What does Abomination mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
תּוֹעֲבַ֣ת a disgusting thing 13
שֶׁ֥קֶץ detestable thing or idol 6
תוֹעֲבַ֛ת a disgusting thing 5
βδέλυγμα a foul thing 4
וְתוֹעֲבַ֖ת a disgusting thing 3
תּוֹעֵבָ֖ה a disgusting thing 3
תּוֹעֲבַ֥ת a disgusting thing 2
؟ תוֹעֵבָ֖ה a disgusting thing 2
תוֹעֵבָ֥ה a disgusting thing 2
הַתּוֹעֵבָ֥ה a disgusting thing 2
תוֹעֲבַ֥ת a disgusting thing 2
שִׁקֻּ֣ץ detestable thing or idol 2
תְּשַׁקְּצ֣וּ (Piel) to detest 1
؟ לְתוֹעֵבָ֣ה a disgusting thing 1
תוֹעֵב֣וֹת a disgusting thing 1
(תּוֹעֲבַ֥ת‪‬) a disgusting thing 1
תוֹעֲבַ֣ת a disgusting thing 1
תּוֹעֵבָֽה a disgusting thing 1
؟ זְעוּמָֽה to denounce 1
תּוֹעֵבָ֑ה a disgusting thing 1
פִּגּ֥וּל foul thing 1
וְתוֹעֲבַ֥ת a disgusting thing 1
תּוֹעֵבָ֥ה a disgusting thing 1
פִּגּ֣וּל foul thing 1
הַתּוֹעֵבָ֣ה a disgusting thing 1
לְתוֹעֵבָֽה a disgusting thing 1
תּוֹעֵבָ֛ה a disgusting thing 1
וְהַשֶּׁ֖קֶץ detestable thing or idol 1
תּֽוֹעֵבָ֔ה a disgusting thing 1
שִׁקֻּ֖ץ detestable thing or idol 1
תוֹעֵבָ֖ה a disgusting thing 1
תֽוֹעֵבָה֙ a disgusting thing 1
נִבְאַשׁ to have a bad smell 1
הַשִּׁקּ֥וּץ detestable thing or idol 1
שִׁקּ֣וּץ detestable thing or idol 1
תּוֹעֲבַ֨ת a disgusting thing 1
שִׁקּוּצִ֖ים detestable thing or idol 1
שֶׁ֣קֶץ detestable thing or idol 1
וְשֶׁ֖קֶץ detestable thing or idol 1
תְּשַׁקֵּֽצוּ (Piel) to detest 1
וְתוֹעֵבָ֛ה a disgusting thing 1

Definitions Related to Abomination

H8441


   1 a disgusting thing, Abomination, abominable.
      1a in ritual sense (of unclean food, idols, mixed marriages).
      1b in ethical sense (of wickedness etc).
      

H8263


   1 detestable thing or idol, an unclean thing, an Abomination, detestation.
   

G946


   1 a foul thing, a detestable thing.
      1a of idols and things pertaining to idolatry.
      

H8251


   1 detestable thing or idol, abominable thing, Abomination, idol, detested thing.
   

H6292


   1 foul thing, refuse.
      1a unclean sacrificial flesh (only use).
      

H2194


   1 to denounce, express indignation, be indignant.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to have indignation, be indignant, be angrily indignant, be defiant.
         1a2 to be abhorrent.
         1a3 to express indignation in speech, denounce, curse.
      1b (Niphal) to show indignation, show anger.
      

H8262


   1 (Piel) to detest, make abominable, count filthy, make detestable.
      1a to detest.
      1b to make detestable.
      

H887


   1 to have a bad smell, stink, smell bad.
      1a (Qal) to stink, smell bad.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to become odious.
         1b2 to make oneself odious.
      1c (Hiphil).
         1c1 to stink, emit a stinking odour.
         1c2 to cause to stink.
         1c3 of wickedness (fig.
         ).
      1d (Hithpael) to make oneself odious.
   2 (TWOT) to abhor.
   

Frequency of Abomination (original languages)

Frequency of Abomination (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Desolation, Abomination of
A portent of the ruin of the House of God mentioned by Daniel, and referred to by Christ as a sign to the faithful to flee from Judea; commonly interpreted as a symbol of idolatry in the Temple.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Abomination
A term applied in Scripture to objects of great detestation. Idols and their worship were so named, because they robbed God of his honor, while the rites themselves were impure and cruel, Deuteronomy 7:25,26 12:31 . The term was used respecting the Hebrews in Egypt, Genesis 43:32 Exodus 8:26 , either because they ate and sacrificed animals held sacred by the Egyptians, or because they did not observe those ceremonies in eating which made a part of the religion of Egypt; and in Genesis 46:34 , because they were "wandering shepherds," a race of whom had grievously oppressed Egypt.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Abomination of Desolation
The Daniel 9:27 denotes, probably, the image of Jupiter, erected in the temple of Jerusalem by command of Antiochus Epiphanes. But by the Abomination of Desolation spoken of by our Lord, Matthew 24:15 Mark 13:14 , and foretold as about to be seen at Jerusalem during the last siege of that city by the Romans under Titus, is probably meant the Roman army, whose standards had the images of their gods and emperors upon them, and were worshipped in the precincts of the temple when that and the city were taken. Luke 21:20 . See ARMOR.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Desolation, Abomination of
(Matthew 24:15 ; Mark 13:14 ; Compare Luke 21:20 ), is interpreted of the eagles, the standards of the Roman army, which were an abomination to the Jews. These standards, rising over the site of the temple, were a sign that the holy place had fallen under the idolatrous Romans. The references are to Daniel 9:27 . (See ABOMINATION .)
Holman Bible Dictionary - Desolation, Abomination of
See Abomination of Desolation.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Abomination That Causes Desolation, the
An expression that occurs three times in the Septuagint of Daniel (9:27; 11:31; 12:11) and twice in the words of Jesus (Matthew 24:15 ; Mark 13:14 ), where slight linguistic variation exists. Luke's account of this prophecy (21:20) is more general and speaks of armies surrounding Jerusalem. First Maccabees, quoting Daniel, refers these words to the sacrifice of swine's flesh on the altar in Jerusalem by Antiochus IV, Epiphanes, in 168 b.c. (1:54). Josephus, without referring to Daniel, recounts this episode in detail (Antiq. 7.5.4). Jesus, in using these cryptic words of Daniel, is also predicting a desecration of the temple, or at lest the temple area, which will parallel the catastrophic event of the past, so well remembered by the Jews of his day.
There have been numerous suggestions as to precisely what Jesus meant by this prophecy. It should be noted that for Jesus, the Abomination has become a personal force rather than an event—he stands (in the holy place [1] where he does not belong [2]). This has caused some to look for a particular historical act by an individual for fulfillment (variously, Pilate, Caligula, or Hadrian, more proximately, or more remotely the Antichrist himself in the endtimes) as the ultimate Abomination. Others have argued, especially in light of Luke 21:20 and Daniel's words, that either the destruction of Jerusalem in a.d. 70 or the desecration of the temple at that time, whether by the apostate Jews beforehand or the Romans afterward, fulfilled Jesus' prophetic words.
Given the nature of prophetic utterance, which often includes a more proximate and remote fulfillment, there is no reason why there could not be truth in both of these approaches. Jesus could very well be referring to the end of the agehe was, after all, answering the questions of "when will this happen" (i.e., the destruction of the temple) and "what will be the sign of your coming and the end of the age?" (Matthew 24:3 )as well as to the destruction of Jerusalem in a.d. 70. If this is so, then the early Christians were right when they fled Jerusalem in obedience to Jesus' words (Matthew 24:16-20 ), but were also right when they looked for yet another, more cataclysmic fulfillment in the more distant future that would constitute the end of the age.
Walter A. Elwell
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Abomination
This word is used,
To express the idea that the Egyptians considered themselves as defiled when they ate with strangers (Genesis 43:32 ). The Jews subsequently followed the same practice, holding it unlawful to eat or drink with foreigners (John 18:28 ; Acts 10:28 ; 11:3 ).
Every shepherd was "an abomination" unto the Egyptians (Genesis 46:34 ). This aversion to shepherds, such as the Hebrews, arose probably from the fact that Lower and Middle Egypt had formerly been held in oppressive subjection by a tribe of nomad shepherds (the Hyksos), who had only recently been expelled, and partly also perhaps from this other fact that the Egyptians detested the lawless habits of these wandering shepherds.
Pharaoh was so moved by the fourth plague, that while he refused the demand of Moses, he offered a compromise, granting to the Israelites permission to hold their festival and offer their sacrifices in Egypt. This permission could not be accepted, because Moses said they would have to sacrifice "the abomination of the Egyptians" (Exodus 8:26 ); i.e., the cow or ox, which all the Egyptians held as sacred, and which they regarded it as sacrilegious to kill.
(Daniel 11:31 ), in that section of his prophecies which is generally interpreted as referring to the fearful calamities that were to fall on the Jews in the time of Antiochus Epiphanes, says, "And they shall place the abomination that maketh desolate." Antiochus Epiphanes caused an altar to be erected on the altar of burnt-offering, on which sacrifices were offered to Jupiter Olympus. (Compare 1 Maccabees 1:57 ). This was the abomination of the desolation of Jerusalem. The same language is employed in Daniel 9:27 (Compare Matthew 24:15 ), where the reference is probably to the image-crowned standards which the Romans set up at the east gate of the temple (A.D. 70), and to which they paid idolatrous honours. "Almost the entire religion of the Roman camp consisted in worshipping the ensign, swearing by the ensign, and in preferring the ensign before all other gods." These ensigns were an "abomination" to the Jews, the "abomination of desolation."
This word is also used symbolically of sin in general ( Isaiah 66:3 ); an idol (44:19); the ceremonies of the apostate Church of Rome (Revelation 17:4 ); a detestable act (Ezekiel 22:11 ).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Birds of Abomination
List of twenty birds not to be consumed by Israelites (Leviticus 11:13-19 ). The reason for the exclusion of these birds is unclear. Some have suggested that the birds were prohibited because they were associated with the worship of idols. Others have suggested that they were excluded because they ate flesh which contained blood or because they had contact with corpses—both of which would make one ritually unclean (see Leviticus 7:26 ; Leviticus 17:13-14 ; Leviticus 21:1-4 ,Leviticus 21:1-4,21:11 ; Leviticus 22:4 ; Numbers 5:2-3 ; Numbers 6:6-11 ). See Birds .
King James Dictionary - Abomination
ABOMINA'TION, n.
1. Extreme hatred detestation. 2. The object of detestation, a common signification in scripture. The way of the wicked is an abomination to the Lord. Proverbs 15
3. Hence, defilement, pollution, in a physical sense, or evil doctrines and practices, which are moral defilements, idols and idolatry, are called abominations. The Jews were an abomination to the Egyptians and the sacred animals of the Egyptians were an abomination to the Jews. The Roman army is called the abomination of desolation. Matthew 24:13 . In short, whatever is an object of extreme hatred, is called an abomination.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Abomination of Desolation
"The idol (See ABOMINATION) of the desolator," or "the idol that causeth desolation." Abomination refers especially to such idolatry only as is perpetrated by apostates from Jehovah (2 Kings 21:2-7; 2 Kings 23:13). Josephus (B. J., 4:6, sec. 3) refers to the Jews' tradition that the temple would be destroyed "if domestic hands should first pollute it." The Lord quotes Daniel 9:27; Daniel 11:31; Daniel 12:11, in Matthew 24:15 "the abomination of desolation," as the sign of Jerusalem's coming destruction. Daniel makes the ceasing of the sacrifice and oblation the preliminary to it. Jewish rabbis considered the prophecy fulfilled when the Jews erected an idol altar, described as "the abomination of desolation" in 1 Maccabees 1:54; 1 Maccabees 6:7. This was necessarily followed by the profanation of the temple under the Old Testament antichrist, Antiochus Epiphanes. He built an idolatrous altar on the altar of burnt offering to Jupiter Olympius, and dedicated the temple to him, and offered swine's flesh.
The divine law is that where the church corrupts herself, the world, the instrument of her sin, is made also the instrument of her punishment (Matthew 24:28; Revelation 17:3; Revelation 17:16). The bringing of the idolatrous, Roman, image crowned standards into the temple, where they were set over the E. gate, and sacrificed to, upon the destruction of Jerusalem under the Roman Titus, 37 years after Jesus' prophecy (A.D. 70), is not enough to meet the requirements of the term "abomination," unless it were shown that the Jews shared in the idolatry. Perhaps the Zealots perpetrated some abomination which was to be the sign of the nation's ruin. They had taken possession of the temple, and having made a profane country fellow, Phannias, their high priest, they made a mock of the sacred rites of the law.
Some such desecration within the city, "in the holy place," coinciding with Cestius Gallus' encampment without, "in a holy place," was the sign foretold by Jesus; noting it, the Christians fled from the city to Pella, and all escaped. The final fulfillment is probably future. The last antichrist, many think, is about to set up an idol on a wing of the restored temple (compare Matthew 4:5; John 5:43) in the latter half of the last, or 70th, of Daniel's prophetic weeks; for the former three and a half days (years) of the prophetic week he keeps his covenant with the Jews; in the latter three and a half breaks it (Zechariah 11:16-17; Zechariah 11:12; Zechariah 11:13; Zechariah 11:14; Daniel 9; 11). The Roman emperor Hadrian erected a temple to Jupiter upon the site of the Jewish temple; but probably "the consummation to be poured upon the desolate" is yet future.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Abomination
(βδέλυγμα)
Like the word ‘taste’-originally a physical, then a mental term,-‘abomination’ denotes that for which God and His people have a violent distaste. It refers in the OT to the feeling: of repulsion against prohibited foods (Leviticus 11:10, Deuteronomy 14:3), then to everything connected with idolatry (Deuteronomy 7:25, Romans 2:22 [1]).* [2] Thence it acquires a moral meaning, and together with fornication stigmatizes all the immoralities of heathendom (Revelation 17:4-5). Its intensest use is reserved for hypocrisy, the last offence against religion (Luke 16:15, Titus 1:16, Revelation 21:27).
Sherwin Smith.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Abomination
A. Noun.
Tô‛êbah (תּוֹעֵבָה, Strong's #8441), “abomination; loathsome, detestable thing.” Cognates of this word appear only in Phoenician and Targumic Aramaic. The word appears 117 times and in all periods.
First, tô‛êbah defines something or someone as essentially unique in the sense of being “dangerous,” “sinister,” and “repulsive” to another individual. This meaning appears in Gen. 43:32 (the first occurrence): “… The Egyptians might not eat bread with the Hebrews; for that is an abomination unto the Egyptians.” To the Egyptians, eating bread with foreigners was repulsive because of their cultural or social differences (cf. Gen. 46:34; Ps. 88:8). Another clear illustration of this essential clash of disposition appears in Prov. 29:27: “An unjust man is an abomination to the just: and he that is upright in the way is abomination to the wicked.” When used with reference to God, this nuance of the word describes people, things, acts, relationships, and characteristics that are “detestable” to Him because they are contrary to His nature. Things related to death and idolatry are loathsome to God: “Thou shalt not eat any abominable thing” (Deut. 14:3). People with habits loathsome to God are themselves detestable to Him: “The woman shall not wear that which pertaineth unto a man, neither shall a man put on a woman’s garment: for all that do so are abomination unto the Lord thy God” (Deut. 22:5). Directly opposed to tô‛êbah are such reactions as “delight” and “loveth” (Prov. 15:8-9).
Second, tô‛êbah is used in some contexts to describe pagan practices and objects: “The graven images of their gods shall ye burn with fire; thou shalt not desire the silver or gold that is on them, nor take it unto thee, lest thou be snared therein: for it is an abomination to the Lord thy God. Neither shalt thou bring an abomination into thine house …” (Deut. 7:25-26). In other contexts, tô‛êbah describes the repeated failures to observe divine regulations: “Because ye multiplied more than the nations that are round about you, and have not walked in my statutes, neither have kept my judgments, neither have done according to the judgments of the nations that are round about you; … because of all thine abominations” (Ezek. 5:7, 9). tô‛êbah may represent the pagan cultic practices themselves, as in Deut. 12:31, or the people who perpetrate such practices: “For all that do these things are an abomination unto the Lord: and because of these abominations the Lord thy God doth drive them out from before thee” (Deut. 18:12). If Israelites are guilty of such idolatry, however, their fate will be worse than exile: death by stoning (Deut. 17:2-5).Third, tô‛êbah is used in the sphere of jurisprudence and of family or tribal relationships. Certain acts or characteristics are destructive of societal and familial harmony; both such things and the people who do them are described by tô‛êbah : “These six things doth the Lord hate; yea, seven are an abomination unto him: … a proud look, a lying tongue, and hands that shed innocent blood, a heart that deviseth wicked imaginations, … and he that soweth discord among brethren” (Prov. 6:16-19). God says, “The scorner is an abomination to men” (Prov. 24:9) because he spreads his bitterness among God’s people, disrupting unity and harmony.
B. Verb.
Tâ‛ab (תָּעַב , Strong's #8581), “to abhor, treat as abhorrent, cause to be an abomination, act abominably.” This verb occurs 21 times, and the first occurrence is in Deut. 7:26: “Neither shalt thou bring an abomination into thine house.…”
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Abomination of Desolation
ABOMINATION OF DESOLATION (τὸ βδέλυγμα τῆς ἐρημώσεως).—This phrase is found in the NT only in Matthew 24:15 and Mark 13:14, in both cases forming part of the passage in which Christ predicts the woes to come on the Jews, culminating in the destruction of Jerusalem. St. Mark’s words, which are probably move exact than those of St. Matthew, are: ὃταν δὲ ἴδητε τὸ βδέλυγμα τῆς ἐρημώσεως ἐστηκότα ὅπου οὐ δεῖ (ὁ ἀναγινώσκων νοείτω), τότε οἵ ἐν τῇ Ἰουδαίᾳ φευγέτωσαν εἰς τὰ ὄρη, κ.τ.λ. Three points in this account are to be noticed: (1) the change of gender* Revelation 2:1 [ἄγγελος]'>[1]+2%3A20">[1] 2:20 [2] 12:3 [3]. In " translation="">2 Thessalonians 2:3ἁ ἄγθρωτος τῆς ἀνομιας (אִישׁ בִּליַעַל = Βελίαρ) may denote not a person, but a sin (ἀτοστασια); see Nestle in . Times, July 1905, p. 472 f.] τὸ βδέλυγμα—ἑστηκότα (cf. 2 Thessalonians 2:6-7, Revelation 21:14); (2) the ‘editorial note’ ὁ ἀναγινώσκων νοείτω, calling special attention to the prophecy (cf. Daniel 9:25, Revelation 2:7; 2 Thessalonians 2:1-12,20); (3) the command to flee to the mountains, which seems to have been obeyed by the Christians who escaped to Pella (Euseb. Historia Ecclesiastica iii. 5; Epiphan. Haeres. xxix. 7). St. Matthew characteristically adds the words (absent from the best MSS [4] [5] ] of St. Mark) τὸ ῥηθὲν διὰ Δανιὴλ τοῦ προφήτου; substitutes the neuter ἑστηκότα for the masc. ἑστηκότα; and instead of the quite general phrase ὅπου οὐ δεῖ has the more definite ἐν τόπῳ ἁγίῳ,—an expression which may refer to the Temple (cf. Acts 6:13; Acts 21:28), but (without the article) may mean nothing more than ‘on holy ground.’ To the Jews all Jerusalem (and, indeed, all Palestine) was holy (2 Maccabees 1:7; 2 Maccabees 3:1). St. Luke, writing most probably after the destruction of Jerusalem, omits the ‘editorial note’; and for ὅταν ἴδητε τὸ βδέλυγμα τῆς ἐρημώσεως substitutes ὅταν ἴδητε κυκλουμένην ὑπὸ στρατοπέδων Ἰερουσαλήμ (Luke 21:20).
The phrase we are considering occurs three times in the LXX Septuagint of Daniel:† [6] Daniel 9:27 (βδ. τῶν ἐρημώσεων), Daniel 11:31 (βδ. τῶν ἐρημώσεων) and Daniel 12:11 (cf. Daniel 8:13), and is quoted in 1 Maccabees 1:54. The original reference is clearly to the desecration of the Temple by the soldiers of Antiochus Epiphanes, the ceasing of the daily burnt-offering, and the election of an idol-altar upon the great Altar of Sacrifice in b.c. 168 (1 Maccabees 1:33-59; Josephus Ant. xii. v. 4, BJ i. i. 1). Thus it is plain that Christ, in quoting the words of Daniel, intends to foretell a desecration of the Temple (or perhaps of the Holy City) resembling that of Antiochus, and resulting in the destruction of the national life and religion. Josephus (Ant. x. xi. 7) draws a similar parallel between the Jewish misfortunes under Antiochus and the desolation caused by the Romans (ὁ Δανίηλος καὶ περὶ τῆς Ῥωμαίων ἡγεμονίας ἀνέγραψε, καὶ ὅτι ὑπʼ αὐτῶν ἐρημωθήσεται). But the precise reference is not so clear.
(1) Blcek, Alford, Mansel, and others explain it of the desecration of the Temple by the Zealots just before the investment of Jerusalem by Titus (Josephus BJ iv. iii. 6–8, vi. 3). Having seized the Temple, they made it a stronghold, and ‘entered the sanctuary with polluted feet’ (μεμιασμένοις τοῖς ποσὶ παρῄεσαν εἰς τὸ ἄγιον). In opposition to Ananus, they set up as high priest one Phannias, ‘a man not only unworthy of the high priesthood, but ignorant of what the high priesthood was’ (ἀνὴρ οὑ μόνον ἀνάξιος ἀρχιερεὺς ἀλλʼ οὐδʼ ἐπιστάμενος σαφῶς τί ποτʼ ἧν ἀρχιερωσύνη). The Temple precincts were defiled with blood, and Ananus was murdered. His murder, says Josephus, was the beginning of the capture of the city (οὑκ ἂν ἁμάρτοιμι δʼ εἰπὼν ἀλώσεως ἄρξαι τῇ πολει τὸν Ἀνάνου θάνατον). In support of this view it is urged (a) that the ‘little Apocalypse’ (1618735749_8 a passage closely resembling this) clearly contemplates a Jewish apostasy; (b) that the word used in Daniel (שׁקּוּץ = βδέλυγμα) is properly used not of idolatry in the abstract, but of idolatry or false worship adopted by Jews (1 Kings 11:5, 2 Kings 23:13, Ezekiel 5:11); (c) that there was among the Jews a tradition to the effect that Jerusalem would be destroyed if their own hands should pollute the Temple of God (ἐὰν χεῖρες οἰκεῖαι προμιάνωσι τὸ τοῦ θεοῦ τέμενος, Josephus BJ iv vi. 3).
(2) Others (Bengel, Swete, Weiss) explain it by reference to the investment of Jerusalem by the Roman armies. A modification of this view is that of H. A. W. Meyer, who explains it of the ‘doings of the heathen conquerors during and after the capture of the Temple.’ When the city was taken, sacrifices were offered in the Temple to the standards (BJ vi. vi. 1, cf. Tertullian, Apol. 16). Between the first appearance of the Roman armies before Jerusalem (a.d. 66) and the final investment by Titus (just before Passover a.d. 70), there would be ample time for flight ‘to the mountains.’ Even after the final investment there would be opportunities for ‘those in Judaea’ to escape. St. Luke’s words (Luke 21:20) are quoted in support of this view.
(3) Theodoret and other early Commentators refer the prophecy to the attempt of Pilate to set up effigies of the emperor in Jerusalem (BJ ii. ix. 2).
(4) Spitta (Offenb. des Joh. 493) thinks it has to do with the order of Caligula to erect in the Temple a statue of himself, to which Divine honours were to be paid (Ant. xviii. viii. 8). This order, though never executed, caused widespread apprehension among the Jews.
(5) Jerome (Commentary on Matthew 24) suggests that the words may be understood of the equestrian statue of Hadrian, which in his time stood on the site of the Holy of Holies. Similarly, Chrysostom and others refer them to the statue of Titus erected on the site of the Temple.
(6) Bousset treats the passage as strictly eschatological, and as referring to an Antichrist who should appear in the ‘last days.’* [7]
Of these views (1) and (2) are the most probable. Considerations of chronology make (3), (4), and (5) more than doubtful, while the warnings that the events predicted should come to pass soon (Matthew 24:33-34, Mark 13:28-30, Luke 21:29-33) and the command to flee ‘to the mountains’ seem fatal to (6). Between (1) and (2) the choice is not easy, though the balance of evidence is on the whole in favour of (1). St. Luke’s language (ὅταν ἵδητε κυκλουμένην ὑπὸ στρατοπέδων Ἰερουσαλήμ) is not decisive. He may not have intended his words to be an exact reproduction of Christ’s words so much as an accommodation of them which would be readily understood by his Gentile readers.
Literature.—R. W. Newton on Matthew 24 (1879); Bousset, Der Antichrist (1885), English translation by A. H. Keane, 1896; J. H. Russell, The Parousia (1887); articles in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (by S. R. Driver), Encyc. Bibl. (by T. K. Cheyne), Smith’s DB [8] 2 [9] (by W. L. Bevan) the Commentaries of Bengel, Cornelius a Lapide, H. A. W. Meyer, Alford, Wordsworth, Mansel (in Speaker’s Commentary on NT, i. 139), H. B. Swete, St. Mark, ad loc.; A. A. Bevan, The Book of Daniel, ad loc.
H. W. Fulford.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Abomination
An object of disgust (Leviticus 18:22); a detestable act (Ezekiel 22:11); a ceremonial pollution (Genesis 43:32); especially an idol (1 Kings 11:5-7; 2 Kings 23:13); food offered to idols (Zechariah 9:7). The Egyptians regarded it an abomination, i.e. ceremonially polluting, to eat with the Hebrew as foreigners (Genesis 43:32), because, as Herodotus says (Genesis 2:41), the cow was eaten and sacrificed by foreign nations. So when Pharaoh told Israel to offer sacrifice to Jehovah in Egypt without going to the wilderness, Moses objected: "we shall sacrifice the abomination of the Egyptians before their eyes" (the cow, the only animal which all the Egyptians held sacred), "and will they not stone us?" (Exodus 8:26) compare the Jews' own practice in later times (Acts 10:28).
The Hebrew, not only as foreigners, accounted by the intolerant mythology of Egypt as unfit for intercourse except that of war or commerce, but also as nomad shepherds, were an "abomination" to the Egyptians (Genesis 46:34). Therefore Joseph tells his brethren to inform Pharaoh, "Our trade hath been about cattle, both we and also our fathers," i.e. hereditarily; for Pharaoh would be sure then to plant them, not in the heart of the country, but in Goshen, the border land. The Egyptians themselves reared cattle, as Pharaoh's offer to make Joseph's brethren "overseers of his cattle" proves (Genesis 47:6), and as their sculptures and paintings show; but they abominated the nomad shepherds, or Bedouins, because the Egyptians, as being long civilized, shrank, and to the present day shrink, from the lawless predatory habits of the wandering shepherd tribes in their vicinity.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Abomination, Abomination of Desolation
refers to that which is detestable to God and is particularly related to idolatry.
Abomination translates four Hebrew and one Greek word. Ba' ash , “stink,” refers to that which becomes odious, despised, or hated as water polluted by dead fish (Exodus 7:18 ). Israel became a stinking abomination to the Philistines (1 Samuel 13:4 ). Shiqquts , “a detested thing,” and shaqats , “to be filthy” refer to that which cannot be accepted in worship or eaten (Leviticus 11:1 ). It often refers to idols (Deuteronomy 29:17 ). Piggul , “stinking, rotten” refers to meat unfit for sacrifice (Leviticus 7:18 ). To' ebah , “offensive, detestable,” the most common word for abominable, occurring 117 times to refer to worship, cultural and moral practices which offend such as homosexuality (Leviticus 18:22 ), Egyptians' eating with foreigners (Genesis 43:22 ), and particularly foreign gods (Ezekiel 6:11 ). Bdelugma , “that which stinks, is disgusting,” things people value are an abomination to God (Luke 16:15 ). See Revelation 21:27 .
“Abomination of desolation” is a special term in Daniel 9:27 ; Daniel 11:31 ; Daniel 12:11 ; Matthew 24:15 ; Mark 13:14 ; Luke 16:15 ; Revelation 17:4-5 ; Revelation 21:27 .
Daniel 9:27 ; Daniel 11:31 ; and Daniel 12:11 give evidence of a heathen idol or altar. “Abomination” ( shiqquts ) is used to describe an idol which would desecrate the holy Temple and/or altar in Jerusalem.
The term “desolation” (shomem ) permeates the book of Daniel (Daniel 8:13 ; Daniel 9:2 ,Daniel 9:2,9:17-18 ,Daniel 9:17-18,9:26-27 ; Daniel 11:31 ; and Daniel 12:11 ). The word has two root meanings: “to be desolated, ravaged” or “to be appalled, astounded.” In these verses, the meaning of desolation is primary to the context.
The three occasions where the two words “abomination” and “desolation” are used together present interpreters with baffling grammatical and syntactical problems. Translators have had an impossible task in making accurate representations of the texts. Compare various translations.
In Daniel, the historical situation was apparently the building of an altar of Zeus by Antiochus Epiphanes in Jerusalem in his attempt at complete hellenization of Israel in the second century B.C. Antiochus fancied himself to be a god who greatly resembled Zeus Olympios. Zeus was known as “bacal shamem” (lord of heaven). Hebrews did not want to write or pronounce the pagan term “bacal” and so substituted “abomination” (shiqquts). “Shamem” in a typical “play on words” was written “desolating one” (shomem). Thus, the Zeus (lord of heaven) is loosely referred to as “abominations one who makes desolate.”
Antiochus selected for himself the title “Epihyphanes” (God manifest). However, the people who were forced to endure his persecutions dubbed him “Epimanes” (madman). “Shamem” (desolate) could also mean “to be mad” and thus identified a more direct reference to Antiochus.
The historical situation of Daniel is clarified in 1 Maccabees 1:54 ; 1 Maccabees 6:7 ; 2 Maccabees 6:2 ; 2 Maccabees 1:1 Enoch 89:68-90:27; and Testament of Levi 16-17.
The idea of “idol worship” being conquered by The Righteous One and righteousness reaches its full and climactic expression when the Kingdom of God was inaugurated by Jesus the Messiah. The passages in Matthew, Mark, Luke, and Revelation clearly show this, pointing ahead at least to the destruction of Jerusalem by Rome in A.D. 70 and possibly beyond to the end of time.
Later literature picks up this same type of violation of proper worship in Jerusalem when Caligula (A.D. 40) sought to erect his own statue in the Jerusalem Temple. Josephus even identified the abomination of the desolator in the destruction of Jerusalem by the Roman Titus in A.D. 69-70.
Bible students give differing interpretations about the eschatological meaning of the abomination of desolation. Such interpretations often depend on the interpreter's view of the millennium. Some would interpret the “eschaton” or end time in the Book of Daniel to be the end of Antiochus Epihyphanes. Others see the end of any and all efforts of heathenism in the spiritual victory by Jesus over Satan. Others point to the destruction of Jerusalem by Titus. Others put off the final fulfillment to the end of all time. Some see this activity occurring repeatedly in history. Others see the fulfillment only in the final end when evil is put down finally and completely. The original passage in Daniel serves as the textual and historical presaging for later applications. One must be sensitive to the immediate interpretation of a passage as differentiated from successive applications of that same principle.
G. Beasley-Murray
Webster's Dictionary - Abomination
(1):
(n.) A cause of pollution or wickedness.
(2):
(n.) The feeling of extreme disgust and hatred; abhorrence; detestation; loathing; as, he holds tobacco in abomination.
(3):
(n.) That which is abominable; anything hateful, wicked, or shamefully vile; an object or state that excites disgust and hatred; a hateful or shameful vice; pollution.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Abomination of Desolation
A portent of the ruin of the House of God mentioned by Daniel, and referred to by Christ as a sign to the faithful to flee from Judea; commonly interpreted as a symbol of idolatry in the Temple.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Abomination
ABOMINATION . Four Hebrew words from three different roots are rendered in EV [1] by ‘abomination’ and, occasionally, ‘abominable thing.’ In almost all cases (for exceptions see Genesis 43:32 ; Genesis 46:34 ) the reference is to objects and practices abhorrent to J″ [2] , and opposed to the moral requirements and ritual of His religion. Among the objects so described are heathen deities such as Ashtoreth (Astarte), Chemosh, Milcom, the ‘abominations’ of the Zidonians (Phœnicians), Moabites, and Ammonites respectively ( 2 Kings 23:13 ); images and other paraphernalia of the forbidden cults ( Deuteronomy 7:25 ; Deuteronomy 27:15 , and often in Ezk.); and the flesh of animals ritually taboo (see esp. Leviticus 11:10 ff. and art. Clean and Unclean). Some of the practices that are an ‘abomination unto J″ [2] ,’ are the worship of heathen deities and of the heavenly bodies ( Deuteronomy 13:14 ; Deuteronomy 17:4 and often), the practice of witchcraft and kindred arts ( Deuteronomy 18:12 ), gross acts of immorality ( Leviticus 18:22 ff.), falsification of weights and measures ( Proverbs 11:1 ), and ‘evil devices’ generally ( Proverbs 15:26 RV [4] ).
One of the four words above referred to ( piggûl ) occurs only as a ‘technical term for stale sacrificial flesh, which has not been eaten within the prescribed time’ (Driver, who would render ‘refuse meat’ in Leviticus 7:18 ; Leviticus 19:7 , Ezekiel 4:14 , Isaiah 65:4 ).
A. R. S. Kennedy.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Abomination of Desolation
ABOMINATION OF DESOLATION . A term found only in Mark 13:14 and its parallel Matthew 24:15 . It is obviously derived, as St. Matthew indicates, from Daniel 11:31 ; Daniel 12:11 ; cf. Daniel 9:27 . In these passages the most natural reference is to the desecration of the Temple under Antiochus Epihanes, when an altar to Olympian Zeus was erected on the altar of burnt sacrifices. As interpreted in the revision by St. Luke ( Luke 21:20 ), the reference in the Gospel is to the encompassing of Jerusalem by the Roman army. It is very difficult, however, to adjust this interpretation to the expression of Mk. ‘standing where he ought not,’ and that of Mt. ‘standing in the holy place.’ Other interpretations would be: (1) the threatened erection of the statue of Caligula in the Temple; or (2) the desecration of the Temple area by the Zealots, who during the siege made it a fortress; or (3) the desecration of the Temple by the presence of Titus after its capture by that general. While it is impossible to reach any final choice between these different interpretations, it seems probable that the reference of Mark 13:14 is prior to the destruction of Jerusalem, because of its insistence that the appearance of the ‘abomination of desolation’ (or the ‘abomination that makes desolate’) is to be taken as a warning for those who are in Judæa to flee to the mountains. It would seem to follow, therefore, that the reference is to some event, portending the fall of Jerusalem, which might also be interpreted by the Christians as a premonition of the Parousia ( 2 Thessalonians 2:1-12 ). It would seem natural to see this event in the coming of the Romans ( Luke 21:20 ), or in the seizure of the Temple by the Zealots under John of Giscala, before the city was completely invested by the Romans. A measure of probability is given to the latter conjecture by the tradition (Eusebius, HE iii. v. 3) that the Jewish Christians, because of a Divine oracle, fled from Jerusalem during the early course of the siege.
Shailer Mathews.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Abomination
In the language of Scripture, the word abomination for the most part means idolatry. Thus we read, (2 Kings 23:13,) that Ashtoreth was the abomination (that is the idol) of the Zidonians; Chemosh, the abomination of the Moabites; and Milcom, the abomination of the Ammonites. Hence our Lord forewarned his disciples, that when they saw the abomination of desolation, spoken of by Daniel the prophet, in the holy place, namely, the temple, they should accept this, as a token, that Jerusalem would be destroyed, and should accordingly then take their flight. And this was done, when Titus Vespasian's army put up the image of idolatry in the temple. Compare (Daniel 9:27 with Matthew 24:15. and Mark 13:14.)
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Abomination
The word 'abomination' is used in the O.T. in reference to any iniquity as viewed by a holy God. It also designates what was unfit to be presented in the service of God, such as an animal with any sort of blemish being brought as a sacrifice; the price of a dog being put into the treasury, etc. Deuteronomy 17:1 ; Deuteronomy 23:18 . The divine service became itself an abomination to God when it had fallen into a mere outward observance or was in association with iniquity. Isaiah 1:13 ; Proverbs 28:9 . But idolatry was the special thing that was declared to be abomination to Jehovah. The idols themselves are thus designated: 2 Kings 23:13 ; Isaiah 44:19 ; and Ezekiel 8 . shows the idolatry that was carried on in secret, and the 'greater abomination,' of bringing it actually into the inner court of the Lord's house, between the porch and the altar! The word is but seldom used in the N.T. and applies then to wickedness in general.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Abomination of Desolation
This exact expression occurs only in Matthew 24:15 and Mark 13:14 , referring to what had been revealed to Daniel in Daniel 12:11 , where it is connected with the great tribulation (ver. 1) spoken of by the Lord in those Gospels. Daniel 9:27 shows that the time of the abomination is in the last half of the last of the seventy weeks of Daniel named in Daniel 9:24 . The person who makes a covenant with the Jews in those days and afterwards breaks it, we know to be the head of the future Roman empire. See SEVENTY WEEKS. Of this person an image will be made, and the people will be constrained to worship it, Revelation 13:14,15 ; but we do not read that it will be carried into the future temple; whereas our Lord says that the abomination will stand in the holy place. On the other hand we read that the Antichrist "exalteth himself above all that is called God, or that is worshipped; so that he, as God, sitteth in the temple of God, showing himself that he is God." 2 Thessalonians 2:4 . The 'abomination of desolation' is evidently connected with the trinity of evil spoken of in Revelation 13 and will be the work of Satan, the Roman beast, and the false prophet. It will end in dire desolation. The desolator is the Assyrian, Isaiah 8:7,8 ; Isaiah 28:2,18 the northern king who will then hold the territory of Assyria. Daniel 11:40 .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Abomination of Desolation,
Mentioned by our Saviour, (Matthew 24:15 ) as a sign of the approaching destruction of Jerusalem, with reference to (Daniel 9:27 ; 11:31 ; 12:11 ) The prophecy referred ultimately to the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans, and consequently the "abomination" must describe some occurrence connected with that event. It appears most probable that the profanities of the Zealots constituted the abomination, which was the sign of the impending ruin; but most people refer it to the standards or banners of the Roman army. They were abomination because there were idolatrous images upon them.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Abomination
This term was used with regard to the Hebrews, who, being shepherds, are said to have been an abomination to the Egyptians; because they sacrificed the animals held sacred by that people, as oxen, goats, sheep, &c., which the Egyptians esteemed unlawful. This word is also applied in the sacred writings to idolatry and idols, not only because the worship of idols is in itself an abominable thing, but likewise because the ceremonies of idolaters were almost always of an infamous and licentious nature. For this reason, Chrysostom affirms, that every idol, and every image of a man, was called an abomination among the Jews. The "abomination of desolation" foretold by the Prophet Daniel 10:27, 11:31, is supposed by some interpreters to denote the statue of Jupiter Olympius, which Antiochus Epiphanes caused to be erected in the temple of Jerusalem. The second of the passages above cited may probably refer to this circumstance, as the statue of Jupiter did, in fact, "make desolate," by banishing the true worship of God, and those who performed it, from the temple. But the former passage, considered in its whole connexion, bears more immediate reference to that which the evangelists have denominated the "abomination of desolation," Matthew 24:15-16 ; Mark 13:14 . This, without doubt, signifies the ensigns of the Roman armies under the command of Titus, during the last siege of Jerusalem. The images of their gods and emperors were delineated on these ensigns; and the ensigns themselves, especially the eagles, which were carried at the heads of the legions, were objects of worship; and, according to the usual style of Scripture, they were therefore an abomination. Those ensigns were placed upon the ruins of the temple after it was taken and demolished; and, as Josephus informs us, the Romans sacrificed to them there. The horror with which the Jews regarded them, sufficiently appears from the account which Josephus gives of Pilate's introducing them into the city, when he sent his army from Caesarea into winter quarters at Jerusalem, and of Vitellius's proposing to march through Judea, after he had received orders from Tiberius to attack Aretas, king of Petra. The people supplicated and remonstrated and induced Pilate to remove the army, and Vitellius to march his troops another way. The Jews applied the above passage of Daniel to the Romans, as we are informed by Jerome. The learned Mr. Mede concurs in the same opinion. Sir Isaac Newton, Obs. on Daniel xi, xii, observes, that in the sixteenth year of the emperor Adrian. B.C. 132, the Romans accomplished the prediction of Daniel by building a temple to Jupiter Capitolinus, where the temple of God in Jerusalem had stood. Upon this occasion the Jews, under the conduct of Barchochab, rose up in arms against the Romans, and in the war had fifty cities demolished, nine hundred and eighty-five of their best towns destroyed, and five hundred and eighty thousand men slain by the sword; and in the end of the war, B.C. 136, they were banished from Judea upon pain of death; and thenceforth the land remained desolate of its old inhabitants. Others again have applied the prediction of Daniel to the invasion and desolation of Christendom by the Mohammedans, and to their conversion of the churches into mosques. From this interpretation they infer, that the religion of Mohammed will prevail in the east one thousand two hundred and sixty years, and be succeeded by the restoration of the Jews, the destruction of Antichrist, the full conversion of the Gentiles to the church of Christ, and the commencement of the millennium.
In general, whatever is morally or ceremonially impure, or leads to sin, is designated an abomination to God. Thus lying lips are said to be an abomination to the Lord. Every thing in doctrine or practice which tended to corrupt the simplicity of the Gospel is also in Scripture called abominable; hence Babylon is represented, Revelation 17:4 , as holding in her hand a cup "full of abominations." In this view, to "work abomination," is to introduce idolatry, or any other great corruption, into the church and worship of God, 1 Kings 11:7 .
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Abominable, Abomination
A — 1: ἀθέμιτος (Strong's #111 — Adjective — athemitos — ath-em'-ee-tos ) occurs in Acts 10:28 , "unlawful," and 1 Peter 4:3 , "abominable" (a, negative, themitos, an adjective from themis, "law"), hence, "unlawful." See UNLAWFUL.
A — 2: βδελυκτός (Strong's #947 — Adjective — bdelyktós — bdel-ook-tos' ) Titus 1:16, is said of deceivers who profess to know God, but deny Him by their works.
B — 1: βδελύσσομαι (Strong's #948 — Verb — bdelusso — bdel-oos'-so ) see ABHOR , No. 2.
C — 1: βδέλυγμα (Strong's #946 — Noun Neuter — bdelugma — bdel'-oog-mah ) akin to A, No. 2 and B, denotes an "object of disgust, an abomination." This is said of the image to be set up by Antichrist, Matthew 24:15 ; Mark 13:14 ; of that which is highly esteemed amongst men, in contrast to its real character in the sight of God, Luke 16:15 . The constant association with idolatry suggests that what is highly esteemed among men constitutes an idol in the human heart. In Revelation 21:27 , entrance is forbidden into the Holy City on the part of the unclean, or one who "maketh an abomination and a lie." It is also used of the contents of the golden cup in the hand of the evil woman described in Revelation 17:4 , and of the name ascribed to her in the following verse.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Abomination
Abominable, Abomination. 1. All abomination, or an abominable thing, is a thing hateful or detestable, as the employment or calling of shepherds was to the Egyptians. Genesis 46:34. 2. Under the Mosaic law those animals and acts are called abominable the use or doing of which was prohibited. Leviticus 11:13 and Deuteronomy 23:18. 3. Idolatry of every kind is especially denoted by this term. Jeremiah 44:4 and 2 Kings 23:13. 4. So of sins in general. Isaiah 66:3. The Abomination of Desolation, literally the abomination of the desolator. This was Daniel's prediction of the pollution of the temple at Jerusalem, by Antiochus Epiphanes, who set up in it the altar and the statue of Jupiter Olympus: the daily sacrifice was taken away, and the abomination that maketh desolate drove ail the true worshippers of God from the temple. Daniel 11:31; Daniel 12:11. But the prophecy had, to say the least, a further reference. For our Lord appeals to it, Matthew 24:15-18; Mark 13:14-16, and declares that its fulfillment was to be the warning for his disciples to flee from the doomed city. This would be simultaneous with the Investment of Jerusalem. Luke 21:20-21. Some have believed the investment (when Cestius Gallus first encamped around Jerusalem, 66 a.d., and then withdrew) the abomination of desolation itself; the Roman standards (objects of worship to the soldiers) being then planted on holy ground. But these standards had been there before: and so it is more likely that the abominable thing was something done by the Jews themselves. Now Josephus mentions a profanation by the Zealots who had got possession of the temple; and to this or some similar deed our Lord, we may suppose, referred. The Christians, it may be added, took the warning, the opportunity being afforded by the retirement of Gallus, and fled to Fella.

Sentence search

Abomination - The way of the wicked is an Abomination to the Lord. Hence, defilement, pollution, in a physical sense, or evil doctrines and practices, which are moral defilements, idols and idolatry, are called Abominations. The Jews were an Abomination to the Egyptians and the sacred animals of the Egyptians were an Abomination to the Jews. The Roman army is called the Abomination of desolation. In short, whatever is an object of extreme hatred, is called an Abomination
Abomination - In the language of Scripture, the word Abomination for the most part means idolatry. Thus we read, (2 Kings 23:13,) that Ashtoreth was the Abomination (that is the idol) of the Zidonians; Chemosh, the Abomination of the Moabites; and Milcom, the Abomination of the Ammonites. Hence our Lord forewarned his disciples, that when they saw the Abomination of desolation, spoken of by Daniel the prophet, in the holy place, namely, the temple, they should accept this, as a token, that Jerusalem would be destroyed, and should accordingly then take their flight
Gaal - Contempt; Abomination
Desolation, Abomination of - See Abomination of Desolation
Abomination of Desolation, - Mentioned by our Saviour, (Matthew 24:15 ) as a sign of the approaching destruction of Jerusalem, with reference to (Daniel 9:27 ; 11:31 ; 12:11 ) The prophecy referred ultimately to the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans, and consequently the "abomination" must describe some occurrence connected with that event. It appears most probable that the profanities of the Zealots constituted the Abomination, which was the sign of the impending ruin; but most people refer it to the standards or banners of the Roman army. They were Abomination because there were idolatrous images upon them
Desolation, Abomination of - (Matthew 24:15 ; Mark 13:14 ; Compare Luke 21:20 ), is interpreted of the eagles, the standards of the Roman army, which were an Abomination to the Jews. (See Abomination
Abomination - The word 'abomination' is used in the O. The divine service became itself an Abomination to God when it had fallen into a mere outward observance or was in association with iniquity. But idolatry was the special thing that was declared to be Abomination to Jehovah. shows the idolatry that was carried on in secret, and the 'greater Abomination,' of bringing it actually into the inner court of the Lord's house, between the porch and the altar! The word is but seldom used in the N
Milcom - (1 Kings 11:33)...
See Abomination
Abomination - ...
Tô‛êbah (תּוֹעֵבָה, Strong's #8441), “abomination; loathsome, detestable thing. 43:32 (the first occurrence): “… The Egyptians might not eat bread with the Hebrews; for that is an Abomination unto the Egyptians. 29:27: “An unjust man is an Abomination to the just: and he that is upright in the way is Abomination to the wicked. People with habits loathsome to God are themselves detestable to Him: “The woman shall not wear that which pertaineth unto a man, neither shall a man put on a woman’s garment: for all that do so are Abomination unto the Lord thy God” ( Abomination to the Lord thy God. Neither shalt thou bring an Abomination into thine house …” ( Abominations” ( Abomination unto the Lord: and because of these Abominations the Lord thy God doth drive them out from before thee” ( Abomination unto him: … a proud look, a lying tongue, and hands that shed innocent blood, a heart that deviseth wicked imaginations, … and he that soweth discord among brethren” ( Abomination to men” ( Abomination, act abominably. 7:26: “Neither shalt thou bring an Abomination into thine house
Abomination - (βδέλυγμα)...
Like the word ‘taste’-originally a physical, then a mental term,-‘abomination’ denotes that for which God and His people have a violent distaste. * Abominable - Abominable, Abomination. All Abomination, or an abominable thing, is a thing hateful or detestable, as the employment or calling of shepherds was to the Egyptians. The Abomination of Desolation, literally the Abomination of the desolator. This was Daniel's prediction of the pollution of the temple at Jerusalem, by Antiochus Epiphanes, who set up in it the altar and the statue of Jupiter Olympus: the daily sacrifice was taken away, and the Abomination that maketh desolate drove ail the true worshippers of God from the temple. , and then withdrew) the Abomination of desolation itself; the Roman standards (objects of worship to the soldiers) being then planted on holy ground
Abomination - Abominable, Abomination. All Abomination, or an abominable thing, is a thing hateful or detestable, as the employment or calling of shepherds was to the Egyptians. The Abomination of Desolation, literally the Abomination of the desolator. This was Daniel's prediction of the pollution of the temple at Jerusalem, by Antiochus Epiphanes, who set up in it the altar and the statue of Jupiter Olympus: the daily sacrifice was taken away, and the Abomination that maketh desolate drove ail the true worshippers of God from the temple. , and then withdrew) the Abomination of desolation itself; the Roman standards (objects of worship to the soldiers) being then planted on holy ground
Abomination - ...
Every shepherd was "an Abomination" unto the Egyptians (Genesis 46:34 ). This permission could not be accepted, because Moses said they would have to sacrifice "the Abomination of the Egyptians" (Exodus 8:26 ); i. ...
(Daniel 11:31 ), in that section of his prophecies which is generally interpreted as referring to the fearful calamities that were to fall on the Jews in the time of Antiochus Epiphanes, says, "And they shall place the Abomination that maketh desolate. This was the Abomination of the desolation of Jerusalem. " These ensigns were an "abomination" to the Jews, the "abomination of desolation
Abomination of Desolation - "The idol (See Abomination) of the desolator," or "the idol that causeth desolation. " Abomination refers especially to such idolatry only as is perpetrated by apostates from Jehovah (2 Kings 21:2-7; 2 Kings 23:13). " The Lord quotes Daniel 9:27; Daniel 11:31; Daniel 12:11, in Matthew 24:15 "the Abomination of desolation," as the sign of Jerusalem's coming destruction. Jewish rabbis considered the prophecy fulfilled when the Jews erected an idol altar, described as "the Abomination of desolation" in 1 Maccabees 1:54; 1 Maccabees 6:7. 70), is not enough to meet the requirements of the term "abomination," unless it were shown that the Jews shared in the idolatry. Perhaps the Zealots perpetrated some Abomination which was to be the sign of the nation's ruin
Kaiwan - As is often the case when foreign gods were referred to, the original vowels of the name were probably replaced with the vowels of the Hebrew word for “abomination
Abomination, Abomination of Desolation - ...
Abomination translates four Hebrew and one Greek word. Israel became a stinking Abomination to the Philistines (1 Samuel 13:4 ). Bdelugma , “that which stinks, is disgusting,” things people value are an Abomination to God (Luke 16:15 ). ...
“Abomination of desolation” is a special term in Daniel 9:27 ; Daniel 11:31 ; Daniel 12:11 ; Matthew 24:15 ; Mark 13:14 ; Luke 16:15 ; Revelation 17:4-5 ; Revelation 21:27 . “Abomination” ( shiqquts ) is used to describe an idol which would desecrate the holy Temple and/or altar in Jerusalem. ...
The three occasions where the two words “abomination” and “desolation” are used together present interpreters with baffling grammatical and syntactical problems. Hebrews did not want to write or pronounce the pagan term “bacal” and so substituted “abomination” (shiqquts). Thus, the Zeus (lord of heaven) is loosely referred to as “abominations one who makes desolate. Josephus even identified the Abomination of the desolator in the destruction of Jerusalem by the Roman Titus in A. ...
Bible students give differing interpretations about the eschatological meaning of the Abomination of desolation
Rags - So the natural righteousness of people which is made up of the natural effusions of the spirit and mind are an Abomination to GOD. The Spirit of GOD uses this illustration to show that whatever comes out of the human spirit as a natural product of the human spirit is a vile Abomination to GOD
Abomination - ) The feeling of extreme disgust and hatred; abhorrence; detestation; loathing; as, he holds tobacco in Abomination
Abomination - This term was used with regard to the Hebrews, who, being shepherds, are said to have been an Abomination to the Egyptians; because they sacrificed the animals held sacred by that people, as oxen, goats, sheep, &c. For this reason, Chrysostom affirms, that every idol, and every image of a man, was called an Abomination among the Jews. The "abomination of desolation" foretold by the Prophet Daniel 10:27, 11:31, is supposed by some interpreters to denote the statue of Jupiter Olympius, which Antiochus Epiphanes caused to be erected in the temple of Jerusalem. But the former passage, considered in its whole connexion, bears more immediate reference to that which the evangelists have denominated the "abomination of desolation," Matthew 24:15-16 ; Mark 13:14 . The images of their gods and emperors were delineated on these ensigns; and the ensigns themselves, especially the eagles, which were carried at the heads of the legions, were objects of worship; and, according to the usual style of Scripture, they were therefore an Abomination. ...
In general, whatever is morally or ceremonially impure, or leads to sin, is designated an Abomination to God. Thus lying lips are said to be an Abomination to the Lord. Every thing in doctrine or practice which tended to corrupt the simplicity of the Gospel is also in Scripture called abominable; hence Babylon is represented, Revelation 17:4 , as holding in her hand a cup "full of Abominations. " In this view, to "work Abomination," is to introduce idolatry, or any other great corruption, into the church and worship of God, 1 Kings 11:7
Abomination - Abomination . ]'>[1] by ‘abomination’ and, occasionally, ‘abominable thing. Among the objects so described are heathen deities such as Ashtoreth (Astarte), Chemosh, Milcom, the ‘abominations’ of the Zidonians (Phœnicians), Moabites, and Ammonites respectively ( 2 Kings 23:13 ); images and other paraphernalia of the forbidden cults ( Deuteronomy 7:25 ; Deuteronomy 27:15 , and often in Ezk. Some of the practices that are an ‘abomination unto J″ Olympius - 168 ( 2Ma 6:2 ), and the setting up of his image is the ‘abomination of desolation’ ( Daniel 9:27 )
Abomination of Desolation - Daniel 9:27 shows that the time of the Abomination is in the last half of the last of the seventy weeks of Daniel named in Daniel 9:24 . Of this person an image will be made, and the people will be constrained to worship it, Revelation 13:14,15 ; but we do not read that it will be carried into the future temple; whereas our Lord says that the Abomination will stand in the holy place. The 'abomination of desolation' is evidently connected with the trinity of evil spoken of in Revelation 13 and will be the work of Satan, the Roman beast, and the false prophet
Ehenna - ) The valley of Hinnom, near Jerusalem, where some of the Israelites sacrificed their children to Moloch, which, on this account, was afterward regarded as a place of Abomination, and made a receptacle for all the refuse of the city, perpetual fires being kept up in order to prevent pestilential effluvia
Abomination - The Egyptians regarded it an Abomination, i. So when Pharaoh told Israel to offer sacrifice to Jehovah in Egypt without going to the wilderness, Moses objected: "we shall sacrifice the Abomination of the Egyptians before their eyes" (the cow, the only animal which all the Egyptians held sacred), "and will they not stone us?" (Exodus 8:26) compare the Jews' own practice in later times (Acts 10:28). ...
The Hebrew, not only as foreigners, accounted by the intolerant mythology of Egypt as unfit for intercourse except that of war or commerce, but also as nomad shepherds, were an "abomination" to the Egyptians (Genesis 46:34)
Daniel - The only passage in which the book is explicitly mentioned is Matthew 24:15, where the phrase τὸ βδέλυγμα τῆς ἐρημώσεως (‘the Abomination of desolation’) is quoted. Abomination of Desolation
Desolation - The Abomination of desolation, Roman armies which ravaged and destroyed Jerusalem
Chemosh - It was for this ‘abomination of Moab’ that Solomon erected a temple ( 1 Kings 11:7 ), later destroyed by Josiah ( 2 Kings 23:13 )
Chemosh - The worship of this god, "the Abomination of Moab," was introduced at Jerusalem by Solomon (1 Kings 11:7 ), but was abolished by Josiah (2 Kings 23:13 )
Er - Tamar was his wife but bore him no son; for "Er was wicked in the sight of the Lord, and the Lord slew him," his sin being probably some Abomination connected with the impure Canaanite idolatry (Genesis 38:3-7)
Foreigner - They enjoyed in many things equal rights with the native-born residents (Exodus 12:49 ; Leviticus 24:22 ; Numbers 15:15 ; 35:15 ), but were not allowed to do anything which was an Abomination according to the Jewish law (Exodus 20:10 ; Leviticus 17:15,16 ; 18:26 ; 20:2 ; 24:16 , etc
Chiun - ” The Hebrew word kiyun appears to represent an intentional change by the Hebrew scribes, inserting the vowels of siqquts , “abomination,” for an original reading, Kaiwan , the name of a Babylonian God of the stars equivalent to the Greek god Saturn
Abominable, Abomination - 2 and B, denotes an "object of disgust, an Abomination. In Revelation 21:27 , entrance is forbidden into the Holy City on the part of the unclean, or one who "maketh an Abomination and a lie
Abomination of Desolation - Abomination OF DESOLATION . While it is impossible to reach any final choice between these different interpretations, it seems probable that the reference of Mark 13:14 is prior to the destruction of Jerusalem, because of its insistence that the appearance of the ‘abomination of desolation’ (or the ‘abomination that makes desolate’) is to be taken as a warning for those who are in Judæa to flee to the mountains
Abomination of Desolation - But by the Abomination of Desolation spoken of by our Lord, Matthew 24:15 Mark 13:14 , and foretold as about to be seen at Jerusalem during the last siege of that city by the Romans under Titus, is probably meant the Roman army, whose standards had the images of their gods and emperors upon them, and were worshipped in the precincts of the temple when that and the city were taken
Antichrist - " Some see allusions to him in the "False Christs," the "abomination of desolation," and "the one who shall come in his own name" of the Gospel
Idol, Idolatry - It is an Abomination to God (Exodus 20:4)
Beelzebub - , the chief Abomination, was used as an appellation of the prince of devils
Malcam - see), the ‘abomination’ of the children of Ammon, and identical with Molech (cf
Moloch - The Israelites regarded Moloch as an ‘abomination,’ and their temporary adoption of the worship of Moloch in the Valley of Hinnom gave rise to the ominous meaning attaching to ‘Gehenna
Chiun - However, it is far more probable that they, conscious of its reference, substituted for the original vowels those of the word shiqqûts (‘abomination’) an epithet often applied to strange gods
Siccuth - The present form is probably due to the Massoretic combination of the consonants of Sakkuth with the vowels of shiqquts (‘abomination’) the same vocalization which we find in Chiun
Shepherds - I notice the character of shepherds in order to offer a short observation on what is said concerning the Abomination the Egyptians had to shepherds, which may not perhaps so immediately strike the reader. )...
It hath been supposed by some that this Abomination of the Egyptians to shepherds arose from their employment, because while the Egyptians worshipped animals the shepherds killed them occasionally for food. The Egyptians of the present hour have their Abomination still
Muggletonians - They affirmed that there was no devil at all without the body of man or woman; that the devil is man's spirit of unclean reason and cursed imagination; that the ministry in this world, whether prophetical or ministerial, is all a lie and Abomination to the Lord; with a variety of other vain and inconsistent tenets
Desolate, Desolation - , in the phrase "the Abomination of desolation," Matthew 24:15 ; Mark 13:14 ; the genitive is objective, "the Abomination that makes desolate;" (b) with stress upon the effect of the process, Luke 21:20 , with reference to the "desolation" of Jerusalem
Abomination That Causes Desolation, the - It should be noted that for Jesus, the Abomination has become a personal force rather than an event—he stands (in the holy place [1] where he does not belong [2]). This has caused some to look for a particular historical act by an individual for fulfillment (variously, Pilate, Caligula, or Hadrian, more proximately, or more remotely the Antichrist himself in the endtimes) as the ultimate Abomination
Balances - Leviticus 19:36 ; Ezekiel 45:10 , for men contrived to falsify the balance, as well as the weights, which was an Abomination to the Lord
Mount Olivet - But so it was, when king Solomon loved many strange wives, those illicit connexions led him into idolatry; hence we read that Solomon built an high place for Chemosh, the Abomination of Moab, in the hill that is before Jerusalem, and for Moloch, the Abomination of the children of Ammon
Hinnom, Valley of - The parallel passage in 2 Chronicles 28:3 indicates that the scene of the Abomination was the valley of Hinnom
Tophet - Here the dead carcasses of beasts and every offal and Abomination were cast, and left to be either devoured by that worm that never died or consumed by that fire that was never quenched
Chemosh - The "abomination" (i
Banner - The banners and ensigns of the Roman army had idolatrous images upon them, and hence they are called the "abomination of desolation" (q
Topheth - Then it became the place of Abomination, the very gate or pit of hell
Dog - The price of a dog was forbidden to be put into the Lord's treasury, it was an Abomination
Magic - The Jews were commanded not to learn the "abomination" of the people of the Promised Land (Leviticus 19:31 ; Deuteronomy 18:9-14 )
Fish, Fisher - Moses says in general, that all sorts of river, lake, or sea fish, which have scales and fins, may be eaten; all others shall be to the Hebrews an Abomination, Leviticus 11:9-12 Deuteronomy 14:9,10
Swine - "They that sanctify themselves, and purify themselves in the gardens, behind one tree in the midst, eating swine's flesh, and the Abomination, and the mouse, shall be consumed together, saith the Lord," Isaiah 66:17 . Such a sacrifice was an Abomination to the Lord, because the eating of the blood was prohibited, and because the sacrifice consisted of swine's flesh
Arms And Armor - Under Abomination is a cut representing the ensigns of the Roman legions, which the Jews regarded as idolatrous, not only because they had been consecrated to idols, and by heathen priests, but as they had images on them, and were objects of adoration
to'Pheth, - Then it became the place of Abomination, the very gate or pit of hell
Molech - This is the Fire-god, 'the Abomination of Ammon
Human Sacrifice - Both Jeremiah and Ezekiel condemn such offerings as an Abomination to God (Jeremiah 7:31-32 ; Jeremiah 19:5-6 ; Ezekiel 16:20-21 ; Ezekiel 20:31 ). Yet the Abomination of human sacrifice, stated Jeremiah, never entered the mind of Yahweh (Jeremiah 19:5 )
Shepherd - Joseph instructed his brethren to tell Pharaoh that they were shepherds, and they asked permission to dwell in Goshen, for every shepherd was an Abomination to the Egyptians
Baal Peor - Chemosh, the Abomination of Moab, to whom Solomon erected an altar, 1 Kings 11:7 , is supposed to have been the same deity
Tribulation - Revelation 12:13-17 ); in this tribulation Gentile witnesses for God will share (Revelation 7:9 ), but it will be distinctly "the time of Jacob's trouble" (Jeremiah 30:7 ); its beginning is signalized by the setting up of the "abomination of desolation" (Matthew 24:15 ; Mark 13:14 , with Daniel 11:31 ; 12:11 )
Book of Life - Those whose names are in the book have been born into God's family through Jesus Christ (Hebrews 12:23 ; Revelation 13:8 ); remain faithful in worship of God (Revelation 13:8 ; Revelation 17:8 ); are untouched by the practice of Abomination and falsehood (Revelation 21:27 ); are faithful through tribulation (Revelation 3:5 ); and are fellow workers in the work of Jesus Christ (Philippians 4:3 )
Animals, Clean And Unclean - Those that were not to be eaten were to be regarded as an Abomination, and if the dead bodies of any such fell upon any vessel or garment it rendered it unclean, and any one who touched their carcass must wash his clothes and be unclean until the evening. ...
We know from other scriptures that the animals described here as unclean are not really so, but good as creatures of God; yet they were by Israel to be regarded as unclean and an Abomination
Judgment--Comparable to Balances - It would be well if the scales of conscience would turn even at the finest dust, but how rarely is this the case! False weights and balances are an Abomination unto the Lord, yet many use them, they weigh their neighbours so as to underestimate them, and they use balances far too favourable to themselves; they give the Lord a portion sadly too small, and to their own pleasures a dowry much too great
Mind - The sacrifice of the wicked is Abomination how much more, when he bringeth it with a wicked mind
Beriah - In Joshua 13:2-3 the Sihor, or (Pelusiac branch of) the Nile, is the boundary between Egypt and Canaan; and in Genesis 46:34 the pastoral population in Goshen being an "abomination to the Egyptians," Goshen must have been regarded as non-Egyptian, but a kind of border land between the two countries, Egypt and Canaan
Harlot - The moral Abomination of it is elsewhere condemned as excluding from heaven (1 Corinthians 6:9-20)
Ammon Ammonites Children of Ammon - The divinity of the tribe was Molech, generally named in the Old Testament under the altered form of Milcom—"the Abomination of the children of Ammon;" and Malcham
Idol - In the Bible various terms are used to refer to idols or idolatry: “image”, either graven (carved) or cast, “statue,” “abomination
Goshen - Goshen, for every shepherd is an Abomination to the Egyptians,") proves that Goshen was regarded by Egyptians as scarcely Egypt proper, though having many Egyptians in it, as is recorded during the ten plagues; also foreigners
Desolation - Abomination of Desolation
Daniel, Prophet - Our Lord quotes from it the words: "When therefore you shall see the Abomination of desolation which was spoken of by Daniel the prophet" (Matthew 24; Daniel 9)
Olivet Discourse, the - ...
The Abomination that Makes Desolate (Matthew 24:15-22 ) Extrabiblical histories describe the desecration of the Jerusalem Temple in 167 B
Naked - A sinner unawakened, unregenerated, hath nothing to clothe him against the calamities of the rain, and storm, and tempest of divine wrath; hence the whole of their corruption must appear; and how then, independent of every other consideration, can such an one enter the kingdom of God? "Here shall in no wise enter into it" (saith the decided language of the word of God when describing the glories of heaven, and the characters that dwell there) "any thing that defileth, neither whatsoever worketh Abomination, or maketh a lie
Homosexuality - ...
In the Holiness Code of Leviticus, homosexuality is considered an Abomination (Judges 18:22 ), and such behavior was to be punished by death (Judges 20:13 )
Molech - This deity often is associated with Ammon (compare 1 Kings 11:7 —) “the Abomination of the children of Ammon
Antichrist - This latter event the Jews term the “abomination of desolation
Can, May - 43:32: “… The Egyptians might not eat bread with the Hebrews; for that is an Abomination unto the Egyptians” (KJV, RSV, NIV, NASB, “could not”)
Necromancy - Josiah's reform targeted all forms of Abomination, including mediums (2 Kings 23:24 )
Ammon - Solomon's Ammonite wives seduced him to rear an altar to this "abomination," to his own hurt (Jeremiah 49:1; Jeremiah 49:3)
Manasseh - He raised altars to the whole host of heaven, in the courts of God's house; made his son pass through the fire in honour of Moloch; was addicted to magic, divinations, auguries, and other superstitions; set up the idol Astarte in the house of God; finally, he involved his people in all the Abomination of the idolatrous nations to that degree, that Israel committed more wickedness than the Canaanites, whom the Lord had driven out before them
Shame - The absence of shame is always regarded as an aggravation of sinful conduct: Job ( Job 19:3 ) reproaches his friends because they are ‘not ashamed’ of dealing hardly with him; the climax of Jeremiah’s complaint ( Jeremiah 6:15 ) against those who had ‘committed Abomination’ is that ‘they were not at all ashamed, neither could they blush’ (cf
Gibeah - ...
It is the Gibeah of Benjamin destroyed by the other tribes under the Judges (Judges 19; 20) for the flagrant Abomination perpetrated there
Eating - And when our fathers were in Egypt, we are told, that it was an Abomination for the Egyptians to sit at meat with the Hebrews
Dedication, Feast of - 167, when ‘an Abomination of desolation’ was erected upon it (1 Maccabees 1:54), and the climax was reached on 25 Chislev, when sacrifices were offered upon this idol-altar standing on the altar of God (v
Prepare - A further development of this emphasis is that a matter “may be admissible”—so Moses said to Pharaoh: “It is not meet so to do; for we shall sacrifice the Abomination of the Egyptians to the Lord our God …” ( Canaan; Canaanite - And there were also sodomites in the land: and they did according to all the Abominations of the nations which the Lord cast out before the children of Israel” (1 Kings 14:23-24; cf. ” A “Canaanite” was not permitted to enter the tabernacle or temple; no longer would one of God’s people who practiced the Abominations of the “Canaanites” enter the house of the Lord. 21:27: “And there shall in no wise enter into it any thing that defileth, neither whatsoever worketh Abomination, or maketh a lie …” (cf
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - Milcom, called the "abomination" of the Ammonites, was apparently the chief deity of the Ammonites or Moabites. The "abomination" label seems to convey both the detestable aspect of origin and of the worship of Lot's descendants. Molech or Moloch was another "abomination" of the Ammonites. Ezekiel lists the worship of Tammuz as one of the Abominations in God's sight (8:1-18) that was being practiced in the temple precincts in Jerusalem
Jeroboam - Can this be the same Solomon? Can this be that Solomon to whom the Lord appeared twice? For Solomon went after Ashtoreth, the goddess of the Zidonians, and after Molech, the Abomination of the Ammonites. Then did Solomon build an high place for Chemosh, the Abomination of Moab, in the hill of God that is before Jerusalem, and for Molech, the Abomination of Ammon
Delight - It is possible to delight in those things that are good and proper; it is also possible to delight in that which is an Abomination to the Lord (Isaiah 66:3 )
Vessel - ...
Kelı̂y can mean “clothing”: “The woman shall not wear that which pertaineth unto a man, neither shall a man put on a woman’s garment: for all that do so are Abomination unto the Lord thy God” ( Hell - It became a garbage dump and a place of Abomination where fire burned continuously (2Kings 23:1;2 Kings 10:1 ; compare Matthew 18:9 ; Mark 9:43 ,Mark 9:43,9:45 ,Mark 9:45,9:47 ; James 3:6 )
Divination And Magic - For whoever does these things is an Abomination to the Lord; and because of these abominable practices the Lord your God is driving them out before you
Think, Devise - ...
Infrequently, châshab is translated as “impute”: “And if any of the flesh of the sacrifice of his peace offerings be eaten at all on the third day, it shall not be accepted, neither shall it be imputed unto him that offereth it; it shall be an Abomination” ( Jephthah - A literal human sacrifice was forbidden as an Abomination before Jehovah (Leviticus 18:21; Leviticus 20:2-5). ...
They would never have come to praise a human sacrifice; Scripture would never have recorded without censure an anti-theocratic Abomination
Covetousness - Such persons reverse unconsciously Christ’s principle that ‘the life is more than meat’ (Matthew 6:25); and the Pharisees, ‘who were covetous’ (Luke 16:14), by their blindness to the true order of importance called forth essentially the same rebuke, ‘that which is highly esteemed amongst men, is Abomination in the sight of God’ (Luke 16:15)
Seventy Weeks of Daniel - See Abomination OF DESOLATION
Elkesai, Elkesaites - The work, however, which was the common groundwork of the Clementine Recognitions and Homilies [1] asserts that a new gospel was published (the Homilies add "secretly") after the destruction of the Holy Place; and it seems on other grounds probable that a number of Essenes, who had always held the Temple sacrifices in Abomination, were brought to recognize Jesus as the true Prophet when the destruction of the Temple and the abolition of its sacrifices fulfilled His prediction
Jephthah - The sacrifice of children to Moloch was an Abomination to the Lord, of which in numberless passages, he expresses his detestation; and it was prohibited by an express law, under pain of death, as "a defilement of God's sanctuary, and a profanation of his holy name," Leviticus...
Judges 20:2-3 . Such a sacrifice, therefore, unto the Lord himself, must be a still higher Abomination
Antiochus - Daniel relates "They shall pollute the ...
sanctuary of strength, and shall take away the daily sacrifice, and they shall place the ...
Abomination that maketh desolate
Greek Church - Their secular clergy, under the rank of bishops, are allowed to marry once, and laymen twice; but fourth marriages they hold in Abomination
Sacrifices in the Old Testament - Human sacrifices among the Hebrews are always spoken of as an Abomination committed by people contaminated through the influence of their pagan neighbors
Old Testament, Sacrifices in the - Human sacrifices among the Hebrews are always spoken of as an Abomination committed by people contaminated through the influence of their pagan neighbors
Dibon - his successors); the second (line 21-31) his public buildings; the third part (31-34) his wars against Horonaim with the help of Chemosh, "the Abomination (idol) of Moab
Proverbs, Book of - There are seven things which are an Abomination to the Lord
Clean, To Be - Unless the rites expressed a person’s contrite and sincere desire to be cleansed from the defilement of sin, they were an Abomination to God and only aggravated a person’s guilt
Abomination of Desolation - ABOMINATION OF DESOLATION (τὸ βδέλυγμα τῆς ἐρημώσεως)
Altar - Antiochus Epiphanes erected a small altar to Jupiter-‘the Abomination of desolation’ (1 Maccabees 1:54)-upon the θυσιαστήριον of the temple, and ‘on the twenty-fifth day of the month they sacrificed upon the idol-altar (βωμός) which was upon the altar of God (θυσιαστήριον)
Altar - Antiochus Epiphanes erected a small altar to Jupiter-‘the Abomination of desolation’ (1 Maccabees 1:54)-upon the θυσιαστήριον of the temple, and ‘on the twenty-fifth day of the month they sacrificed upon the idol-altar (βωμός) which was upon the altar of God (θυσιαστήριον)
Obsolete or Obscure Words in the English av Bible - ...
Abomination, Deuteronomy 7:26—idol; polluted thing
Lord's Supper - To drink blood would have been an Abomination (Leviticus 17:11-12; Acts 15:29)
Idol - Israel's idolatry was not merely an Abomination in God's sight, as that of the Gentiles, but spiritual "adultery" against Jehovah her Husband (Isaiah 54:5; Jeremiah 3:14; Ezekiel 16). He placed them in a separate province; as shepherds they were an Abomination to Egyptians, and sacrificed to God the very animals Egypt worshipped (Exodus 8:26)
Essenes - It was also a great Abomination to them to eat any food except such as had been prepared by persons of their own sect
Habits - This practice is said to be an Abomination to the Lord; which plainly intimates that the law refers to some idolatrous custom, of which Moses and the prophets always spoke in terms of the utmost abhorrence
Sacrifice - They were taught that without repentance, faith, and reformation, all sacrifices were an Abomination to God, Proverbs 21:27 Jeremiah 6:20 Amos 5:22 Micah 6:6-8 ; that He desires mercy and not sacrifice, Hosea 6:6 Matthew 9:13 , and supreme love to him, Mark 12:33
Sin - 36:31: “Then shall ye remember your own evil ways … and shall loathe yourselves in your own sight for your iniquities and for your Abominations” (cf. ...
Justifying the “wicked” is classed as a heinous crime: “He that justifieth the wicked, and he that condemneth the just, even they both are Abomination to the Lord” ( Abominations of the house of Israel! For they shall fall by the sword, by the famine, and by the pestilence. 24:1-4, after forbidding adulterous marriage practices, concludes: “… For that is Abomination before the Lord: and thou shalt not cause the land to sin …” (KJV); the RSV renders this passage: “You shall not bring guilt upon the land
Antiochus - Daniel 9 would comfort the faithful Jews amidst the "abominations" against "the covenant," with the prospect of Messiah, who would confirm it. Antiochus "took away the daily sacrifice, and placed (on the 15th day of Cisleu, on Jehovah's altar) the Abomination (idol, Jupiter Olympius' image) that maketh desolate," i
Eye - "Cast ye away every man the Abomination of his eyes," Ezekiel 20:7-8 ; let not the idols of the Egyptians seduce you
Lazarus - Not the rich man's wealth but his practical unbelief (Luke 16:27-31) shut him out "in torments"; he was one of those" covetous" whom Jesus just before reproved, "justifying himself before men," "highly esteemed among men," but one whose practice was "abomination in the sight of God
Amos - Jehovah’s first demands were morality and justice and kindliness, and any sacrificial system that removed the emphasis from these things and placed it on the observance of ritual was an Abomination ( Amos 5:21-25 )
Balaam - " This Baal-peor was an obscene idol, before which image, the votaries offered the most horrid prostitution of their bodies, and wrought such Abomination as would be shocking to the feelings of chastity to relate
Pharaoh - To the old native Egyptians, who were an African race, shepherds were "an Abomination;" but to the Hyksos kings these Asiatic shepherds who now appeared with Jacob at their head were congenial, and being akin to their own race, had a warm welcome (Genesis 47:5,6 )
Canticles; the Song of Solomon - A shepherdess (Song of Solomon 1:7) would have been an Abomination to the Egyptians; nor do Song of Solomon 1:6; Song of Solomon 3:4; Luke 11:27-284; Song of Solomon 5:7 suit this view
Balaam - ...
Balaam had recourse to "enchantments" also, so that he is called "the soothsayer" (Joshua 13:22) (ha -kosem , distinguished, from the true prophet, Isaiah 3:2), a practice denounced as "an Abomination to the Lord" (Romans 1:25-26; Deuteronomy 18:12)
Exodus, the - As shepherds they were "an Abomination to the Egyptians" from the first; they sacrificed the very animal the Egyptians worshipped (compare Exodus 8:26); blood in sacrifices too was an offense to the Egyptians
Man - “The woman [9] shall not wear that which pertaineth unto a man, neither shall a man [8] put on a woman’s [9] garment: for all that do so are Abomination unto the Lord thy God” ( Abominations have the men of the land done, which were before you, and the land is defiled” ( Mary Magdalene - Yea, seven are an Abomination unto Him. " And, again: "When he speaketh fair, believe him not, for there are seven Abominations in his heart. " And John Bunyan has the very same number at the end of his Grace Abounding: "I find to this day these seven Abominations in my heart. Now, what are your seven scars? What are your seven Abominations in your heart? What are the six things, yea seven, in your heart that the Lord hates? It is almost our whole salvation to ask and to answer that question
Confession - ) Item, We have always accounted as an unspeakable Abomination before God all those inventions of men; namely, the feasts and the vigils of saints, the water which they call holy: as likewise to abstain from flesh upon certain days, and the like; but especially their masses. ) We esteem for an Abomination, and as antichristian, all those human inventions which are a trouble or prejudice to the liberty of the spirit
Mark, Theology of - 9-13), and the Abomination of desolation (v
Lazarus - ...
This has been pronounced no authentic parable of Jesus, but an ‘evangelic discourse upon His words—“that which is exalted among men is an Abomination in the sight of God” ’ (Luke 16:15),† Absalom - David himself is a towering warning to all men, and especially to all godly men against this master Abomination
Antichrist - In the reference to the ‘abomination of desolation’ standing in the holy place (Matthew 24:15; cf
Matthew, the Gospel According to - Leviticus 19:17 tell him his fault" Matthew 19:4 "He which made them at the beginning Genesis 1:27 made male and female" Matthew 19:5 "For this cause shall a man leave his father" Genesis 2:24 Matthew 19:7 "Divorcement" Deuteronomy 24:1 Matthew 19:18 "Do no murder" Exodus 20:13 Matthew 21:5 "Behold, thy King cometh" Zechariah 9:9 Matthew 21:9 "Blessed is he that cometh in the Psalms 118:25-26 name of the Lord, Hosanna"...
Matthew 21:13 "My house the house of prayer" Isaiah 56:7 Matthew 21:16 "Out of the mouth of babes" Psalms 8:2 Matthew 21:42 "The stone which the builders rejected" Psalms 118:22-23 Matthew 21:44 "Whosoever shall fall on this stone Isaiah 8:14 shall be broken" Matthew 22:24 "Moses said, If a man die" Deuteronomy 25:5 Matthew 22:32 "I am the God of Abraham" Exodus 3:6 Matthew 22:37 "Thou shalt love the Lord" Deuteronomy 6:5 Matthew 22:39 "Thou shalt love thy neighbor" Leviticus 19:18 Matthew 22:45 "Sit thou on My right hand" Psalms 110:1 Matthew 23:35 "Blood of Abel" Genesis 4:8 Matthew 23:38 "Your house is left desolate" Psalms 69:25 Matthew 23:39 "Blessed is he that cometh in the Psalms 118:26 name of the Lord"...
Matthew 24:15 "The Abomination of desolation" Daniel 9:27 Matthew 24:29 "Sun
Luke, Gospel According to - The passage Luke 21:20 , where ‘Jerusalem compassed with armies’ replaces ‘the Abomination of desolation’ of Mark 13:14 , is said to betoken a date later than the destruction of Jerusalem, and to describe what had actually happened
Joseph - In Egypt swine-herds and cow-herds were ‘an Abomination’ to the people ( Genesis 46:34 ; cf
Temple - This also was the spot where it was predicted that the Abomination of desolation, or the Roman ensigns, should stand, Daniel 9:27 ; Matthew 24:15
Transubstantiation - It might have been naturally supposed, that when Luther directed his vigorous mind to point out and to condemn the abuses which had been sanctioned in the popish church, he would not have spared a doctrine the most irrational and objectionable which that church avows, and that he would have vindicated the holy ordinance of the Lord's Supper from the Abomination with which it had been associated
Psalms of Solomon - and following years); and in the profanation of the altar to which Psalms 2 refers it is tempting at first to see an allusion to Antiochus Epiphanes’ act in setting up on the altar the ‘abomination of desolation’ (1 Maccabees 1:54)
Plagues of Egypt - But the appointed time of this plague was in the middle of winter; and, accordingly, this plague extorted Pharaoh's partial consent, "Go ye, sacrifice to your God, but in the land;" and when Moses and Aaron objected the offence they would give to the Egyptians, who would stone them for sacrificing "the Abomination of the Egyptians," namely, animal sacrifices, he reluctantly consented, "only ye shall not go very far away;" for he was apprehensive of their flight, like his predecessor, who first enslaved the Israelites, Exodus 1:10 ; and he again desired them to "entreat for him
Antiochus - The statue of Jupiter Olympus was placed upon the altar of the temple, and thus the Abomination of desolation was seen in the temple of God
Egypt - It was to the Egyptians that shepherds were an Abomination, as scripture says, which may not have applied to the Hyksos (which signifies 'shepherds' and agrees with their being called shepherd-kings), and this may account, under the control of God, for 'the best of the land' being given to the Israelites
Sanctify, Sanctification - ἅγιος is used as follows: He addresses God as ‘Holy Father’ (John 17:11); He speaks of ‘the holy angels’ (Mark 8:38 ||); He uses the name ‘Holy Spirit’ (Matthew 12:32 || Matthew 28:19, Mark 12:36; Mark 13:11, Luke 12:12, John 14:26; John 20:22); He warns against giving ‘that which is holy’ unto the dogs (Matthew 26:26-287); and He refers to the Abomination that stands ‘in the holy place’ (Matthew 24:15)
Food - All creatures technically ‘unclean’ were taboo, to use the modern term (see Abomination, Clean and Unclean)
Holiness Purity - The ‘holiness’ inculcated in the Leviticus passage involves the disuse as food of certain ‘creeping things’ regarded as repugnant and an ‘abomination’ to God
Jerusalem - which describes how the "children of Judah smote it with the edge of the sword, and set the city on fire;" and almost the latest mention of it in the New Testament is contained in the solemn warnings in which Christ foretold how Jerusalem should be "compassed with armies," Luke 21:20, and the "abomination of desolation" be seen standing in the Holy Place, Matthew 24:15
Prayer - "The sacrifice of the wicked is an Abomination to the Lord, but the prayer of the upright is his delight
Mark, Gospel According to - The alteration of ‘abomination of desolation’ ( Mark 13:14 , so Matthew 24:15 ) into ‘Jerusalem compassed with armies’ ( Luke 21:20 ) is clearly an explanation of a writer later than Mk
Egypt - Faber thinks, the work of the "Shepherds," or Cushite invaders, who, at an early period, held possession of Egypt for two hundred and sixty years, and reduced the Egyptians to bondage, so that "a shepherd was an Abomination to the Egyptians" in Joseph's time
Joseph - "Shepherds were an Abomination" in Joseph's time, which could not have been the case under a shepherd king
Egypt - Shepherds were, according to Genesis, "an Abomination to the Egyptians" in Joseph's time; this is decisive against his living under a shepherd king
New Jerusalem - And the gates thereof shall in no wise be shut by day (for there shall be no night there): and they shall bring the glory and the honour of the nations into it: and there shall in no wise enter into it anything unclean, or he that maketh an Abomination and a lie: but only they which are written in the Lamb’s book of life
Egypt - The assertion that to eat bread with the Hebrews was an Abomination to the Egyptians ( Genesis 43:32 ) has not yet been satisfactorily explained