Isaac
Cainan - Ephrem Syrus says the Chaldees in the time of Terah and Abraham worshipped a graven god, Cainan
Mamre - Genesis 13:18, "the plain (rather the oaks or terebinths) of Mamre"; Genesis 14:13; Genesis 14:24, brother of Eshcol, friend and ally of Abraham
Anakim - In the days of Abraham (Genesis 14:5,6 ) they inhabited the region afterwards known as Edom and Moab, east of the Jordan
Integrity - Several Old Testament characters are designated persons of integrity: Noah ( Genesis 6:9 ); Abraham (Genesis 17:1 ); Jacob (Genesis 25:27 ); Job (Job 1:1 ,Job 1:1,1:8 ; Job 2:3 ); and David (1 Kings 9:4 )
Concubine - The immediate cause of concubinage might be gathered from the conjugal histories of Abraham and Jacob (Genesis 1630;30 )
Defeat - The English army defeated the French on the plains of Abraham
ai, Hai - It was known to Abraham, who pitched his tent between Hai and Bethel
Baking Bread - Abraham directed Sarah to bake cakes upon the hearth, for the use of the strangers who had visited him, Genesis 18:6
Rephaim - There were some of the Rephaim beyond Jordan, at Ashteroth Karnaim, in the time of Abraham, when Chedorlaomer made war against them, Genesis 14:5
Cities - Even before the time of Abraham there were cities in Egypt, Genesis 12:14-15; Numbers 13:22, and the Israelites, during their sojourn there, were employed in building or fortifying the "treasure cities" of Pithom and Raamses
Concubine - On cause of concubinage is shown in the history of Abraham and Jacob, Genesis 16:16
la'Ban - ) The elder branch of the family remained at Haran, Mesopotamia, when Abraham removed to the land of Canaan, and it is there that we first meet with Laban, as taking the leading part in the betrothal of his sister Rebekah to her cousin Isaac
Commerce - From the time that men began to live in cities, trade, in some shape, must have been carried on to supply the town-dwellers with necessaries from foreign as well as native sources, for we find that Abraham was rich, not only in cattle, but in silver, gold and gold and silver plate and ornaments
Pharaoh Pharaohis Daughter - In biblical history several Pharaohs are met with, especially in connexion with Abraham, Joseph, and Moses
Bless - In all of these instances, God’s blessing goes out to the nations through Abraham or his seed. 2:2-4), but made it plain that the initiative in blessing rests with God, and that Abraham and his seed were the instruments of it. When expressed by men, a “blessing” was a wish or prayer for a blessing that is to come in the future: “And [3] give thee the blessing of Abraham, to thee, and to thy seed with thee; that thou mayest inherit the land wherein thou art a stranger, which God gave unto Abraham” ( Abraham is a blessing to the nations ( Machpelah - Portion; double cave, the cave which Abraham bought, together with the field in which it stood, from Ephron the Hittite, for a family burying-place (Genesis 23 ). " Here were laid the bodies of Abraham and Sarah, Isaac and Rebekah, Jacob and Leah (Genesis 23:19 ; 25:9 ; 49:31 ; 50:13 )
Ur - was the land of Haran's nativity, (Genesis 11:28 ) the place from which Terah and Abraham started "to go into the land of Canaan. in the extreme south of Chaldaea, at Mugheir , not very far above-- and probably in the time of Abraham actually upon--the head of the Persian Gulf
Silver - Abraham paid Ephron for the cave of Machpelah "400 shekels of silver, current money with the merchant" (Genesis 23:16). The thousand ("pieces" is not in the Hebrew) of silver given by Abimelech to Abraham probably indicate the value of the "sheep and oxen," etc
Way - ...
Genesis 24:42 (a) The servant of Abraham is referring to the path he took and the course he pursued in carrying out the instructions of Abraham
Hamor - ...
There is a curious fusion of traditions in Acts 7:10 , where Jacob ‘and our fathers’ are said to have been ‘laid in the tomb which Abraham bought for a money price from the sons of Emmor in Sychem. ’ Abraham bought a tomb in Machpelah, not in Shechem ( Genesis 23:17 f
Circumcision - " (Galatians 5:2) And the reason seems to have been this: The seed of Abraham, by the act of circumcision, declared that they were looking for and waiting to the coming of the promised Seed, in whom all the families of the faithful were to be blessed. Hence, all the faithful posterity of Abraham were so tenacious of observing the rite of circumcision before Christ came, and so determined not to observe it after
Philistines - of Palestine when Abraham went to sojourn at Gerar, Genesis 20 ; and both Abraham and Isaac had certain contentions with them respecting the wells which they had digged
Birthright - Jacob, having bought Esau's birthright, acquired a title to the particular blessing of his dying father; and, accordingly, he had consigned to him the privilege of the covenant which God made with Abraham, that from his loins the Messiah should spring; a prerogative which descended to his posterity. Thus the patriarchs, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, offered sacrifices, and were priests as well as kings in their respective families, Genesis 12:7-8 ; Genesis 13:18 ; Genesis 17:7 ; Genesis 26:25 ; Genesis 31:54 ; Genesis 35:7
Isaac - Son of Abraham and Sarah. Thence he was taken to ‘the land of Moriah,’ to be offered up as a burnt-offering at the bidding of God; and if Abraham’s unquestioning faith is the primary lesson taught ( Genesis 22:12 , Genesis 26:5 , Hebrews 11:17 ff. His mother died when he was thirty-six years of age; and Abraham sent a servant to fetch a wife for Isaac from amongst his kindred in Mesopotamia, according to Genesis 24:1-67 , where the religious spirit is as noticeable as the idyllic tone. Famine and drought made it necessary for Isaac to shift his encampment to Gerar ( Genesis 26:1 ), where a story similar to that of Abraham’s repudiation of Sarah is told of him (ch. In Genesis 26:5 he is subordinated to Abraham, and blessed for his sake; but the two are more frequently classed together ( Exodus 2:24 ; Exodus 3:6 , Matthew 8:11 ; Matthew 22:32 , Acts 3:13 el al . The submission of Isaac plays a part, although a less important one than the faith of Abraham, in the NT references ( Hebrews 11:17 f
Hagar - " (Genesis 21:12) And though a period of somewhat more than twenty years had elapsed between the promise given to Abraham and the fulfilment of it, yet the thing itself was as sure and certain as the promise concerning the coming of Christ himself. "To Abraham and his seed was the promise made. " (Galatians 3:16) And how striking was the difference in the gift of these two sorts to Abraham! Ishmael was the product of lust; Isaac a child of prayer. "Lord God, said Abraham, what wilt thou give me, seeing I go childless? Look now (said God,) towards heaven, and tell the stars, if thou be able to number them
Justification - ...
God called Abraham and promised to make him into a great people (Genesis 12:1-3 ). Effectually, Abraham was called to counteract the sin of Adam. Although advanced in years, Abraham was promised a child Isaac, through whom innumerable descendants would emerge. Abraham's response to this promise is the crux of the whole idea of justification in the Old as well as in the New Testament. Righteousness is not something Abraham possessed that prompted a reward from God. Quite to the contrary, a condition was fulfilled on the part of Abraham, and subsequently on the part of God. On the basis of this understanding, God accepted the response of Abraham's faith. ” Christians are justified in the same way Abraham was, by faith (Romans 4:16 ; Romans 5:1 ). He drew a connection between the Christian's faith and the faith of Abraham. Abraham's faith in God can be seen as an exemplary foreshadowing which would find ultimate expression in every Christians' relationship to God through Jesus Christ
Hagar - Her story shows that Sarah renounced the hope of bearing children to Abraham, and gave him Hagar as concubine. After the weaning of Isaac, the sight of Ishmael aroused Sarah’s jealousy and fear ( Genesis 21:9 ); and Abraham was reluctantly persuaded to send away Hagar and her son. ...
The story is an important part of the biography of Abraham, illustrating both the variety of trials by which his faith was perfected and the active concern of God in even the distracted conditions of a chosen household
Milk - It means "butter," but also more frequently "cream," or perhaps, as some think, "curdled milk," such as that which Abraham set before the angels (Genesis 18:8 ), and which Jael gave to Sisera (Judges 5:25 )
Apple Tree - Having been introduced from China prior to the time of Abraham, the apricot is widespread in Palestine
Popery - 'How choice a people is Israel! how dearly God is in love with Israel! what a happy thing it is to be of the seed of Abraham! how blessed the nation of the Jews above all nations!' And such stuff as this all along
Jebusites - A race of people, descendants of Canaan, son of Ham, living in Palestine when the land was promised to Abraham
Balances - They were needful also in early days for weighing the money: when Abraham bought a burying place he "weighed to Ephron the silver
Sadducees - These were a sect among the Jews, but possessing nothing of the principles of Abraham, but rather a class of Epicureans: They were rigid to a degree for the law, because, denying any future state of reward or punishment, angel or spirit, they made the chief good to consist in an attention to the observance of order in this life
Silver - Abraham was rich in silver, Genesis 13:2 ; but with Solomon gold was so plentiful that silver was 'nothing accounted of
Family - ) Those who descend from one common progenitor; a tribe, clan, or race; kindred; house; as, the human family; the family of Abraham; the father of a family
Family - Thus the Israelites were a branch of the family of Abraham and the descendants of Reuben, of Manasseh, &c
Rove - The grove mentioned in Deuteronomy 16:21 and the groves planted by Abraham were normal and natural groups of ordinary trees
Forerunner - The author of the Epistle shows that the promise made to Abraham still awaits its complete fulfilment-a promise which is made doubly sure, being confirmed by an oath
Tempt, to; Temptation - "God did tempt Abraham" when He bade him offer up Isaac
Lamb (Male) - “And Abraham set seven ewe lambs of the flock by themselves” ( Bosom - Hence, figuratively, it is used of a place of blessedness with another, as with Abraham in paradise, Luke 16:22,23 (plural in ver
Bethel - It was visited by Abraham, Genesis 12:8; Genesis 13:3; marked by Jacob after his vision of the ladder, Genesis 28:11-19; Genesis 31:13; dwelling-place of Jacob, Genesis 35:1-8; name applied to Luz, Judges 1:22-23
Beer-Sheba - At Beersheba, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob often dwelt, Genesis 21:31 ; 22:19 ; 26:33 ; 28:10 ; 46:1
Promise - Used by Paul to denote the spiritual gifts of God, chiefly the Messiah, the Holy Spirit, and the fullness of gospel blessings, of which an assurance was given to Abraham and other saints in behalf of themselves, and of believers who should come after them, Romans 4:13-14 Galatians 3:14-29
Stephen - He summarizes OT history from the call of Abraham to the building of Solomon’s Temple (cf. God had not confined His presence to the Tabernacle and the Temple; He had appeared to Abraham and others before the Law was given; Isaiah ( Isaiah 66:1 f
Pharaoh - The Pharaoh whom Abraham visited was more honest in his behaviour than Abraham (Genesis 12:10-20), and the Pharaoh of Joseph’s time was sensible and generous (Genesis 41:37-45; Genesis 41:55; Genesis 45:16-20; Genesis 47:20-22; Genesis 50:4-6)
Friend, Friendship - Both 2 Chronicles 20:7 and Isaiah 41:8 characterize Abraham as the friend of God. Echoing the Old Testament, James pointed to Abraham, the friend of God, as one whose example of active faith is to be followed (James 2:23 )
God of the Fathers - Other references include the name of a particular patriarch, as “the God of Abraham” (Genesis 31:53 ; Genesis 26:24 ; Genesis 28:13 ; Genesis 32:9 ), “the God of Isaac” (Genesis 28:13 ; Genesis 32:9 ; Genesis 46:1 ), or “the God of Nahor” (Genesis 31:53 ). God commanded Him to answer: “Yahweh, the God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, hath sent me to you” (Exodus 3:15 )
Christianity - The original promise to Abraham, "in thee . Psalm 110 declared that His priesthood should be one "forever, after the order of Melchizeded" (the king of righteousness and king of peace), to which the Levitical priesthood did homage in the person of Abraham their ancestor, paying tithes to Melchizedek (compare Hebrew 6-7)
Shepherds - ...
I rather think, (though I speak not in the most distant way decidedly upon the subject) that the mind of the patriarch Joseph had an eye to Christ and aimed, upon this and every other occasion, to keep up the gracious distinction of character of the seed of Abraham, whose first and most decisive feature all along was of "the people that dwell alone, and that were not to be reckoned among the nations. But circumcised shepherds, and sacrificing shepherds, to the God of Abraham, when the cause of covenant grace and mercy was discovered, would have done then as it hath ever since done in the church of Jesus, stirred up the natural hatred of the heart against the chosen seed
Faith, - is when it is said of Abraham that "he believed in the Lord, and he counted it to him for righteousness. It is confidence in God founded on His word; it is believing in a person, as Abraham believed God
Almighty - The name first occurs in Genesis 17:1 ; God said to Abraham "I am the Almighty God. This is plainly declared: "I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob by the name of GOD ALMIGHTY; but by my name JEHOVAH was I not known to them
Lot - (veil or covering ), the son of Haran, and therefore the nephew of Abraham. He removed with the rest of his kindred to Charran, and again subsequently with Abraham and Sarai to Canaan
Lot - (veil or covering ), the son of Haran, and therefore the nephew of Abraham. He removed with the rest of his kindred to Charran, and again subsequently with Abraham and Sarai to Canaan
Covenant - This promise was the foundation of that transaction which Almighty God, in treating with Abraham, condescends to call "my covenant with thee," and which, upon this authority, has received in theology the name of the Abrahamic covenant. Upon the one part, Abraham, whose faith was counted to him for righteousness, received this charge from God, "Walk before me, and be thou perfect;" upon the other part, the God whom he believed, and whose voice he obeyed, beside promising other blessings to him and his seed, uttered these significant words, "In thy seed shall all the families of the earth be blessed. " In this transaction, then, there was the essence of a covenant; for there were mutual stipulations between two parties; and there was superadded, as a seal of the covenant, the rite of circumcision, which, being prescribed by God, was a confirmation of his promise to all who complied with it, and being submitted to by Abraham, was, on his part, an acceptance of the covenant. ...
The Abrahamic covenant appears, from the nature of the stipulations, to be more than a covenant of works; and, as it was not confined to Abraham, but extended to his seed, it could not be disannulled by any subsequent transactions, which fell short of a fulfilment of the blessing promised. The law of Moses, which was given to the seed of Abraham four hundred and thirty years after, did not come up to the terms of that covenant even with regard to them, for, in its form it was a covenant of works, and to other nations it did not directly convey any blessing. But although the Mosaic dispensation did not fulfil the Abrahamic covenant, it was so far from setting that covenant aside, that it cherished the expectation of its being fulfilled: for it continued the rite of circumcision, which was the seal of the covenant; and in those ceremonies which it enjoined, there was a shadow, a type, an obscure representation, of the promised blessing, Luke 1:72-73 . " The covenant made with Abraham retained its force during the dispensation of the law, and was the end of that dispensation. ...
The views which have been given furnish the ground upon which we defend that established language which is familiar to our ears, that there are only two covenants essentially different, and opposite to one another, the covenant of works, made with the first man, intimated by the constitution of human nature to every one of his posterity, and having for its terms, "Do this and live;" —and the covenant of grace, which was the substance of the Abrahamic covenant, and which entered into the constitution of the Sinaitic covenant, but which is more clearly revealed, and more extensively published in the Gospel. Accordingly, the tenor of the new covenant, founded upon the promise originally made to Abraham, is expressed by Jeremiah in words which the Apostle to the Hebrews has quoted as a description of it: "I will be to them a God, and they shall be to me a people," Hebrews 8:10 :—words which intimate on one part not only entire reconciliation with God, but the continued exercise of all the perfections of the Godhead in promoting the happiness of his people, and the full communication of all the blessings which flow from his unchangeable love; on the other part, the surrender of the heart and affections of his people, the dedication of all the powers of their nature to his service, and the willing uniform obedience of their lives
Bless - From the time that God entered into covenant with Abraham, and promised extraordinary blessings to his posterity, it appears to have been customary for the father of each family, in the direct line, or line of promise, previous to his death, to call his children around him, and to inform them, according to the knowledge which it pleased God then to give him, how, and in what manner, the divine blessing conferred upon Abraham was to descend among them. When Melchizedeck blessed Abraham, the act of benediction included in it not merely the pronouncing solemn good wishes, but also a petitionary address to God that he would be pleased to ratify the benediction by his concurrence with what was prayed for
Haran - " The eldest son of Terah, brother of Abraham and Nahor, and father of Lot, Milcah, and Iscah
Incest - In patriarchal times marriage to a half sister (Genesis 20:12 ) and marriage to rival sisters (Genesis 29:21-30 ) were permissible, though such marriages proved troublesome to both Abraham and Jacob
Sheep - Probably the flocks of Abraham and Isaac were of the wild species found still in the mountain regions of Persia and Kurdistan
Cartographers -
Abraham Ortelius (1527-98), a Catholic of Antwerp, made the first modern atlas which combined the maps of the world and contained a catalog of maps with the names of 99 cartographers who lived before 1570
Cartography -
Abraham Ortelius (1527-98), a Catholic of Antwerp, made the first modern atlas which combined the maps of the world and contained a catalog of maps with the names of 99 cartographers who lived before 1570
Grace - So Abraham, Genesis 18:1-3
Amalekite - They were not the descendants of Amalek, the son of Eliphaz, for they existed in the days of Abraham (Genesis 14:7 )
Generation - In the time of Abraham a generation was an hundred years, thus: Genesis 15:16 , "In the fourth generation" = in four hundred years (Compare verse 13 and Exodus 12:40 )
Beersheba - Well of the oath, or well of seven, a well dug by Abraham, and so named because he and Abimelech here entered into a compact (Genesis 21:31 )
Tithe - Abraham presented a tithe of war booty to the priest-king of Jerusalem, Melchizedek (Genesis 14:18-20 )
Laugh - Both Abraham (Genesis 17:17 ) and Sarah (Genesis 18:12 ) laughed in contempt and disbelief at God's promise that Sarah would bear a son
Builder - As early as Genesis 4:17 we read of Cain building a city and calling it after his son's name; since which time building houses has become general; whereas Abraham looked for a city whose Builder is God
Calling - God's call to individuals, when he also makes them willing to obey: as when Abraham was called to leave his country and kindred
Blessing - Again, we read that "the less [1] is blessed of the better," Hebrews 7:7 ; and though this refers to Melchisedec blessing Abraham, the same thing is true respecting God and His creatures: in bestowing favours God is the only one who can bless
Sheba - Son of Jokshan, a son of Abraham and Keturah
Gomorrah, Gomorrha - They were rescued by Abraham because Lot was among the captives
Abimelech - King of Gerar, who, believing Sarah to be Abraham's sister, took her into his harem, but being warned by God* he returned Sarah, calling Abraham her brother, as a rebuke
Come Near, Approach - 18:23, where Abraham is said to “draw near” to God to plead that Sodom be spared
Brother - ...
In scripture, the term brother is applied to a kinsman by blood more remote that a son of the same parents as in the case of Abraham and Lot, Jacob and Laban
Promise - The word in the New Testament is usually taken for the promises that God heretofore made to Abraham, and the other patriarchs, of sending the Messiah, and conferring his Holy Spirit and eternal life on those that should believe on him
Rebecca, Rebekah - Daughter of Bethuel the nephew of Abraham, and wife of Isaac. Abraham's servant conducted her to one, whom she had not before seen — to Isaac, who had in a figure been received back from the dead after having been offered to God on the altar: beautiful type of the saints who form the bride of Christ being led by the Holy Spirit on their journey to be the 'wife' of the Risen One "whom having not seen they love," and to whom they can now be companions in spirit, being of His 'kindred,' whom He is not ashamed to own as brethren
Famine - Two are mentioned as occurring in Canaan in the days of Abraham and Isaac, compelling those patriarchs to remove to Egypt and to Gerar
Shekel - Abraham weighed to Ephron the silver-in the audience of the sons of Heth," Genesis 23:15,16
Seed - Progeny offspring children descendants as the seed of Abraham the seed of David
Patriarch - In common usage the title of patriarch is assigned especially to those whose lives are recorded in Scripture previous to the time of Moses, as Adam, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob
Circumcision - It was enjoined upon Abraham, the father of the nation, by God, at the institution and as the token of the covenant, which assured to him and his descendants the promise of the Messiah
Sheba - Son of Jokshan, a son of Abraham and Keturah
Hebrew Language - ...
When Abraham entered Canaan it is obvious that he found the language of its inhabitants closely allied to his own. " Whether this language, as seen in the earliest books of the Old Testament, was the very dialect which Abraham brought with him into Canaan, or whether it was the common tongue of the Canaanitish nations which he only adopted, is uncertain; probably the latter opinion is the correct one
Hebron - In the time of Abraham, however (whose history is much bound up with this place), we read of Hittites here. The modern name is Khalîl er-Rahmân , ‘the friend of the Merciful’ the Muslim title of Abraham. ‘Abraham’s oak’ is shown near the city, but this is as apocryphal as the ascription of a cistern called ‘Sarah’s bath
Covenant - When Abraham bought the field of Ephron in Machpelah, he paid the money "in the audience of the sons of Heth" as witnesses, and it was thus made sure unto him. Such was God's covenant with Abraham, first as to his natural posterity, Genesis 15:4-6 ; and secondly, as to his seed, Christ. The promise being through Christ, the apostle could add respecting Gentile believers, "If ye be Christ's, then are ye Abraham's seed, and heirs according to promise
Salt - GOD called Abraham, he obeyed and began the nation of Israel immediately. The salting of the baby at birth showed that GOD found in Abraham all that he needed for the beginning of a healthy growth for a healthy nation
Command - Pharaoh “ordered” (“commanded”) his men concerning Abraham, and they escorted Abraham and his party out of Egypt ( Covenant - Abraham and Abimelech cut such a covenant as equal partners, agreeing that the well at Beersheba belonged to Abraham (Genesis 21:22-34 ). Apparently, Abraham gained the right to live among Abimelech's people, the Philistines (Genesis 21:34 ). ...
This is seen in comparing Isaac's covenant concerning the digging of wells (Genesis 26:28 ) with Abraham's (Genesis 21:22-24 ) discussed above. ...
God made His second covenant with Abraham (Genesis 15:18 ; Genesis 17:2 ). As the covenant with Noah involved a righteous man (Genesis 6:8-9 ), so the covenant with Abraham involved a man of faith (Genesis 15:6 ). The covenant with Abraham, like that with Noah, involved divine promises, not human obedience. God promised to give the land of Canaan to Abraham's descendants after a long sojourn to a foreign land. For Abraham, the rite became a sacrifice to God and a sign of his devotion to the rite even when attacking birds threatened to spoil it. Abraham did not walk through the divided animals. God's covenant promise was extended to include international-relations, many descendants, and to be God of the people descended from Abraham forever. This covenant differed from those with Noah and Abraham. God renewed the covenant with His people, making explicit His covenant promise to conquer miraculously the land of Canaan promised to Abraham (Exodus 34:1 ; note Exodus 34:10 )
Altar - Abraham built an altar where he pitched his tent between Bethel and Ai. In the next passage, however, Abraham went to Egypt and fell into sin, lying about Sarah out of fear of Pharaoh. In the stark and moving story of Abraham's encounter with God at Moriah, Abraham built an altar and arranged the wood on it (Genesis 22:9 ). " By placing Isaac on the altar, Abraham transferred him from the profane to the sacred
Promise - We may define God's promise this way: the divine declaration or assurance made at first to Eve, Shem, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob and then to the whole nation of Israel that: (1) He would be their God, (2) they would be His people, and (3) He would dwell in their midst. The blessing of land and of growth as a nation as well as the call to bless the nations was part of the promise to Abraham. ...
The Promise and the Patriarchs For the fathers of Israel (Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob) we may speak of the promise in the singular even though it announced three significant elements. ...
To demonstrate the eternality and one-sidedness in the gracious offer of God, only God passed between the pieces in Genesis 15:9-21 thus obligating Himself to fulfill His promises without simultaneously and similarly obligating Abraham and the subsequent beneficiaries of the promise. ...
The Promise and the Law The promise was eternal, Abraham's descendants had to transmit the promise to subsequent generations until the final Seed, even Jesus the Messiah, came. Thus, Abraham obeyed God and left Ur (Genesis 12:1-4 ) and walked before God in a blameless way (Genesis 17:1 ). The first, and most frequent, are the references to God's promises to Abraham about the heir he was to receive, even Jesus Christ (Romans 4:13-16 ,Romans 4:13-16,4:20 ; Romans 9:7-9 ; Romans 15:8 ; Genesis 35:12 ; Galatians 4:23 ; Hebrews 6:13-17 ; Hebrews 7:6 ; Hebrews 11:9 , Hebrews 11:11 ,Hebrews 11:11,11:17 )
Freedom - Already when establishing his covenant with Abraham, God had predicted the bondage and suffering of the Hebrews in a foreign land (Genesis 15:13 ). Remembering the covenant to Abraham, the Lord is accomplishing "salvation from our enemies and from the hand of all who hate us" (Luke 1:71 ). This claim drew a sharp response from the audience, who appealed to their kinship with Abraham and deduced that they had never been slaves (v. Interestingly, the central concern of this letter parallels the issue reflected in John 8 : What is the relationship between freedom and being a descendant of Abraham? The Gentile Christians of Galatia were being persuaded by some Judaizing groups to adopt circumcision and other distinctive Jewish ceremonies. Apparently, these Judaizers argued that such conversion to Judaism was necessary to participate fully in the blessings God promised to Abraham. In other words, if the Galatians wanted to be truly part of God's people (and thus spiritually free?), they must become descendants of Abraham by submitting to the Mosaic law. Through faith and the power of the Holy Spirit we are freed from the law of sin and death (Romans 8:2 ); we are no longer slaves, but childrenand not merely children of Abraham (Galatians 3:29 ) but children of God (Romans 8:15 ; Galatians 3:26 ; 4:6-7 )
Bethuel - Nahor's son by Miclah, nephew of Abraham, father of Rebekah (Genesis 22:22-23; Genesis 24:15; Genesis 24:24; Genesis 24:47; Genesis 28:2). When Abraham's servant at the well asks Rebekah, "Is there room in thy father's house for us?" she "ran and told them of her mother's house" (not of her father's, as Rachel did when Jacob introduced himself: Genesis 29:12)
Daughter, Daughter-in-Law - ); (d) the women who followed Christ to Calvary, Luke 23:28 ; (e) women of Aaron's posterity, Luke 1:5 ; (f) a female descendant of Abraham, Luke 13:16
Septuagint Chronology - It reckons 1500 years more from the creation to Abraham than the Hebrew Bible
Ur - ” An ancient city in lower Mesopotamia that is mentioned in the Bible as Abraham's birthplace. Abraham's family home is alluded to in Genesis 12:1 and Acts 7:2 . This Sumerian site is most probably to be identified as Abraham's city of origin. See Abraham ; Babylon ; Chaldees ; Mesopotamia ; Sumeria
Impute, to, - Abraham believed God and it was reckoned (same word) to him as righteousness; and this is true of believers generally
Moriah - Here Abraham was directed by the Lord for the offering up of his son
Arabians - We readthat Abraham sent the sons of Keturah and of his concubines "eastward, to the east country
Kadesh-Barnea - They consider the latter of them as situated on the western side of Mount Hor, toward the land of Canaan, and thus confound it with that Kadesh in the land of the Philistines, where Abraham sojourned, Genesis 16:13 ; Genesis 20:1
Epoch - 2554; the calling of Abraham, B
Septuagint Chronology - It reckons one thousand five hundred years more from the creation to Abraham than the Hebrew Bible
Vision - God appeared to Abraham under the form of three travellers; he showed himself to Isaiah and Ezekiel, in the splendour of his glory
ha'Ran - (1 Chronicles 2:46 ) ...
HARAN or CHARRAN , (Acts 7:2,4 ) name of the place whither Abraham migrated with his family from Ur of the Chaldees, and where the descendants of his brother Nahor established themselves
Name, the Christian - Thus Abram's name was changed to Abrahamwhen God made His covenant with him, and Jacob's name was changedto Israel when that covenant was renewed with him, which had beenmade with Abraham
Hebron - But "Hebron would appear to have been the original name of the city, and it was not till after Abraham's stay there that it received the name Kirjath-arba, who
House - Thus the faithful Abraham, after that the Lord had revealed himself unto him in vision, and said, "Fear not, Abraham, I am thy shield, and thine exceeding great reward;" the patriarch felt a boldness to ask of God concerning his household
Temptation - Thus God "tempted [1] Abraham;" and afflictions are said to tempt, i
Habiru - Since it appears in texts written earlier than Abraham lived and since the Habiru seemed numerous during the patriarchal period, it does not appear to designate ethnic Hebrews
Alliance - Abraham formed an alliance with some of the Canaanitish princes (Genesis 14:13 ), also with Abimelech (21:22-32)
Elam - ...
"The earliest Elamite kingdom seems to have been that of Anzan, the exact site of which is uncertain; but in the time of Abraham, Shushan or Susa appears to have already become the capital of the country
Election of Grace - , Abraham, Jacob, Saul, David, Solomon, were all chosen by God for the positions they held; so also were the apostles
Milk - Still offered in hospitality to the passing stranger, as by Abraham, Genesis 18:8
Worship - 18:2, where Abraham “bowed himself toward the ground” before the 3 messengers who announced that Sarah would have a son
Ephah - Son of Midian and grandson of Abraham (Genesis 25:4 ). The line came through Abraham's wife Keturah rather than Sarah and did not inherit as did Isaac
Manoah - He was a worshipper of Jehovah, and a man of reverent piety; he was hospitable, like his ancestor Abraham; he shared the dislike of his people for the alien surrounding tribes, and strongly deprecated an alliance between his son and the Philistines
Sarah - Peter (1 Peter 3:6) praises the holy women of the olden time, who trusted in God and were in subjection to their husbands, ‘as Sarah obeyed Abraham, calling him lord
Descent - The Jews boast of their descent from Abraham
Shem - This was verified by Jehovah being the God of the descendants of Shem through Abraham; the sons of Japheth (Gentiles) came into the tents for blessing
Gentiles, Times of the - He declared, "Abraham shall surely become a great and mighty nation
Mid'Ian - (strife ), a son of Abraham and Keturah, ( Genesis 25:2 ; 1 Chronicles 1:32 ) progenitor of the Midianites, or Arabians dwelling principally in the desert north of the peninsula of Arabia
Jew - In a similar way the Jews prided themselves in being 'sons of Abraham,' whereas, the Lord declared that they were not such morally
Jethro - The primitive faith still had its representatives here and there in the Gentile world after Abraham's call, e. Jethro of Midian (Abraham's descendant) celebrated a sacrificial meal with Aaron and Israel's elders; the representative firstfruits of the pagan who would afterward enter into fellowship with God and His people; as Amalek, another descendant of Abraham, represents on the contrary the pagan world hostile to the Lord and His people
Reckon, Reckoning - 3); in Romans 4:3,5,6,9,11,22-24 , of "reckoning" faith for righteousness, or "reckoning" righteousness to persons, in all of which the RV uses the verb "to reckon" instead of the AV "to count or to impute;" in Romans 4:4 the subject is treated by way of contrast between grace and debt, which latter involves the "reckoning" of a reward for works; what is owed as a debt cannot be "reckoned" as a favor, but the faith of Abraham and his spiritual children sets them outside the category of those who seek to be justified by self-effort, and, vice versa, the latter are excluded from the grace of righteousness bestowed on the sole condition of faith; so in Galatians 3:6 (RV, "was reckoned," AV, "was accounted"); since Abraham, like all the natural descendants of Adam, was a sinner, he was destitute of righteousness in the sight of God; if, then, his relationship with God was to be rectified (i
Hebron - Abraham, Sarah, and Isaac were buried near Hebron, in the cave of Machpelah, or the double cave, which Abraham bought of Ephron, Genesis 23:7-9
Father - So the Jews in our Saviour's time called Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, their fathers. Adam is the first father, the father of the living; Abraham is the father of the faithful, the father of the circumcision; called also the "father of many nations," because many people sprung from him; as the Jews, Ishmaelites, Arabs, &c
Lot - The son of Haran and nephew of Abraham. He removed with the rest of his kindred to Haran, and again subsequently with Abraham and Sarai to Canaan
Circumcision - The cutting off all round of the foreskin (the projecting skin in the male member, the emblem of corruption, Deuteronomy 10:16; Jeremiah 4:4) of males, appointed by God as token of His covenant with Abraham and his seed (Genesis 17:10-14). If the rite existed before Abraham it was then first sanctioned as a token of God's covenant with Abraham and his seed, and particular directions given by God as to the time of its being performed, the eighth day, even though it were a sabbath (John 7:22-23), and the persons to be circumcised, every male, every slave, and (at the Exodus it was added) every male foreigner before he could partake of the Passover (Genesis 17:12-13; Exodus 12:48). The testimony of the Egyptian sculptures, mummies, and hieroglyphics, is very doubtful as to the pre-Abrahamic antiquity of circumcision. " Moses had neglected to circumcise his son, owing to Zipporah's repugnance to it, as a rite not generally adopted in the East, even by the descendants of Abraham and Keturah, the Midianites
Jacob - " The promises made by God to Abraham were thus confirmed to Jacob, as they had been to Isaac. The typical character of these three patriarchs has been described thus: "In general, Abraham is the root of all promise, and the picture of the life of faith; Isaac is a type of the heavenly Man, who receives the church; and Jacob represents Israel as heir of the promises according to the flesh. ...
Jacob had then to become a wanderer; but God was faithful to him, and spoke to him, not openly as to Abraham, but in a dream. He fell asleep, and his body was embalmed and carried into Palestine to lie with those of Abraham and Isaac
Jacob - " The promises made by God to Abraham were thus confirmed to Jacob, as they had been to Isaac. The typical character of these three patriarchs has been described thus: "In general, Abraham is the root of all promise, and the picture of the life of faith; Isaac is a type of the heavenly Man, who receives the church; and Jacob represents Israel as heir of the promises according to the flesh. ...
Jacob had then to become a wanderer; but God was faithful to him, and spoke to him, not openly as to Abraham, but in a dream. He fell asleep, and his body was embalmed and carried into Palestine to lie with those of Abraham and Isaac
Jacob - ...
From the beginning God made it clear that he had chosen Jacob, not Esau, as the one through whom he would fulfil his promises to Abraham. ...
The line of descent from Abraham through Isaac and Jacob was the line God used to produce the nation that became his channel of blessing to the whole world (Genesis 28:13-14). To the generations that followed, God was known as the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob (Genesis 50:24; Exodus 3:6; Deuteronomy 1:8; Matthew 22:32; Acts 3:13). Before Jacob left Canaan, God graciously confirmed the promise given to Abraham, and assured Jacob that one day he would return to Canaan (Genesis 28:10-22)
Pentateuch - People went the same way as before, but God still extended his favour, promising to work through one of the few remaining believers (Abraham) to bring blessing to the whole world. ...
God promised that Abraham would produce a notable line of descendants, that those descendants would enjoy a special relationship with himself, and that he would give them a national homeland. In due course Abraham started the family and his descendants began to multiply, but through a variety of circumstances they eventually found themselves slaves in Egypt
Blessing - The curse, which had dominated the early chapters of the biblical story (Genesis 3:14,17 ; 4:11 ; 5:29 ; 9:25 ), was countered by God's promise to Abraham that "all peoples on earth will be blessed through you" (Genesis 12:3 ). First, the greater blesses the lesser, a fact picked up by the writer of Hebrews to demonstrate the superiority of Melchizedek to Abraham (Hebrews 7:6-7 ). ...
God's promise to Abraham again serves as a foundation for blessings
Canticle of Zachary - This was the oath he swore to our father Abraham: to set us free from the hands of our enemies, free to worship him without fear, holy and righteous in his sight all the days of our life
Genesis - , Adam (1-3), Noah (4-9), Abraham ((10-25:18),), Isaac ((25:19-35:29),), and Jacob (36-50)
Benedictus, the - This was the oath he swore to our father Abraham: to set us free from the hands of our enemies, free to worship him without fear, holy and righteous in his sight all the days of our life
Goiim - This action led to a war in which Abraham became involved (Genesis 14:1 )
Kenites - ” Nomadic tribe, probably of blacksmiths, whose land, along with that of the Kadmonites and Kenizzites God promised to Abraham (Genesis 15:19 )
Almighty - By this name He revealed to Abraham His power to supply every need of man, both physical and spiritual
World to Come - times looked forward to this, as forexample Abraham
Shem - Some have thought Shem the same as Melchisedec, and that he himself had been at the school of Methuselah before the deluge: that he gave to Abraham the whole tradition, the ceremonies of the sacrifices of religion, according to which this patriarch afterward offered his sacrifices
Oath - " This is referred to in order to illustrate the greater subject of God's "oath" to Abraham, confirming His promise; cp
Zachary, Canticle of - This was the oath he swore to our father Abraham: to set us free from the hands of our enemies, free to worship him without fear, holy and righteous in his sight all the days of our life
Oak - For many ages after Christ, a tree of this kind near Heron was superstitiously venerated as one of those under which Abraham dwelt at Mamre
Hittites - sought vengeance against the "vile Kheta," as he called them, and encountered and defeated them in the great battle of Kadesh, four centuries after Abraham. ) ...
They are first referred to in Scripture in the history of Abraham, who bought from Ephron the Hittite the field and the cave of Machpelah (Genesis 15:20 : 23:3-18 )
Family - Even God’s promise to Abraham had reference to all the nations: “And I will bless them that bless thee, and curse him that curseth thee: and in thee shall all families of the earth be blessed” ( Abraham sent his servant to his relatives in Padanaram to seek a wife for Isaac ( Temptation - God “tested” Abraham's loyalty to God when He told Abraham to sacrifice Isaac. Hebrews 11:17 says: “By faith Abraham, when he was tried, offered up Isaac
Midian, Mtdianites - A nomadic tribe or group of tribes, said by an early genealogy ( Genesis 25:2 ) to be descended from Abraham by Keturah, of which the Kenites (wh. ]'>[5] ), that the sons of Abraham by Keturah, of whom Midian was one, lived to the eastward
Esau - Paul is engaged in proving that the Divine promise has not failed though the majority of the children of Abraham have been excluded (or have excluded themselves by unbelief) from a share in its fulfilment in Christ. Esau and all his descendants-were children of Abraham
Thigh - I pause at this word in order to notice the very remarkable custom, and of the highest antiquity, observed by the patriarchs, and which it is said is observed even now by some of the descendants of Abraham after the flesh, of swearing with the hand under the thigh. Thus we find Abraham desired his servant Eliezer to swear, concerning the taking a wife for his son
Answer - 18:27 (the first occurrence of ‛ânâh), we read: “Abraham answered and said” to the Lord, who had just spoken. 23:5), they are responding verbally to the implied inquiry made by Abraham (v
Camel - Mention is made of the camel among the cattle given by Pharaoh to Abraham (Genesis 12:16 ). Abraham's servant rode on a camel when he went to fetch a wife for Isaac (Genesis 24:10,11 ). Jacob had camels as a portion of his wealth (30:43), as Abraham also had (24:35)
Names - God was revealed to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, as GOD ALMIGHTY, which indicates the character in which God was pleased to be known by them: He was not known to them as JEHOVAH. He altered the names of some persons: Abram was changed to Abraham; Sarai to Sarah; Jacob to Israel; and He gave reasons why they were altered; and the Lord Jesus gave Simon the name of Peter
Can, May - …” God promised Abraham: “And I will make thy seed as the dust of the earth: so that if a man can number the dust of the earth, then shall thy seed also be numbered” ( Abraham
Circumcision - In the Old Testament the origin of Israelite practice was founded upon the circumcision of Abraham as a sign of the covenant between God and the patriarch (Genesis 17:10 ). ...
Israelite practice The circumcision of Abraham and the male members of his entourage followed the repetition of the covenant promise (see Genesis 15:1 ) of land and national descendants (Genesis 17:1 )
Galatians, Letter to the - The Galatians should know this from their own experience of conversion (3:1-5), but the example of Abraham makes the point even clearer. Abraham was saved by believing the promise of God, not by keeping the law of Moses (3:6-14)
Land (of Israel) - The Abrahamic Covenant and the Land . The Lord "cut" an unconditional covenant with Abraham in which he stated, "To your descendants I give this land, from the river of Egypt to the great river, the Euphrates" (Genesis 15:18 ). The Lord periodically reconfirmed the aspect of the land to Abraham (Genesis 12:7 ; 13:14-17 ; 17:8 ; 24:7 ). The reason the Lord gave this land to the children of Israel was because he was faithful to his covenant to Abraham (Deuteronomy 9:4-5 ), his love for Abraham (Deuteronomy 4:37 ), and his love for Israel (Deuteronomy 7:8 ). Abraham, by faith, left Ur of the Chaldees to go to the "land I [1] will show you. It was only after the Lord "cut the covenant" with Abraham that he gave a general delineation of the land
Hebrews - That branch of the posterity of Abraham whose home was in the land of promise. The name Hebrew is first applied to Abraham in Genesis 14:13 , and is generally supposed to have been derived for Heber, the last of the long-lived patriarchs. However outlived six generations of his descendants, including Abraham himself, after whose death he was for some years the only surviving ancestor of Isaac and Jacob. Abraham, the founder of the Jewish nation, was a migratory shepherd, whose property consisted mainly in vast flocks and herds, but who had no fixed residence, and removed from place to place as the convenience of water and pasturage dictated. Under the patriarchs, they were instructed in the will of God by direct revelation, worshipped him by prayer and sacrifices, opposed idolatry and atheism, used circumcision as the appointed seal of the covenant made by God with Abraham, and followed the laws which the light of grace and faith discovers to those who honestly and seriously seek God, his righteousness, and truth. Such was the religion of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Judah, Joseph, etc
Church - He began by choosing one man, Abraham, and promising to make from him a nation that would belong to God and be his channel of blessing to the world. The people of this nation, Israel, were therefore both the physical descendants of Abraham and the chosen people of God (Genesis 12:1-3; Exodus 6:7-8; Exodus 19:5-6; Psalms 105:6; 1 Corinthians 10:16-171; John 8:37; Acts 13:26). Certainly there were those who, like Abraham, trusted God and desired to follow him obediently, but they were always only a minority within the nation (Isaiah 1:4; Isaiah 1:11-20; Amos 5:14-15; Romans 11:2-7; 1 Corinthians 10:1-5; Hebrews 3:16). These were God’s true people, the true Israel, the true children of Abraham (Romans 2:28-29; Romans 4:9-12; Romans 9:6-8). ...
From this faithful minority (or remnant) there came one person, Jesus the Messiah, who was the one particular descendant of Abraham to whom all God’s promises to Abraham pointed. The new people of God consists of Abraham’s spiritual descendants, those who have been saved through faith in Christ, regardless of their nationality or social standing (Galatians 3:14; Galatians 3:28-29)
Intercession - Abraham asked God not to destroy Sodom in order to save his nephew Lot. In so doing, Abraham acknowledged that he was not worthy to lay such claims before the holy God (Genesis 18:27 ). Abraham also interceded for Abimelech, fulfilling a prophetic function and bringing healing (Genesis 20:7 ,Genesis 20:7,20:17 )
Pharaoh - ...
References to ten pharaohs can be clearly distinguished in the Old Testament: the Pharaoh of Abraham, Genesis 12:10-20 ; of Joseph, Genesis 39-50 ; of the Oppression, Exodus 1:1 ; of the Exodus, Exodus 2:23-15:19 ; of 1 Chronicles 4:18 ; of Solomon, 1 Kings 3-11 ; of Rehoboam, called Shishak, king of Egypt, 1 Kings 14:25 ; of Hezekiah and Isaiah, 2 Kings 18:21 ; Isaiah 36:1 ; of Josiah, 2 Kings 23:29 ; of Jeremiah 44:30 and Ezekiel 29:1-16
Lazarus And the Rich Man - Lazarus dies and is carried by angels into Abraham's bosom, a name for heaven; the rich man dies and was buried, in hell, as the text implies. Then come the pleadings of the rich man to Father Abraham to send Lazarus to cool hIs tongue with a fingertip dipped in water
Disannul, Disannulling - kurios, "a lord," kuroo, "to strengthen"), hence, "to make of none effect," Matthew 15:6 ; Mark 7:13 , with reference to the commandment or word of God, RV, "to make void," is translated "disannul" in Galatians 3:17 , of the inability of the Law to deprive of force God's covenant with Abraham
Pit - ) The word refers to the “pit” itself whether dug or natural: “And Abraham reproved Abimelech because of a well of water, which Abimelech’s servants had violently taken away” ( Booty - Abraham devoted one tenth of the spoil of Sodom, rescued from Chedorlaomer, to Jehovah through Melchizedek the king-priest (Genesis 14:19-24)
Engedi - ...
Engedi, also called Hazazon-tamar (2 Chronicles 20:2 ), was inhabited by Amorites in the time of Abraham and was subjugated by Chedorlaomer (Genesis 14:7 )
Sodom And Gomorrah - Two cities in Palestine at the time of Abraham. Sodom and Gomorrah were among the five “cities of the valley” (Genesis 13:12 ; Genesis 19:29 ; KJV, “plain”) of Abraham's time. Despite Abraham's successful plea (Genesis 18:22-32 ) not even ten righteous men could be found in Sodom, and the cities were judged by the Lord, then destroyed by “brimstone and fire” (Genesis 19:24 ; NIV, “burning sulfur”)
New - ...
New Relationships God acted in the past to establish relationships, notably with the descendants of Abraham and the people of Israel at Sinai
Sodom - ...
Abraham could see the smoke of the burning cities from near Hebron
Hilarianus (1) Quintus Julius, Latin Chiliast Writer - ...
"; "; Deluge to the Call of Abraham
Amorites - When Abraham was at Hebron some confederated with him
Midian, Midianites - Son of Abraham and Keturah, and his descendants
Abim'Elech - A similar account is given of Abraham's conduct of this occasion to that of his behavior towards Pharaoh. [1] (B
Consecration - The whole race of Abraham was in a peculiar manner consecrated to his worship; and the tribe of Levi and family of Aaron were more immediately consecrated to the service of God, Exodus 13:2 ; Exodus 13:12 ; Exodus 13:15 ; Numbers 3:12 ; 1 Peter 2:9
Oak - It should appear that the Patriarch Abraham resided under an oak, or a grove of oaks, which our translators render the plain of Mamre; and that he planted a grove of this tree, Genesis 13:18
Faith - With such a faith "Abraham believed God; and it was counted unto him for righteousness
Wrong - ...
Sarai said to Abraham, my wrong be on thee
be-er'-Sheba, - According to the first, the well was dug by Abraham, and the name given to Judah, ( Joshua 15:28 ) and then to Simeon, (Joshua 19:2 ; 1 Chronicles 4:28 ) In the often-quoted "from Dan even unto Beersheba," (Judges 20:1 ) it represents the southern boundary of Canaan, as Dan the northern
Elam - In the days of Abraham Chedorlaomer king of Elam was able to make war as far off as the Dead Sea
People - So Abraham was gathered to his people: “Then Abraham gave up the ghost, and died in a good old age, an old man, and full of years; and was gathered to his people” ( Abraham was gathered to all those who were true believers. In the phrase “people of the land” ‛am may signify those who have feudal rights, or those who may own land and are especially protected under the law: “And Abraham stood up, and bowed himself to the people of the land, even to the children of Heth” ( Genesis - He calls one man of faith—Abraham—and leads him to a new beginning in a new land. This works itself out in blessing nations that help Abraham and punishing those who do not. It climaxes in God's covenant with Abraham in which Abraham shows faithfulness in the sign of circumcision and God renews His promises. Even when crafty Jacob appears to meet his match while returning to Abraham's homeland, God leads him back to the Promised Land and back to safety. ...
Thus is established the heritage of God's people in the triad of patriarchal fathers—Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. See Creation ; Flood ; Sin ; Humanity ; Anthropology ; Earth; Image of God ; Abraham ; Isaac ; Jacob ; Joseph ; Adam and Eve ; Noah ; Names of God ; God of the Fathers
Matthew, Theology of - The story of Israel is well known: God, the Creator of heaven and earth, chose Abraham, formed a covenant with him, and promised to remain faithful to his covenantal relationship with both Abraham and his descendants for all time (Genesis 12:1-3 ; 13:14-17 ; 15:1-6 , ; etc. Israel, the descendants of Abraham, however, did not always live in covenantal faithfulness; thus, God developed a system of punishment or reward, depending on Israel's faithfulness (cf. The story is now different: those who follow Jesus are the true descendants of Abraham and they alone will enjoy the covenantal faithfulness of Israel's God. This covenant with Abraham, however, has been renewed in the new covenantal arrangement established by Jesus (26:26-30). We are the true successors of Abraham's physical descendants (3:7-10) who are now bringing forth the fruits God wants from his people (21:33-44). Those symbols were the temple, the land of Israel, the physical heritage from Abraham, and the Torah, God's covenantal arrangement with Israel. Physical heritage from Abraham no longer mattered because what mattered was following Jesus (3:7-10; 8:5-13; 15:21-28; 21:33-44; 28:16-20). The foundation of Israel's faith was the covenant God made with Abraham to multiply the descendants of Abraham, forming a massive nation for God (Genesis 12:1-3 ). Just as important is the consciousness that this new Israel of God is transnational in its essence; the new people of God is not just comprised of those who are physical descendants of Abraham but of all who follow Jesus (2:1-12; 8:5-13; 15:21-28; 27:54; 28:16-20)
Sarah - It will persist in my heart that Abraham is my faith in God's promise to me of the fruit of the Spirit in me; while childless Sarah, Abraham's married wife, is my still unfruitful heart. And my heart also, like Abraham and Sarah, shall see of her travail and shall be satisfied. And in the wildness of her pride Sarah determined to as good as slay herself, and to make it impossible for Abraham in his heart of hearts any longer to despise her. Shall not the Judge of all the earth do right?...
Hagar had not come from Ur of the Chaldees with the immigration, neither had she been bought by Abraham in Canaan. When Sarah was down in Egypt with her husband Abraham, young Hagar had been recommended to Sarah for a lady's maid. And, besides, Sarah, the sister of Abraham, was a favourite in Pharaoh's palace. Not Adam before his fall; not Enoch, who so pleased God; not Abraham at his call, or after offering his son; not Jacob at Bethel, nor Israel at the Jabbok; not Moses on the mount and in the cleft rock; not Isaiah in the temple, and not John in the spirit-not the best and the most blessed of them all was more blessed or better blessed than was Hagar the polluted outcast on her weeping way to Shur. And, what impurity Hagar had contracted of Sarah and Abraham she had washed away, her head waters and her eyes a fountain of tears, all the way from Abraham's tent door to that well in the wilderness. For, from that day on the way to Shur, all the days of Hagar's pilgrimage on earth, we still see Sarah and Abraham entreating Hagar with hardness till she drinks again and again of the well of God, and again and again has Almighty God given to her and to him as the heavenly Father of her fatherless son. '...
'Doubtless Thou art our Father, though Abraham be ignorant of us, and Israel acknowledge us not
Tithe - Abraham paid tithes to Melchizedek (Genesis 14:20 ; Hebrews 7:6 ); and Jacob vowed unto the Lord and said, "Of all that thou shalt give me I will surely give the tenth unto thee
Money - Of uncoined money the first notice we have is in the history of Abraham (Genesis 13:2 ; 20:16 ; 24:35 )
Effect - It is used of making "void" the Word of God, Matthew 15:6 ; Mark 7:13 (AV, "making of none effect"), and of the promise of God to Abraham as not being deprived of authority by the Law 430 years after, Galatians 3:17 , "disannul
Gilgal - It was "beside the oaks of Moreh," near which Abraham erected his first altar (Genesis 12:6,7 )
Idumaea - They were partly destroyed, partly absorbed, by the Bedouin tribes who claimed descent through Esau from Abraham, and who were acknowledged by the Israelites as late as the date of the Deuteronomic codes as brethren ( Deuteronomy 23:7 )
Chedorlaomer - Abraham with 318 armed servants however defeated him in turn, and rescued Lot, and pursued the invader to Hobah on the left of Damascus
Seed - , Acts 13:23, Romans 1:3; Romans 4:13; Romans 9:7; Romans 11:1, 2 Corinthians 11:22, 2 Timothy 2:8, Hebrews 2:16; Hebrews 11:18, Revelation 12:17), or (b) figuratively, as when believers were called Abraham’s seed because they emulated his faith (Romans 4:16; Romans 4:18; Romans 9:8, Galatians 3:16; Galatians 3:19; Galatians 3:29); and, finally, (3) of the generating power of God acting through His Word (cf. , he concluded that the promise made to Abraham pointed to Christ as an individual and not collectively to Jews
Zarephath - This Evangelist—apparently the only Gentile-Christian NT writer—seizes as does no other upon the thought that the boundless grace of God has been extended in certain typical cases to remote Gentiles, even to the superseding and exclusion of those who were of the stock of Abraham and dwelt within the Holy Land
Judgment - Those who had done wrong would be doomed to punishment, and those who had accepted Jesus as Christ, either explicitly, as in the case of the Christians, or implicitly, as in the case of Abraham, would be acquitted and admitted to heaven
Offering, Offering up - They are both also used of Abraham offering Isaac; he gave Isaac, and as a priest virtually offered him up
Count - Abraham believed in God, and he counted it to him for righteousness
Philemon - He "feared God with all his house," like Abraham (Genesis 18:19), Joshua (Joshua 24:15), and Cornelius (Acts 10:2,)
Genealogy - This is the only genealogy given us in the New Testament We have two lists of the human ancestors of Christ: Matthew, writing for Jewish Christians, begins with Abraham; Luke, writing for Gentile Christians, goes back to Adam, the father of all men
Altar - Abraham, Isaac and Jacob alsobuilt altars to the Lord: these would have been constructed of stoneor earth, but it is remarkable that we seldom read of their offering sacrifices on them
Bottle - Hence, when it is said, (Genesis 21:14) that Abraham rose up early in the morning, and took bread and a bottle of water, and gave it unto Hagar, putting it on her shoulder, we may suppose, that this was not only a large skin for a bottle, but as it was put on her shoulder, it was somewhat cumbersome and heavy
Age of Man - In Peleg is another decline, he lived 239 years; Abraham only 175 years
Friend - Abraham is called "the friend of God" (2 Chronicles 20:7) And the friendship of David and Jonathan is proverbial
Abednego - In changing their names therefore, they not only designed to make them forget their beloved Jerusalem, but the yet more beloved Lord God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
zo'an - Its name indicates a place of departure from a country, and hence it has been identified with Avaris (Tanis, the modern San ), the capital of the Shepherd dynasty in Egypt, built seven years after Hebron and existing before the time of Abraham
Sign - This word is used in the sense of token and pledge; as, when the Lord gave to Noah the rainbow, as a sign of his covenant, Genesis 9:12-13 ; and when he appointed to Abraham the use of circumcision, as the seal of the covenant he had made with him and his posterity, Genesis 17:11
Old - Abraham was seventy five years old when he departed from Haran
Fire - By sending fire from heaven to consume sacrifices, God often signified his acceptance of them: as in the case of Abel, Genesis 4:4 ; Abraham, Genesis 15:17 ; Manoah, Judges 13:19-20 ; Elijah, 1 Kings 18:38 ; and at the dedication of the tabernacle and the temple, Leviticus 9:24 2 Chronicles 7:1
Concubine - Both Abraham and Nahor had concubines (Genesis 22:24 ; Genesis 25:6 ; 1 Chronicles 1:32 )
e'Lam - By the time of Abraham a very important power had been built up in the same region
Euphra'Tes - ( Genesis 2:14 ) We next hear of it in the covenant made with Abraham
Damascus - One of the world’s most ancient cities, Damascus has existed from at least the time of Abraham (Genesis 14:15)
Burial - The first commercial transaction recorded is that of the purchase of a burial-place, for which Abraham weighed to Ephron "four hundred shekels of silver current money with the merchants. Jacob, when charging his sons to bury him in the cave of Machpelah, said, "There they buried Abraham and Sarah his wife; there they buried Isaac and Rebekah his wife; and there I buried Leah" (49:31)
Seed - of Genesis 13:15 ; 17:7,8 , there is especial stress on the word "seed," as referring to an individual (here, Christ) in fulfillment of the promises to Abraham, a unique use of the singular. While the plural form "seeds," neither in Hebrew nor in Greek, would have been natural any more than in English (it is not so used in Scripture of human offspring; its plural occurrence is in 1 Samuel 8:15 , of crops), yet if the Divine intention had been to refer to Abraham's natural descendants, another word could have been chosen in the plural, such as "children;" all such words were, however, set aside, "seed" being selected as one that could be used in the singular, with the purpose of showing that the "seed" was Messiah. Descendants were given to Abraham by other than natural means, so that through him Messiah might come, and the point of the Apostle's argument is that since the fulfillment of the promises of God is secured alone by Christ, they only who are "in Christ" can receive them; (2) of spiritual offspring, Romans 4:16,18 ; 9:8 ; here "the children of the promise are reckoned for a seed" points, firstly, to Isaac's birth as being not according to the ordinary course of nature but by Divine promise, and, secondly, by analogy, to the fact that all believers are children of God by spiritual birth; Galatians 3:29
Beer-Sheba - ...
Abraham and a nearby king, Abimelech, swore to protect Abraham's right to the water of this region (Genesis 21:22-33 ). Abraham then named the place “Beer-sheba,” meaning “well of the oath” or preferably “well of the seven,” referring to seven lambs involved in the agreement
Gospel, the, - It was good news to Abraham, when called out by God to be blessed by Him, to be told that he should have a son in his old age; that his seed should possess the land, and that in his Seed should all the nations of the earth be blessed. Abraham believed God, and it was counted unto him for righteousness
Hear - ...
To “hear” something may imply to “have knowledge,” as when Abimelech told Abraham that he did not know about the controversy over the wills because no one had told him and neither had he “heard” it ( Abraham that He had “heard” his prayer and would act accordingly ( Abraham’s seed, all nations would be blessed because he “heard” (obeyed) God’s voice ( Esau - These marriages were very displeasing to Isaac and Rebekah, because they intermingled the blood of Abraham with that of Canaanite aliens. ) That although it was always the design of God that the blessing connected with primogeniture in the family of Abraham should be enjoyed by Jacob, and to exercise his sovereignty in changing the succession in which the promises of the Abrahamic covenant might descend; yet the conduct of Rebekah and Jacob was reprehensible in endeavouring to bring about the divine design by the unworthy means of contrivance and deceit; and they were punished for their presumption by their sufferings
Dispensation, - ...
About 360 years after the deluge the Patriarchal Age was begun by the call of Abraham, a new and sovereign dealing of God; but this was confined to Abraham and his descendants
Priest; Priesthood - No doubt priestly functions were performed in pre-Mosaic times by the head of the family, such as Noah, Abraham, and Job. At Bethel, Mamre, and Moriah, Abraham built altars. 22:12-13, we read that Abraham was willing to offer his son as a sacrifice
Remember - God delivered Lot from Sodom because of His covenant with Abraham to bless all the nations through him ( Abraham, and brought Lot out of the catastrophe …” ( Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, thy servants, to whom thou swarest …” ( Bosom - The expression ‘Abraham’s bosom’ (Luke 16:22-23) has already been dealt with in its general eschatological signification (see art. Abraham). Is Abraham to be thought of, fatherlike, as enfolding Lazarus in his arms (cf. ‘Father Abraham,’ Luke 16:24; Luke 16:27; Luke 16:30), or rather as receiving him into the place of the honoured guest, the place nearest to himself at a heavenly banquet? ‘Into Abraham’s bosom’ (εἰς τὸν κόλπον Ἀ. ]'>[2] reading of Luke 7:36, which Authorized Version renders ‘sat down to meat’) with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven. ’ Alike for the social outcast (Lazarus) and for the religious outcasts (the Gentiles), Jesus holds out as a joyful prospect the thought of sitting down with Abraham at a heavenly banqueting-table. ‘Dress,’ ‘Abraham’s Bosom
Galatians Epistle to the - ...
‘The promise of salvation,’ said they, ‘is given to the seed of Abraham alone (Galatians 3:7; Galatians 3:16; Galatians 3:29). Gentiles like the Galatians, who wish to be included in its scope, must first be incorporated into the family of Abraham. It was a temporary provision, inserted parenthetically between the promise to Abraham and its fulfilment in Christ. Faith, not works of law, makes men true children of Abraham and inheritors of the blessing bestowed on him. Through faith in Him we receive the fulfilment of the promise made to Abraham-a promise which is older than the Law and cannot be annulled by it. Being one with Him, we are the true promised seed of Abraham. But Isaac, the child of promise, born of a free woman, represents the true seed of Abraham, namely, Christ, and them who are united to Him by faith. -God made a promise to Abraham, that in him and in his seed all nations should be blessed (Galatians 3:9). He is the true seed of Abraham (Galatians 3:17; Galatians 3:29), and the blessing received by the human race is the gift of the Spirit (Galatians 3:14), which is the evidence of man’s justification. The Scripture speaks only of the ‘faith’ of Abraham (Galatians 3:6). The promise given to Abraham was of the nature of a covenant signed and sealed
Circumcision - The special meaning of circumcision for the people of Israel is found in Genesis 17 and occurs within the context of God's renewed covenant promise to Abraham, following the initial contractual relationship ( Genesis 15 ). On the second occasion, God again promised lands and offspring to the still childless patriarch, and gave him the sign of circumcision, which was to be imposed upon Abraham and his descendants as a token of covenant membership (Genesis 17:10 ). For the Israelites circumcision was a religious rite and was intended to mark the beginning of covenant solidarity for Abraham's descendants rather than describing the historical origins of the procedure. ...
While Abraham and his household were circumcised forthwith, the Lord's command required that hereafter male infants were to be circumcised on the eighth day of life
Mesopotamia - ...
In the earliest accounts we have of this country, subsequent to the time of Abraham, it was subject to a king, called Cushan-Rishathaim, then perhaps the most powerful potentate of the east, and the first by whom the Israelites were made captive, which happened soon after the death of Joshua, and about B. This is implied in the history of Abraham; who, when ordered to depart from his country, namely, Chaldea, in the southern part of Mesopotamia, removed to Charran, still in Mesopotamia, but beyond the boundary of the Chaldees, and in the territory of Aram. To be treading that ground which Abraham trod, where Nahor the father of Rebecca lived, where holy Job breathed the pure air of piety and simplicity, and where Laban the father-in-law of Jacob resided, was to me a circumstance productive of delightful sensations
Abraham - Originally called Abram, Abraham received his new name from God in confirmation of God’s promise that he would be father of a multitude of people (Genesis 17:5-7). In fulfilment of this promise, Abraham became the physical father of the Israelite nation (Matthew 3:9; John 8:37). As God in his grace declared Abraham righteous, so he declares righteous all who trust in him (Genesis 15:6; Romans 4:11)
Promise - ...
A promise that was to bring great blessing to humanity was made by God to Abraham (Genesis 12:2-3 ), in which the latter, although childless, was to become the progenitor of a great nation. Later this promise was repeated (Genesis 15:5 ), and to his credit Abraham believed God's utterances. The promise was given added credibility by means of a sacrificial ritual (Genesis 15:9-17 ), following which God listed the territories that Abraham's offspring would inhabit. Thereafter Abraham rested his confidence in this divine power, and lived to see the Lord's assurances implemented in what Paul, millennia later, was to call the "covenants of the promise" (Ephesians 2:12 ; cf. ...
God's promises to Abraham's descendants took definite shape in the Sinai covenant (Exodus 19-20,24 ), which resembled a Hittite vassal treaty in form. ...
Coexisting with the promise to Abraham was a more general declaration made by God at the time of the fall (Genesis 3:15 ), and continued in a promise to David (2 Samuel 7:12-13 ) that his seed would continue forever. At his coming he fulfilled the divine promises made to Abraham and David (Luke 1:68 ; Acts 13:23 ). Instead, while sharing in all the benefits of Abraham's covenant (Ephesians 3:6 ), the Christian looks forward to a time when the kingdom of God, which was ushered in with the age of grace, will be realized when Christ returns to complete the kingdom of believers and establish it for all eternity before God in heaven
Moreh, - ]'>[1] , wrongly, ‘plain’) of Moreh ( Genesis 12:6 ) may have been so named from the theophany vouchsafed to Abraham there
Ass - They are frequently spoken of as having been ridden upon, as by Abraham (Genesis 22:3 ), Balaam (Numbers 22:21 ), the disobedient prophet (1 Kings 13:23 ), the family of Abdon the judge, seventy in number (Judges 12:14 ), Zipporah (Exodus 4:20 ), the Shunammite (1 Samuel 25:30 ), etc
Hittites - Their courteous dignity of bearing towards Abraham is conspicuous throughout
Money - The first mention of money is in the touching story of Abraham's buying a burial place for his wife. It is said, "Abraham weighed the silver, four hundred shekels, current with the merchant
Mesopotamia - Here lived Bethuel and Laban, and hither Abraham sent his servant to fetch Isaac a wife
Lamps, Lighting, Lampstand - Archaeological excavations have provided numerous examples of these lighting implements used in ancient times, dating from before Abraham to after Christ
Perfect - Genesis 6:9 Noah was perfect in obedience...
Genesis 17:1 Abraham was perfect in trust...
Job 1:1 Job was perfect in uprightness...
Ezekiel 28:15 Satan was perfect in his actions at that time...
Matthew 5:48 The Christian is to be perfect in forgiveness of others...
Matthew 19:21 The Christian is to be perfect in devotion to CHRIST...
Luke 6:40 The Christian is to be perfect in discipleship...
Luke 13:32 CHRIST was perfect in His training course on earth...
John 17:23 The Christian is to be perfect in his relationship to GOD...
1 Corinthians 2:6 The Christian is to be perfect in understanding...
2 Corinthians 13:11 The Christian is to be perfect in fellowship...
Ephesians 4:13 The Christian is to be perfect in his development...
Philippians 3:15 The Christian is to be perfect in his efforts and desires...
Colossians 1:28 The Christian is perfect in salvation...
Colossians 4:12 The Christian is to be perfect in obedience...
2 Timothy 3:17 The Christian is to be perfect in instruction...
Hebrews 2:10 CHRIST is perfect in His experience ( 5:9)...
Hebrews 12:23 The Christian is perfect in the culmination...
James 1:4 The Christian is to be perfect in patience...
James 3:2 The Christian is to be perfect in conversation...
1 Peter 5:10 The Christian is to be perfect in his training...
The word "perfect" as it pertains to the Christian always refers to the subject under consideration
Great Commission, the - The Great Commission is thus linked to God's words to Abraham: that "all peoples on earth will be blessed through you" (Genesis 12:3 )
Waterlandians - Galen, Abraham Haan, doctor of physic, and pastor of the Mennonites at Amsterdam, a man of uncommon penetration and eloquence, inclined towards the Arian and Socinian tenets, and insisted for the reception of all such into their church fellowship as acknowledged the divine authority of the Scriptures, and led virtuous lives
Indolence - Most deadly is the spiritual indolence which is satisfied to have Abraham for father (Luke 3:8, John 8:39), or Christ for Saviour, without response to the impulses of the Holy Spirit, the source of life and motion and progress
Three - The ancient descendants of Abraham, and it is to be hoped the modern stock of Israel, though overlooking the time, have lost not sight of his Almighty person
Grove - Abraham planted a memorial tree in Beer-sheba, and called there on the name of Jehovah
Prophecy, Prophet - God said to Abimelech concerning Abraham, "He is a prophet, and he shall pray for thee
Advocate - Abraham intercedes with God in behalf of Sodom ( Genesis 18:23-33 ); Moses intercedes with God in behalf of the Israelites (Exodus 32:11-14 ); Samuel intercedes with God in behalf of the children of Israel (1 Samuel 7:8-9 )
Token - ...
Genesis 17:11 (b) Circumcision is a permanent mark on the men of Israel to remind them of GOD's unconditional promises to Abraham, and their identification with that covenant
Hittites - They were inhabitants of Canaan in the time of Abraham
Father - " (Genesis 4:20) And in a yet more interesting sense, the word of God calls them father, who stand distinguished in the church in a way of pre-eminency, such as Abraham, the father of the faithful, so called for the greatness of his faith
Lord - ' They are used as a term of respect as between man and man, as seen in the children of Heth to Abraham
Commandment - 26:5, where mitsvâh is synonymous with choq (“statute”) and torah (“law”): “Because that Abraham obeyed my voice, and kept my charge, my commandments, my statutes, and my laws
Concubine - Concubines are mentioned very early in Scripture, as in the history of Abraham, Genesis 16:1-16, of Nahor, 22:24, of Jacob, 30. Keturah is said to have been Abraham's wife, Genesis 25:1; and yet, 5, 6, all Abraham's sons save Isaac are called the sons of concubines
Melchiz'Edek - The relation between Melchizedek and Christ as type and antitype is made in the Epistle to the Hebrews to consist in the following particulars: Each was a priest, (1) not of the Levitical tribe; (2) superior to Abraham; (3) whose beginning and end are unknown; (4) who is not only a priest, but also a king of righteousness and peace
Ashes - "I am but dust and ashes," exclaims Abraham before the Lord, Genesis 18:27 ; indicating a deep sense of his own meanness in comparison with God
Shechem - Its history begins 4000 years ago, before Jerusalem was founded, and extends through Scripture from Abraham to Christ
Race - Thus all mankind are called the race of Adam the Israelites are of the race of Abraham and Jacob
Genesis - It contains an account of the creation; the primeval state and fall of man; the history of Adam and his descendants, with the progress of religion and the origin of the arts; the genealogies age, and death of the patriarchs until Noah; the general defection and corruption of mankind, the general deluge, and the preservation of Noah and his family in the ark; the history of Noah and his family subsequent to the time of the deluge; the repeopling and division of the earth among the sons of Noah; the building of Babel, the confusion of tongues, and the dispersion of mankind; the lives of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph
Famine - The first famine recorded in the Bible is that of Abraham after he had pitched his tent on the east of Bethel, (Genesis 12:10 ) the second in the days of Isaac, (Genesis 26:1 ) seq
Esau - ...
Although God’s purpose was that his promises to Abraham and Isaac be fulfilled through Jacob and not Esau, that did not excuse either of them for their disgraceful behaviour (Genesis 25:23; Romans 9:10-13)
Lamb - ) Abel’s offering was probably a lamb (Genesis 4:4), Abraham considered a lamb to be the natural animal for a burnt offering (Genesis 22:7-8), and the Israelites in Egypt offered sacrificial lambs at the time of the original Passover (Exodus 12:3-8; see PASSOVER)
Nebridius, a Friend of Saint Augustine - "He is now," says Augustine with confidence, "in the bosom of Abraham" ( ib
Archangel - God commanded Abraham to sacrifice Isaac, but eventually Abraham is addressed by “the angel of the Lord” (Genesis 22:1 ,Genesis 22:1,22:11 ,Genesis 22:11,22:15 )
Biblical Chronology - , those that precede the time of Abraham, cannot be determined even approximately. Abraham seems to have lived c
Aaron - First, Aaron was committed to the God of the “fathers”—Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob (Exodus 3:1-6 ). Second, he understood that God had made a covenant with Abraham that included him and the people of Israel
Hagar - Ishmael the elder brother, the son of Hagar the bondwoman, the seed of Abraham by nature, persecuted Isaac the younger brother, the son of the freewoman, the child of promise and heir of the birthright, and was therefore east out and excluded from the inheritance of the blessing. If he was convinced that men might be sons of Abraham and yet spiritual slaves, he was bound to say so (cf
God - It is worthy observation, that the Lord speaking of himself to Moses, (Exodus 6:2-3) saith, "I am JEHOVAH: And I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, by the name of God Almighty (El Shaddai,) but by my name JEHOVAH was I not known to them. And in modern times it is generally observed by the seed of Abraham, when marking the number fifteen (which in the ordinary way of doing it by letters would take the Yod (10,) and the He (5
Walk - 15:2, when Abraham says: “O Lord God, what wilt thou give me, since I am [2] childless …?” (NASB). 18:33, when the Lord “departed” from Abraham
Offer, Offering - , Matthew 8:4 ; Mark 1:44 ; Acts 7:42 ; 21:26 ; Hebrews 5:1,3 ; 8:3 ; 9:7,9 ; 10:1,2,8,11 ; (c) of "offerings" previous to the Law, Hebrews 11:4,17 (of Isaac by Abraham); (d) of gifts "offered" to Christ, Matthew 2:11 , RV, "offered" (AV, "presented unto"); (e) of prayers "offered" by Christ, Hebrews 5:7 ; (f) of the vinegar "offered" to Him in mockery by the soldiers at the cross, Luke 23:36 ; (g) of the slaughter of disciples by persecutors, who think they are "offering" service to God, John 16:2 , RV (AV, "doeth"); (h) of money "offered" by Simon the sorcerer, Acts 8:18 . ...
A — 2: ἀναφέρω (Strong's #399 — Verb — anaphero — an-af-er'-o ) primarily, "to lead" or "carry up" (ana), also denotes "to offer," (a) of Christ sacrifice, Hebrews 7:27 ; (b) of sacrifices under the Law, Hebrews 7:27 ; (c) of such previous to the Law, James 2:21 (of Isaac by Abraham); (d) of praise, Hebrews 13:15 ; (e) of spiritual sacrifices in general, 1 Peter 2:5
Joseph the Son of Jacob - It spreads over more than a dozen chapters of Genesis and shows how God was fulfilling his promises to Abraham. ...
God had promised Canaan to Abraham and his descendants, but those descendants would be able to take possession of it only when they had sufficient numbers to do so
Ishmael - (See HAGAR; ISAAC; Abraham) ("God hears"); the name of God is Εl , "the God of might", in relation to the world at large; not Jehovah , His name in relation to His covenant people. Born of Hagar when Abraham was 86 (Genesis 16:15-16), dwelling at Mature. "Jehovah," in covenant with Abraham her husband, "heard her affliction" in the wilderness whither she had fled from Sarah. ...
Abraham's love for him appears in his exclaiming, upon God's giving the promise of seed by Sarah, then 90, Abraham himself being 100, "Oh that Ishamel might live before Thee!" whether the words mean that he desires that Ishmael (instead of the seed promised to Sarah) might be heir of the promises, or, as is more consonant with Abraham's faith, that Ishmael might be accepted before God so as to share in blessings. ...
Ishmael himself cannot have settled far from Abraham's neighbourhood, for he joined with Isaac in the burial of his father (Genesis 25:9), and burial in the East follows a few hours after death. "The East country" unto which Abraham sent away his sons by concubines, not to be in the way of Isaac, must therefore have been in those regions (Genesis 25:6; Genesis 25:18). ...
The term" Ishmaelites" was applied in course of time to the Midianites, sprung from Abraham and Keturah, and not from Ishmael, because the Ishmaelites being the more powerful tribe gave their name as a general one to neighbouring associated tribes (Genesis 37:25; Genesis 37:28; Genesis 37:36; Psalms 83:6), the nomad tribes of Arabia (Judges 8:24)
Burial - The burial place of Sarah, Abraham, Isaac, Rebekah, Leah, and Jacob, in the field of Machpelah (Genesis 23), bought by Abraham from Ephron the Hittite, and the field bought by Jacob from Shechem's father, Hamor, where Joseph's bones were buried (Joshua 24:32), were the only fixed possessions the patriarchs had in Canaan, and the sole purchases they made there. To give a place in one's own sepulchre was a special honor; as the children of Heth offered Abraham, and as Jehoiada was buried among the kings (Genesis 23:6; 2 Chronicles 24:16)
Gerizim - They also supported the claim of their shrine by traditions in which it was represented as the mountain on which Abraham prepared to sacrifice Isaac (cf. ]'>[1] 334, note), the place where Abraham was met by Melchizedek, and also the scene of Jacob’s dream. Gerizim, is associated with the entrance of both Abraham and Jacob into the promised land (Genesis 12:6; Genesis 33:18)
Hebrew Language - The Jews, in general, have been of opinion, that the Hebrew was the language of Heber's family, from whom Abraham sprung. On the other hand, it has been maintained that Heber's family, in the fourth generation after the dispersion, lived in Chaldea, where Abraham was born, Genesis 11:27-28 , and that there is no reason to think they used a different language from their neighbours around them. It appears, moreover, that the Chaldee, and not the Hebrew, was the language of Abraham's country, and of his kindred, Genesis 24:4 ; Genesis 31:46-47 ; and it is probable that Abraham's native language was Chaldee, and that the Hebrew was the language of the Canaanites, which Abraham and his posterity learned by travelling among them
Galatians, Letter to the - Paul supported his thesis of faith alone on three principles: the gift of the Spirit, the promise and faith of Abraham, and the curse of the law. Abraham received the promise and righteousness by faith 430 years before the law was given. People of faith were true children of Abraham and heirs of the promise. Abraham's inheritance comes through faith to both Jews and non-Jews (Galatians 3:6-9 ). Christ is the true heir of Abraham (Galatians 3:15-16 ). The law cannot annul the justification by faith promised to Abraham (Galatians 3:17-22 )
Sheba - A son of Jokshan, who was a son of Abraham by Keturah (Genesis 25:3 )
Mourn - Abraham mourned for Sarah (Genesis 23:2 ); Jacob for Joseph (37:34,35); the Egyptians for Jacob (50:3-10); Israel for Aaron (Numbers 20:29 ), for Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8 ), and for Samuel (1 Samuel 25:1 ); David for Abner (2 Samuel 3:31,35 ); Mary and Martha for Lazarus (John 11 ); devout men for Stephen (Acts 8:2 ), etc
Euphrates - It is next mentioned in connection with the covenant which God entered into with Abraham (15:18), when he promised to his descendants the land from the river of Egypt to the river Euphrates (Compare Deuteronomy 11:24 ; Joshua 1:4 ), a covenant promise afterwards fulfilled in the extended conquests of David (2 Samuel 8:2-14 ; 1 Chronicles 18:3 ; 1 Kings 4:24 )
Sure - ...
A — 2: βέβαιος (Strong's #949 — Adjective — bebaios — beb'-ah-yos ) "firm, steadfast," is used of (a) God's promise to Abraham, Romans 4:16 ; (b) the believer's hope, Hebrews 6:19 , "steadfast;" (c) the hope of spiritual leaders regarding the welfare of converts, 2 Corinthians 1:7 , "steadfast;" (d) the glorying of the hope, Hebrews 3:6 , "firm;" (e) the beginning of our confidence, Hebrews 3:14 , RV, "firm" (AV, "steadfast"); (f) the Law given at Sinai, Hebrews 2:2 , "steadfast;" (g) the testament (or covenant) fulfilled after a death, Hebrews 9:17 , "of force;" (h) the calling and election of believers, 2 Peter 1:10 , to be made "sure" by the fulfillment of the injunctions in 2 Peter 1:5-7 ; (i) the word of prophecy, "made more sure," 2 Peter 1:19 , RV, AV, "a more sure (word of prophecy);" what is meant is not a comparison between the prophecies of the OT and NT, but that the former have been confirmed in the person of Christ (2 Peter 1:16-18 )
Witness - Among people with whom writing is not common the evidence of a transaction is given by some tangible memorial or significant ceremony: Abraham gave seven ewe-lambs to Abimelech as an evidence of his property in the well of Beersheba
Kadesh-Barnea - Kadesh-Barnea is mentioned as a site where Abraham fought the Amalekites (Genesis 14:7 ) and as the southern border of the tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:3 )
Brethren of the Lord - ( b ) They were held to be His cousins, sons of Mary, the wife of Alphœus ( Matthew 27:56 = Mark 15:40 ); ‘brother’ here implying merely kinship, as Abraham calls himself and his nephew Lot ‘brethren’ ( Genesis 13:8 ), and Laban calls Jacob, his sister’s son, his ‘brother’ ( Genesis 29:16 )
Sacrifice - By faith Abraham when he was tried offered up Isaac
Priest, Priesthood - " Nothing is said of his offering sacrifices, but he brought forth bread and wine, and blessed Abraham
Ishmael - The son of Abraham by Hagar, and the ancestor of Arabian tribes, generally called "Ishmaelites
Alien - The patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob) were aliens in Canaan, but owned large material resources (Genesis 20:1 ; Genesis 26:3 ; Genesis 32:5 )
Command - ...
I know that he Abraham will command his children and his household after him, and they shall keep the way of the Lord
Gulf - Having reminded the Rich Man of the contrast between his condition and that of Lazarus in their earthly lives, and of its reversal in their respective conditions at present, Abraham is made to say, ‘In all these things (see RVm Steps - ...
Romans 4:12 (b) The believers in this day follow in the path of Abraham who lived by faith, walked with GOD, and believed GOD
Genealogies - ...
The prophecies, which reveal that in the seed of Abraham should all the nations of the earth be blessed, and that the Messiah was to be of the royal line of David, made it needful that the genealogies of both these lines should be preserved, as we find them given in the N
Step - 18:32—Abraham said to God: “Oh, let not the Lord be angry, and I will speak yet but this once [1]
Field - ...
Sometimes particular sections of land are identified by name: “And after this, Abraham buried Sarah his wife in the cave of the field of Machpelah before Mamre …” ( Rock - ...
Finally, Abraham is the source (rock) from which Israel was hewn ( Chronicles - The descendants of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and David, from all of whom it was predicted that the Saviour of the world should be born, are here marked with precision
Affinity - ...
It is true the patriarchs, before the law, married their sisters, as Abraham married Sarah, who was his father's daughter by another mother; and two sisters together, as Jacob married Rachel and Leah; and their own sisters, both by father and mother, as Seth and Cain
Alien - The patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob) were aliens in Canaan, but owned large material resources (Genesis 20:1 ; Genesis 26:3 ; Genesis 32:5 )
Genealogy - We find in the Bible a record carried on for more than 3,500 years, 1 Chronicles 1:1-54 3:1-24 6:1-81 ; and thus were guarded the proofs that Christ was born according to prophecy of the seed of Abraham, and heir to the throne of his father David, Luke 1:32 2 Timothy 2:8 Hebrews 7:14
It - If Abraham brought all with him, it is not probable he meant to walk it back for his pleasure
Veil - Sarah the wife of Abraham, and Rebekah and her companions at the well do not appear to have worn them, Genesis 12:14,15 24:16
Sabeans - A son of Jokshan, and grandson of Abraham and Keturah, Genesis 10:28 2
Gate - God promises Abraham that his posterity shall possess the gates of their enemies- their towns, their fortresses, Genesis 23:10-188
Damas'Cus, - It is first mentioned in Scripture in connection with Abraham, ( Genesis 14:15 ) whose steward was a native of the place
Impute - Well, therefore, might the apostle, when speaking of the faith of Abraham on this point, declare the cause of it: "Abraham believed God, and it was imputed unto him for righteousness
Take Away - ” So Abraham asks Ephron the Hittite to “receive from” his hand payment for the field which contained the sepulchre ( Abraham from his father’s house ( Lot - the son of Haran, and nephew to Abraham. With Abraham he descended into Egypt, and afterward returned with him into Canaan: but the multiplicity of their flocks, and still more the quarrels of their servants, rendered a friendly separation necessary
Covenant - This emphasized repetition of seed was strongly affirmed by the change of his name to Abraham and the assurance that the covenant with his offspring was for all time. The life-love bond between Yahweh and Abraham and his seed was strongly affirmed by the promise "to be your God and the God of your descendants" (17:8). Yahweh, by these words, assured Abraham of his abiding presence, his availability, his sure help, and his unfailing love, support, and comfort in all circumstances of life. In the context of assuring Abraham of much seed, Yahweh gave the covenantal sign of circumcision (17:11), which sons were always to carry and by which he demonstrated that he claimed the seed as people in covenant with him. Circumcision was given such an emphatically important role in Yahweh's covenanting with Abraham and his offspring, that it was referred to as the "covenant of circumcision" (17:13). Also in the context of Yahweh's claim to Abraham's seed as his, the concept of divine election is included. Abraham pled that his son Ishmael be considered a covenant progenitor, but Yahweh emphatically stated Isaac, to be born of Sarah, was to be that one (17:15-21). ...
After God had tested Abraham's obedience, by oath (22:1-6) he repeated and confirmed elements of his covenant (22:17-18a). This stress on obedience is strong evidence that the covenant with Abraham should not be considered basically as a covenant of promise with the response of faith. Abraham was never given options that he could choose to accept or reject. Yahweh's covenant with Abraham was characterized by promise and law. ...
As Yahweh had promised that his redemptive/ restorative covenant in the broader context of the creation covenant was to be continued with Isaac (17:19-20), and because Abraham had obeyed Yahweh and kept his laws (26:5), Yahweh did accordingly confirm his covenant with Isaac (26:3-4,24). Rather, it was Yahweh's plan to fulfill his covenant word to Abraham that Israel was to spend 400 years in a foreign land (15:13-14) in which a son, Joseph, proved to serve as a type of Christ, the mediator of the covenant, and Judah was prophesied to become the ancestor of David, the covenant servant, and of Christ (49:8-12). Yahweh identified himself as the covenant Lord of the patriarchs (3:6), as the ever faithful One (3:14) who would be with Moses (3:12a) as he served in the fulfillment of Yahweh's promise to Abraham to bring his descendants from a strange land (3:8)
Election - The ‘call’ which brings the election to light, as in the call of Abraham, Israel, believers, is in time, but the call rests on God’s prior, eternal determination ( Romans 8:28-29 ). Abraham, accordingly, is chosen, and God calls him, and makes His covenant with him, and with his seed; not, however, as a private, personal transaction, but that in him and in his seed all families of the earth should be blessed ( Genesis 12:2-3 etc. ...
Here, however, it will naturally be asked Is there not, after all, a reason for these and similar elections in the greater congruity of the object with the purpose for which it was designed? If God chose Abraham, was it not because Abraham was the best fitted among existing men for such a vocation? Was Isaac not better fitted than Ishmael, and Jacob than Esau, to be the transmitters of the promise? This leads to a remark which carries us much deeper into the nature of election. It presides, to use a happy phrase of Lange’s, at the making of its object (Abraham, Moses, David, Paul, etc. The question is not simply how, a man of the gifts and qualifications of Abraham, or Moses, or Paul, being given, God should use him in the way He did, but rather how a man of this spiritual build, and these gifts and qualifications, came at that precise juncture to be there at all
Election - At the very beginning of Israel's role in salvation history is the call of Abraham to leave his homeland for a new one which would be shown unto him (Genesis 12:1-7 ). This directive came to Abraham from God who also promised to bless his descendants and all peoples on earth through them. While Abraham responded to this call in obedience and faith, his election was not the result of his own efforts, but solely of God's decision. The following persons are said to be elected in this sense: Abraham (Nehemiah 9:7 ), Moses (2 Corinthians 2:15-16 ), Aaron (Numbers 16:1-17:13 ), David (Psalm 78:70 ), Solomon (Romans 8:28-394 ), and Zerubbabel (Haggai 2:23 )
Nations, the - If you belong to Christ, then you are Abraham's seed, and heirs according to the promise" (Galatians 3:28-29 ). Thus the call of Abraham looked toward the time when all peoples would become the children of Abraham by faith. For the nations as for the ethnic descendants of Abraham, the person and ministry of Jesus were indeed good news, providing the means of reconciliation to God and with one another
Cosmopolitanism - Matthew is the narrator of the visit of Wise Men from the East (Matthew 2:1); and if he traces the genealogy of Christ to Abraham (Matthew 1:2) St. ...
It is true that the Gospels are full of protests against Jewish exclusiveness (Matthew 3:9 ‘Think not to say within yourselves, We have Abraham to our father’; cf. , where the claim founded on descent from Abraham is contemptuously dismissed; also Matthew 12:41 f
Wells - And Isaac digged again the wells of water which they had digged in the days of Abraham his father; for the Philistines had stopped them after the death of Abraham; and he called their names after the names by which his father had called them. Richardson, "between the different villagers and the different herdsmen here, exists still, as it did in the days of Abraham and Lot: the country has often changed masters; but the habits of the natives, both in this and other respects, have been nearly stationary
Election - ...
In the Old Testament God’s election applied particularly to his choice of Abraham and, through Abraham, to his choice of Israel to be his people (Genesis 12:1-3; Nehemiah 9:7-8; Isaiah 41:8-9). All who believe in Jesus, whether Jew or Gentile, are the true people of God, the true descendants of Abraham (Romans 9:6-9; Galatians 3:14; Galatians 3:26-29)
Church - Prior to the days of Abraham, this church, though scattered up and down the world, and subject to many changes in its worship through the addition of new revelations, was still but one and the same, because founded in the same covenant, and interested thereby in all the benefits or privileges that God had granted, or would at any time grant. In process of time, God was pleased to restrict his church, as far as visible acknowledgment went, in a great measure, to the seed of Abraham. " So that since the days of Abraham, the church has, in every age, been founded upon the covenant made with that patriarch, and on the work of redemption which was to be performed according to that covenant. Now wheresoever this covenant made with Abraham is, and with whomsoever it is established, with them is the church of God, and to them all the promises and privileges of the church really belong. Hence we may learn that at the coming of the Messiah, there was not one church taken away and another set up in its room; but the church continued the same, in those that were the children of Abraham, according to the faith. The carnal privilege of the Jews, in their separation from other nations to give birth to the Messiah, then failed, and with that also their claim on that account to be the children of Abraham. The Gentiles came into the faith of Abraham along with the Jews, being made joint partakers with them in his blessing. The Jewish plea, is, that the church is with them, because they are the children of Abraham according to the flesh. Christians reply, that their privilege on that ground was of another nature, and ended with the coming of the Messiah: that the church of God, unto whom all the promises belong, are only those who are heirs of the faith of Abraham, believing as he did, and are consequently interested in his covenant
Paul the Apostle - ...
Children of Abraham, Children of God . Paul's preaching in Acts 13:17 and his numerous references to Abraham in Romans and Galatians (9 references in each epistle see also 2 Corinthians 11:22 ) confirm that Paul did not see himself as founder of a new religion. Peter in Acts 3:25 ]'>[1]; likewise traces the gospel message back to God's promise to Abraham is Paul Luke's source for what Stephen said on that occasion? Did Stephen have a hand in instructing Paul? ) The foundation of the gospel Paul preached was the covenant God made with Abraham (see Genesis 12:1-3 ; 15:1-21 ). As Paul writes, "The Scripture announced the gospel in advance to Abraham So those who have faith are blessed along with Abraham, the man of faith" (Galatians 3:8-9 ). They also include "the adoption as sons, the divine glory, the covenants, the receiving of the law, the temple worship and the promises, " as well as "the patriarchs [2] and Christ" (Romans 9:4-5 )
Siddim, Vale of - half of which has in places a depth of 1300 feet) is the remains of an inland sea which existed ‘long before the appearance of man on the earth,’ and consequently long before the age of Abraham
Arabia Felix - Ishmael, Genesis 25:13-15 , and the six sons of Abraham by Keturah, Genesis 25:2 , together with the seed of Esau and of Lot, occupied the parts of Arabia nearer Judea
Regeneration - This restitution will not in the coming millennial age be universally a return to the pristine condition of Edenic innocence previous to the Fall, but it will fulfill the establishment of God's covenant with Abraham concerning his descendants, a veritable rebirth of the nation, involving the peace and prosperity of the Gentiles
Name - Abram becomes Abraham; Sarai, Sarah; Jacob, Israel
Priests - Noah sacrificed; so did Abraham and the patriarchs
Memorial - Israel must remember their God as the "God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, " the "I am, " forever
Israelite - Are they the seed of Abraham?-so am I’ (2 Corinthians 11:22)
Sarah - The wife of Abraham
Ashes - Genesis 18:27 (a) By the use of this word Abraham is expressing to GOD his own utter worthlessness and lowliness as though he were not even worth any consideration from GOD
Weighing - Thus Abraham when he bought ground of the sons of Heth, weighed the money agreed upon, four hundred shekels of silver,"current money with the merchant
Shechem - ...
It is called SYCHEM in Acts 7:16 , where it says that Abraham bought a sepulchre there
Ask - The first occurrence is found in Genesis 24:47, where the servant of Abraham asks Rebekah, "Whose daughter art thou?" It is commonly used for simple requests, as when Sisera asked for water from Jael (Judges 5:25)
Stephen - He sketched the history of the people from Abraham, with which they were all familiar; but he laid bare from the outset the opposition of the Jews and of their fathers
Captain - The "captain of the Lord's host" (Joshua 5:14,15 ) is the name given to that mysterious person who manifested himself to Abraham (Genesis 12:7 ), and to Moses in the bush (Exodus 3:2,6 , etc
Ai - A place between which and Bethel Abraham was stationed before ( Genesis 12:8 ) and after ( Genesis 13:3 ) his sojourn in Egypt
Meekness - Observe the many examples of it; Jesus Christ, Matthew 11:28 ; Abraham, Genesis 13:1-18 : Genesis 16:5-6 ; Moses, Numb
Age, - The 'Patriarchal age' embraces the time from the call of Abraham to the release from Egypt and the giving of the law
Midian - LAND OF, a country of the Midianites, derived its name and its inhabitants from Midian, the son of Abraham by Keturah
Dreams - He informed Abimelech in a dream, that Sarah was the wife of Abraham, Genesis 20:3 ; Genesis 20:6
Travelling - " Instead of the Koran of modern times, let us conceive of Abraham, and other patriarchal emirs, collecting their numerous dependents and teaching them the true religion, and we then see with what truth they are called the Lord's "prophets
Hebron - Its modern name, El-khulil, the friend, is the same which the Moslems give to Abraham, "the friend of God;" and they profess to hold in their keeping the burial-place of the patriarchs, the "cave of Machpelah
Infant Baptism - The "Mercy to Babes" in the Old Dispensation has not been lost outof the New, the Dispensation of the Spirit of love, which brings toall, even to the infant, as well as to its parents, God's mercywhich "He promised to our forefathers, Abraham and his seedforever
Marcianus, a Solitary in Syria - He zealously upheld the Nicaean rule of Easter and broke off communion with the venerable solitary Abraham in the same desert until he gave up the old Syrian custom and conformed to the new one
Opposition - He assured them that their lineal descent from Abraham, on which they prided themselves so much, gave them no special plea for acceptance with God
Bethel - When Abraham entered Canaan, one of his main camping places was near Bethel, in the hill country west of the lower Jordan
Foreknowledge - The idea of choice is also evident in the call of Abraham to be the founder of God's covenant nation. By storing food in Egypt, Joseph partially fulfilled the promise to Abraham that "all peoples on earth will be blessed through you" (Genesis 12:3 )
Sojourn, Dwell - 21:23, Abraham makes a covenant with Abimelech, saying, “… According to the kindness that I have done unto thee, thou shalt do unto me, and to the land wherein thou hast sojourned. They are admonished to treat the client with justice, righteousness, and love because like Abraham ( Messiah - ...
Abraham, descendant of Shem, was called and appointed to be the covenant agent. God covenanted in a special manner with Abraham, assuring him that via his seed God would carry out his redemptive/restorative work. That Abraham and his seed would be able to do this was confirmed by God's assuring covenantal affirmation: "I am God Almighty I will make you very fruitful be your God and of your descendants" (Genesis 17:1-7 ). Two important messianic factors stand out: (1) the covenant Lord would continue the seedline; and (2) Abraham was called to believe, obey, and serve as the father of all believers who would receive the benefits of the Messiah. God, however, maintained the seedline from Abraham, through David, through Zerubbabel, through Mary and Joseph. ...
The wider dimension of the messianic concept is evident in Abraham's life of faith, intercession on behalf of Sodom and Gomorrah (Genesis 18 ), and offering of the ram substituted for his son Isaac (Genesis 22 ). Abraham's grandson Joseph, serving as a type of the Messiah, performed in a royal capacity but before he was lifted to that capacity he suffered humiliation. He came, born of Abrahamic and Davidic lineage (Matthew 1:2-16 ; Luke 2:4-15 )
Jacob - Hales on this transaction implicate Isaac also:—Thirty-seven years after, when Jacob was seventy-seven years old, according to Abulfaragi, and Isaac a hundred and thirty-seven, when he was old, and his sight had failed, and he expected soon to die, his partiality for Esau led him to attempt to set aside the oracle, and the cession of Esau's birthright to Jacob, by conferring on him the blessing of Abraham, in reward for bringing him savoury venison to eat, before his death. Though he had the consolation of having the blessing of Abraham voluntarily renewed to him by his father, before he was forced to fly from his brother's fury, Genesis 28:1-4 , and had the satisfaction of obeying his parents in going to Padanaram, or Charran, in quest of a wife of his own kindred, Genesis 28:7 ; yet he set out on a long and perilous journey of six hundred miles and upward, through barren and inhospitable regions, unattended and unprovided, like a pilgrim, indeed, with only his staff in his hand Genesis 32:10 . And though he was supported with the assurance of the divine protection, and the renewal of the blessing of Abraham by God himself, in his remarkable vision at Bethel, and solemnly devoted himself to his service, wishing only for food and raiment, and vowing to profess the worship of God, and pay tithe unto him should he return back in peace, Genesis 28:10-22 ; yet he was forced to engage in a tedious and thankless servitude of seven years, at first for Rachel, with Laban, who retaliated upon him the imposition he had practised on his own father; and substituted Leah, whom he hated, for Rachel, whom he loved; and thereby compelled him to serve seven years more; and changed his wages several times during the remainder of his whole servitude of twenty years; in the course of which, as he pathetically complained, "the drought consumed him by day, and the frost by night, and the sleep departed from his eyes," in watching Laban's flocks, Genesis 31:40 ; and at last he was forced to steal away, and was only protected from Laban's vengeance, as afterward from Esau's, by divine interposition. Hitherto the promise was confined generally to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, that from them the glorious blessing should arise; but now, under the divine direction, the dying patriarch fortels in what tribe, and at what period, the great Restorer shall come. ...
When Jacob had finished blessing his sons, he charged them to bury him in the cave of Machpelah, with Abraham and Isaac, and, "gathering his feet into the bed, he yielded up the ghost, and was gathered unto his people,"...
Genesis 49:33
Stephen - His speech is not the unconnected narrative that many suppose, but a covert argument which carries his hearers unconsciously along with him until at the close he unveils the drift of the whole, namely, to show:...
(1) That in Israel's past history God's revelation of Himself was not confined to the holy land and the temple, that Abraham had enjoyed God's revelations in Mesopotamia, Haran, and Canaan before he possessed a foot of the promised land; so also Israel and Moses in the strange land of Egypt, and in Midian and Sinai, which was therefore "holy ground" (Acts 7:33), and in the wilderness 40 years. ...
(3) That God nevertheless by ways seeming most unlikely to man ultimately exalted the exile Abraham, the outcast slave Joseph, and the despised Moses to honour and chiefship; so it will be in Messiah's case in spite of the humiliation which makes the Jews reject Him. Again as to 1618449090_5 "Jacob and our fathers were carried over into Sychem, and laid in the sepulchre that Abraham bought of Emmor," Stephen with elliptical brevity refers to six different chapters, summing up in one sentence, which none of his hearers could misunderstand from their familiarity as to the details, the double purchase (from Ephron the Hittite by Abraham, and from Hamor of Shechem by Jacob: Genesis 23:16; Genesis 33:19), the double burial place (Machpelah's cave and the ground at Shechem), and the double burial (Jacob in Machpelah's cave: Genesis 50:13, and Joseph in the Shechem ground of Jacob, Genesis 50:25; Exodus 13:19; Joshua 24:32)
Immutability of God - He is the God who is and will be what He has already been in the past: “the Lord God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob this is my name for ever” (Exodus 3:15 )
Shepherd - Shepherding was the chief occupation of the Israelites in the early days of the patriarchs: Abraham (Genesis 12:16 ); Rachel (Genesis 29:9 ); Jacob (Genesis 30:31-40 ); Moses (Exodus 3:1 )
i am - That the Jews rightly understood Jesus' claim “before Abraham was, I am” (John 8:58 ) as a divine claim is evident from their picking up stones to throw at Him
Micah - It crowns the whole chain of predictions respecting the several limitations of the promised seed: to the line of Shem; to the family of Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob; to the tribe of Judah; and to the royal house of David, terminating in his birth at Bethlehem, "the city of David
Esau - Thus, the lineage became Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
Moriah - Abraham saw Moriah at some little distance (Genesis 22:4) on the third day; the distance, two days' journey from Beersheba, would just bring him to Zion, but not so far as Moreh and Gerizim (Genesis 12:6) where some fix Moriah
Testament (2) - ?]'>[2] is to the covenant with Abraham (Genesis 15, 17). ), and its application to the Christian covenant was in current use among the Apostles: the ‘old’ covenant in the implied contrast was the Mosaic not the Abrahamic (2 Corinthians 3:6, Hebrews 9:15 etc
Israel, Spiritual - Is spiritual Israel the church, Israel of all generations from Abraham to the end of time, Jews at the end of the ages, or the remnant of believing Jews included in the church or brought into the church in the last days? Many interpretations have been made
Priest - Afterwards that office devolved on the head of the family, as in the cases of Noah (Genesis 8:20 ), Abraham (12:7; 13:4), Isaac (26:25), Jacob (31:54), and Job (Job 1:5 )
Prophecy - ...
Then there are many prophecies regarding the Jewish nation, its founder Abraham (Genesis 12:1-3 ; 13:16 ; 15:5 ; 17:2,4-6 , etc
Requirement - ...
Abraham by faith fulfilled God's requirements (Genesis 26:5 ), Zecharias and Elizabeth were righteous, keeping all the Lord's commandments and requirements (Luke 1:6 )
Gentiles - The covenant from the first with Abraham contemplated that "in his seed all the nations of the earth should be blessed" (Genesis 22:18)
Father - Abraham was "father of nations," both by natural descent from him and by spiritual fellowship in his faith (Genesis 18:18-19; Romans 4:17)
Flesh - In Romans 4:1, "what hath Abraham found, as pertaining to the flesh?" i
Apocrypha - ...
The following is a list of the Apocrypha: ...
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Jewish Apocalypses ...
Book of Henoch
Assumption of Moses
Fourth Book of Esdras
Apocalypse of Baruch
Apocalypse of Abraham
Legendary Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Book of Jubilees, or Little Genesis
Third Book of Esdras
Third Book of Machabees
History and Maxims of Ahikar, the Assyrian
Apocryphal Psalms and Prayers ...
Psalms of Solomon
Prayer of Manasses
Jewish Philosophy ...
Fourth Book of Machabees
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin with Christian Accretions ...
Sibylline Oracles
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs
Ascension of Isaias
Apocrypha Of Christian Origin ...
Apocryphal Gospels of Catholic Origin ...
Protoevangelium Jacobi, or Infancy Gospel of James, describing the birth, education, and marriage of the Blessed Virgin
Gospel of the Pseudo-Matthew
Arabic Gospel of the Infancy
History of Joseph the Carpenter
Transitu Marire, or Evangelium Joannis, describing the death and assumption of the Blessed Virgin
Judaistic and Heretical Gospels ...
Gospel according to the Hebrews
Gospel according to the Egyptians
Gospel of Peter
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Thomas
Gospel of Marcion
Gospel of Bartholomew
Gospel of Matthias
Gospel of Nicodemus
Gospel of the Twelve Apostles
Gospel of Andrew
Gospel of Barnabas
Gospel of Thaddeus
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Eve
Gospel of Judas Iscariot
Pilate Literature and Other Apocrypha concerning Christ ...
Report of Pilate to the Emperor
Narrative of Joseph of Arimathea
Pseudo-Correspondence of Jesus and Abgar, King of Edessa
Gnostic Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter
Acts of John
Acts of Andrew
Acts and Martyrdom of Matthew
Acts of Thomas
Acts of Bartholomew
Catholic Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter and Paul
Acts of Paul
Acts of Paul and Thecla
Acts of Philip
Acts of Matthew
Acts of Simon and Jude
Acts of Barnabas
Acts of James the Greater
Apocryphal Doctrinal Works ...
Testamentum Domini
Nostri Jesu
Preaching of Peter, or Kerygma Petri
Apocryphal Epistles ...
Pseudo-Epistle of Peter
Pseudo-Epistles of Paul
Pseudo-Epistles to the Laodiceans
Pseudo-Correspondence of Paul and Seneca
Christian Apocryphal Apocalypses ...
Apocalypse of Peter
Apocalypse of Paul
Hospitality - "Use hospitality one to another without grudging," saith Peter, (1 Peter 4:9) And Paul begged the Hebrews," (Hebrews 13:2) not to be forgetful"to entertain strangers, for thereby, he said, some had entertained angels unawares? alluding very probably, to the case of Abraham and Lot, as related Genesis 18:3 and Genesis 19:2
Incest - In the time of Abraham and Isaac, these marriages were permitted, and among the Persians much later; it is even said to be esteemed neither criminal nor ignominious among the remains of the old Persians at this day
Rechabites - They appear to have sprung from Midian, the son of Abraham by Keturah, Genesis 25:2 ; for Jethro, from whom they are descended, is called a Midianite, Numbers 10:23
Think - Think not to say within yourselves,we have Abraham to our father-- Matthew 3 ...
9
Paulus, the Black - Thus they "fell into communion" with the deceitful "synodite," and on their loading him with reproaches the severity of their treatment was increased and they were thrown into prison in the monastery of Beth Abraham in Constantinople, where their sufferings continued
Theophilus - " Theophilus then defends his position from the conduct of Abraham towards the angel whom he worshipped at the oak of Mamre and from the Psalms
Responsibility - Sarah became upset with Abraham when Hagar bore him a child, even though Abraham was following Sarah's advice (Genesis 16:1-5 )
Tithes - We have nothing more ancient concerning tithes, than what we find in Genesis 14:20 , that Abraham gave tithes to Melchisedec, king of Salem, at his return from his expedition against Chedorlaomer, and the four kings in confederacy with him. Abraham gave him tithe of all the booty he had taken from the enemy
Job - No reference is made to any order of priesthood, Job himself being the priest of his household, like Noah and Abraham. Hales places the trial of Job before the birth of Abraham, and Usher, about thirty years before the exodus, B
Biblical Theology - God covenantsestablishes terms under which redemptive relationship to him rather than judgment are possiblewith the remnant, Noah and his kin (Genesis 9:1-17 ), foreshadowing the covenant par excellence with Abraham lying yet in the future. To Abram, later called Abraham (17:5), the Hebrew people trace their ancestry. The line from Abraham to the Savior of humankind is in that sense direct. ...
Abraham is saved through his trust in God's saving mercy alone, as atonement for sin and hope for the future (15:6). Abraham's sacrifice of Isaac, halted by an angel, foreshadows God's own sacrifice for sin millennia hence, just as his wife Sarah's conception of a son at the age of ninety prefigures resurrection from the dead (Romans 4:17-25 ). ...
Abraham's descendants (Isaac, Jacob) bear the responsibility of the covenant God made with their father, but they seldom rise to his level of integrity in seeking the Lord. His rise to power there as adjutant second only to Pharaoh himself sets the stage for a captivity of Israel's descendants some four centuries in length, in keeping with God's promise to Abraham (15:16). Their deliverance is a direct result of God's covenant with Abraham (Exodus 2:24 ). This instruction, epitomized by the Decalogue or Ten Commandments, does not set aside, but rather, gives a vehicle for living within the Abrahamic covenant. His aim to bless all nations in keeping with his promise to Abraham is still at work. Jeremiah's doleful lamentations bespeak the despondency of those who await, now with virtually no visible consolation, the deliverance and glory promised to their forefathers since Abraham. ...
The truly faithful fewtheir number seems seldom if ever to constitute a hegemony among Abraham's physical descendants throughout Old Testament historyappear to dwindle steadily once the Old Testament period proper ends. The children of Abraham and the land of promise languish under the rule of Persia, which is terminated abruptly by the Greeks in the 320s b
Bela - of the Dead Sea, on the route to Egypt, not far from where Sodom and Gomorrah stood, according to Holland, arguing from the smoke of the burning cities having been seen by Abraham from the neighborhood of Hebron, and also because if Sodom had been N
Endure, Enduring - ...
A — 7: μακροθυμέω (Strong's #3114 — Verb — makrothumeo — mak-roth-oo-meh'-o ) "to be long-tempered" (makros, "long," thumos, "mind"), is rendered "patiently endured" in Hebrews 6:15 , said of Abraham
Rebekah - Bethuel's daughter, Laban's sister, Isaac's wife (Genesis 22:23; Genesis 22:24), Rebekah, the grand-daughter of Abraham's brother, marries Isaac, Abraham's son; it is an undesigned coincidence with probability that Isaac was the son of Abraham's and Sarah's old age (Genesis 18:12), and so, though of a generation earlier than Rebekah, yet not so much her senior in years. Rebekah was buried in the cave of Machpelah with Abraham and Sarah
Milk - This soured milk was carried by travelers who mixed it with meat, dried it, and then dissolved it in water to make a refreshing drink such as that set by Abraham before the messengers (Genesis 18:8 )
City - Before the time of Abraham there were cities in Egypt (Numbers 13:22 )
Shiloh - "The second was all gospel, and all of Christ: and this was given to Abraham, (Genesis 22:18) "In thy seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed
Euphrates - boundary of the land promised to Abraham, as the river of Egypt was the S
Temptation - I beg the reader to turn to the memorable instance of Abraham, and consider the result of that interesting transaction, Genesis 22:1-24 throughout; and read also what the apostle James hath said concerning temptation; and I venture to hope, under the Holy Ghost's teaching, the truth will appear very plain and obvious
Flesh - What shall we then say that Abraham, our father as pertaining to the flesh, hath found? Romans 4
Amorites - ...
Abraham assisted Mamre the Amorite in recovering his land from four powerful kings (Genesis 14:1 ), but later the Amorites were a formidable obstacle to the Israelites' conquest and settlement of Canaan
Doorway - ” Abraham was sitting at the “doorway” of his tent in the heat of the day when his three heavenly visitors appeared ( Generation - Abraham received the promise that four “generations” of his descendants were to be in Egypt before the Promised Land would be inherited
There is - Used with the particle ‘im and a participle, it emphasizes abiding intention: “And I came this day unto the well, and said, O Lord God of my master Abraham, if now thou do prosper my way which I go [2] …” ( Names - Examples of this are Abraham, ( Genesis 17:5 ) Sarah, (Genesis 17:15 ) Israel, as the designation of the spiritual character in place of Jacob, which designated the natural character
Messi'ah - (Genesis 9:26 ) Next follows the promise to Abraham
Travail - 2, is used negatively in Galatians 4:27 , "(thou) that travailest (not)," quoted from Isaiah 54:1 ; the Apostle applies the circumstances of Sarah and Hagar (which doubtless Isaiah was recalling) to show that, whereas the promise by grace had temporarily been replaced by the works of the Law (see Galatians 3:17 ), this was now reversed, and, in the fulfillment of the promise to Abraham, the number of those saved by the Gospel would far exceed those who owned allegiance to the Law
Amorites - ...
Later these Amorites migrated down into Palestine, and were well established in certain areas by the time Abraham arrived (Genesis 14:7; Genesis 14:13)
Angel - The appearances to Abraham at Mamre (Genesis 18:2,22 . There is no notice of angelic appearances to man till after the call of Abraham
Egypt - This role begins with Abraham. This is also the first recorded encounter of the divine ruler of Egypt and Yahweh the God of Abraham
Ebal - Here first in Canaan Abraham rested, and built an altar to Jehovah who appeared unto him (Genesis 12:6-7). " These "terebinths of Moreh" near Shechem were familiar to the people, as marking the spot where Abraham first entered the land (Genesis 12:6)
Jehovah - )...
Exodus 6:2-3; "I am JEHOVAH, and I appeared unto Abraham,. Elohim appears in the trial of Abraham's faith (Genesis 22); Jehovah, in its triumph. "Before Abraham began, to be (Greek) I am" (Matthew 28:20)
Ishmael - The son of Abraham by Hagar. A dozen tribes, scattered over the Sinaitic peninsula and the districts east of the Jordan, because of some similarity in civilization or language, or in some cases possibly under the influence of correct tradition, are grouped as kinsmen, being sons of Abraham, but of inferior status, as being descended from the son of a handmaid
Confusion of Tongues - Now in none of these was the transmission so likely to have taken place, as among that branch of the descendants of Shem, from which the patriarch Abraham proceeded. Upon these grounds, therefore, we may probably conclude, that the language spoken by Abraham, and by him transmitted to his posterity, was in fact the primitive language, modified indeed and extended in the course of time, but still retaining its essential parts far more completely than any other of the languages of men
Ephesians, Theology of - God had promised Abraham that his seed would be a blessing to all the nations, and they must now be accepted fully as equal partners in the kingdom. ...
A number of key theological terms and arguments in Ephesians revolve around these two concepts: (1) the historical and cosmological role of the Jews in God's redemptive history from the time of Abraham; and (2) Paul's own place in that process, that of bringing in the Gentiles as full participants in the kingdom, which evil forces in the cosmos conspired to prevent and thus to destroy the work of Christ. It is in the context of the role of Israel as the elect, the chosen, descended from Abraham to propagate the Messiah, rather than in the context of individual predestination to salvation, that Paul speaks of election. The first chapter asserts that the Jews, God's saints or holy ones, were "chosen" to bring the blessing of redemption to all nations in fulfillment of the promise to Abraham. ...
Therefore, from this point on (2:3) the first-person plural pronouns include the Gentiles as well, who have been grafted as wild olive branches into the Jewish tree (Romans 11:17-24 ) and are henceforth, like the Jews, included among the descendants of Abraham, "in order that the blessing given to Abraham might come to the Gentiles through Jesus Christ, so that by faith we [1] might receive the promise of the Spirit" ( Galatians 3:14 )
God, Names of - Abram (great father) became Abraham (father of a multitude) (Genesis 17:5 ; 32:28 ). ...
Elohim [3] (God), a plural of Eloah [2], occurs more than 2,250 times, sometimes with an addition such as "God of Abraham/Israel, " but mostly it is free standing. Abraham mentions El 'Elyon when addressing Melchizedek ( Genesis 14:18,19,20,22 ). To Abraham God appears as God Almighty, El Shaddai ( Genesis 17:1 ). Abraham memorialized God's provision of a sacrifice in the name Yahweh-jireh ("The Lord will provide, " Genesis 22:14 ). Other titles are "God of Abraham" (Genesis 28:13 ; 31:53 ; 1 Chronicles 29:18 ), "Fear of Isaac" (Genesis 31:42,53 ), "Mighty One of Jacob" (Genesis 49:24 ), and especially (more frequent than the foregoing three) "God of Israel" (Numbers 16:9 ; 1 Samuel 5:8 ; Psalm 41:13 )
Hope - Abraham serves as a prime example here. "Against all hope, Abraham in hope believed" (Romans 4:18 ). Like Abraham, we can trust in God's promises and "seize the hope set before us" (Hebrews 6:18 )
Gentiles (2) - ...
The fact that Jesus did not pass His youth in the religiously exclusive atmosphere of Jerusalem, but in the freer and more liberal surroundings of semi-Gentile Galilee, fits in with the prophetic word of Simeon at the Presentation, and the declarations of His forerunner: He was to be ‘a light to lighten the Gentiles’ (Luke 2:32); and, God was able to raise up to Abraham children (Luke 3:8) who could not boast any natural descent from the patriarch. ); and, setting the seal to the teaching of His forerunner, He asserted in effect that the true children of Abraham were those who did the deeds of Abraham, and were not necessarily those who were naturally descended from him (John 8:39 ff
Exodus, Book of - ...
Message of the book...
God had promised that from the descendants of Abraham he would make a nation that would in a special sense be his people, and he would give them Canaan as their national homeland (Genesis 12:1-3; Genesis 13:14-16; Genesis 17:6-8; Genesis 22:17-18). The chosen descendants of Abraham settled in Egypt in the fertile region of the Nile Delta. ...
But God had not forgotten the covenant he had made with Abraham
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - to Abraham only. Both lists agree from Abraham to David, except that Aram or Ram in Matthew 1:3 = Arm in Luke 3:33 (best text); but between David and Joseph the lists have only Shealtiel and Zerubbabel, and possibly two other names (see below), in common. ...
( b ) The Lukan list , which inverts the order, beginning at Jesus and ending at Adam, takes the line from Adam to Abraham, from Genesis 5:1-32 ; Genesis 10:21-25 (to Peleg), 1 Chronicles 1:1-27 , but inserts Cainan between Arphaxad and Shelah, as does the LXX Work - In an extended use this verb means to prepare a meal, a banquet, or even an offering: “And he [1] took butter, and milk, and the calf which he had dressed, and set it before them [2] …” ( Abraham, and said unto him, What hast thou done unto us?” ( Abraham, I pray thee, send me good speed this day, and show kindness unto my master Abraham” ( Montreal, Quebec, Canada, City of - The superior filled the position of vicar-general to the bishop, and it was in their house that Bishop Pontbriand took refuge after the English victory on the Plains of Abraham
Hospitality - The word is not used in the Old Testament, but its elements are recognizable: Abraham and the three visitors (Genesis 18:1-8 ), Lot and the two angels (Genesis 19:1-8 ), Abraham's servant at Nahor (Genesis 24:17-33 ), Reuel and Moses (Exodus 2:20 ), Manoah and the angel (Judges 13:15 ), Elijah and the widow of Zarephath (1 Kings 17:10-11 ), and Elisha and the Shunammite woman (2 Kings 4:8-11 )
Philistines - In the time of Abraham they inhabited the south-west of Judea, Abimelech of Gerar being their king (Genesis 21:32,34 ; 26:1 )
Concubine - Abraham eventually gives the full inheritance to Isaac, and only gives gifts to his concubines' sons (Genesis 25:6 )
Chaldea - (See BABYLON; Abraham; AMRAPHEL
Nebaioth - ...
But the mention of names resembling Adam, Seth, Enoch, Noah, Shem, Abraham, and of Hermes, Agathodaemon, Tammuz, and the Ionians, and the anachronisms geographical, linguistic, historical, and religious, point to a modern date even as late as the first century A
Elect - ...
Exemplified in Isaac (Genesis 21:12); Abraham (Nehemiah 9:7; Haggai 2:23); the apostles (John 13:18; John 15:16; John 15:19); Jacob (Romans 9:12-13); Paul (Galatians 1:15)
Shechem - It was the first recorded camping place of Abraham when he came to Canaan from Haran (Genesis 12:4-6). )...
Abraham’s grandson, Jacob, upon returning to Canaan from Paddan-aram, bought land in Shechem and settled there with his family and flocks (Genesis 33:18-19)
Trance - Thus though we have not the word, we have the thing in the "deep sleep" the "horror of great darkness," that fell on Abraham
Firstfruits - ...
In light of this, God's people, as his "firstfruits, " are to have a sanctifying effect on others (1 Corinthians 5:6-7 ), just as Abraham and the patriarchs had a sanctifying effect on disobedient Israel (Romans 11:14-16 )
Caves - Abraham brought the cave of Machpelah as a tomb for Sarah (Genesis 23:11-16 ,Genesis 23:11-16,23:19 )
Sheba (2) - Grandson of Abraham by Keturah; son of Jokshan (Genesis 25:3)
Midst - …” In other passages this word signifies the hypothetical center line dividing something into two equal parts: “And he [5] took unto him all these, and divided them in the midst, and laid each piece one against another …” ( Testament - Abraham gave presents, to what amount is not known, both to Ishmael and to the sons whom he had by Keturah, and sent them away before his death
People of God - ...
Election and Covenant The election of Israel as people of God may be traced from Abraham (Genesis 12:1 ; compare Galatians 3:29 ; Romans 9:7-8 )
Canaanites - " In the time of Abraham they possessed Hebron; and the patriarch purchased from them the cave of Machpelah as a sepulchre, Genesis 23:1-20 25:9,10
Money - No piece, however effaced, is refused there: the merchant draws out his scales and weighs it, as in the days of Abraham, when he purchased his sepulchre
Genealogy - The promise of the land of Canaan to the seed of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob successively, and the separation of the Israelites from the Gentile world; the expectation of Messiah as to spring from the tribe of Judah; the exclusively hereditary priesthood of Aaron with its dignity and emoluments; the long succession of kings in the line of David; and the whole division and occupations of the land upon genealogical principles by the tribes, occupation of the land upon genealogical principles by the tribes, families and houses of fathers, gave a deeper importance to the science of genealogy among the Jews than perhaps any other nation
Righteousness - Their father Abraham believed God, and it was counted unto him for righteousness; and the faith of the believer is counted to him for righteousness, apart from works
Mammaea or Mamaea, Julia - 54) that of religiosa , was probably of the syncretistic type then prevalent, which shewed itself, in its better form, in Alexander's adoption of Christian rules of action, and in his placing busts of Christ, Abraham, Orpheus, and Apollonius of Tyana in his private oratory (Lamprid Vit
Covenant - "...
The legal covenant of Sinai came in as a parenthesis (pareiselthee ; Romans 5:20) between the promise to Abraham and its fulfillment in his promised seed, Christ. But the promise to David (2 Samuel 7; Psalm 89; 2; 72; Isaiah 11) took up again that to Abraham, defining the line, the Davidic, as that in which the promised seed should come
Mediator, Mediation - Well-known Scripture examples are the intercession of Abraham for Sodom ( Genesis 18:23-33 ), of Moses for Israel ( Exodus 32:30-34 ), of Samuel for Israel ( 1 Samuel 7:8-12 ). It is the singular fact in connexion with the covenant with Abraham of which St
Midian - The Midianites were a nomad people descended from Abraham and his concubine Keturah (Genesis 25:1-2). From early days they seem to have mingled with the Ishmaelites, who were descended from Abraham through another woman, the slave-girl Hagar (Genesis 25:12; Genesis 37:28; Genesis 37:36; Judges 8:24-26)
Hebrews - These facts have led to the conjecture that the name ‘Hebrews’ was originally given to the race of Abraham by their Canaanite neighbours, and that this name continued to be the designation of the race by outsiders all through their history, just as the Magyars are known as ‘Hungarians’ by other nations of Europe. In the period immediately before Christ, an artificial interest in the past and a revival of ancient learning, coupled with the exaggerated reverence for Abraham ‘the Hebrew,’ led to a revival in the use of this term, and to the language of the race being designated thereby, although Philo calls the language of the OT, Chaldee (de Vita Mosis, ii
God - So when God offers Abraham the land of Canaan, it is his right to give it because he created the world. So one is not surprised to find him walking in the garden, addressing Adam and Eve, laying out plans to save a morally debased world, covenanting with Abraham, intervening on Moriah to spare Isaac's life, speaking to Jacob in a dream, and preserving Joseph in a foreign and hostile environment in order to procure his will for the people he had chosen to bear his name in the world. With the introduction of the patriarchs of Israel (Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob), God became known as the "God Almighty, " El Shaddai ( Genesis 17:1 ; 28:3 ; 35:11 ; 48:3 ; 49:25 ; Exodus 6:3 ; Ezekiel 10:5 ), and less frequently "God everlasting" (El Olam ), "God of seeing" (El Roi ), and "God most high, " El Elyon ( Genesis 21:33 ; 16:13 ). He is also called the "Shield of Abraham" (Genesis 15:1 ), the "Kinsman of Isaac" (Judges 2:20-23 ), and the "Mighty One of Jacob" (Genesis 49:24 ). " And Exodus 3:15 equates I am with the God of the fathers: "The Lord the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacobhas sent me to you. God began this work when he created the world, and continued it in his work of grace executed in the lives of the heroes and heroines of faith, like Enoch who walked with God (Genesis 5:22,24 ), Noah who found favor in the eyes of the Lord (Genesis 6:8 ), Abraham whose faith God counted as righteousness (Genesis 15:6 ), and Joseph whom God sustained in Egypt through adversity and success (Genesis 39:23 ). The covenant he made with Abraham was activated on a national level at Sinai and designed with particulars that formalized the relationship between Israel and Yahweh. Even in the time of Abraham, the Lord noted that the iniquity of the Amorites (Canaanites) was not yet full (Genesis 15:16 )
Genealogies of Jesus Christ - Matthew (Matthew 1:2-17) begins with Abraham, and traces the line in fourteen generations to David; then through Solomon in fourteen generations to Jechoniah at the time of the carrying away to Babylon: then in fourteen (or thirteen according to our present text) generations through Shealtiel and Zerubbabel to Matthan, Jacob, Joseph, and Jesus. Thus he brings the Messiah into relation with all who, whether in a literal or a spiritual sense, could call Abraham their Father. ) back to Abraham; but, not stopping there, he carries the pedigree back to ‘Adam the son of God,’ thus bringing the Son of man into relation with all men whom God has created. —The heading is translated in the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘The book of the generation (βίβλος γενέσεως) of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham’: in the margin the alternative rendering is given ‘the genealogy of Jesus Christ. Taken as the title of the pedigree, it indicates clearly the intention of the writer—to show that in Jesus, as the heir of David and of Abraham, were fulfilled the promises made to them: the pedigree itself is intended to illustrate this, rather than to prove it, and it is not easy to avoid the conclusion that it is quite artificial, as is indeed implied by the more or less arbitrary division into 3 sections containing twice seven names apiece. on Matthew 1:6) points out that the articles before Δαυεὶδ τὸν βασιλἐα in Matthew 1:6, and before Ἰωσὴφ τὸν ἄνδρα Μαρίας in Matthew 1:16, are incorrect: it seems probable that the compiler of the Gospel had a pedigree before him in which each step was given in the simple form ‘Abraham begat Isaac’ (Ἀβραὰμ ἐγέννησεν τὸν Ἰσαάκ), and that he added notes to this at certain points; in Matthew 1:6; Matthew 1:16 he did not notice that the use of the article became incorrect when the notes were added. ...
This examination compels us to conclude that the genealogy is essentially and intentionally artificial; the word ‘begat’ (ἐγέννησεν) is not intended necessarily to imply physical birth, but merely marks the descent; the compiler was more interested in the throne-succession than the actual lineage, and used his material to illustrate and enforce his main proposition that Jesus Christ was the son of David and of Abraham, and he joined to the bare pedigree a sort of running commentary of notes
James, Epistle of - It has points of contact with Romans: James 1:22 ; James 4:11 and Romans 2:13 (hearers and doers of the law); James 1:2-4 and Romans 5:3-5 (the gradual work of temptation or tribulation); James 4:11 and Romans 2:1 ; Romans 14:4 (the critic self-condemned); James 1:21 , James 4:1 and Romans 7:23 ; Romans 13:12 ; and the contrast between James 2:21 and Romans 4:1 (the faith of Abraham). Both writers quote Genesis 15:6 , and deal with the case of Abraham as typical, but they draw from it apparently opposite conclusions St. James that a man is justified, as Abraham was, by works and not by faith alone; St. ) that the history of Abraham, and in particular Genesis 15:6 , figured frequently in Jewish theological discussions. Abraham is ‘our father’ ( James 2:21 ), and God bears the OT title ‘Lord of Sabaoth’ ( James 5:4 ) [3]
Heir Heritage Inheritance - ’ ‘If ye are Christ’s then are ye Abraham’s seed, heirs according to promise. ’ Or the sonship is deduced from the heirship; in Galatians 3:7 ‘they which be of faith’-who succeed, as heirs to Abraham’s faith [3]-‘the same are sons of Abraham. Acts 7:5, where it is meant that Abraham did not actually enter into possession; and Hebrews 11:3 f. , where Isaac and Jacob are fellow-heirs (συγκληρονόμοι) with Abraham; and Hebrews 12:17, where Esau failed to inherit the blessing. Abraham was promised that he should be ‘heir of the world’ (Romans 4:13)-a passage which has given some difficulty to commentators, as there is no such promise explicitly made in the OT; the reference is probably to Genesis 12:3; Genesis 22:18 and similar passages: in Abraham’s seed all the nations of the earth should be blessed; cf. ...
(d) In Jesus, Christians are Abraham’s heirs, whether of Jewish or Gentile stock (Romans 4:9 ff. They inherit Abraham’s faith, and are therefore his sons; the promise did not depend on Abraham’s circumcision, but was before it, though it was confirmed by it; nor was it dependent on the Law. Thus all nations are blessed in Abraham, and he is the heir of the world (see above (b))
Family Life And Relations - In its broadest definition, the household would also include its servants: Abraham had 318 who had been "born in his household" (Genesis 14:14 ). ...
Though every effort was expended to preserve the stability of the family, tensions existed, and the Bible makes no effort to conceal them (Abraham's quarrel with his nephew Lot, Genesis 13:5-8 ; Esau's hatred of Jacob, Genesis 27:41 ; and the favoritism shown Jacob by Rebekah, Genesis 25:28 ; 27:15-17 ). Sarah, for example, after urging Abraham to have sexual relations with Hagar to father a child, expels both the girl and her infant child over Abraham's protests (Genesis 21:9-13 ). ...
Rooted in the promise given to Abraham, and through him to his seed (Genesis 12:1-3,7 ), lay the assurance of an election, ever present and articulated in the covenant. Embracing the whole of the people of Israel (Genesis 15:5-21 ; 17:1-22 ), it was premised, not on the goodness of the people themselves, but on that of Abraham
Law - ...
God’s covenant with Israel...
In his grace God made a covenant with Abraham to make his descendants into a great nation and to give them Canaan as their national homeland (Genesis 17:1-8). Over the next four hundred years God directed the affairs of Abraham’s descendants so that their numbers increased and they became a distinct people. At Mt Sinai God confirmed the covenant made previously with Abraham, this time making it with Abraham’s descendants, the nation Israel (Exodus 24:7-8; see COVENANT). ...
God had chosen Israel to be his people, saved them from slavery in Egypt, and taken them into a close relationship with himself, all in fulfilment of his covenant promise made to Abraham. Abraham, David and Paul lived respectively before, during and after the period when the old covenant and its law-code operated in Israel, but all three alike were saved by faith (Genesis 15:6; Romans 3:28; Romans 4:1-16; Romans 4:22; Galatians 3:17-18; Ephesians 2:8; 1 Timothy 1:14-16)
Family - Of this a familiar illustration is the figure of Abraham, who was regarded as being in a very real sense the father of the nation. In addition to his concubines a man might take several wives, and from familiar examples in the OT it seems that it was usual for wealthy and important personages to do so; Abraham, Jacob, David, Solomon, occur as instances. Reasons are given in explanation of the bigamy of Abraham ( Genesis 16:1-16 ) and of Jacob ( Genesis 29:23 )
Moses - By the time of his death he had welded his people into a highly efficient military force that would occupy the land promised by God to Abraham (Genesis 12:7 ). ...
Moses is so strongly interwoven with the religious tradition involving God's plan for human salvation through Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and ultimately the Davidic Messiah, and attested to as an authoritative figure for Hebrew culture even in the New Testament period, that he could not possibly have been an invention or a fictional character used as an object of religious or social propaganda. God promises to provide for all their needs and give them the land promised long ago to Abraham if they, for their part, worship him as their one and only true God
Galatians, Epistle to the - Having begun in the Spirit, were they now to be made perfect by the flesh ? Faith was the principle on which Abraham, the head of promise and blessing, was reckoned righteous, and on which the Gentiles would, with believing Abraham, receive blessing, according to God's promise to him. Christ had borne the curse that Abraham's blessing might come on the Gentiles in Christ Jesus, and that through faith they might receive the promise of the Spirit. The law, given four hundred and thirty years after the promise, could not set the latter aside, which was made not only to Abraham, but to his Seed, even to Christ. In Christ distinctions between Jew and Gentile disappeared: all were one, and the Gentile believers being of Christ were Abraham's seed and heirs according to promise
Prophecy - And men are termed prophets, Abraham for example, Genesis 20:7, of whom it is nowhere recorded that they uttered a single prophecy in the sense of foretelling future events
Fear - Except the God of Abraham, and the fear of Isaac, had been with me
Shechem - Here Abraham pitched his tent and built his first altar in the Promised Land, and received the first divine promise (Genesis 12:6,7 )
Father - , Matthew 3:9 ; 23:30 ; 1 Corinthians 10:1 ; the patriarchs, 2 Peter 3:4 ; (c) one advanced in the knowledge of Christ, 1 John 2:13 ; (d) metaphorically, of the originator of a family or company of persons animated by the same spirit as himself, as of Abraham, Romans 4:11,12,16,17,18 , or of Satan, John 8:38,41,44 ; (e) of one who, as a preacher of the Gospel and a teacher, stands in a "father's" place, caring for his spiritual children, 1 Corinthians 4:15 (not the same as a mere title of honor, which the Lord prohibited, Matthew 23:9 ); (f) of the members of the Sanhedrin, as of those who exercised religious authority over others, Acts 7:2 ; 22:1 ; (g) of God in relation to those who have been born anew (John 1:12,13 ), and so are believers, Ephesians 2:18 ; 4:6 (cp
Kenites - The latter were of Midianite origin, sprung from Abraham and Keturah, occupying the region E
Oath - ...
Even God sometimes bound himself by an oath; for example, in his covenant promises to Abraham (Genesis 15:5-20; Genesis 22:16-17; Luke 1:68-73; Hebrews 6:13-14), to David (Psalms 89:34-36; Acts 2:30), to the messianic king (Psalms 110:4; Hebrews 7:15-22; Hebrews 7:28), and to his redeemed people (Hebrews 6:16-17)
Dispensations - ...
(3) The dispensation of Noah, like that of Adam, requiring, besides the duties of the light of nature, repentance for sin, faith in God's mercy, hope of the promised Savior, kept up by sacrifices; to which were added the prohibition to shed blood of man on penalty of death, and to eat animals' blood, and the permission to eat flesh (Genesis 9); extending from the flood to Abraham. ...
(4) The Abrahamic covenant of more explicit promise (Genesis 12; Genesis 15; Genesis 17; Genesis 22; Galatians 3), extending to the dispensation of...
(5) The law, which was parenthetically introduced to be the schoolmaster until Christ, the end of the promise and the law, should come
Hebron - Over the cave is now the mosque El Haran, from which all but Muslims are excluded jealously (though the Prince of Wales was admitted), and in which probably lie the remains of Abraham and Isaac, and possibly Jacob's embalmed body, brought up in state from Egypt (Genesis 50:13). Still there is an oak bearing Abraham's name, 23 ft
Mourning - It was an occasion of studied publicity and ceremonial; so Abraham for Sarah (Genesis 23:2), Jacob for Joseph (Genesis 37:34-35), Joseph and the Egyptians for Jacob 70 days and a further period of seven (Genesis 50:3-10), Israel for Aaron 80 days (Numbers 20:29), and for Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8)
Famine - ...
Famines are recorded in connexion with Abraham (Genesis 12:10 ) and Isaac ( Genesis 26:1 )
Grove - In Genesis 21:33 it is a different word, "Abraham planted a "grove" (eshowl ) in Beersheba," rather "a tamarisk tree," a hardy evergreen fitted to be a memorial to his posterity that the well was theirs
Peter - And yet we find, in the instance of Abraham and Jacob, the Lord when he changed their names seemed to express his pleasure in calling them by those names
Jehoshaphat - He turned to the Lord, proclaimed a fast, and prayed for help in the house of the Lord, where the Lord had set His name, pleading that He was their God, who had given the land to the seed of Abraham His friend, pleading also His response to the prayer of Solomon
Travail - Hagar gave birth to a child through the scheme and plan of Abraham
Shiloh (1) - "Abraham rejoiced to see Messiah's day, he saw it and was glad" (John 8:56); Jacob naturally expresses the same sure anticipation
Child - Hence Abraham, the great father the faithful, when the Lord promised, that he himself would be his shield, and his exceeding reward, said, Lord God, "what wilt thou give me seeing I go childless?" (Genesis 15:1-2) And the punishment the Lord appointed to unnatural alliances, was to bear their sins in dying childless
Hospitality - So in the case of Abraham, Genesis xviii, where he invites the angels who appeared in the form of men to rest and refreshment, "And he stood by them under the tree, and they did eat. "...
"So when angelic forms to Syria sent ...
Sat in the cedar shade, by Abraham's tent, A spacious bowl th' admiring patriarch fills ...
With dulcet water from the scanty rills; ...
Sweet fruits and kernels gathers from his hoard, With milk and butter piles the plenteous board; While on the heated hearth his consort bakes Fine flour well kneaded in unleavened cakes, ...
The guests ethereal quaff the lucid flood, Smile on their hosts, and taste terrestrial food; ...
And while from seraph lips sweet converse spring, They lave their feet, and close their silver wings
Foot - So Abraham washed the feet of the three angels, Genesis 18:4
Metals - The first commercial transaction of which we possess the details was the purchase of Ephron's field by Abraham for 400 shekels of silver
Repentance - ...
But the unconditional promises of God, as made to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, are not subject to repentance
Resurrection - Job may perhaps have learnt it (Job 19:25-27 ), and when the Lord rebuked the Sadducees He taught that resurrection could be gathered inferentially from God speaking of Himself as the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob long after they were dead
Priest - He was God’s representative to whom Abraham offered gifts, and the worshippers’ representative through whom Abraham drew near to God (Genesis 14:17-24)
Damascus - Abraham entering Canaan by way of Damascus there obtained Eliezer as his retainer. because of His covenant with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, neither east He them from His presence us yet" (2 Kings 13:23)
Gentiles - ...
In the apostolic preaching the promise to Abraham (Genesis 12:3 ; Genesis 18:18 ) found fulfillment (Galatians 3:8 ). Abraham has become the spiritual father of all nations (Romans 4:17 )
Land, Ground - God told Abraham that all the families of the inhabited earth would be blessed in him (Genesis 12:3 ). This is enigmatic: God did not tell Abraham how they would be blessed. God said the same thing to Jacob ( Genesis 28:14 ): Through what God did in Abraham's family, blessing would come to all families of the inhabited earth. All human families in the ground where they dwell determine their destiny in terms of what God did in Abraham's posterity—Christ
Temptation, Test - In particular, he tests those exercising a pivotal role in his purposes, such as Abraham (Genesis 22:1 ) and especially the people of Israel (Exodus 15:25 ; 16:4 ; Deuteronomy 8:2 ; 13:3 ). What is true in the private experiences of individuals is also true in the history of salvation in which the testing of Abraham (Genesis 22:1 ), Israel (Psalm 66:8-12 ), or Christ (Hebrews 2:17-18 ) contributed to the furtherance of God's saving purpose
Angel - They must have been the ones who came to visit Abraham and afterwards went to Sodom. They accepted the worship of Abraham and therefore they seemed to be two persons of the Trinity
Weights And Measures - The first recorded transaction in scripture is that of Abraham buying the field of Ephron the Hittite for four hundred shekels of silver, which Abraham 'weighed' to Ephron
Angels - "The angel of Jehovah" spake to Abraham saying, "By myself have I sworn," etc. Three 'men' drew near to Abraham's tent. One said Sarah should have a son: at which Sarah laughed, and Jehovah said, "Wherefore did Sarah laugh?" Two of the three left, and were called 'angels' at the gate of Sodom, while Jehovah, the third, talked with Abraham
Keep, Watch, Guard - God says of Abraham: “For I know him, that he will command his children and his household after him, and they shall keep the way of the Lord, to do justice and judgment …” ( Abraham obeyed my voice, and kept my charge, my commandments, my statutes, and my laws
Babel - It represents Shem as dying nearly a century and a half before the death of Peleg, instead of more than that number of years afterward, and almost four centuries and a half before the death of Abraham; whom, in accordance with the history, it makes to survive his father Terah precisely a hundred years. It explains also the silence respecting Shem in the history of Abraham, by making the former die in Armenia four hundred and forty years before the latter was born, instead of surviving him thirty-five years; and, lastly, it makes sacred history accord with profane; the Babylonic history of Berosus, and the old records consulted by Epiphanius, both placing the death of Noah and his sons before the emigration from Armenia
Wells And Springs - Thus we read that Abraham, in making a treaty with king Abimelech, "reproved him because of a well of water which Abimelich's servants had violently taken away," and the ownership of the well was sealed to Abraham by a special oath and covenant, Genesis 21:25-31
Philis'Tines - --The Philistines must have settled in the land of Canaan before the time of Abraham; for they are noticed in his day as a pastoral tribe in the neighborhood of Gerur. ( Genesis 21:32,34 ; 26:1,8 ) Between the times of Abraham and Joshua the Philistines had changed their quarters, and had advanced northward into the plain of Philistia
Pha'Raoh, - " As several kings are mentioned only by the title "Pharaoh" in the Bible, it is important to endeavor to discriminate them:
The Pharaoh of Abraham . The date at which Abraham visited Egypt was about B
Pharaoh - The Pharaoh of the time of Abraham. The date of Abraham's visit to Egypt is most probably fixed at about b
Altar - Mention is made of altars reared by Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Moses
Dispersion - The following table shows how the different families were dispersed: ...
| - Japheth | - Gomer | Cimmerians, Armenians | - Magog | Caucasians, Scythians | - Madal | Medes and Persian tribes | - Javan | - Elishah | Greeks | - Tarshish | Etruscans, Romans | - Chittim | Cyprians, Macedonians | - Dodanim | Rhodians | - Tubal | Tibareni, Tartars | - Mechech | Moschi, Muscovites | - Tiras | Thracians | | - Shem | - Elam | Persian tribes | - Asshur | Assyrian | - Arphaxad | - Abraham | - Isaac | - Jacob | Hebrews | - Esau | Edomites | - Ishmael | Mingled with Arab tribes | - Lud | Lydians | - Aram | Syrians | | - Ham | - Cush | Ethiopans | - Mizrain | Egyptians | - Phut | Lybians, Mauritanians | - Canaan | Canaanites, Phoenicians ...
Promise - ...
In Galatians 3:16 , the plural "promises" is used because the one "promise" to Abraham was variously repeated (Genesis 12:1-3 ; 13:14-17 ; 15:18 ; 17:1-14 ; 22:15-18 ), and because it contained the germ of all subsequent "promises;" cp
Famine And Drought - Drought caused famines in the time of Abraham (Genesis 12:10 ), Isaac (Genesis 26:1 ), Joseph (Genesis 41:27 ), and the judges (Ruth 1:1 )
Say, Speak, Answer - 22:2 Abraham is to offer Isaac on the “mountain of which” God “tells [1] him” (NASB)
Ur - (See Abraham
Mediator - ...
As His own representative He gives the blessing directly, without mediator such as the law had, first by promise to Abraham, then to Christ by actual fulfillment
Genealogies - ...
New Testament Matthew began his Gospel with a genealogy tracing Jesus' lineage from Abraham through David
Heredity - This is more especially emphasized in the unity of the race of Abraham, that ‘Israel after the flesh’ ( 1 Corinthians 10:18 ), whose were the fathers and the promises ( Romans 9:4-5 )
Anthropomorphism - God enters into an agreement (covenant) with Israel at Sinai (Exodus 19:5-6 ), an outgrowth of an earlier covenant he had made with Abraham (Genesis 17:1-18 )
Bethel - It was visited by Abraham, who sacrificed here ( Genesis 12:8 )
Servant, Service - ...
Many persons in the Old Testament are called "servants, " among them Abraham (Genesis 26:24 ), Jacob (Genesis 32:4 ), Joshua (Joshua 24:29 ), Ruth (Ruth 3:9 ), Hannah (1 Samuel 1:11 ), Samuel (1 Samuel 3:9 ), Jesse (Acts 53:7-8892 ), Uriah the Hittite (2 Samuel 11:21 ), Joab (2 Samuel 14:20 ), Isaiah (Isaiah 20:3 ), Daniel (Daniel 9:17 ), Ben-Hadad of Aram (1 Kings 20:32 ), and Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon (Jeremiah 25:9 )
Hades - In Luke 16:23 the rich man lifts up his eyes in Hades, being in torment, and sees Abraham afar off and Lazarus in his bosom. Enoch, 22), it is represented now as a scene of moral issues and contrasted experiences-the selfish rich man is ‘tormented in this flame’; the humble beggar is ‘comforted’ in Abraham’s bosom
Sinai - There are three divisions:...
(1) the southernmost, the neighbourhood of Sinai;...
(2) the desert of et Tih, the scene of Israel's wanderings;...
(3) the Νegeb , or "south country", the dwelling of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
Arabia - Most of these groups are linked with Abraham through his son Ishmael or through his second wife Keturah (Genesis 25:1 )
Hope - They all, like Abraham, saw "his day afar off," rejoiced and were glad; and, like him, amongst all the discouraging circumstances they had to encounter"against hope, they believed in hope
Covenant - Thus Abraham and Abimelech entered into covenant at Beersheba
Perfect - 4 where Paul argues that Abraham fulfilled God’s condition but that he did so only through faith
Fear - In this sense, the word may imply submission to a proper ethical relationship to God; the angel of the Lord told Abraham: “… I know that thou fearest God, seeing thou hast not withheld thy son, thine only son from me” ( Find - ” God told Abraham: “If I find in Sodom fifty righteous within the city, then I will spare all the place for their sakes” ( Circumcise - ...
The physical act of circumcision was introduced by God as a sign of the Abrahamic covenant: “This is my covenant with you and your descendants after you … Every male among you shall be circumcised. Not only were the physical descendants of Abraham “circumcised,” but also those who were servants, slaves, and foreigners in the covenant community ( Elder; Aged - 18:11: “Now Abraham and Sarah were old and well stricken in age; and it ceased to be with Sarah after the manner of women
Ear-Rings - This ornament was one of the presents which the servant of Abraham gave to Rebecca, in the name of his master: "I put," said he, "the ear-ring upon her face;" more literally, I put the ring on her nose
Only Begotten - 1: μονογενής (Strong's #3439 — Adjective — monogenes — mon-og-en-ace ) is used five times, all in the writings of the Apostle John, of Christ as the Son of God; it is translated "only begotten" in Hebrews 11:17 of the relationship of Isaac to Abraham
Tempt - ' But God tempted, or tried, Abraham, Hebrews 11:17 , and the Israelites tempted, or tried, God, 1 Corinthians 10:9
Damascus - Josephus says it was founded by Uz, a grandson of Shem; Abraham' visited it, Genesis 14:15; Genesis 15:2, A
Joseph - His genealogy is traced in Matthew 1:1-15 , to David, Judah, and Abraham
Pharaoh - Pharaoh, Genesis 12:15 , in the time of Abraham, B
Year - , Luke 3:1 (dates were frequently reckoned from the time when a monarch began to reign); in Galatians 3:17 the time of the giving of the Law is stated as 430 "years" after the covenant of promise given to Abraham; there is no real discrepancy between this and Exodus 12:40 ; the Apostle is not concerned with the exact duration of the interval; it certainly was not less than 430 "years;" the point of the argument is that the period was very considerable; Galatians 1:18 ; 2:1 mark events in Paul's life; as to the former the point is that three "years" elapsed before he saw any of the Apostles; in Galatians 2:1 the 14 "years" may date either from his conversion or from his visit to Peter mentioned in Galatians 1:18 ; the latter seems the more natural (for a full discussion of the subject see Notes on Galatians by Hogg and Vine, pp
Blessing - Probably the most striking example of a blessing carrying with it the power of certain fulfilment was God’s blessing to Abraham that promised him a people and a land (Genesis 12:1-3; Genesis 26:24)
Inheritance - The blessings of salvation promised to Abraham were fulfilled in Christ, and believers inherit these blessings through him (Galatians 3:14; Galatians 3:16; Galatians 3:29)
Egypt - It was in the time of the Hyksos that Abraham, Jacob, and Joseph entered Egypt. ...
Even in the time of Abraham, Egypt was a flourishing and settled monarchy. Abraham and Sarah went to Egypt in the time of the shepherd kings
Covenant - The covenant with Abraham ( Genesis 15:18 ; Genesis 17:2-21 ) was confirmed in its promise to Isaac and Jacob ( Exodus 2:24 , Leviticus 26:42 , Psalms 105:9 f. Yet the ancient covenant, even that with Abraham, was everlasting ( Genesis 17:7 ), and still stands in its supreme purpose ( Leviticus 26:44 f. ) in the course from Abraham to Christ
Assyria - Abraham came from Ur Kasdim (Ur of the Chaldees), according to Genesis 11:28; Genesis 11:31; Genesis 15:7; Nehemiah 9:7. " After Abraham, for nearly 1200 years, we have no record of the contact of Hebrews with Assyrian or Babylonian peoples. The recent explorations have brought to light immense libraries illustrating the habits and life of a cultured people, recording their history on clay tablets, 2000 years before Abraham
Scripture, Unity And Diversity of - Abraham is still a father model for those who believe when Romans and Galatians are read. From Abraham to Paul, salvation is by faith and faith alone. From Abraham to James, righteousness by faith is functional (a point also noted by Paul in Ephesians 2:10 ; Titus 3:3-8 ). Covenant forms are presented to Adam, Noah, Abraham, and Moses; then the promise of a new covenant appears in the prophets
Micah - The third division is the appeal based on the foregoing, and the elect church's anticipation of God's finally forgiving His people's sin completely, and restoring Israel because of the covenant with Jacob and Abraham of old. Zacharias (Luke 1:72-73) reproduces the closing anticipation (Micah 7:16-20), "Thou wilt perform the truth to Jacob and the mercy to Abraham which Thou hast sworn unto our fathers from the days of old
Romans, Letter to the - ...
Abraham was justified by faith; his salvation had nothing to do with good works, law-keeping or rituals. Abraham might therefore be called the spiritual father of all who believe (4:1-25)
Earth, Land - God promised Abraham that He would establish His covenant with Abraham and with his descendants as an everlasting covenant; all the “land of Canaan” was to be for an everlasting possession (1618449090_85 )
Gospels, the - The gospel opens with "The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the Son of David, the son of Abraham. " And the genealogy goes no further than Abraham, whereas in Luke it ascends to Adam, agreeing with the scope of that gospel
Names of God - God used it to make His Covenant with Abraham ( Genesis 17:1-2 ). Melchizadek was a priest of El-Elyon and blessed Abraham in this name (Genesis 14:19-20 ), refering to El-Elyon as “Maker of heaven and earth. This was the name given to the location where God provided a ram for Abraham to sacrifice in the place of Isaac
Shepherds - Rebecca, the only daughter of a shepherd prince, went to a considerable distance to draw water; and it is evident from the readiness and address with which she let down her pitcher from her shoulder, and gave drink to the servant of Abraham, and afterward drew for all his camels, that she had been long accustomed to that humble employment. So great was the stock of Abraham and Lot, that they were obliged to separate, because "the land was not able to bear them. In the house of Abraham, this honourable station was held by Eliezer, a native of Damascus, a servant in every respect worthy of so great and good a master
Matthew, the Gospel According to - The genealogy was necessary in a Gospel for Jews, to show that Jesus' claim to Messiahship accorded with His descent through king David from Abraham, to both of whom the promise of Messiah was given; while its insertion is proof of early date. ...
Mere Judaic privileges will not avail, for unbelief shall cast the children of the kingdom into outer darkness, while the saved shall come from every quarter to sit down with Abraham through faith (Matthew 8:10-12). ...
Christ's genealogy from Abraham to Joseph through the male line; the succession to the throne, from Abraham through king David to Joseph, 42 generations, with omissions. Leviticus 19:17 tell him his fault" Matthew 19:4 "He which made them at the beginning Genesis 1:27 made male and female" Matthew 19:5 "For this cause shall a man leave his father" Genesis 2:24 Matthew 19:7 "Divorcement" Deuteronomy 24:1 Matthew 19:18 "Do no murder" Exodus 20:13 Matthew 21:5 "Behold, thy King cometh" Zechariah 9:9 Matthew 21:9 "Blessed is he that cometh in the Hosea 6:6 name of the Lord, Hosanna"...
Matthew 21:13 "My house the house of prayer" Isaiah 56:7 Matthew 21:16 "Out of the mouth of babes" Psalms 8:2 Matthew 21:42 "The stone which the builders rejected" Psalms 118:22-23 Matthew 21:44 "Whosoever shall fall on this stone Isaiah 8:14 shall be broken" Matthew 22:24 "Moses said, If a man die" Deuteronomy 25:5 Matthew 22:32 "I am the God of Abraham" Exodus 3:6 Matthew 22:37 "Thou shalt love the Lord" Deuteronomy 6:5 Matthew 22:39 "Thou shalt love thy neighbor" Leviticus 19:18 Matthew 22:45 "Sit thou on My right hand" Psalms 110:1 Matthew 23:35 "Blood of Abel" Genesis 4:8 Matthew 23:38 "Your house is left desolate" Psalms 69:25 Matthew 23:39 "Blessed is he that cometh in the Psalms 118:26 name of the Lord"...
Matthew 24:15 "The abomination of desolation" Daniel 9:27 Matthew 24:29 "Sun
Faith - Paul founded his doctrine of justification by faith (see Romans 4:9 ; Romans 4:22 , Galatians 3:6 ; also James 2:23 ); ‘and Abraham believed Jehovah, and he counted it to him for righteousness’ (JE House - ...
Abraham left Mesopotamia where he lived in houses made of mud brick (compare Genesis 11:3 ) and became a tent dweller (Hebrews 11:9 )
Grief And Mourning - So we are told of the mourning of Abraham for Sarah (Genesis 23:2 )
Command, Commandment - Abraham in essence kept God's "commands, decrees, and laws" (Genesis 26:5 ) even before these had been revealed through Moses, presumably via living by faith
Righteousness - Because Abraham accepted the Word of God, making it his own by that act of the mind and spirit which is called faith, and, as the sequel showed, submitting himself to its control, therefore God accepted him as one who fulfilled the whole of His requirements, Romans 4:3
Elam - Abraham fought Chedorlaomer, king of Elam, to secure the return of Lot and others (Genesis 14:1 )
Zacharias - Then followed his song of thanksgiving under the Holy Spirit, as Israel shall sing when turned to the Lord according to "the oath which He sware to our father Abraham," etc
Arise - It may denote any movement to an erect position, such as getting up out of a bed (Genesis 19:33), or it can be used as the opposite of sitting or kneeling, as when Abraham "stood up from before his dead" ( Genesis 23:3)
Faith - " Abraham believed, and was justified before God on the ground of believing (Genesis 15:6)
Witness - ...
The witness which God vouchsafed of Himself to Abraham was that He was 'THE ALMIGHTY GOD'; to Moses it was 'I AM THAT I AM'; and to Israel, 'JEHOVAH
Elders - When Moses was sent into Egypt to deliver Israel, he assembled the elders of Israel, and told them that the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, had appeared to him, Exodus 3:15 ; Exodus 4:29 , &c
Rephidim - " On their way to Rephidim, the Amalekites, the original inhabitants of the country, who are noticed in Abraham's days, Genesis 14:7 , not having the fear of God before their eyes, nor regarding the judgments recently inflicted on the Egyptians, attacked the rear of the Israelites when they were faint and weary; but were defeated by a chosen party, under the command of Joshua, the faithful lieutenant of Moses, who is first noticed on this occasion, and even then pointed out by the Lord as his successor. While the Israelites were encamped at Rephidim, on the western side of Horeb, the mount of God, Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses, who lived in that neighbourhood, and was priest and prince of Midian, came to visit him, with his wife Zipporah, and his two sons, Eleazar and Gershom, who had accompanied him part of the way to Egypt, but returned home again; and they rejoiced with him "for all the goodness which the Lord had done for Israel, whom he had delivered out of the hand of the Egyptians;" and upon this occasion, Jethro, as "a priest of the most high God," of the order of Melchizedek, "offered a burnt-offering and sacrifices of thanksgiving to God, at which Aaron and all the elders of Israel ate bread with Jethro before God," by a repetition of the eucharistic feast upon a sacrifice which Melchizedek formerly administered to Abraham, Genesis 14:18 ; Exodus 18:1-12
Fire - When the Lord made a covenant with Abraham, a fire like that of a furnace passed through the divided pieces of the sacrifices, and consumed them, Genesis 15:17
Circumcision, Uncircumcision, Circumcise - , "a cutting round, circumcision" (the verb is peritemno), was a rite enjoined by God upon Abraham and his male descendants and dependents, as a sign of the covenant made with him, Genesis 17 ; Acts 7:8 ; Romans 4:11
Mark, Gospel of - Matthew as the Messiah, "the son of David and Abraham," Tent - The patriarchs Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob dwelt in tents, Genesis 18:1 Hebrews 11:9 ; and on the exodus of the Israelites from Egypt, throughout their peregrinations until they obtained the promised land, and to some extent afterwards, they adopted the same kind of habitation
Paronomasia - There may therefore be a, paronomasia here: ‘God can from these stones (אֲבָנִים ’ăbânîm) raise up children (בָּנִים bânîm) to Abraham
Romans, Theology of - ...
Paul now proceeds to show the continuity between the old and the new by citing Abraham as a primary example of the person of faith and humility (4:1-25), making the point that the faith principle was operating before Abraham became technically a Jew by circumcision. The Abraham of faith is therefore to be seen as the father of both Gentile and Jew—of the Jew because David personifies the grace and faith principle operative in the Mosaic period (vv. 6-8), and of the Gentile because Abraham was a Gentile before he was circumcised (vv. Though different typologies were operative during the Abrahamic and Mosaic periods, and though Christ is the superior typology in this age because he embodies the old in himself as the new, the nature of God and salvation remain essentially the same. ...
The Old Testament example of Abraham is complemented in 5:1-21 with a fuller comparison of two principial personalities, Adam I and Adam II. While Abraham functions as a secondary figure as patriarch of righteousness by faith for Gentile and Jewish believers, Adam and Christ represent archetypal progenitors of the human race where works are the primary focus
Abel - " Thus he argues that Abraham believed God, "and it was accounted to him for righteousness,"—"that faith was reckoned to Abraham for righteousness,"—"that he received the sign of circumcision, a seal," a visible confirmatory, declaratory, and witnessing mark "of the righteousness which he had by faith. In both, sinful men are placed in the condition of righteous men; the instrument in both cases, is ...
faith; and the transaction is, in both cases also, publicly and sensibly witnessed, —as to Abraham, by the sign of circumcision; as to Abel, by a visible acceptance of his sacrifice, and the rejection of that of Cain. When Abraham went into Canaan at the command of God, and upon the promise that that country should become the inheritance of his descendants, he showed his faith by taking possession of it for them in anticipation, and his residence there indicated the kind of promise which he had received
Jacob - Life had to include wrestling with God and assuming responsibility as the heir of God's promises to Abraham (Genesis 28:10-22 ). He was finally laid to rest at Hebron in the cave Abraham had purchased (Genesis 50:12-14 ). He received instruction from Isaac concerning the history of Abraham, covenant, and the great promises
Arabia - ...
The posterity of Nahor, of Abraham and Keturah (Genesis 25), of Lot also, formed a part of the population, namely, in Arabia Deserta. His dwelling in the presence of his brethren implies that Ishmael would maintain an independent nationality before all Abraham's descendants. ...
The Kaaba or Square was built by Seth, destroyed by the flood, and rebuilt by Abraham and Ishmael
Money - The "thousand pieces of silver" which Abimelech gave Abraham (Genesis 20:16) were of this kind; so the 400 shekels "weighed" by Abraham to Ephron (Exodus 30:12-1366; Genesis 23:9; Genesis 23:16), "current (money) with the merchant"; implying that the silver was in some conventional shapes, with a rude sign to mark its weight
Tomb - --One of the most striking events in the life of Abraham is the purchase of the field of Ephron the Hittite at Hebron, in which was the cave of Machpelah, in order that he might therein bury Sarah his wife, and that it might be a sepulchre for himself and his children. From the time when Abraham established the burying-place of his family at Hebron till the time when David fixed that of his family in the city which bore his name, the Jewish rulers-had no fixed or favorite place of sepulture
Zacharias - ...
Zacharias had not the faith of Abraham, who staggered not through unbelief (Romans 4:19) at a promise of God exactly similar, ‘involving human generation, but prophetically announced and supernatural’ (Alford). Here we need only note in it an evident allusion to his own name (signifying ‘Remembered by Jehovah’) and his wife’s (Elisabeth = Eli-sheba = ‘the oath of God’)—‘to remember his holy covenant; the oath which he sware to our father Abraham’ (Luke 1:72-73)
Love - Abraham loves Isaac, the son of his old age, the child of God's promise. For the sake of the love of God, Abraham is willing to sacrifice the son he loves
Head, Headship - Yet Abraham also listened to her (Genesis 16:2 ). In Genesis 21:12 God tells Abraham to "listen to whatever Sarah tells you" (about Ishmael)
Statute, Ordinance - ...
Chûqqâh is found for the first time in God’s words of commendation about Abraham to Isaac: “Because that Abraham obeyed my voice, and kept my charge, my commandments [2]0, my statutes [10], and my laws [5]” ( New France - From the beginning New France was engaged in almost incessant warfare with the English colonies and their Iroquois allies, but notwithstanding her vast and sparsely populated territory she repelled the invader until, abandoned to her fate by the motherland at the instigation of Voltaire and other malignant or short-sighted publicists, she lost her last fight under the gallant Montcalm on the Plains of Abraham, Quebec, September 14, 1659
Laban (2) - ) Bethuel's son; grandson of Nahor, Abraham's brother (Genesis 28:5; Genesis 29:5). ...
When Abraham emigrated to Canaan the part of the family to which Laban belonged remained in Haran (Genesis 27:43; Genesis 29:1 ff)
Seal - A — 1: σφραγίς (Strong's #4973 — Noun Feminine — sphragis — sfrag-ece' ) denotes (a) "a seal" or "signet," Revelation 7:2 , "the seal of the living God," an emblem of ownership and security, here combined with that of destination (as in Ezekiel 9:4 ), the persons to be "sealed" being secured from destruction and marked for reward; (b) "the impression" of a "seal" or signet, (1) literal, a "seal" on a book or roll, combining with the ideas of security and destination those of secrecy and postponement of disclosures, Revelation 5:1,2,5,9 ; 6:1,3,5,7,9,12 ; 8:1 ; (2) metaphorical, Romans 4:11 , said of "circumcision," as an authentication of the righteousness of Abraham's faith, and an external attestation of the covenant made with him by God; the rabbis called circumcision "the seal of Abraham;" in 1 Corinthians 9:2 , of converts as a "seal" or authentication of Paul's Apostleship; in 2 Timothy 2:19 , "the firm foundation of God standeth, having this seal, The Lord knoweth them that are His," RV, indicating ownership, authentication, security and destination, "and, Let every one that nameth the Name of the Lord depart from unrighteousness," indicating a ratification on the part of the believer of the determining counsel of God concerning him; Revelation 9:4 distinguishes those who will be found without the "seal" of God on their foreheads Hospitality - We have many striking examples of hospitality on divine record: Abraham, Genesis 18:1 ; Genesis 18:8
Euphrates - ) The bound to which God promised the land given to Abraham's seed should extend. ...
The promise to Abraham that his seed's inheritance should reach the Euphrates (Genesis 15:18; Deuteronomy 1:7; Joshua 1:4) received a very partial fulfillment in Reuben's pastoral possessions (1 Chronicles 5:9-10) (the Hagarites here encountered them, the inscriptions confirming scripture as to their appearance upon the middle Euphrates in the later empire); a fuller accomplishment under David and Solomon, when an annual tribute was paid from subject petty kingdoms in that quarter, as Hadadezer king of Zobah, etc
Prophet - Thus Enoch, Abraham, and the patriarchs, as bearers of God's message (Genesis 20:7 ; Exodus 7:1 ; Psalm 105:15 ), as also Moses (Deuteronomy 18:15 ; 34:10 ; Hosea 12:13 ), are ranked among the prophets
High Places - The three altars built by Abraham at Shechem, between Bethel and Ai, and at Mamre, were on heights
Lie, Lying - The lying selfishness of Cain, and the reprehensible deception practised by Abraham, are recorded by the historian in a tone which reveals his attitude towards such acts ( Genesis 4:9 ; Genesis 20:2-16 ; Genesis 12:11-20 ; cf
Burial - It was desirable to be buried in the family tomb, so Sarah (Genesis 23:19 ), Abraham (Genesis 25:9 ), Isaac, Rebekah, Leah (Genesis 49:31 ) and Jacob (Genesis 50:13 ) were all buried in the cave of Machpelah, east of Hebron
Hand, Right Hand - Placing the hand under the patriarch's thigh forms part of the oath that his servant makes to Abraham (Genesis 24:2,9 )
Intermediate State - Because God says, "I am the God of Abraham, Israel and Jacob, " they are not dead, but living. " None of this tells us what the interim body is like, but it does tell us that a conscious existence, morally continuous with this life awaits us—Paradise or Abraham's bosom for the righteous, torment for those who reject God's offer of mercy. Elwell...
See also Abraham's Bosom ; Paradise ; Resurrection ; Sheol ...
Bibliography
Priest - Thus Cain and Abel, Noah, Abraham, Melchizedec, Job, Isaac, and Jacob, offered themselves their own sacrifices
Oath - "Shaba," from sheba' "seven" the sacred number, is the general word "swear"; compare the seven ewe lambs given by Abraham to Abimelech in covenanting (Genesis 21:30)
Gomorrah - Combining with an earthquake, the storm cast showers of ignited bitumen on the cities, so that "the smoke of the country" was "as the smoke of a furnace," as beheld by Abraham
Redeemer - Thus when Abraham made a purchase of a burying-place from the sons of Heth, it is said that he weighed and gave "four hundred shekels of silver, current money of the merchant
Exodus, the - That might have satisfied their poor craven hearts,but it would not satisfy God, nor be according to His promise to Abraham,Isaac, and Jacob
Tithes - Abraham gave tithes of the spoils to Melchizedek, and Jacob vowed that he would give to God the tenth of all that God might give to him
Idolatry - The first was a venerable antiquity, more ancient than the Jewish religion; and idolaters might have said to the Israelites, Where was your religion before Moses and Abraham? Go, and enquire in Chaldes, and there you will find that your fathers served other gods. Abraham's father's family served other gods beyond the river Euphrates; and Laban had idols which Rachel brought along with her
Esau - The repentance of Esau is wholly concerning earthly possessions, and not a word spoken about the covenant blessing given to Abraham concerning the rejection of Esau's repentance is the rejection of his earthly father Isaac, and hath nothing to do with the rejection of the Lord
Amos, Book of - Hosea's prophecy is confined to the sins of Judah and Israel, whereas Amos tells of the judgements that should fall upon some of the surroundingnations that had molested Israel, especially upon those that retained any part of the land that had been promised to Abraham; and then he recounts the sins, not only of Judah to which he himself belonged, but also of Israel, indeed there is more concerning the latter than the former
Age - The second age, from the deluge to Abraham's entering the land of promise, A. The third age, from Abraham's entrance into the promised land to the Exodus, A. From this confusion to the calling of Abraham, 460 years
Japheth - Abraham was named the first of Terah's sons, "not from primogeniture, but from preeminence," as the father of the faithful, and the illustrious ancestor of the Israelites, and of the Jews, whose "seed was Christ," according to the flesh; with whose history the Old Testament properly commences: "Now these are the generations of Terah," &c, Genesis 11:27 ; all the preceding parts of Genesis being only introductory to this
Prince - nâsî ’, ‘one lifted up,’ is applied to chiefs of tribes, princes of Ishmael ( Genesis 17:20 ), to Abraham ( Genesis 23:6 ), to Shechem ( Genesis 34:2 ), to Sheshbazzar ( Ezra 1:8 )
Gen'Esis - It is a part of the writer's plan to tell us what the divine preparation of the world was in order to show, first, the significance of the call of Abraham, and next, the true nature of the Jewish theocracy
Family - Beyond the household was the larger clan, the tribe, and the nation which were descendants of Abraham, the origin of the people of Israel. Abraham, Jacob, and David were all husbands of more than one wife, and they also had concubines which were recognized as a lower status than a wife. Abraham had the power to sacrifice his son (Genesis 22:1 )
Death - This belief is expressed in the Genesis 25:8 report of Abraham's death. Abraham survived after a fashion with and in the vicinity of his ancestors because he was buried in the family grave ( Genesis 15:15 ; Romans 6:5-113 ; Judges 8:32 ). Especially when life was long and blessed (Abraham, Genesis 25:8 ; David, 1 Chronicles 29:28 ), the Israelites accepted death with some degree of grace
Palestine - It is also called "the holy land" (Zechariah 2:12 ), the "land of Jehovah" (Hosea 9:3 ; Psalm 85:1 ), the "land of promise" (Hebrews 11:9 ), because promised to Abraham (Genesis 12:7 ; 24:7 ), the "land of Canaan" (Genesis 12:5 ), the "land of Israel" (1 Samuel 13:19 ), and the "land of Judah" (Isaiah 19:17 ). ...
The territory promised as an inheritance to the seed of Abraham (Genesis 15:18-21 ; Numbers 34:1-12 ) was bounded on the east by the river Euphrates, on the west by the Mediterranean, on the north by the "entrance of Hamath," and on the south by the "river of Egypt
Pseudepigrapha - It traces Jewish history from the time of Abraham to the building of the second Temple. In the Book of Jubilees, Abraham was the ideal righteous man
Servant of the Lord - Individuals such as Abraham (Genesis 26:24 ), Moses (Exodus 14:31 ; Deuteronomy 34:5 ), David (2 Samuel 7:5,8 ), and Isaiah (20:3) were called God's "servants" as they obediently walked with the Lord. In 41:8-9 the servant is called "Israel" or "Jacob, " the "descendants of Abraham my friend
Nahum, Theology of - And do not think you can say to yourselves, We have Abraham as our father. ' I tell you that out of these stones God can raise up children for Abraham
Remember, Remembrance - "I will remember my covenant with Jacob and my covenant with Abraham" (Leviticus 26:42 ). Further, in the parable of the rich man and Lazarus, Abraham says to the rich man "Remember that in your lifetime you received your good things" (Luke 16:25 )
Matthew, Gospel by - In this gospel Christ is more especially presented as the Messiah, the son of Abraham, and son of David. The genealogy here starts with Abraham, in contrast with that in Luke, which goes back to Adam because in that gospel the Lord is viewed as connected with man, i
Joshua, Book of - Israel had a title to all that was promised to Abraham, but they would possess that whereon the soles of their feet trod, and thus it would become theirs. " In one sense they had taken all from north to south, so that they could divide the land among the tribes; but all their enemies were not destroyed, and they did not really possess all the land promised unto Abraham
Priest - The patriarchs—Noah, Abraham, and others—officiated as priests of their households
Gate - One instance of these judgments appears in that given at the gate of Bethlehem, between Boaz and a relation of Naomi, on the subject of Ruth, Ruth 4:2 ; another in Abraham's purchase of a field to bury Sarah, Genesis 23:10 ; Genesis 23:18 . God promises Abraham that his posterity shall possess the gates of their enemies, their towns, their fortresses, Genesis 22:17
Altar - Altars were erected by Abraham (Genesis 12:7 ; 13:4 ; 22:9 ), by Isaac (Genesis 26:25 ), by Jacob (33:20; 35:1,3), and by Moses (Exodus 17:15 , "Jehovah-nissi")
Meat - In Psalms 111:5, "He hath given meat (tereph ) unto them that fear Him," literally, spoil such as Israel brought out of Egypt (Exodus 12:36), and which God had covenanted to Abraham, Genesis 15:14 (Kimchi)
Saints - ...
Thus, although Gentile Christians are saints, too, because they were given access to the faith of Abraham and the people of the Old Testament, when redemptive history is discussed the Jews are specially designated the "saints" while the Gentiles are considered believers who were later admitted into this "holy" Jewish nucleus
Archangel - (Genesis 48:16) So that both the angel of the covenant and the archangel are one and the same; and both spoken of in the nature of the office and character of Christ, for Christ "took not on him the nature of angels, but the seed of Abraham
Watch - ...
This word often refers to divine obligation or service in general, a non-cultic obligation: “Because that Abraham obeyed my voice, and kept my charge, my commandments, my statutes, and my laws” ( Eat - There is one case in which God literally “consumed” food—when He appeared to Abraham in the form of three “strangers” ( Passover - The paschal lamb therefore prefigured the offering of the spotless Son of God, the appointed propitiation for the sins of the whole world; by virtue of which, when received by faith, we are delivered from the bondage of guilt and misery; and nourished with strength for our heavenly journey to that land of rest, of which Canaan, as early as the days of Abraham, became the divinely instituted figure
Sacrifice - ...
THE SACRIFICING MINISTER ...
Under the law of nature, there were private sacrifices (Abel; Abraham) for which no special authorization was needed on the part of the community
Hospitality - " This reminds us of the guests of Abraham, Genesis 18:1-33 , of the conduct of Job, Job 31:17 , and of the frankness with which the apostles of Christ were to enter into a man's house after a salutation, and there to continue "eating and drinking such things as were set before them," Luke 10:7
Captivity - Both Judah and Israel being removed from "the lot of their inheritance" in Canaan, and dispersed among strangers, the various tribes would naturally amalgamate with each other, the envy of Judah and Ephraim would depart, and the memory of Abraham, Moses, and David would revive, Ezra 6:16,17 8:35 Ezekiel 37:26-28
Obed-Edom - In receiving the ark into his house, into his family, and among his people, he did, to all intents and purposes, receive Christ into his heart, and like the faithful descendant of the faithful Abraham, "saw the day of Christ afar off, rejoiced, and was glad
Leviticus - ...
Features of the book...
God had brought the people of Israel out of Egypt and set them on their way to Canaan, all according to the covenant promises he had given to Abraham
Education in Bible Times - The aim or purpose of Old Testament education is encapsulated within the revelation given to Abraham concerning the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah. Here God bids Abraham to direct his children in "the way of the Lord. For example, the details of Yahweh's covenant with Abraham fills but three chapters in Genesis (12,15, 17). Ironically, this was the intended educational outcome of that original mandate for instruction in the way of the Lord given to Abraham (Genesis 18:19 ). Wilson, Our Father Abraham ; R
Righteousness - Abraham, says Paul, was himself justified by faith alone (Genesis 12:3 ; 15:6 ; 18:18 ; Romans 4:3 ; Galatians 3:8 ). ...
A faith without works is said by James to be a dead faith, and Abraham is presented as being justified by his works because he was prepared to sacrifice his beloved son. For James, faith comes to completion in practical works and it was this completed faith of Abraham, says James, which was reckoned to him for righteousness (Genesis 15:6 ; James 2:23 )
Galatians, Theology of - These teachers argued that Gentile Christians, if they wanted to share in Abraham's blessing, must be circumcised and submit themselves to the Old Testament Law. If the Galatians really want to share in the Abrahamic inheritanceif they really want to be regarded as Abraham's childrenthey must live by faith as Abraham did (3:6-7,29). Perhaps the Judaizers claimed that Paul created a contradition between the Abrahamic promise and the Mosic Law. When God gave the Law four centuries after Abraham, he could not have intended that Law to alter the promise. It is union with Christ by faith that makes us not merely children of Abraham, but also children of God
Joy (2) - It occurs in the reported controversy of our Lord with the Jews, where He tells them, ‘Your father Abraham rejoiced (ἠγαλλιάσατο) to see my day: and he saw it, and was glad’ (ἐχάρη). The force of the Greek implies that Abraham ‘exulted that he should see,’ that is, presumably, in the promises that were made to him, while the actual seeing of it, of which the Lord speaks, is possibly an assertion of Abraham’s living with God, as in Christ’s similar use of the text, ‘I am the God of Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob,’ to prove the reality of the doctrine of the resurrection
Session - Chama, In the time to come the Holy One, Blessed be He, causes the King Messiah to sit at His right hand, according as it is said, “The utterance of Jehovah to my Lord, Sit Thou on My right hand,” and Abraham on His left. And the face of Abraham grows pale, and he says, “The son of my son sits on the right hand, but I on the left”; and the Holy One, Blessed be He, appeases him, and says, “The son of thy son is at My right hand, but I am at thy right hand”: and this is implied by (ביכול), “Jehovah upon thy right hand. ” ’ Later Jewish writers seek to explain the words as referring to Abraham (Rashi), David (Aben Ezra, Mendelssohn), Hezekiah, or Zerubbabel, with regard to which interpretations see Jennings and Lowe, op
Sepulchre - Abraham, for example, buried Sarah in the cave of Machpelah (Genesis 23:9; Genesis 23:17). ...
(2) Acts 7:16, ‘And they [2] were carried over unto Shechem, and laid in the tomb (ἐν τῷ μνήματι) that Abraham bought for a price in silver of the sons of Hamor in Shechem. On the other hand, the Ḥarâm, or sacred area, which encloses the Cave of Machpelah in Hebron marks the place where Abraham and Sarah, Isaac and Rebekah, Jacob and Leah were buried
Paul in Arabia - And, again, no sooner does God speak in covenant to Abraham about his seed, than Paul immediately annotates that He saith not to seeds as of many, but as of One, which is Christ. But, on all that Moses ever wrote, there was nothing that Paul spent so much time and strength, as just on this concerning the father of the faithful,-that Abraham believed in the Lord, and it was counted to him for righteousness. Now, said Paul, reasoning to himself over that revelation, and then reasoning to us,-Now it was not written for Abraham's sake only, that it was imputed to him, but for our sakes also, to whom it shall be imputed, if we believe on Him who raised up Jesus our Lord from the dead; who was delivered for our offences, and was raised again for our justification. So did Paul discover the Son of God in Arabia: so did Paul have the Son of God revealed to him in Adam, and in Abraham, and in Moses, and in David, and in Isaiah, but, best of all, in Paul himself
Fall of Man - The creation of the world, of man, of woman; the planting of the garden of Eden, and the placing of man there; the duties and prohibitions laid upon him; his disobedience; his expulsion from the garden; the subsequent birth of his children, their lives, and actions, and those of their posterity, down to the flood; and, from that event, to the life of Abraham, are given in the same plain and unadorned narrative; brief, but yet simple; and with no intimation at all, either from the elevation of the style or otherwise, that a fable or allegory is in any part introduced. As this, then, is the case, and the evidence of it lies upon the very face of the history, it is, clear, that if the account of the fall be excerpted from the whole narrative as allegorical, any subsequent part, from Abel to Noah, from Noah to Abraham, from Abraham to Moses, may be excerpted for the same reason, which reason is merely this, that it does not agree with the theological opinions of the interpreter; and thus the whole of the Pentateuch may be rejected history, and converted into fable
Number Systems And Number Symbolism - For example, the Hebrew letters of the name Eliezer, Abraham's servant, have a numerical value of 318. When Gensis Acts 14:14 states that Abraham took 318 trained men to pursue the kings from the east, some Jewish commentaries interpret this to mean that Abraham had but one helper, Eliezer, since Eliezer has the numerical value of 318
Election - Thus the descendants of Abraham, the Jews, were chosen to receive special revelations of truth; and to be "the people of God," that is, his visible church, publicly to observe and uphold his worship. Some embraced it, and submitted to be the elect people of God, on the new ground of faith, instead of the old one of natural descent; and therefore the Apostle, Romans 11:7 , calls the believing part of the Jews, "the election," in opposition to those who opposed this "election of grace," and still clung to their former and now repealed election as Jews and the descendants of Abraham; "But the election hath obtained it, and the rest were blinded
Temptation - ]'>[1] ‘God did prove Abraham
Seal - ...
Paul described Abraham's circumcision as a seal, or guarantee, that Abraham was reckoned righteous by God (Romans 4:11 )
Descent Into Hell (Hades) - And the author of Hebrews (2:14-16) declared that just as Jesus shared fully in the humanity of Abraham's seed, so also he shared the entire experience of death, by which he destroyed the power of Satan. the bosom of Abraham, Luke 16:22-23 )
Doubt - ...
Abraham, as a positive example, is said not to have wavered" through unbelief [1] regarding the promise of God, but was strengthened in his faith" (Romans 4:20 )
Tithes - Abraham, on gaining a notable victory in the land God had promised him, offered to God a tithe of the goods he had seized in battle (Genesis 14:17-24; Hebrews 7:4-10)
Dispensation - Promise (Genesis 12:1 ) This is the new covenant made with Abraham
Blessedness - Abraham (Genesis 12:1-3 ) and Peter (Matthew 16:17 ) are blessed because they stand at the head of God's people in each Testament and are channels of God's blessedness to others
Pharisees - A resurrection was the privilege of the children of Abraham alone, who were all to rise on Mount Zion; their incorruptible bones, wherever they might be buried, being carried to that mountain below the surface of the earth
Church - "The promise [1] is unto you, and to your children" (Acts 2:38,39 )
Obedience - ...
The obedience of Abraham is perhaps most exemplary in the Old Testament. Abraham's obedience results in his being elected a chosen one for a special role in God's salvation-plan for humankind
Pillar - The manifestation made on both occasions as the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, plainly shows that the covenant of redemption, in the seed of the woman, was the great and leading cause of all
Turtle - ...
In the law, we find many offerings appointed of the turtle; and before the law, Abraham was directed to the use of, the turtle in sacrifice, by the Lord himself
Wicked - Râshâ‛, which is found about 30 times, usually means “wickedness”: “Remember thy servants, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob; look not unto the stubborness of this people, nor to their wickedness, nor to their sin” ( Pass Over - The word can also be used of “passing by” something; Abraham begged the three men not “to pass by” him but to stop and refresh themselves ( Remove, Depart - 13:6 says the land could not support, or provide enough sustenance for, Abraham’s and Lot’s parties. 18:24 Abraham pleads with God to spare Sodom and Gomorrah and to bear away the sin of the place
Speak - 18:5 one of the three men “spoke” to Abraham
Send - Shâlach can also mean to give someone a send off, or “to send” someone on his way in a friendly manner: “… And Abraham went with them to bring them on the way [1]” ( Father - 28:13: “I am the Lord God of Abraham thy [1]father, and the God of Isaac
Luke, Gospel of - Unconditional promises to Abraham, etc
Micah, Book of - He has confidence that God will perform the truth to Jacob, and the mercy to Abraham, which He had sworn to their fathers from the days of old
Damascus - One of the oldest cities in the world, being mentioned as a known city in the days of Abraham
Joshua - Having accomplished that arduous enterprise, and settled the chosen tribes in the peaceable possession of their inheritance, he retired to Shechem, or, according to some Greek copies, to Shiloh; where he assembled the elders of Israel, the heads of families, the judges and other officers; and, presenting themselves before God, he recapitulated the conduct of Divine Providence toward them, from the days of Abraham to that moment; recounted the miraculous and gracious dispensations of God toward their fathers and themselves; reminded them of their present enviable lot, and concluded his solemn address with an exhortation in these emphatic words: "Now, therefore, fear the Lord, and serve him in sincerity and truth; and put away the gods which your fathers served on the other side of the flood, and in Egypt; and serve ye the Lord," Joshua 24
Obedience, Obedient, Obey - ...
B — 1: ὑπακούω (Strong's #5219 — Verb — hupakouo — hoop-ak-oo'-o ) "to listen, attend" (as in Acts 12:13 ), and so, "to submit, to obey," is used of "obedience" (a) to God Hebrews 5:9 ; 11:8 ; (b) to Christ, by natural elements, Matthew 8:27 ; Mark 1:27 ; 4:41 ; Luke 8:25 ; (c) to disciples of Christ, Luke 17:6 ; (d) to the faith, Acts 6:7 ; the Gospel, Romans 10:16 ; 2 Thessalonians 1:8 ; Christian doctrine, Romans 6:17 (as to a form or mold of teaching); (e) to apostolic injunctions, Philippians 2:12 ; 2 Thessalonians 3:14 ; (f) to Abraham by Sarah, 1 Peter 3:6 ; (g) to parents by children, Ephesians 6:1 ; Colossians 3:20 ; (h) to masters by servants, Ephesians 6:5 ; Colossians 3:22 ; (i) to sin, Romans 6:12 ; (j) in general, Romans 6:16
Mary - The genealogy of the Savior through her, in the line of David and Abraham, is preserved in Luke 3:1-38 , to prove that he was born "as concerning the flesh" according to ancient prophecies
Descent Into Hades - In the parable of Dives and Lazarus ( Luke 16:19-31 ), while the soul of Dives was said to be in torment the soul of Lazarus was taken to the society of Abraham
Barnabas, Epistle of - If Abraham is said to have circumcised 318 men, the real meaning is Jesus and the Cross, because ‘in the number 18, I stands for ten, H for eight. If the purpose of God in creating the world and in calling Abraham had been fulfilled in Jesus, then it was not for the sake of unbelieving Jews but for the sake of the believers in the Messiah that the world had been created and Abraham called. He is sure that the patriarchs from Abraham to Moses stood in a special relation to God and received special promises from Him (v. Paul would say that the physical descendants of Abraham were not cut off from this special relationship until they out themselves off when they refused to believe in Jesus (Romans 11), our author thinks that they were cut off long before this, as long ago as the day of Aaron’s golden calf
Election - Abraham was chosen that in him all the families of the earth should be blessed (Genesis 12:3). It was through the chosen people, the seed of Abraham, that God was pleased to make the clearest and fullest revelation of Himself to man and to prepare the way in the fullness of the time for the world’s redemption. ...
‘There was from the first an element of inscrutable selectiveness in God’s dealings within the race of Abraham. Such selectiveness ought at least to have prevented the Jews from renting their claims simply on having “Abraham to their father” ’ (Gore, ‘Argument of Romans ix
James Epistle of - But none of the passages are decisive, and in an extended reference to the faith of Abraham (ad Cor. In Genesis 15:6 ‘Abraham believed God,’ etc. , refers specifically to belief in God’s promise; James by an exegetical tour de force gives it a prospective reference to Abraham’s ‘works’ in the sacrifice of Isaac. (2) Abraham was, in the Jewish schools, a stock example of faith (see Lightfoot, Galatians 5, London, 1876, p. Paul might have introduced him quite independently of one another; and the following passage shows that James’s rather loose employment of Genesis 15:6 is not peculiar to himself: 1 Maccabees 2:52, ‘Was not Abraham found faithful in temptation, and it was reckoned unto him for righteousness?’ Mayor reverses the point of the argument by remarking that it is inconceivable, if James wrote after St
James, the General Epistle of - " Abraham was justified by faith before God the moment he believed God's promise (Genesis 15:6). (See FAITH) In James 2:23 James recognizes, like Paul, that Abraham's "faith was imputed unto him for righteousness. " James meets the Jews' false notion that their possession of the law, though they disobeyed it, and their descent from Abraham and notional belief apart from obedience, would justify (an error which Paul also combats, Romans 2:17-25; compare James 1:22)
Hospitality - Its practice characterized Abraham (Genesis 18:2-8 ) and the church leaders (1 Timothy 3:2 ; Titus 1:8 ). Lot was deemed righteous by the fact that he alone imitated Abraham's behavior of hospitality (Genesis 19:1-8 ; 18:2-8 ). Besides presenting the model of Abraham, the Old Testament specifically commanded hospitality
Genesis, the Book of - From Exodus 6:2-3, "I am JEHOVAH; I appeared unto Abraham, by the name of God Almighty (Εl Shaday ), but by My name Jehovah was I not known to them," rationalists infer that the passages in Genesis (e. The sense of Exodus 6:2-3 must be, "I was manifested to Abraham
Canaan - ) "The land of Promise," Hebrews 11:9 , from the promise given to Abraham, that his posterity should possess it, Genesis 12:7 13:15 . Various arguments have been adduced to justify the conquest of Canaan, and the extermination of its inhabitants by the Israelites; as, that the land had been allotted to Shem and his sons after the flood, and the sons of Ham were usurpers; that they first assaulted to the Jews; that Abraham had taken possession of the land ages before; that the Canaanites were akin to the Egyptians, and implicated in their guilt and punishment as oppressors of the Hebrews
Exodus - It clearly shows the accomplishment of the divine promises and prophecies delivered to Abraham: that his posterity would be numerous, Genesis 15:5 17:4-6 46:27 Numbers 1:1-3,46 ; and that they should be afflicted in a land not their own, whence they should depart in the fourth generation with great substance, ...
Genesis 15:13-16 Exodus 12:40-41 . ...
The four hundred and thirty years referred to in Exodus 12:40 , date, according to the received chronology, from the time when the promise was made to Abraham, Genesis 15:13
Law - " The law is closely connected with the promise to Abraham, "in thy seed shall all families of the earth be blessed" (Genesis 12:3). Christ shows that in the very title, "the God of Abraham," etc. ) Scripture (Hebrews 4:2; Galatians 3:8) affirms the gospel was preached unto Abraham and to Israel in the wilderness, as well as unto us
Old Testament in the New Testament, the - But Jesus does!...
Stephen's powerful speech (Acts 7:2-53 ) turns on the thought that the promise given to Abraham in Genesis 15:13-14— ;paraphrased by Stephen as "you will worship me in this place" (v. Paul had to labor hard to defend his conviction that Abraham was the father of all who believe in Christ , not just the father of the Jewish nation (Romans 4:9-17 ; Galatians 3:6-9 ). Certain Old Testament texts were especially important for him, but more important than particular texts was the conviction that the spiritual experience described by texts like Genesis 15:6 , Psalm 32:1-2 , and Habakkuk 2:4 was exactly that now being enjoyed by his Gentile converts: by believing in Jesus, they were being "justified by faith" just like Abraham and David ( Romans 4:22-25 )
Call, Calling - It is also in Deutero-Isaiah that we find the emergence of ‘call’ in a sort of theological sense; the ‘call’ of Abraham (Isaiah 51:2 ‘I called him’). The term is not so used in OT (unless Isaiah 51:2?—see above—Abraham is a ‘prophet’ in Genesis 20:7 [3]). ’ We say the ‘call’ not ‘calling’ of Abraham; but if Scripture had used a substantive, ‘calling’ would have been installed by our translators in this phrase
Job - Bishop Warburton, in like manner, admits them to bear the marks of high antiquity; and Michaelis confesses the manners to be perfectly Abrahamic, that is, such as were common to all the seed of Abraham, Israelites, Ishmaelites, and Idumeans. That it was composed before Abraham's migration to Canaan, may also be inferred from its silence respecting the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, and the other cities of the plain, which were still nearer to Idumea, where the scene is laid. Farther: Job acted as high priest in his family, according to the patriarchal usage, Genesis 8:20 ; for the institution of an established priesthood does not appear to have taken place any where until the time of Abraham. This carries us up to an age so early as that in which all the posterity of Abraham, Israelites, Idumeans, and Arabians, yet continued to speak one common language, and had not branched into different dialects
Hittites - ]'>[4] tells us ( Genesis 23:1-20 ) that Abraham bought from a Hittite the cave of Machpelah at Hebron
Jordan - The first historical notice of the Jordan is in the account of the separation of Abraham and Lot (Genesis 13:10 )
Sod'om - (d) (A fourth and yet stronger argument is drawn from the fact that Abraham saw the smoke of the burning cities from Hebron
Condemnation - Yet God patiently bore with his rebellious creatures, and chose Abraham and his descendants to be his special people and mediate his blessings to all nations (Genesis 12 )
Exodus, Book of - God threatened to destroy the people, but Moses pleaded for them, and asked God to remember Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
Prayer - , of Abraham (Genesis 17:18,20 ; 18:23-32 ; 20:7,17,18 ), of Moses for Pharaoh (Exodus 8:12,13,30,31 ; Exodus 9:33 ), for the Israelites (Exodus 17:11,13 ; 32:11-14,31-34 ; Numbers 21:7,8 ; Deuteronomy 9:18,19,25 ), for Miriam (Numbers 12:13 ), for Aaron (Deuteronomy 9:20 ), of Samuel (1 Samuel 7:5-12 ), of Solomon (1 Kings 8 ; 2 Chronicles 6 ), Elijah (1618449090_82 ), Elisha (2 Kings 4:33-36 ), Isaiah (2 Kings 19 ), (Jeremiah 42:2-10 ), Peter (Acts 9:40 ), the church (12:5-12), Paul (28:8). ...
"Abraham's servant prayed to God, and God directed him to the person who should be wife to his master's son and heir (Exodus 32:11 )
Rachel - ) The old superstition from which Abraham had been called still lingered in the family (Joshua 24:2; Joshua 24:14)