What does Aaron mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
אַהֲרֹ֖ן brother of Moses 47
אַהֲרֹן֙ brother of Moses 35
אַהֲרֹ֔ן brother of Moses 31
אַהֲרֹ֜ן brother of Moses 18
אַהֲרֹ֣ן brother of Moses 18
אַהֲרֹ֗ן brother of Moses 18
אַהֲרֹ֤ן brother of Moses 12
אַהֲרֹ֨ן brother of Moses 12
אַהֲרֹ֧ן brother of Moses 12
אַהֲרֹ֥ן brother of Moses 10
אַהֲרֹ֛ן brother of Moses 10
אַהֲרֹ֑ן brother of Moses 9
לְאַהֲרֹ֖ן brother of Moses 9
אַהֲרֹֽן brother of Moses 8
וְאַהֲרֹ֔ן brother of Moses 8
וְאַהֲרֹ֖ן brother of Moses 7
לְאַהֲרֹ֣ן brother of Moses 6
וְאַהֲרֹן֙ brother of Moses 5
וְאַהֲרֹ֣ן brother of Moses 5
אַהֲרֹן֒ brother of Moses 5
וְאַהֲרֹֽן brother of Moses 5
לְאַהֲרֹ֔ן brother of Moses 4
וְאַהֲרֹ֛ן brother of Moses 4
וְאַהֲרֹ֑ן brother of Moses 4
אַ֠הֲרֹן brother of Moses 3
ἀαρών the brother of Moses 3
לְאַהֲרֹ֥ן brother of Moses 3
וְאַהֲרֹ֥ן brother of Moses 2
אַהֲרֹ֡ן brother of Moses 2
ἀαρὼν the brother of Moses 2
וּֽלְאַהֲרֹ֑ן brother of Moses 2
אַ֝הֲרֹ֗ן brother of Moses 2
לְאַהֲרֹ֨ן brother of Moses 2
וְאַהֲרֹ֜ן brother of Moses 2
אַ֭הֲרֹן brother of Moses 1
לְ֝אַהֲרֹ֗ן brother of Moses 1
אַֽהֲרֹן־ brother of Moses 1
וְׄאַׄהֲׄרֹ֛ׄןׄ‪‬ brother of Moses 1
לְאַהֲרֹ֑ן brother of Moses 1
אַהֲרֹן֮ brother of Moses 1
וּֽלְאַהֲרֹ֔ן brother of Moses 1
וּֽלְאַהֲרֹ֗ן brother of Moses 1
וְאַהֲרֹ֨ן brother of Moses 1
וְאַֽהֲרֹ֔ן brother of Moses 1
וְאַהֲרֹ֤ן brother of Moses 1
וּֽלְאַהֲרֹ֜ן brother of Moses 1
אַֽהֲרֹ֖ן brother of Moses 1
לְאַֽהֲרֹ֔ן brother of Moses 1
אַֽהֲרֹן֙ brother of Moses 1
לְאַהֲרֹ֤ן brother of Moses 1
וְֽאַהֲרֹ֨ן brother of Moses 1
וּֽבְאַהֲרֹ֗ן brother of Moses 1
וְאַהֲרֹן֮ brother of Moses 1
אַהֲרֹ֕ן brother of Moses 1
וְאַהֲרֹ֗ן brother of Moses 1
וְאַהֲרֹ֨ן ׀ brother of Moses 1

Definitions Related to Aaron

H175


   1 brother of Moses, a Levite and the first high priest.
   Additional Information: Aaron = “light bringer”.
   

G2


   1 the brother of Moses, the first high priest of Israel and head of the whole priestly order.
   Additional Information: Aaron = “light-bringer”.
   

Frequency of Aaron (original languages)

Frequency of Aaron (English)

Dictionary

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Aaron
The son of Amram and Jochabed, of the tribe of Levi, and brother of Moses and Miriam, Exodus 6:20 ; born about the year B. C. 1574. He was three years older than Moses, Exodus 7:7 and was the spokesman and assistant of the latter in bringing Israel out of Egypt, Exodus 4:16 . His wife was Elisheba, daughter of Amminadab; and his sons, Nadab, Abihu, Eleazar, and Ithamar. He was 83 years old when God summoned him to join Moses in the desert near Horeb. Cooperating with his brother in the exodus from Egypt, Exodus 4:1-16:36 , he held up his hands in the battle with Amalek, Exodus 17:1-16 ; and ascended Mount Sinai with him to see the glory of God, Exodus 24:1,2,9-11 .
Aaron's chief distinction consisted in the choice of him and his male posterity for the priesthood. He was consecrated the first high priest by God's directions, Exodus 28:1-29:46 Leviticus 8:1-36 ; and was afterwards confirmed in his office by the destruction of Korah and his company, by the staying of the plague at his intercession, and by the budding of his rod, Numbers 16:1-17:13 . He was faithful and self-sacrificing in the duties of his office, and meekly "held his peace" when his sons Nadab and Abihu were slain, Leviticus 10:1 - 3 . Yet he fell sometimes into grievous sins: he made the golden calf at Sinai, Exodus 32:1-22 ; he joined Miriam in sedition against Moses, Numbers 12:1-16 ; and with Moses disobeyed God at Kadesh, Numbers 20:8-12 . God, therefore did not permit him to enter the promised land; but he died on Mount Hor, in Edom, in the fortieth year after leaving Egypt, at the age of about 123 years, Numbers 20:22-29 33:39 . In Deuteronomy 10:6 , he is said to have died at Mosera, which was probably the station in the valley west of Mount Hor, whence he ascended into the mount. The Arabs still pretend to show his tomb on the mount, and highly venerate it. In his office as high priest, Aaron was an eminent type of Christ, being "called of God," and anointed; bearing the names of the tribes on his breast; communicating God's will by Urim and Thummim; entering the Most Holy place on the Day of Atonement, "not without blood;" and interceding for and blessing the people of God. See PRIEST .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Caerleon, Aaron of
Martyr in Wales during the Diocletian persecution in 303. He was the companion of Saint Julius and is possibly Britain's proto-martyr. Feast, July 1,.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Aaron
Aaron had the distinctive privilege of being Moses' close associate and also the one selected as the first high priest of God's people. He and the firstborn son of each generation of his lineage were dedicated in a special anointing ceremony to officiate before God and on behalf of God's people as high priests.
Aaron, the first priest of ancient Israel, was the older brother of Moses. His parents Amram and Jochebed were Kohathites of the tribe of Levi. Two aspects of Aaron's earlier years provided a matrix out of which he responded to God's call to help Moses when he returned to Egypt. First, Aaron was committed to the God of the “fathers”—Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob (Exodus 3:1-6 ). Second, he understood that God had made a covenant with Abraham that included him and the people of Israel.
Pre-Sinai . Aaron agreed to help his brother Moses in the cause of seeking the release of his people from bondage. He and Moses were Yahweh's human instruments, carrying out Yahweh's mighty, unprecedented salvation-acts.
First, he accepted God's call to be Moses' mouthpiece before Pharaoh (Exodus 4:10-17 ; 5:1-13 ; 6:10-13 ; 6:28-7:7 ), a risky assignment. Both he and Moses were to be Yahweh's messengers in a hostile, polytheistic setting.
Second, as Moses' prophet (Exodus 7:1 ) he was an important proclaimer of God's word to Pharaoh and the other Egyptians. He fulfilled his priestly role by serving as mediator and intercessor on behalf of the people of Israel.
Third, like Moses he was moved by the Spirit of God and was used to effect miracles a number of times on the way to Sinai.
At Sinai . God graciously granted both Moses and Aaron new revelation during Israel's encampment at Sinai.
First, they were granted an unparalleled privilege. Moses and Aaron were allowed to enter into God's holy presence on Sinai (Exodus 19:24 ; 24:9-10 ).
Second, Aaron and Moses were leader-participants in the covenant Yahweh made between himself and the people of Israel.
Third, Yahweh delivered specific instructions to Aaron and Moses at Sinai about how they were to lead Israel to become his holy nation and kingdom of priests.
The Break in Loyalty . Aaron was directly responsible for a grave offense against God when Moses was on Mount Sinai receiving the written law of Israel (Exodus 32:1-10 ). He gave in to the demands of the people, collecting the necessary materials and supervising the making of a golden calf. He then told the people, "These are your gods, O Israel, who brought you up out of Egypt." Aaron then set up an altar and proceeded to lead the people in worshiping the calf.
Aaron acted against what he knew God wanted. Perhaps he had not completely detached himself from the Apis-bull worship of Egypt or from some insidious feature of Baal worship present in Egypt. In spite of his sin, Aaron was restored to his position of high priest. This is a most remarkable incident demonstrating the grace and compassion of God.
High Priest of God Most High . Aaron was duly attired and dedicated as God's priest (Leviticus 8-9 ). He ministered before Yahweh, whose presence-cloud dwelt above the mercy seat over the ark of the covenant in the Most Holy Place of the tabernacle (Exodus 40:38 ).
Aaron was chief as he ministered with other priests in presenting offerings and sacrifices to Yahweh for himself and for the people of Israel. He was an intercessor and mediator before Yahweh among his people. His priestly vestments, especially the ephod and breastplate adorned with precious stones inscribed with the names of the tribes, emphasized in a special way this ministry before God on behalf of the people.
Harvey E. Finley
See also Offerings and Sacrifices ; Priest, Priesthood
Bibliography . W. F. Albright, History, Archaeology and Christian Humanism ; O. T. Allis, ZPEB, 1:1-4; B. S. Childs, The Book of Exodus ; L. G. Cox, Exodus ; C. F. H. Henry, God Who Speaks and Shows ; J. P. Hyatt, Exodus ; C. F. Keil and F. Delitzsch, The Pentateuch ; D. F. Kinlaw, Leviticus .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Aaron, Rod of
"Thy rod and thy staff, they have comforted me" (Psalms 22).
Rod of Aaron. "When Pharao shall say to you: Shew signs; Thou shalt say to Aaron: Take thy rod and cast it down before Pharao, and it shall be turned into a serpent" (Exodus 7). "Carry back the rod of Aaron into the tabernacle of the testimony" (Numbers 17). "And Aaron took the rod before Pharao, and his servants, and it was turned into a serpent. ..but Aaron's rod devoured their rod" (Exodus 7). "And there were twelve rods besides the rod of Aaron" (Numbers 17). "He. ..found that the rod of Aaron, for the house of Levi, was budded" (Numbers 17). "Take the rod. ..thou and Aaron thy brother, and speak to the rock before them and it shall yield waters" (Numbers 20). "And the Ark of the Testament. ., in which was. ..the rod of Aaron that had blossomed" (Hebrews 9).
Rod of Jesse. "And there shall come forth a rod out of the root of Jesse, and a flower shall rise up out of his root" (Isaiah 11).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Aaron
Brother of Moses and high priest of the Old Law; chosen by Moses to be his spokesman before Pharoah (Exodus 4,7, 8). He caused the casting of the golden calf which the Israelites worshiped in the wilderness (Exodus 32), but at the prayer of Moses he was spared the fate of the three thousand worshipers (Deuteronomy 9). The rod of Aaron blossomed as a sign that he had been chosen by God to be first high priest (Leviticus 8). He was not allowed to enter the Land of Promise, but died on Mount Hor (Numbers 20). His son Eleazar and descendants, Aaronites, were consecrated as an hereditary priesthood.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Aaron of Caerleon, Saint
Martyr in Wales during the Diocletian persecution in 303. He was the companion of Saint Julius and is possibly Britain's proto-martyr. Feast, July 1,.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Aaron
Hebrews 5:4 (c) Aaron is a type of CHRIST in many ways.
As he entered into the Holy of Holies once a year with the blood of an animal, so our Lord JESUS entered into Heaven by His own blood, not just once a year, but forever.
Aaron bore the names of the twelve tribes on his shoulders, so the Lord JESUS carries His people and their burdens on His shoulders.
Aaron bore the breastplate of twelve stones over his heart, and our Saviour bears His own children on His heart.
Aaron wore a gold band on his forehead bearing the inscription "Holiness to the Lord." So our Lord JESUS was holy, pure and perfect in all His ways, words and character.
Aaron pleaded with GOD for the people, and pleaded with the people for GOD. So our Lord JESUS "ever liveth to make intercession for us," and appears in GOD's presence for us. He also reveals GOD to us.
Aaron was chosen by GOD to be the High Priest, and GOD chose CHRIST to be our High Priest.
Aaron's garments were prescribed by GOD and were called holy garments. So the garment of our Lord JESUS is called "the robe of righteousness, the garments of salvation," Isaiah 61:10.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Aaron
(according to Jerome means "mountain of strength"), the oldest son of Amram and Jochebed, of the tribe of Levi; brother of Moses and Miriam (Numbers 26:59; Exodus 6:20) 1574 B.C. Jochebed, mother of Moses and Aaron, bore them three centuries after the death of Levi (Exodus 2:1); "daughter of Levi, whom her mother bore to Levi," means "a daughter of a Levite whom her mother bore to a Levite." The point of Hebrews 5:4-54 is, Moses and Aaron were Levites both on the father's side and mother's side, Hebrew of Hebrew. He was three years older than Moses (Exodus 7:7): born, doubtless, before Pharaoh's edict for the destruction of the Hebrew male infants (Exodus 1:22). Miriam was the oldest of the three, as appears from her being old enough, when Moses was only three months old and Aaron three years, to offer to go and call a Hebrew nurse for Pharaoh's daughter, to tend his infant brother.
The first mention of Aaron is in Exodus 4:14; where, in answer to Moses' objection that he did not have the eloquence needed for such a mission as that to Pharaoh, Jehovah answers: "Is not Aaron, the Levite, thy brother? I know that he can speak well: and thou shalt speak unto him, and put words in his mouth; and I will be with thy mouth, and with his mouth, and will teach you what ye shall do; and he shall be thy spokesman unto the people; and he shall be instead of a mouth, and thou shalt be to him instead of God." His being described as "the Levite" implies that he already took a lead in his tribe; and, as the firstborn son, he would be priest of the household.
The Lord directed him to "go into the wilderness to meet Moses" (Exodus 4:27). In obedience to that intimation, after the forty years' separation, he met Moses in the "mount of God," where the vision of the flaming bush had been vouchsafed to the latter, and conducted him back to Goshen. There Aaron, evidently a man of influence already among the Israelites, introduced Moses to their assembled elders; and, as his mouthpiece, declared to them the divine commission of Moses with such persuasive power, under the Spirit, that the people "believed, bowed their heads, and worshipped" (Exodus 4:29-31). During Moses' forty years' absence in Midian, Aaron had married Elisheba or Elizabeth, daughter of Amminadab, and sister of Naashon, a prince of the children of Judah (Exodus 6:23; 1 Chronicles 2:10). By her he had four sons: Nadab, Abihu, Eleazar (father of Phinehas), and Ithamar. From his first interview with Pharaoh to the end of his course he always appears in connection with his more illustrious brother, cooperating with and assisting him.
On the way to Sinai, in the battle with Amalek, Aaron, in company with Hur, supported Moses' weary hands, which uplifted the miracle-working rod of God (Exodus 17:9-13); and so Israel prevailed. His high dignity as interpreter of Moses, and worker of the appointed "signs in the sight of the people," and his investiture with the hereditary high priesthood, a dignity which Moses did not share, account naturally for his having once harbored envy, and joined with Miriam in her jealousy of Moses' Ethiopian wife, when they said: "Hath the Lord spoken only by Moses? Hath He not spoken also by us?" (Compare Numbers 12:1-2 with Exodus 15:20.) But Moses is always made the principal, and Aaron subordinate. Whereas Moses ascended Sinai, and there received the tables of the law direct from God, as the mediator (Galatians 3:19), Aaron has only the privilege of a more distant approach with Nadab and Abihu and the seventy elders, near enough indeed to see Jehovah's glory, but not to have access to His immediate presence.
His character, as contrasted with Moses, comes out in what followed during Moses' forty days' absence on the mount. Left alone to guide the people, he betrayed his instability of character in his weak and guilty concession to the people's demand for visible gods to go before them in the absence of Moses, their recognized leader under Jehovah; and instead of the pillar of cloud and fire wherein the Lord heretofore had gone before them (Exodus 13:21; Exodus 32). Perhaps Aaron had hoped that their love of their personal finery and jewelry, which is the idol of so many in our own days, would prove stronger than their appetite for open idolatry; but men will for superstition part with that which they will not part with for a pure worship. So, casting the responsibility on them, easy and too ready to yield to pressure from outside, and forgetting the precept, "thou shalt not follow a multitude to do evil" (Exodus 23:2), he melted, or permitted their gold to be melted in a furnace, and "fashioned it with a graving tool into a calf." This form was probably designed as a compromise to combine the seemingly common elements of the worship of Jehovah associated with the calf-formed cherubim , and of the Egyptian idol-ox, Μnevis or Αpis .
Like Jeroboam's calves long after, the sin was a violation of the second rather than of the first commandment, the worship of the true God by an image (as the church of Rome teaches), rather than the adding or substituting of another god. It was an accommodation to the usages which both Israel and Jeroboam respectively had learned in Egypt. Like all compromises of truth, its inevitable result was still further apostasy from the truth. Aaron's words, "These are thy gods elohim (a title of the true God), O Israel, which brought thee up out of Egypt," as also his proclamation, "Tomorrow is a feast to JEHOVAH," show that he did not mean an open apostasy from the Lord, but rather a concession to the people's sensuous tastes, in order to avert a total alienation from Jehovah.
But, the so-called "feast of the Lord" sank into gross paganness; "the people sat down to eat and to drink, and rose up to play," "dancing" before the calf, "naked unto their shame among their enemies"; they aroused Moses' righteous anger when he descended from the mountain, so that he broke in pieces the tables out of his hand, as a symbol of their violation of the covenant. Then he burned the calf in the fire, ground it to powder (a process which required a considerable acquaintance with chemistry), strewed it upon the water, and made the Israelites drink of it. Compare Proverbs 1:31. Aaron alleged, as an excuse, the people's being "set on mischief," and seemingly that he had only cast their gold into the fire, and that by mere chance "there came out this calf."
Aaron's humiliation and repentance must have been very deep; for two months after this great sin, God's foreappointed plan (Exodus 29) was carried into effect in the consecration of Aaron to the high priesthood (Leviticus 8). That it was a delegated priesthood, not inherent like the Messiah's priesthood, of the order of Melchizedek, appears from the fact that Moses, though not the legal priest but God's representative, officiates on the occasion, to inaugurate him into it. Compare, for the spiritual significance of this, Hebrew 7. Aaron's very fall would upon his recovery make him the more fit as a priest, to have compassion on the ignorant and on them that are out of the way, for that he himself also is compassed with infirmity (Hebrews 5:2); compare the case of Peter, Luke 22:31-32.
The consecration comprised a sin offering for reconciliation, a burnt offering to express whole-hearted self-consecration to God, and a meat offering (minchah ), unbloody, of flour, salt, oil, and frankincense, to thank God for the blessings of nature (these marking the blessings and duties of man); then also the special tokens of the priestly office, the ram of consecration, whose blood was sprinkled on Aaron and his sons to sanctify them, the sacred robes "for glory and for beauty," breast-plate, ephod, robe, embroidered coat, mitre, and girdle, and linen breeches (Exodus 28); and the anointing with the holy oil, which it was death for anyone else to compound or use (Exodus 30:22-38), symbolizing God's grace, the exclusive source of spiritual unction. Aaron immediately offered sacrifice and blessed the people, and the divine acceptance was marked by fire from the Lord consuming upon the altar the burnt offering and the fat, so that the people shouted at the sight and fell on their faces.
Nadab and Abihu, probably (see Leviticus 10:8-9) under the effects of wine taken when about to be consecrated, instead of taking the sacred fire from the brazen altar, burned the incense on the golden altar with common fire; or, as Knobel and Speaker's Commentary think, they offered the incense in accompaniment of the people's shouts, not at the due time of morning or evening sacrifice, but in their own self-willed manner and at their own time. ((See FIRE.) God visited them with retribution in kind, consuming them with fire from the Lord; and to prevent a similar evil recurring, forbade henceforth the use of wine to the priests when about to officiate in the tabernacle; the prohibition coming so directly after the sin, if the cause was indeed intemperance, is an undesigned coincidence and mark of genuineness: compare Luke 1:15 and 1 Timothy 3:3 for the present application.
The true source of exhilaration to a spiritual priest unto God, is not wine, but the Spirit: Ephesians 5:18-19; compare Acts 2:15-18. Nothing could more clearly mark how grace had raised Aaron above his natural impulsiveness than the touching picture, so eloquent in its brevity, of Aaron's submissiveness under the crushing stroke, "and Aaron held his peace." Moses, in chronicling the disgrace and destruction of his brother's children, evinces his own candor and veracity as an impartial historian. The only token of anguish Aaron manifested was his forbearing to eat that day the flesh of the people's sin offering: Leviticus 10:12-20. All other manifestations of mourning on the part of the priests were forbidden; compare, as to our spiritual priesthood, Luke 9:60.
Miriam, in a fit of feminine jealousy, some time afterward acted on Aaron so as to induce him to join in murmuring against Moses: the former relying on her prophetic inspiration (Exodus 15:20), the latter on his priesthood, as though equal with Moses in the rank of their commission. Their pretext against Moses was his Ethiopian wife, a marriage abhorrent to Hebrew feelings. That Miriam was the instigator appears from her name preceding that of Aaron (Numbers 12), and from the leprosy being inflicted on her alone. Aaron, with characteristic impressibleness, repented of his sin almost immediately after he had been seduced into it, upon Jehovah's sudden address to Moses, Aaron, and Miriam, declaring His admission of Moses to speak with Him "mouth to mouth, apparently," so that he should "behold the similitude of the Lord," a favor far above all "visions" vouchsafed to prophets. At Aaron's penitent intercession with Moses, and Moses' consequent prayer, Miriam was healed.
Twenty years later (1471 B.C.), in the wilderness of Paran, the rebellion took place of Korah and the Levites against Aaron's monopoly of the priesthood, and of Dathan, Abiram, and the Reubenites against Moses' authority as civil leader. It is a striking instance of God's chastising even His own people's sin in kind. As Aaron jealously murmured against Moses, so Korah murmured against him. Fire from the Lord avenged his cause on Korah and the 250 priestsn with him burning incense: and the earth swallowed up the Reubenites with Dathan and Abiram. Possibly Reuben's descendants sought to recover the primogeniture forfeited by his incest (Genesis 49:3-4; 1 Chronicles 5:1). The punishment corresponded to the sin; pride goeth before destruction, and a haughty spirit before a fall. His numbers were so reduced that Moses prays for his deliverance from extinction: "Let Reuben live, and not die, and let not his men be few."
A plague from the Lord had threatened to destroy utterly the people for murmuring against Moses and Aaron as the murderers of Korah, Dathan, Abiram, and their accomplices, when Aaron proved the efficacy of his priesthood by risking his own life for his ungrateful people, and "making atonement for the people" with incense in a censer, and "standing between the living and the dead," so that the plague was stopped (Numbers 16). To prevent future rivalry for the priesthood, God made Aaron's rod alone of the twelve rods of Israel, suddenly to blossom and bear almonds, and caused it to be kept perpetually "before the testimony for a token against the rebels" (Numbers 17; Hebrews 9:4).
Inclined to lean on his superior brother, Aaron naturally fell into Moses' sin at Meribah, and shared its penalty in forfeiting entrance into the promised land (Numbers 20:1-13). As Moses' self-reliance was thereby corrected, so was Aaron's tendency to be led unduly by stronger natures than his own. To mark also the insufficiency of the Aaronic priesthood to bring men into the heavenly inheritance, Aaron must die a year before Joshua (the type of Jesus) leads the people into their goodly possession. While Israel in going down the wady Arabah, to double the mountainous land of Edom, was encamped at Mosera, he ascended Mount Hor at God's command. There Moses stripped him of his pontifical robes, and put them upon Eleazar his son; and Aaron died, 123 years old, and was buried on the mountain (Numbers 20:28; Numbers 20:38; Deuteronomy 10:6; Deuteronomy 32:50). The mountain is now surmounted by the circular dome of the tomb of Aaron, a white spot on the dark red surface.
For thirty days all Israel mourned for him; and on the 1st of the 5th month, Ab (our July or August), the Jews still commemorate him by a fast. Eleazar's descendants held the priesthood until the time of Eli, who, although sprung from Ithamar, received it. With Eli's family it continued until the time of Solomon, who took it from Abiathar, and restored it to Zadok, of the line of Eleazar; thus accomplishing the prophecy denounced against Eli (1 Samuel 2:30). For the Jews' opinion of Aaron, see the apocryphal Ecclesiasticus 45.
His not taking the priestly honor to himself, but being called by God (1618388525_97), his anointing with incommunicable ointment (compare Psalms 45:7 and Psalms 133:2), his intercession for his guilty people, his bearing the names of his people on his shoulders and breast (Exodus 28:12; Exodus 28:29-30), his being the only high priest, so that death visited any other who usurped the priesthood, his rod of office (compare Psalms 110:2; Numbers 24:17), his alone presenting the blood before the mercy-seat on the day of atonement, the HOLINESS TO THE LORD on his forehead in his intercession within the veil (compare 1 Corinthians 1:30; Hebrews 9:24), the Urim and Thummim (Light and Perfection), all point to the true High Priest, the Lord Jesus Christ. Aaron's descendants, to the number of 3,700 fighting men, with Jehoiada, father of Benaiah, their head, joined David at Hebron (1 Chronicles 12:27; 1 Chronicles 27:17); subsequently, Zadok was their chief, "a young man mighty of valor."
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Aaron (2)
AARON.—The name occurs only 5 times in the NT. Three of the passages contain historical references only: Luke 1:5 where Elisabeth is described as ‘of the daughters of Aaron’; Acts 7:40 which refers to the request of the Israelites that Aaron would ‘make them gods’; and Hebrews 9:4 ‘Aaron’s rod that budded.’ The other two passages refer to Aaron’s office as high priest, and are directly concerned with the Christian doctrine of the priesthood of Christ. In Hebrews 5:4 we read, ‘And no man taketh the honour unto himself, but when he is called of God, even as was Aaron’; and Hebrews 7:11 speaks of another priest after the order of Melchizedek, who should ‘not be reckoned after the order of Aaron.’ It is as the representative high priest that Aaron has been regarded as a type of Christ.
The two points on which the writer of Hebrews insists are, one of comparison, and one of contrast. On the one hand, Christ, like Aaron, did not take His priestly office on Himself, but was directly appointed by God (Hebrews 5:5); on the other, the Aaronic type of priesthood is sharply distinguished from that of our Lord in certain fundamental respects. Christ was indeed divinely appointed: He was prepared for service, in being made like His brethren (Hebrews 2:17), and fitted by His sympathy (Hebrews 4:15) and fidelity to undertake priestly work on their behalf; through His death on the cross He offered Himself as a sacrifice, apparently on earth and certainly in heaven as a temple not made with hands (Hebrews 9:24); He is able to save to the uttermost those who come to God through Him as priest, seeing He ever lives to make priestly intercession for them (Hebrews 7:25). Thus far He was Aaron’s antitype. But the analogy fails most seriously in certain important features, as the writer of Hebrews shows. Christ’s priesthood was not according to the Law. If He were on earth, He would not be a priest at all, springing as He did from Judah, not from Levi (Hebrews 7:14). He did not hold His office in virtue of earthly descent, nor was He limited to an earthly sanctuary, nor did He present to God a sin-offering which could be, or needed to be, frequently repeated (Hebrews 9:24 f.). None of the sacrifices of the Law could ‘make perfect as pertaining to the conscience’ (Hebrews 9:9). At best they procured only a limited access to God. Into the holiest place the high priest was permitted to enter only once a year, and then in virtue of sacrifices offered for his own sins, as well as the people’s (Hebrews 9:7). Christ’s priesthood was ‘after the order of Melchizedek’ (Hebrews 6:20), eternal: His sacrifice was a spiritual one, offered once for all; it is impossible to think of the repetition on earth of that offering which ‘through (the) eternal Spirit’ (Hebrews 9:14) our glorified High Priest presents continually in ‘a more perfect tabernacle’ (Hebrews 9:11) in heaven itself, for us. He was made a priest, not according to any legal enactment belonging to earth and finding its expression in the flesh; but dynamically, according to the enduring power of an indissoluble life (Hebrews 7:16).
Thus Christ may well be spoken of as the second Adam, but not as a second Aaron. The lines of Bishop Wordsworth’s hymn, ‘Now our heavenly Aaron enters, Through His blood within the veil,’ can be defended only in so far as the name Aaron is synonymous with high priest. The personal name suggests just those limitations which the generic name avoids, and which the writer of Hebrews expressly warns us must on no account be attributed to our great High Priest who has passed into the heavens. So far as the doctrine of Christ is concerned, it is well to follow Scripture usage and to speak of Him as our Eternal High Priest, rather than to press an analogical or typical relation to Aaron, which fails at many cardinal points.
Literature.—For the further discussion of the subject see Westcott and A. B. Davidson on Hebrews, especially the detached note of the latter on the Priesthood of Christ; also Milligan’s Baird Lectures on The Ascension and Heavenly Priesthood of our Lord, and the art. of Dr. Denney on ‘Priesthood in NT’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, vol. iv.
W. T. Davison.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Aaron
By name Aaron is mentioned in the NT only by St. Luke (Luke 1:5, Acts 7:40) and by the writer of the Epistle to the Hebrews (Hebrews 5:4; Hebrews 7:11; Hebrews 9:4), and in his personal history very little interest is taken. Offically, he was represented to be the first of a long line of high priests, specifically appointed such (Exodus 28:1 f.) in confirmation of the status already allowed him in Arabic usage (Exodus 4:14); and, though his successors were probably not all in the direct line of descent, they found it convenient to claim relationship with him (Ezra 2:61 f.), and gradually the conceptions involved in high-priesthood were identified with the name of Aaron. That continued to be the case in the apostolic period; and it became a familiar thought that the high priest was a type of Christ, who was viewed as the antitype of all true sacerdotal persons and ministries.
In this typical relation between Aaron as the embodiment of priestly ideas and Christ as their final expression, an attempt was made to trace differences as well as correspondences. Christ was thought of, not as identical with His prototype, but as invested with higher qualities, of which only the germ and promise are to be found in Aaron.
1. In regard to vocation, both were appointed by God (Hebrews 5:4); yet to the priesthood of Christ no Aaronic (Hebrews 7:11), or Levitical (Hebrews 7:14), or legal (Hebrews 9:9) measure may he put. He was a man like Aaron (Hebrews 2:16 f.), capable of sympathy both by nature and from experience (Hebrews 4:15); yet His priesthood is distinctly of a higher and eternal order (Hebrews 5:9), limited neither to an earthly sanctuary (Hebrews 9:24), nor to the necessity of repeating the one great sacrifice (Hebrews 9:25 f.), nor in efficiency to the treatment of offences that ware chiefly ceremonial or ritual (Hebrews 9:9; Hebrews 9:14).
2. In the consecration of the high priest the supreme act was anointing with oil (Leviticus 8:12), from which, indeed, the designation Messiah (‘anointed one’) arose. Yet such was the lofty position of Jesus, and such was His consciousness, that He could say, ‘I consecrate myself’ (John 17:19 m), on the very eve of His priestly sacrifice.
3. In function Aaron stood between God and the congregation, representing each to the other. On the one hand, not only were the priests gathered together into an embodied unity in him, but in his annual approach to God he brought a sacrifice even for the ‘ignorances’ of the people (Hebrews 9:7), and purified the sanctuary itself from any possible defilements contracted through the sins of its frequenters (Hebrews 9:19 ff.; cf. Leviticus 16:16). As the representative of God, he wore the sacred Urim and Thummim in the pouch of judgment upon his heart (Exodus 28:30), indicating his qualification to communicate God’s decision on matters that transcended human wit; and through him and his order the blessing of God was invoked. In the Christian thought of the apostolic age all these functions pass over to Jesus Christ, with modifications emphasizing their ethical effect and the intrinsically spiritual benefit that follows. One of the most general statements is Hebrews 2:17, where the phrase ‘things pertaining to God’ covers both sides of the relations between God and man, though prominence is given, as in the passages that speak of Christ as our Advocate with God, to the work done by Him as representing men. Much the same is the case with the great passage on mediatorship (1 Timothy 2:5). As He is the Saviour, so He is the High Priest, of all men, ‘specially of them that believe’ (1 Timothy 4:10). In virtue of His immanence as God, as well as of His priestly rank and sympathy, He fitly represents all men before God, while for those who have put themselves into a right attitude towards Him He acts as Paraclete (1 John 2:1), promoting their interests and completing their deliverance from sin. On the other hand, as representative of God, He bestows gifts upon men (Ephesians 4:8), communicating to them the will of God and enriching them with every spiritual blessing. He is not only the Revealer of the Father; but, just as He offers His sacrifice to God in the stead of man, so He represents to man what God is in relation to human sin, and what God has devised and does with a view to human redemption. Between God and man He stands continuously, the medium of access on either side, the channel of Divine grace and of human prayer and praise.
See, further, article Melchizedek.
Literature.-See article ‘Aaron’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) , Dict. of Christ and the Gospels and Jewish Encyclopedia , and Comm. on Hebrews, esp. those of A. B. Davidson and B. F. Westcott, A. S. Peake (Century Bible), E. C. Wickham (Westminster Com.); also Phillips Brooks, Sermons in English Churches, 1833, p. 43; J. Wesley, Works, vii. [1] 273.
R. W. Moss.
 
Holman Bible Dictionary - Aaron
(awehr' uhn) Moses' brother; Israel's first high priest. He figures prominently in Exodus through Numbers and then is mentioned in Deuteronomy 9-10 ; Joshua 21:1 ; Judges 20:1 ; 1 Samuel 12:1 ; 1 Chronicles 6:1 ; Exodus 4:27-31 ; 1 Chronicles 23-24 ; 2 Chronicles 13:1 ; 2 Chronicles 26:1 ; 2 Chronicles 29:1 ; 2 Chronicles 31:1 ; 2 Chronicles 35:1 ; Ezra 7:1 ; Nehemiah 10:1 ; Nehemiah 12:1 ; Psalm 77:20 ; Psalm 99:6 ; Psalm 105:26 ; Psalm 106:16 ; Psalm 115:10 , Psalm 115:12 ; Psalm 135:19 ; Micah 6:4 .
Aaron's parents Amram and Jochebed were from the tribe of Levi, Israel's tribe of priests. Miriam was his sister. See Exodus 6:16-26 . With his wife Elisheba, Aaron had four sons: Nadab, Abihu, Eleazar, and Ithamar. The first two perished when they offered sacrifices with fire that God had not commanded them to make (Leviticus 10:1-2 ; Leviticus 16:1-2 ). Two priestly lines developed from the remaining sons: (1) Ithamar through Eli to Abiathar and (2) Eleazar to Zadok (1 Samuel 14:3 ; 1 Samuel 22:20 ; 1 Kings 2:26-27 ; 1 Chronicles 6:50-53 ).
Aaron experienced the joy of starting Israel's formal priesthood, being consecrated to the office (Exodus 28-29 ; Leviticus 8-9 ), wearing the first priestly garments, and initiating the sacrificial system (Leviticus 1-7 ). He also bore the burdens of his office as his sons were killed for their disobedience (Leviticus 10:1-2 ), and he could not mourn for them (Leviticus 10:6-7 ). He also bore the special rules of conduct, clothing, and ritual cleanness (Leviticus 27:1-22:33 ).
He could not live up to such high standards perfectly. Thus he had to offer sacrifices for his own sins (Leviticus 16:11 ). Then in his cleansed, holy office, he offered sacrifices for others. In his imperfection, Aaron still served as a symbol or type of the perfect priest as seen in Psalm 110:4 , where the future king was described as eternal priest. Zechariah 6:11-15 also speaks of a priest—Joshua—in typical terms. Thus the imperfect Aaron established an office full of symbolic meaning for Israel.
Aaron's life. With all his faults, Aaron was a man chosen by God. We do not know what Aaron did during Moses' forty-year exile from Egypt, but he maintained the faith, kept contact with Israel's leaders, and did not forget his brother (1 Chronicles 15:1 ). Ready of speech, he served nobly as Moses' spokesman before Pharaoh. More than once he stretched out Moses' staff to bring God's plagues on the land (Exodus 7:9 ,Exodus 7:9,7:19 ). In the wilderness Aaron and Hur helped Moses hold up the staff, the symbol of God's power, so that Israel would prevail over Amalek (Exodus 17:12 ).
At Sinai, Aaron and his two older sons, Nadab and Abihu, were called to go up the mountain with Moses and seventy elders (Exodus 24:9 ). There they worshiped and ate and drank in heavenly fellowship. As Moses and Joshua went farther up, Moses left Aaron and Hur in charge (Exodus 24:14 ). But as Moses delayed on the mountain, the people asked Aaron for action. They cried, “Make us gods” (Exodus 32:1 ). Their sin was polytheism (worship of many gods) as well as idolatry. Aaron all too easily obliged and made a calf and apparently led in its worship. How far into sin Aaron went we do not know. Was it giving in or active error? The text does not say, but Aaron was not specifically judged. The Levites, the tribe of Moses and Aaron, rallied to Moses and were blessed accordingly (Exodus 32:26-29 ).
On another occasion Aaron appeared in a bad light. In Numbers 12:1 he and Miriam spoke against Moses' marriage to the Cushite (Ethiopian) woman. (Cush was an old name for upper Egypt—approximately modern Sudan.) We are not told if this was a wife in addition to Zipporah, or if Zipporah had died, or even if Zipporah—a Midianite—had Cushite connections. Anyway, Aaron and Miriam were jealous of their younger brother. Really, their murmuring was against God's selection. Second place did not satisfy them.
Miriam was severely judged. Again, Aaron was not as harshly judged. Perhaps again he was not the instigator but the accomplice. He confessed his sin and pleaded for mercy for Miriam. When Korah, Dathan, and Abiram opposed Moses and Aaron, Aaron's intercession stopped the plague (Numbers 16:1 ). Aaron's leadership was vindicated by God in the miraculous blossoming of his staff (Numbers 17:1 ). When the people cried for water at Kadesh in the desert of Zin, Aaron joined in Moses' sin as they seized the power of the Lord for themselves (Numbers 20:7-13 ). In consequence, Aaron, like Moses, was not to enter the Promised Land. Nearby on the border of Edom after forty years of his priesthood, Moses took Aaron up mount Hor, transferred his garments to his son, Eleazar, and Aaron died there at the age of 123 years (Numbers 20:23-28 ). Israel mourned for their first high priest thirty days (Numbers 20:29 ), as they soon would mourn for Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8 ).
R. Laird Harris
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Aaron
A teacher; lofty; mountain of strength
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Aaron
The eldest son of Amram and Jochebed, a daughter of Levi (Exodus 6:20 ). Some explain the name as meaning mountaineer, others mountain of strength, illuminator. He was born in Egypt three years before his brother Moses, and a number of years after his sister Miriam (2:1,4; 7:7). He married Elisheba, the daughter of Amminadab of the house of Judah (6:23; 1 Chronicles 2:10 ), by whom he had four sons, Nadab and Abihu, Eleazar and Ithamar. When the time for the deliverance of Isarael out of Egypt drew nigh, he was sent by God (Exodus 4:14,27-30 ) to meet his long-absent brother, that he might co-operate with him in all that they were required to do in bringing about the Exodus. He was to be the "mouth" or "prophet" of Moses, i.e., was to speak for him, because he was a man of a ready utterance (7:1,2,9,10,19). He was faithful to his trust, and stood by Moses in all his interviews with Pharaoh. When the ransomed tribes fought their first battle with Amalek in Rephidim, Moses stood on a hill overlooking the scene of the conflict with the rod of God in his outstretched hand. On this occasion he was attended by Aaron and Hur, his sister's husband, who held up his wearied hands till Joshua and the chosen warriors of Israel gained the victory (17:8-13).
Afterwards, when encamped before Sinai, and when Moses at the command of God ascended the mount to receive the tables of the law, Aaron and his two sons, Nadab and Abihu, along with seventy of the elders of Israel, were permitted to accompany him part of the way, and to behold afar off the manifestation of the glory of Israel's God (Exodus 19:24 ; 24:9-11 ). While Moses remained on the mountain with God, Aaron returned unto the people; and yielding through fear, or ignorance, or instability of character, to their clamour, made unto them a golden calf, and set it up as an object of worship (Exodus 32:4 ; Psalm 106:19 ). On the return of Moses to the camp, Aaron was sternly rebuked by him for the part he had acted in this matter; but he interceded for him before God, who forgave his sin (Deuteronomy 9:20 ).
On the mount, Moses received instructions regarding the system of worship which was to be set up among the people; and in accordance therewith Aaron and his sons were consecrated to the priest's office (Leviticus 8 ; 9 ). Aaron, as high priest, held henceforth the prominent place appertaining to that office.
When Israel had reached Hazeroth, in "the wilderness of Paran," Aaron joined with his sister Miriam in murmuring against Moses, "because of the Ethiopian woman whom he had married," probably after the death of Zipporah. But the Lord vindicated his servant Moses, and punished Miriam with leprosy (Numbers 12 ). Aaron acknowledged his own and his sister's guilt, and at the intercession of Moses they were forgiven.
Twenty years after this, when the children of Israel were encamped in the wilderness of Paran, Korah, Dathan, and Abiram conspired against Aaron and his sons; but a fearful judgment from God fell upon them, and they were destroyed, and the next day thousands of the people also perished by a fierce pestilence, the ravages of which were only stayed by the interposition of Aaron (Numbers 16 ). That there might be further evidence of the divine appointment of Aaron to the priestly office, the chiefs of the tribes were each required to bring to Moses a rod bearing on it the name of his tribe. And these, along with the rod of Aaron for the tribe of Levi, were laid up overnight in the tabernacle, and in the morning it was found that while the other rods remained unchanged, that of Aaron "for the house of Levi" budded, blossomed, and yielded almonds (Numbers 17:1-10 ). This rod was afterwards preserved in the tabernacle (Hebrews 9:4 ) as a memorial of the divine attestation of his appointment to the priesthood.
Aaron was implicated in the sin of his brother at Meribah (Numbers 20:8-13 ), and on that account was not permitted to enter the Promised Land. When the tribes arrived at Mount Hor, "in the edge of the land of Edom," at the command of God Moses led Aaron and his son Eleazar to the top of that mountain, in the sight of all the people. There he stripped Aaron of his priestly vestments, and put them upon Eleazar; and there Aaron died on the top of the mount, being 123 years old (Numbers 20:23-29 . Compare Deuteronomy 10:6 ; 32:50 ), and was "gathered unto his people." The people, "even all the house of Israel," mourned for him thirty days. Of Aaron's sons two survived him, Eleazar, whose family held the high-priesthood till the time of Eli; and Ithamar, in whose family, beginning with Eli, the high-priesthood was held till the time of Solomon. Aaron's other two sons had been struck dead (Leviticus 10:1,2 ) for the daring impiety of offering "strange fire" on the alter of incense.
The Arabs still show with veneration the traditionary site of Aaron's grave on one of the two summits of Mount Hor, which is marked by a Mohammedan chapel. His name is mentioned in the Koran, and there are found in the writings of the rabbins many fabulous stories regarding him.
He was the first anointed priest. His descendants, "the house of Aaron," constituted the priesthood in general. In the time of David they were very numerous (1 Chronicles 12:27 ). The other branches of the tribe of Levi held subordinate positions in connection with the sacred office. Aaron was a type of Christ in his official character as the high priest. His priesthood was a "shadow of heavenly things," and was intended to lead the people of Israel to look forward to the time when "another priest" would arise "after the order of Melchizedek" (Hebrews 6:20 ). (See MOSES )
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Aaron
AARON . In examining the Biblical account of Aaron, we must deal separately with the different ‘sources’ of the Hexateuch.
1. In J [1] , Aaron plays a very subordinate part. He, Nadah and Ahihu, along with 70 elders, accompanied Moses up Mt. Sinai ( Exodus 19:24 ; Exodus 24:9 ). In the former passage he is distinguished from the priests, who are forbidden to come up; he would seem, therefore, to have been an elder or sheikh , perhaps somewhat superior to the 70. In Exodus 32:25 Aaron ‘let the people loose for a derision among their enemies.’ What this refers to is not known; it was not the making of the golden bull, which in the eyes of the surrounding nations would be only an act of piety.
In other passages, which cannot be assigned either to E [2] or P [3] , the mention of Aaron is probably due to a later hand. In Exodus 4:13-16 Moses is allowed to nave Aaron as a spokesman. But ‘the Levite’ ( Exodus 4:14 ) is suspicious: for Moses was also of the tribe of Levi, and the description is superfluous. The verses probably belong to a time when ‘Levite’ had become a technical term for one trained in priestly functions, and when such priestly officials traced their descent from Aaron. In the narratives of the plagues Aaron is a silent figure, merely summoned with Moses four times when Pharaoh entreats for the removal of the plagues ( Exodus 8:8 ; Exodus 8:25 , Exodus 9:27 , Exodus 10:16 ). In each case Moses alone answers, and in the last three he alone departs. In Exodus 10:3 Moses and Aaron went in to announce the plague, but Moses alone ‘turned and went out’ ( Exodus 10:6 ). The occurrence of Aaron’s name seems to be due, in each case, to later redaction.
2. In E [2] , Aaron is the brother of Miriam ( Exodus 15:20 ). He was sent to meet Moses in the wilderness, and together they performed signs before the people ( Exodus 4:27-31 ). They demanded release from Pharaoh, and on his refusal the people murmured ( Exodus 5:1-2 ; Exodus 5:4 ; Exodus 5:20 f.). Little of E [2] has survived in the narrative of the plagues, and Aaron is not mentioned. In Exodus 17:10 ; Exodus 17:12 he and Hur held up Moses’ hands, in order that the staff might be lifted up, during the fight with Amalek. And while Moses was on the mountain, the same two were left in temporary authority over the people ( Exodus 24:13 f.). Aaron is related to have abused this authority, in making the golden bull ( Exodus 32:1-6 ; Exodus 32:21-24 ). [The narrative is composite, and in its present form must be later than E [2] . It has some connexion with the story of 1 Kings 12:26-30 , for Jeroboam’s words, which are suitable in reference to two bulls, are placed in Aaron’s mouth.] In Exodus 18:12 Aaron, with the elders, was called to Jethro’s sacrifice an incident which must he placed at the end of the stay at Horeb. In Numbers 12:1-16 Aaron and Miriam claimed that they, no less than Moses, received Divine revelations; only Miriam, however, was punished. In Joshua 24:5 there is a general reference to the part played by Aaron in the Exodus.
It is noteworthy that there is not a word so far either in J [1] or E [2] , which suggests that Aaron was a priest. But it is probable that by the time of E [2] the belief had begun to grow up that Aaron was the founder of an hereditary priesthood. Deuteronomy 10:6 occurs in a parenthesis which seriously interrupts the narrative, and which was perhaps derived from E [2] (cf. Joshua 24:33 ).
3. In D [11] , Aaron was probably not mentioned. Deuteronomy 10:6 has been referred to; Deuteronomy 32:50 is from P [3] ; and the only remaining passage ( Deuteronomy 9:20 ) appears to be a later insertion.
4. Outside the Hexateuch, two early passages ( 1 Samuel 12:6 ; 1 Samuel 12:8 , Micah 6:4 ) refer to Aaron merely as taking a leading part in the Exodus.
5. In P [3] , the process by which the tradition grew up that Moses delegated his priesthood to Aaron is not known. But the effect of it was that the great majority of ‘Levites,’ i.e. trained official priests, at local sanctuaries throughout the country traced their descent to Aaron. The priests of Jerusalem, on the other hand, were descendants of Zadok ( 1 Kings 1:39 ; 1 Kings 2:27 ); and when local sanctuaries were abolished by Josiah’s reforms, and the country priests came up to seek a livelihood at Jerusalem (see Deuteronomy 18:6-8 ), the Zadokite priests charged them with image-worship, and allowed them only an inferior position as servants (see 2 Kings 23:9 , Ezekiel 44:9-15 ). But at the Exile the priests who were in Jerusalem were carried off, leaving room in the city for many country (Aaronite) priests, who would establish themselves firmly in official prestige with the meagre remnant of the population. Thus, when the Zadokite priests returned from Babylon, they would find it advisable to trace their descent from Aaron (see Ezra 2:61 f.). But by their superiority in culture and social standing they regained their ascendancy, and the country priests were once more reduced, under the ancient title of ‘Levites,’ to an inferior position.
This explains the great importance assigned to Aaron in the priestly portions of the Hexateuch. Reference must be made to other articles for his consecration, his purely priestly functions, and his relation to the Levites (see articles Priests and Levites, Sacrifice, Tabernacle). But he also plays a considerable part in the narrative of the Exodus and the wanderings. His family relationships are stated in Exodus 6:20 ; Exodus 6:23 ; Exodus 6:25 , Leviticus 10:4 . He became Moses’ spokesman, not to the people but to Pharaoh (7:1), in whose presence he changed the staff into a ‘reptile’ (contrast ‘serpent’ in 4:3 J [1] ). P [3] relates the 2nd plague (combined with J [1] ), the 3rd and the 6th, in each of which Aaron is conspicuous. Aaron as well as Moses suffered from the murmurings of the people ( Exodus 16:2 , Numbers 14:2 ; Numbers 16:3 ; Numbers 16:41 ; Numbers 20:2 ); both were consulted by the people ( Numbers 9:6 ; Numbers 15:33 ); and to both were addressed many of God’s commands ( Exodus 9:8-10 ; Exodus 12:1 ; Exodus 12:43 , Leviticus 11:1 ; Leviticus 13:1 ; Leviticus 14:33 ; Leviticus 15:1 , Numbers 2:1 ). Aaron stayed a plague by offering incense ( Numbers 16:46-48 ). [17]. At Meribah-kadesh he, with Moses, sinned against J″ [18] ( Numbers 20:1-13 ), but the nature of the sin is obscure (see Gray, Com . p. 262 f.). He was consequently forbidden to enter Canaan, and died on Mt. Hor, aged 123, Eleazar his son being clothed in the priestly garments ( Numbers 20:22-29 ; Numbers 33:38 f., Deuteronomy 32:50 ).
6. In the NT: Luke 1:5 , Acts 7:40 , Hebrews 5:4 ; Hebrews 7:11 ; Hebrews 9:4 .
A. H. M‘Neile.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Aaron
Son of Amram, and the elder brother of Moses. He was of the tribe of Levi. (Exodus 6:19-20.) His name is derived from Har, a Mountain: and consequently signifies somewhat great and lofty. And when we consider, to what an high honour Aaron was called; to be the type of Him, who, in the everlasting nature of his office, was, and is, JEHOVAH'S High Priest; both the altar, and the offering, the sacrifice, and the sacrificer, through whom alone, all offerings must be presented: surely, none taken from among men, could be more great and lofty in office than Aaron. The history of Aaron, incorporated as it is with that of Moses, fills a large part in the books of Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers. But the great eminency of his character is formed from his becoming so illustrious a type of the Lord Jesus Christ. Every thing in his priestly office ministered to this one point. Indeed the whole law, and consequently the priesthood, became "a shadow of good things to come; but the body, which formed that shadow, was Christ." (Colossians 2:17; Leviticus 16:2; Numbers 16:46-47.)
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Aaron
[1] Eldest son of Amram and Jochebed, of the tribe of Levi. We first read of him when Moses was excusing himself from being sent to deliver Israel from Egypt because he was 'slow of speech.' Jehovah declared that his brother Aaron who was coming to meet him could speak well and should be his spokesman. Aaron accompanied Moses in his interviews with Pharaoh, and with his rod some of the miraculous plagues were called forth. He with Hur held up the hands of Moses on the Mount when Israel fought with Amalek. Exodus 17:12 . Aaron with his two sons Nadab and Abihu with seventy of the elders, went with Moses into the mount where "they saw the God of Israel: and there was under his feet as it were a paved work of a sapphire stone, and as it were the body of heaven in his clearness." Exodus 24:9,10 . When Moses retired higher into the mount, he left Israel in charge of Aaron and Hur. Exodus 24:14 .
Aaron, alas, had not the stability of his brother,* but at the request of the people, and apparently without a protest, made for them the golden calf: he also built an altar before it, and made proclamation of a feast to Jehovah on the morrow.
* Moses was with God — Aaron with the people. The stability of Moses was dependent upon the fact, that he was sustained by sovereign grace in communion with the thoughts of God: while Aaron below fell in with the thoughts of the people.
He was thus engaged while God was directing Moses respecting the tabernacle and its offerings, and declaring that Aaron and his sons were to be the appointed priests. Their appointment stood, showing how marvellously God's grace abounds over sin, and that none are chosen because of their inherent goodness. †
† Aaron's rod that budded had more to do with the tribe of Levi being chosen for the priesthood than with Aaron as an individual. Numbers 17:8 .
Aaron with Miriam (priest and prophetess) spake against Moses, with whom as mediator God had established His covenant for Israel in sovereign mercy, Exodus 34:27 ; and to whom God spake 'mouth to mouth' at that time. Their excuse was that he had married an Ethiopian woman (sign of the same sovereign grace that goes out to Gentiles who have no claim to it). Aaron humbled himself and interceded for Miriam. Numbers 12 . Aaron also sinned with Moses at the waters of Meribah, and was not allowed to enter the promised land. Numbers 20:10-29 . He was stripped of his robes, which were put on Eleazar his son, and he died and was buried on Mount Hor. Viewed officially Aaron is a striking type of Christ. In his consecration he was clothed with the priestly garments, with the breastplate, the mitre and the crown, and then was anointed with oil, type of the Holy Spirit. It was only in connection with his sons that there was any washing spoken of, or any sacrifice, even as Christ identified Himself with the priestly company, His brethren. Exodus 24:4,10,19,20 ; Hebrews 2:11-13
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Aaron
IS NOT AARON THE LEVITE THY BROTHER? I KNOW THAT HE CAN SPEAK WELL
WHAT a gifted house! What an honour to that man of the house of Levi who took to wife a daughter of Levi! What a rich slave-hut was that with Miriam and Aaron and Moses all born of God into it! What splendid wages to have three such children given to that son and daughter of Levi to nurse up for the Lord, and for Israel, and for all the world; three such goodly children as Miriam the prophetess, and Aaron the high priest, and Moses the deliverer and leader and lawgiver of Israel. Has there ever been another house gifted like that house in Goshen on the face of the earth? I have not heard or read of another house in all the world like the house of Amram of the house of Levi, and his wife God-my-glory. And, then, the sovereign distribution and allotment of their gifts and their graces and their offices, the dividing-out of the family genius, was no less wonderful than the immense amount of it. For, by that sovereign division and distribution Moses was made the first and the greatest of all the prophets of Israel. Aaron, again, must have been the most eloquent of all eloquent men, since the fame of his eloquence had reached up to heaven itself till it was acknowledged and talked of and boasted about there. What oratory must Aaron's oratory have been when God Himself both felt and confessed its power. I know, said the Divine Voice, that he can speak well. And, then, Miriam, in sacred drama, in sacred dance, in sacred song, and in sacred instruments of music, was quite worthy to stand out beside her two unapproachable brothers. While, all the time, each several one of the three was all the more dependent on the other two just because of the greatness of his own and her own special gift. The very magnitude of their own gifts made the others' gifts more necessary to them, till the whole house of Amram was a complete and a rounded and a perfect gift of God to all Israel. And till all that Israel could ever need as a nation and as a church, as fathers and as mothers, as masters and as servants, as slaves and as redeemed from slavery, as sinners and as the chosen people of God-all Israel was complete in Moses and Aaron and Miriam, even as they also were complete in God and in one another. Yes, indeed, what a highly honoured house was the house of that son and daughter of Levi, Amram and God-her-glory.
And Moses said unto the Lord, O my Lord, I am not eloquent. Neither heretofore nor since Thou hast spoken to Thy servant; but I am slow of speech and of a slow tongue. It was the depth and the weight and the fulness of Moses' mind that made him a man of such slow speech and of such a slow tongue. Moses had lived so long alone in Horeb that he had well-nigh forgotten the every-day language of every-day men. He had been so much alone with God that he felt like a man away from home when he met again with any man of many words. He had taken the shoes off his feet so often before God that he never could put them on again or walk in them with any ease or any freedom before men. I Am! was all that God had said to Moses, year after year, as Moses fed the flock of his father-in-law in the mount of God. And, who am I? was all that Moses answered God for forty years. Moses was a great philosopher, says Matthew Henry, and a great statesman, and a great divine, and yet he was no orator. And one great statesman of England speaking of another great statesman, says of him, He was without any power to be called oratory, and yet I never heard a man speak in the House of Commons who had so much power over the House. He had those great qualities that govern men, and that has far more influence in the House of Commons than the most brilliant flights of fancy, or the keenest wits. But, better than all his great philosophy and great statesmanship, Moses was a great divine, the greatest of Old Testament divines; the greatest because the first of all divines. And yet he was no preacher, as we say. In this Moses was somewhat like certain of our own great divines. They have such a depth and weight of matter that they also are slow of speech and of a slow style. Butler for one, and Foster for another. Whereas certain others of our great divines are like Aaron in this, that they can speak well. And yet we have sometimes heard of great divines and great preachers too who shrank back from the pulpit as much as Moses himself shrank. The call of Isaiah, and the call of Jeremiah, and the call of Calvin, and the call of Knox, and the call of Bruce all remind us of Moses' noble modesty, his fear of his office, his fear of himself, and of his fellow-men. And the Lord said to Moses, 'Who hath made man's voice? Is not Aaron the Levite thy brother? And he shall be thy spokesman unto the people; he shall be to thee instead of a mouth, and thou shalt be to him instead of God.'
Cato the Censor defined a great orator to he nothing else than a good man well skilled in speaking. And Quintilian, in his Institutes of Oratory, has a noble passage on the great Roman's great text. Let all our young orators, and, especially, let all our sacred and Aaronic orators, study the delightful Institutes, that perfect treasure-house of ancient letters, ancient wisdom, and ancient truth and beauty. Now, Aaron was one of Cato's good men skilled in speaking. We are sure of that, because for Aaron's goodness as a man we have not only his long lifetime in the most sacred of all services, but also the psalmist's testimony that Aaron, with all his great trespass, was a great saint of God. And, besides, for his great skilfulness in speaking we have the great certificate of the Divine Voice itself. The sword had entered Aaron's soul also. The iron furnace of Egypt had been burning for long in Aaron's covenant heart also. But when Aaron looked at the tremendous and impossible task of delivering Israel out of Egypt, he felt that he was helpless and hopeless. At the same time, he felt sure that if there was a man on the face of the earth made of God on special purpose for such a service, it was just his own banished brother Moses. And thus it was that Aaron set out to Horeb to seek for Moses just at the moment when the bush began to burn on Horeb, and when the Lord began to speak to Moses out of the bush. 'Behold, Aaron thy brother cometh forth to meet thee, and when he soeth thee he will be glad in his heart. And thou shalt speak to him, and put words in his mouth; and I will be with his month and with thy mouth, and will teach you both what you shall both do. And he shall be, even he shall be to thee, instead of a mouth, and thou shalt be to him instead of God.' And Aaron went and met Moses in the mount of God. And Aaron kissed Moses, and Moses told Aaron all that the Lord bad said concerning him, till Aaron answered, and shrank back, and said: Surely it is not so. Surely the Lord did not so speak concerning me. I speak well! I speak for thee, my brother! I am not worthy to unloose thy shoe-latchet. I am not worthy to be of the same name with thee. I should always sit silent. I should never speak. My tongue will not tame. I need thee, my brother. I need thy wisdom. I need thy patience. I need thy counsel. I need thy command. Thou art the wisest and the best of men. Thou art a king in Israel. Moses, my dear brother! While all the time Moses felt more than ever before how all this must be of God. For even as Aaron so spake, Moses saw to his delight that Aaron had always the right word ready. No man could resist Aaron. No man could refuse Aaron, Pharaoh himself would not be able to resist and refuse Aaron. Moses felt beside Aaron that he would never open his mouth again. The right word always went away, somehow, when Moses opened his mouth to speak. Whereas Aaron bad but to open his mouth and the right word always came out of his mouth. Till, with Aaron beside him, Moses felt that he could face without fear of failure both all Israel and Pharaoh with all his priests and all his magicians.
Now, as we have already seen, we have always had men among ourselves more or less like Moses, and other men more or less like Aaron. Men like Moses-that is, men of great originality, and of great depth and grasp and strength of mind. And yet men who have been of a stammering tongue. Carlyle has made Cromwell's 'mute veracity' noble and venerable to us to all time, and Lord Acton has told us that Dr. Döllinger knew too much to write much. On the other hand, what are those men to do, who, like Aaron, have no such depth, and grasp, and originality, and productivity of mind as Moses and the great thinkers and great scholars of our race have had? A common man and a man of no gifts may be set in a place, and may have a calling of God that he cannot escape-a place and a calling which demand constant speaking and constant teaching at his hands. A minister, for instance. He may not he a great scholar or a great thinker himself, but he is set over those who are still less scholars, and who think still less. Now, what is such a man to do? What, but just to take Moses instead of God. What, but just to find out those great divines and other great authors who have been so immediately and so richly gifted of God, and to live with them, and work with them, and make them his own, just as if God had given him all the great gifts He has given them. If I am a man of no learning and no originality, then I know men, both living and dead, who are; and they are all that, of God, and under God, for me. And, if I had to travel barefoot to Horeb for them; if I had to sell my bed for them, at any cost I would have them. I would take no rest till I had found them, and then, as God said of Aaron, I would be glad when I saw them, and I would kiss them, and claim them as my own. We are not all the men of Moses-like genius and originality we might like to be. We are not all epoch-making, history-making, nation-making men. But we are what we are. We are what God has made us to be; and Moses himself is no more. And Moses may be as glad to meet me in my teachableness and in my love and in my reverence as I am to meet him in his magnificent supremacy and high solitariness of gift and of office. Yes; and who knows what our Master may graciously say to us after He has rewarded Moses for his magnificent talents and for his magnificent services? One thing is sure: we shall be satisfied with what He shall say to us, and we shall have no room left in our hearts wherewith any more to envy Moses for his god-like gifts and for his god-like services.
All went well with Aaron as long as he had Moses beside him to inspire him, and to support him, and to be to him instead of God. Aaron faced the elders of Israel, and scattered all their objections and all their fears as a rushing mighty wind scatters chaff; and the long struggle with Pharaoh and with his magicians lias surely been preserved to us by Aaron's eloquent pen. The crossing of the Red Sea also, Mount Sinai, and the giving of the tabernacle and the law-it has certainly been by some one who could both speak well and write well also that all that wonderful piece has been put into our hands. And, whatever part Aaron and Aaron's great gifts may have had in all that, at any rate, all went well with Aaron through all that. Aaron did splendid service through all that, and both his great name and his great service would have gone on growing in love and in honour to the end if only he had never let Moses out of his sight. But always when Moses was for any length of time out of sight, Aaron was a reed shaken with the wind; he was as weak and as evil as any other man. Those forty days that Moses was away on the Mount brought out, among other things, both Moses' strength and greatness and Aaron's littleness and weakness in a way that nothing else could have done. 'Up, make us gods, which shall go before us; for, as for this Moses, we wot not what is become of him.' And Aaron went down like a broken reed before the idolatrous and licentious clamour of the revolted people. "A man may be able to speak well when all men's ears are open to him, and when all men's hands are clapping to what he says, who is yet a very weak man, and a very helpless man, and a very mischievous man in a time of storm and strain and shipwreck." A man may be, if not one of Cato's orators, yet a great favourite with the multitude, who has no real root in himself. He may speak well under sufficient applause who has no nobility of character, and no strength of will, and no backbone or brow of courage, and no living and abiding faith in God and in the truth of God. It has often been seen, both in sacred, and in profane, and in contemporary history, how soon the man of a merely emotional, impulsive, oratorical temperament goes to the wall in the hour of real trial. "It is popular clamour, and the dividing and receding wave of popular support, that tries a true statesman's strength. The loud demands and the angry threats of the excited people soon serve to discover whether the wonted leader is really able and really worthy to lead or no. "And men of the oratorical order have so often flinched and failed in the hour of action and of suffering that our eloquent men are apt to be too lightly esteemed. The love of popularity, and the absolute necessity to have the multitude with him, is a terrible temptation to that leader of men and of movements in the church and in the state who has the gift of popular speech, and who loves to employ it. What would the people like me to say to them on that subject? Will they crowd to hear it? How will they take it? And what will be said about what I have said after I have said it and cannot unsay it? And, in my heart of hearts, can I let them go? Shall I not tune my pulpit just a touch or, two, so as to attract this man, and so as to keep that other man from going away? Moses had his own temptations and snares that even he did not always escape and overcome; but it was the good speaker's temptation, it was the popular preacher's temptation, that led Aaron into the terrible trespass of the golden calf.
There is a fine sermon by the finest of English preachers under this fine title-'Saintliness not forfeited by the penitent.' And though that unique preacher, after his provoking manner, gives with the one hand and takes away with the other all through that fine sermon, at the same time the sermon is full of subtle truth and exquisite beauty. No; by the true penitent neither saintliness nor service is ever forfeited. Blessed be God, both saintliness and service too are, in such a case, only the better secured and the more fruitfully employed. But then, in order to either saintliness or service being preserved and maintained in a penitent, his penitence must be of the very best kind. It must be penitence indeed. It must be a breaking, burning, consuming, and ever-deepening life of penitence, and that, too, both before God and man. And it was because Aaron's penitence was at once so saintly, and so laid out in service, that we hear so little, and in as many words, about it. We would be nearer the truth about Aaron if we put him at the very head of all Old Testament penitents, both for his own sins and for the sins of all other men. Luther speaks with Isaiah-like boldness when he says that Jesus Christ, by reason of the law of imputation, was the greatest sinner that ever was. Now, Aaron had to be Jesus Christ till Jesus Christ came. And while Aaron was Jesus Christ in type and by imputation, at the same time, and to give the uttermost reality and the uttermost intensity to that, he was himself Aaron all the time, Aaron of the golden calf and of many other untold transgressions besides. And you may be quite sure that Aaron never slew a sacrifice for sin that he did not lay the golden calf, and the nakedness, and the dancing, and the shame, and all the never-to-be-forgotten sin upon its bleeding head. You may be quite sure that Aaron never went into the holy place any day for the sin of others till he had gone first for his own sin. You may rely upon it that many an Israelite whose sin had found him out had a prayer offered for him and for his case at the altar such that the penitent never knew where all the compassion, and all the sympathy, and all the humility, and all the holiness, and all the harmlessness of his high priest came from. Little did the penitents in Israel think how much of his high priesthood Aaron had put on under Sinai and on the scene of that idolatrous and licentious revelry. Moses in his anger had ground the golden calf to ashes, and had sprinkled the ashes on the waters of the brook that ran down out of the Mount of God, till all the people drank of the sin laden water. And to this day the children of Israel have a saying to this effect,-that when any terrible judgment of God, or any great remorse, or any great repentance comes upon them there is always an ounce of the ashes of the golden calf in it. And Aaron kept in the holy place, and beside the pot of manna and the rod that budded, a silver chest full of that same accursed ashes, and out of which chest he always sprinkled, and with many tears, all that he ate and all that he drank on every returning day of atonement. By these things priests pray, by these things prophets preach, by these things psalmists sing, and l by things like these there comes to all sinful men the best life of their souls. John Foxe used to declare that both he and his people had got much more good out or his sins than ever either he or they had got out of his good works. And, though they did not know it, and would not have believed it, the penitents in Israel got far more good out of their high priest's trespass in the matter of the golden calf, than ever they got out of his broidered garments, and his silver bells, and his fair mitre upon bis head.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Aaron
(a teacher, or lofty ), the son of Amram and Jochebed, and the older brother of Moses and Miriam. ( Numbers 26:59 ; 33:39 ) (B.C. 1573.) He was a Levite, and is first mentioned in (Exodus 4:14 ) He was appointed by Jehovah to be the interpreter, (Exodus 4:16 ) of his brother Moses, who was "slow of speech;" and accordingly he was not only the organ of communication with the Israelites and with Pharaoh, (Exodus 4:30 ; 7:2 ) but also the actual instrument of working most of the miracles of the Exodus. (Exodus 7:19 ) etc. On the way to Mount Sinai, during the battle with Amalek, Aaron with Hur stayed up the weary hands of Moses when they were lifted up for the victory of Israel. (Exodus 17:9 ) He is mentioned as dependent upon his brother and deriving all his authority from him. Left, on Moses' departure into Sinai, to guide the people, Aaron is tried for a moment on his own responsibility, and he fails from a weak inability to withstand the demand of the people for visible "gods to go before them," by making an image of Jehovah, in the well-known form of Egyptian idolatry (Apis or Mnevis). He repented of his sin, and Moses gained forgiveness for him. (9:20) Aaron was not consecrated by Moses to the new office of the high priesthood. (Exodus 29:9 ) From this time the history of Aaron is almost entirely that of the priesthood, and its chief feature is the great rebellion of Korah and the Levites. Leaning, as he seems to have done, wholly on Moses, it is not strange that he should have shared his sin at Meribah and its punishment. See MOSES . (Numbers 20:10-12 ) Aaron's death seems to have followed very speedily. It took place on Mount Hor, after the transference of his robes and office to Eleazar. (Numbers 20:28 ) This mount is still called the "Mountain of Aaron." See HOR . The wife of Aaron was Elisheba, (Exodus 6:23 ) and the two sons who survived him, Eleazar and Ithamar. The high priesthood descended to the former, and to his descendants until the time of Eli, who, although of the house of Ithamar, received the high priesthood and transmitted it to his children; with them it continued till the accession of Solomon, who took it from Abiathar and restored it to Zadok (of the house of Eleazar). See ABIATHAR .
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Aaron
the son of Amram and Jochebed, of the tribe of Levi. Aaron was three years older than his brother Moses; and when God appeared in the burning bush, Moses having excused himself from the undertaking committed to him, by urging that he was slow of speech, Aaron, who was an eloquent man, was made his interpreter, and spokesman; and in effecting the deliverance of the Hebrews we therefore find them constantly associated. During the march of the children of Israel through the wilderness, Aaron and his sons were appointed by God to exercise for ever the office of priests in the tabernacle.
Moses having ascended the mountain to receive the law from God, Aaron, his sons, and seventy elders, followed him, Exodus 24:1-2 ; Exodus 24:9-11 ; not indeed to the summit, but "afar off," "and they saw the God of Israel," that is, the glory in which he appeared, "as it were the paved work of a sapphire stone, and as it were the body of heaven for clearness;"—a clear and dazzling, azure, a pure, unmingled splendour like that of the heavens. "And upon the nobles of Israel," Aaron, his sons, and the seventy elders, "he laid not his hand,"—they were not destroyed by a sight which must have overwhelmed the weakness of mortal men had they not been strengthened to bear it; "and they did eat and drink,"—they joyfully and devoutly feasted before the Lord, as a religious act, upon the sacrifices they offered. After this they departed, and Moses remained with God on the very summit of the mount forty days.
During this period, the people, grown impatient at the long absence of Moses, addressed themselves to Aaron in a tumultuous manner, saying, "Make us gods which shall go before us: for, as for this Moses, the man that brought us up out of the land of Egypt, we wot not what is become of him." Aaron sinfully yielded to the importunities of the people; and having ordered them to bring the pendants and the earrings of their wives and children, he melted them down, and then made a golden calf, probably in imitation of the Egyptian Apis, an ox or calf dedicated to Osiris. In this instance the image was dedicated to Jehovah the true God; but the guilt consisted in an attempt to establish image worship, which, when even ultimately referring to God, he has forbidden. Neither are images to be worshipped, nor the true God by images;—this is the standing unrepealed law of Heaven. The calf was called a golden calf, as being highly ornamented with gold. Having finished the idol, the people placed it on a pedestal, and danced around it, saying, "These be thy gods, O Israel;" or, as it is expressed in Nehemiah, "This is thy God," the image or symbol of thy God, "which brought thee up out of the land of Egypt." Moses, having hastened from the mount by the command of God, testified to the people, by breaking the tables of the law in their presence, that the covenant between God and them was now rendered of none effect through their offence. He also indignantly reproved Aaron, whose sin indeed had kindled against him the anger of the Lord, so that he would "have destroyed him but that Moses prayed for him."
After the tabernacle was built, Moses consecrated Aaron to the high priesthood with the holy oil, and invested him with his priestly robes,—his garments "of glory and beauty;" but Aaron's weakness was again manifested in concurring with Miriam, his sister, to censure and oppose Moses, through envy. Aaron, as being the elder brother, could not perhaps brook his superiority. What the motive of Miriam might be does not appear; but she being struck with leprosy, this punishment, as being immediately from God, opened Aaron's eyes; he acknowledged his fault, and asked forgiveness of Moses both for himself and his sister.
Aaron himself became also the object of jealousy; but two miraculous interpositions confirmed him in his office of high priest, as of Divine appointment. The first was the destruction of Korah, who sought that office for himself, and of the two hundred and fifty Levites who supported his pretensions, Numbers 16. The second was the blossoming of Aaron's rod, which was designed "to cause the murmurings of the Israelites against him to cease," by showing that he was chosen of God. Moses having, at the command of God, taken twelve rods of an almond tree from the princes of the twelve tribes, and Aaron's separately, he placed them in the tabernacle before the sanctuary, after having written upon each the name of the tribe which it represented, and upon the rod of Aaron the name of Aaron. The day following, when the rods were taken out, that of Aaron "was budded, and brought forth buds, and bloomed blossoms, and yielded almonds." This rod therefore was laid up by the ark, to perpetuate the remembrance of the miracle, and to be a token of Aaron's right to his office.
Aaron married Elisheba, the daughter of Amminadab, of the tribe of Judah, by whom he had four sons, Nadab and Abihu, Eleazar and Ithamar, Exodus 6:23 . The two first were killed by fire from heaven, as a punishment for presuming to offer incense with strange fire in their censers, Leviticus 10:1-2 . From the two others the succession of high priests was continued in Israel.
The account of the death of Aaron is peculiarly solemn and affecting. As he and Moses, in striking the rock at Meribah, Num. xvi, had not honoured God by a perfect obedience and faith, he in his wrath declared unto them that they should not enter into the promised land. Soon after, the Lord commanded Moses, "Take Aaron, and Eleazar, his son, and bring them up to mount Hor; and strip Aaron of his garments,"—his splendid pontifical vestments,—"and put them upon Eleazar, his son; and Aaron shall be gathered unto his people, and shall die there." This command was carried into effect in the presence of all Israel, who were encamped at the foot of the mountain; and his son being invested with the father's priestly dress, Aaron died, and all the people mourned for him thirty days. His sepulchre was left unmarked and unknown, perhaps to prevent the superstitious reverence of future ages. In Deuteronomy it is said that Aaron died at Mosera; because that was the name of the district in which mount Hor was situated.
2. The PRIESTHOOD being established in Aaron and his family, the nature of this office among the Israelites, and the distinction between the high priest and the other priests, require here to be pointed out.
Before the promulgation of the law by Moses, the fathers of every family, and the princes of every tribe, were priests. This was the case both before and after the flood; for Cain and Abel, Noah, Abraham, Job, Abimelech, Laban, Isaac, and Jacob, themselves offered their own sacrifices. But after the Lord had chosen the family of Aaron, and annexed the priesthood to that line, then the right of sacrificing to God was reserved to that family only. The high priesthood was confined to the first-born in succession; and the rest of his posterity were priests simply so called, or priests of the second order. Both in the high priest and the second or inferior priests, two things deserve notice,—their consecration and their office. In some things they differed, and in others agreed. In their consecration they differed thus: the high priest had the chrism, or sacred ointment, poured upon his head, so as to run down to his beard, and the skirts of his garment, Exodus 30:23 ; Leviticus 8:12 ; Psalms 133:2 . But the second priests were only sprinkled with this oil, mixed with the blood of the sacrifice, Leviticus 8:30 . They differed also in their robes, which were a necessary adjunct to consecration. The high priest wore at the ordinary times of his ministration in the temple, eight garments;—linen drawers—a coat of fine linen close to his skin—an embroidered girdle of fine linen, blue and scarlet, to surround the coat—a robe all of blue with seventy-two bells, and as many embroidered pomegranates upon the skirts of it; this was put over the coat and girdle—an ephod of gold, and of blue, purple, scarlet, and fine linen, curiously wrought, on the shoulders of which were two stones engraved with the names of the twelve tribes; this was put over the robe, and girt with a curious girdle of the same—a breastplate, about a span square, wrought with gold, blue, purple, scarlet, and fine linen, and fastened upon the ephod by golden chains and rings; in this breastplate were placed the urim and thummim, also twelve several stones, containing the names of the twelve tribes—a mitre of fine linen, sixteen cubits long, to wrap round his head—and lastly, a plate of gold, or holy crown, two fingers broad, whereon was engraved, "Holiness to the Lord;" this was tied with blue lace upon the front of the mitre. Beside these garments, which he wore in his ordinary ministration, there were four others, which he wore only upon extraordinary occasions, viz. on the day of expiation, when he went into the holy of holies, which was once a year. These were: linen drawers—a linen coat—a linen girdle—a linen mitre, all white, Exodus xxviii; Leviticus 16:4 . But the inferior priests had only four garments: linen drawers—a linen coat—a linen girdle—a linen bonnet. The priest and high priest differed also in their marriage restrictions; for the high priest might not marry a widow, nor a divorced woman, nor a harlot, but a virgin only; whereas the other priests might lawfully marry a widow, Leviticus 21:7 .
In the following particulars the high priest and inferior priests agreed in their consecration; both were to be void of bodily blemish—both were to be presented to the Lord at the door of the tabernacle—both were to be washed with water—both were to be consecrated by offering up certain sacrifices—both were to have the blood of a ram put upon the tip of the right ear, the thumb of the right hand, and the great toe of the right foot, Exodus 29:20 . In the time of consecration, certain pieces of the sacrifice were put into the priest's hand, which was called "filling his hand;" hence the Hebrew phrase, "to fill the hand," signifies consecration.
In the discharge of their offices, the high priest differed from the other priests in these particulars: the high priest only, and that but once a year, might enter into the holy of holies—the high priest might not mourn for his nearest relations by uncovering his head, or tearing any part of his garments, except the skirt; whereas the priest was allowed to mourn for these six,—father, mother, son, daughter, brother, and sister if she had no husband, Leviticus 21:2 ; Leviticus 21:10-11 ; but they agreed in these respects; they both burnt incense and offered sacrifices—they both sounded the trumpet, either as an alarm in war, or to assemble the people and their rulers—they both slew the sacrifices—both instructed the people—and both judged of leprosy.
For the more orderly performance of these offices, the high priest had his sagan, who, in case of the high priest's pollution, performed his duty. The high priest and his sagan resembled our bishop and his suffragan.
3. Aaron was a TYPE of Christ, not personally, but as the high priest of the Jewish church. All the priests, as offering gifts and sacrifices, were in their office types of Christ; but Aaron especially,
1. As the high priest.
2. In entering into the holy place on the great day of atonement, and reconciling the people to God; in making intercession for them, and pronouncing upon them the blessing of Jehovah, at the termination of solemn services.
3. In being anointed with the holy oil by effusion, which was pre- figurative of the Holy Spirit with which our Lord was endowed.
4. In bearing the names of all the tribes of Israel upon his breast and upon his shoulders, thus presenting them always before God, and representing them to him.
5. In being the medium of their inquiring of God by urim and thummim; and of the communication of his will to them. But though the offices of Aaron were typical, the priesthood of Christ is of a different and higher ORDER than his, namely, that of MELCHIZIDECK. See CALF , See PRIEST , See TYPE , See EPHOD , See BREASTPLATE , See URIM .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Aaron
Aaron (âr'on or â'ron). The name, if of Hebrew origin, means enlightened. According to Jerome, it means mountain of strength. The son of Amram and Jochebed, of the tribe of Levi He was three years older than his brother Moses. Exodus 6:20; Exodus 7:7. Aaron was noted for his eloquence, and was appointed by Jehovah to speak for Moses in the court of Pharaoh. Exodus 4:14-16. He aided Moses in leading the Hebrews out of Egypt; and was consecrated the first high priest of the Hebrew nation. Exodus 7:1-10; Exodus 28:1-43; Leviticus 8:1-36. He was a man of great devotion; but, from want of firmness, he sometimes fell into grievous sins. While Moses was absent in Mount Sinai receiving the law, Aaron weakly yielded to the people's demand to have some image of a deity for them to worship. The image he made was a golden calf, after the form of the Egyptian Apis or Mnevis. Exodus 32:1-35; Psalms 106:19-20. Aaron joined Miriam, his sister, in sedition against Moses, Numbers 12:1-12, and, with Moses, neglected to acknowledge the power of God at Kadesh. For this sin he was denied the privilege of entering the promised land. Numbers 20:12-24. While the Hebrews were encamped at Moserah, in the fortieth year after leaving Egypt, Aaron, at the divine command, ascended Mount Hor and died, at the age of 123 years. Numbers 20:25-29; Deuteronomy 10:6. The sons and descendants of Aaron served as priests at the sanctuary; while the other families of the tribe of Levi performed those religious duties which were of an inferior kind. Numbers 4:15-16; Numbers 4:24. Aaron is called the "saint of the Lord" with reference to his official character, Psalms 106:16, but, as the most superficial study of his life shows, he had many faults. Yet the people loved him, and the mourning over his death, which lasted 30 days, Numbers 20:28, was sincere. One of the fasts of later Judaism was held in his memory, on the first day of the fifth month, Ab, our July or August.
Aaron married Elisheba, daughter of Amminadab, probably a prince of the tribe of Judah, and had four sons, Nadab, Abihu, Eleazar and Ithamar. Exodus 6:23; Numbers 1:7. The Jewish priesthood began in the family of Aaron and remained in its possession, though not uninterruptedly, in the line of Eleazar; it passed into the family of Ithamar, the brother of Eleazar, in the person of Eli; but, in consequence of the wickedness of Ell's sons, God declared that it should be taken from his family, 1 Samuel 2:30, and this prophecy was fulfilled in the time of Solomon, who took the priesthood from Abiathar and restored it to Zadok, of the line of Eleazar. 1 Kings 2:27.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Aaron
(a) (1397-1273 BCE) Son of Amram and Jochebed, brother of Miriam and Moses. Moses’ partner and spokesman in his mission to free the Israelites from Egypt. First High Priest and patriarch of the Priestly Family. A man who loved peace and always sought to bring conflicting parties to reconciliation. Died in the desert, shortly before the Israelites entered Canaan. (b) A common Jewish name.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Aaron
From the time Moses set out to free Israel from Egypt, Aaron his brother played an important part in the young nation’s development. He remained in a position of influence and responsibility until the day of his death, forty years later (Exodus 7:7; Numbers 33:39).
Early developments
Although Aaron was three years older than Moses (Exodus 7:7), he willingly accepted Moses’ supreme leadership of the nation. He became Moses’ chief spokesman and personal assistant (Exodus 4:10-16; Exodus 4:29-30; Exodus 7:1-2; Exodus 7:10; Exodus 7:19; Exodus 8:5; Numbers 20:22-2921; Exodus 8:25). As Moses grew in confidence, he became less dependent upon Aaron in his public activities (Exodus 9:13; Exodus 9:22; Exodus 9:33). Aaron, however, continued to support Moses, especially in prayer (Exodus 17:12).
Aaron was one of the privileged few who went with Moses up on to the mountain of God. He was also one of those to whom Moses entrusted the leadership of Israel during his absence (Exodus 24:1-2; Exodus 24:9; Exodus 24:14). Aaron proved to be a weak leader, and was easily persuaded to build an idol as a visible symbol of the invisible God (Exodus 32:1-6; Exodus 32:21-25). When Moses challenged the faithful to fight against this idolatry, the men of the tribe of Levi responded. God rewarded them by promising that in the new religious order, the Levites would be his chosen religious servants (Exodus 32:26-29).
Levi was the tribe to which Moses and Aaron belonged (Exodus 6:16-20). God had already told Moses that in the new religious order, Aaron and his sons were to be the priests, with Aaron the high priest (Exodus 28:1-4). In the generations to follow, although all Levites were to be religious officials, only those of the family of Aaron could be priests (Numbers 3:3-10; see LEVITE; PRIEST).
Troubles along the way
In spite of his devoted service to God, Aaron had his disappointments and failures. His two older sons made an offering contrary to the way God had instructed them, and were punished with instant death (Leviticus 10:1-3). On another occasion, he and his sister Miriam showed some jealousy against Moses because of Moses’ supreme position in Israel. When Miriam, who had led the criticism, was punished with leprosy, Aaron confessed his wrong and asked God to heal her (Numbers 12:1-2; Numbers 12:9-12).
Just as Aaron had been jealous of Moses’ position as supreme leader, so other Levites grew jealous of Aaron’s position as high priest (Numbers 16:1-11). God destroyed the rebels (Numbers 16:31-35) and sent a plague on the people who had supported them; but Aaron prayed for them and the plague stopped (Numbers 16:47-48). By the miraculous budding of Aaron’s rod, God emphasized afresh that only those of the family of Aaron were to be priests (Numbers 17:1-11).
Moses and Aaron were guilty of disobedience to God when, in anger at the people’s constant complaining, they struck the rock at Meribah. God punished them by assuring them that they would never enter the promised land (Numbers 20:2; Numbers 20:10-13). Soon after, when the journeying Israelites reached Mt Hor, Aaron died. Before he died, however, there was a public ceremony to appoint Eleazar, Aaron’s eldest surviving son, as the replacement high priest (1618388525_4).

Sentence search

Korah - First cousin of Moses and Aaron. Led a revolt against Moses and Aaron, claiming that the priesthood should not belong exclusively to Aaron and his descendants
Jesse, Rod of -
Rod of Aaron. "When Pharao shall say to you: Shew signs; Thou shalt say to Aaron: Take thy rod and cast it down before Pharao, and it shall be turned into a serpent" (Exodus 7). "Carry back the rod of Aaron into the tabernacle of the testimony" (Numbers 17). "And Aaron took the rod before Pharao, and his servants, and it was turned into a serpent. but Aaron's rod devoured their rod" (Exodus 7). "And there were twelve rods besides the rod of Aaron" (Numbers 17). found that the rod of Aaron, for the house of Levi, was budded" (Numbers 17). thou and Aaron thy brother, and speak to the rock before them and it shall yield waters" (Numbers 20). the rod of Aaron that had blossomed" (Hebrews 9)
Aaron, Rod of -
Rod of Aaron. "When Pharao shall say to you: Shew signs; Thou shalt say to Aaron: Take thy rod and cast it down before Pharao, and it shall be turned into a serpent" (Exodus 7). "Carry back the rod of Aaron into the tabernacle of the testimony" (Numbers 17). "And Aaron took the rod before Pharao, and his servants, and it was turned into a serpent. but Aaron's rod devoured their rod" (Exodus 7). "And there were twelve rods besides the rod of Aaron" (Numbers 17). found that the rod of Aaron, for the house of Levi, was budded" (Numbers 17). thou and Aaron thy brother, and speak to the rock before them and it shall yield waters" (Numbers 20). the rod of Aaron that had blossomed" (Hebrews 9)
Rod of Jesse -
Rod of Aaron. "When Pharao shall say to you: Shew signs; Thou shalt say to Aaron: Take thy rod and cast it down before Pharao, and it shall be turned into a serpent" (Exodus 7). "Carry back the rod of Aaron into the tabernacle of the testimony" (Numbers 17). "And Aaron took the rod before Pharao, and his servants, and it was turned into a serpent. but Aaron's rod devoured their rod" (Exodus 7). "And there were twelve rods besides the rod of Aaron" (Numbers 17). found that the rod of Aaron, for the house of Levi, was budded" (Numbers 17). thou and Aaron thy brother, and speak to the rock before them and it shall yield waters" (Numbers 20). the rod of Aaron that had blossomed" (Hebrews 9)
Scripture, Rod in -
Rod of Aaron. "When Pharao shall say to you: Shew signs; Thou shalt say to Aaron: Take thy rod and cast it down before Pharao, and it shall be turned into a serpent" (Exodus 7). "Carry back the rod of Aaron into the tabernacle of the testimony" (Numbers 17). "And Aaron took the rod before Pharao, and his servants, and it was turned into a serpent. but Aaron's rod devoured their rod" (Exodus 7). "And there were twelve rods besides the rod of Aaron" (Numbers 17). found that the rod of Aaron, for the house of Levi, was budded" (Numbers 17). thou and Aaron thy brother, and speak to the rock before them and it shall yield waters" (Numbers 20). the rod of Aaron that had blossomed" (Hebrews 9)
Amram - A Levite; father of Miriam, Aaron, and Moses (Exodus 6:18-20). (See Aaron; JOCHEBED
Elisheba - Daughter of Amminadab, and wife of Aaron. She was of the tribe of Judah, and her marriage with Aaron united the priestly and royal tribes
Dathan - (See Aaron; ABIRAM; KORAH. ) He and Abiram , sons of Reuben, conspired with Korah against Moses and Aaron (Numbers 16:1-26; Numbers 16:9-11; Deuteronomy 11:6; Psalms 106:17)
Aaron - From the time Moses set out to free Israel from Egypt, Aaron his brother played an important part in the young nation’s development. ...
Early developments...
Although Aaron was three years older than Moses (Exodus 24:1-2), he willingly accepted Moses’ supreme leadership of the nation. As Moses grew in confidence, he became less dependent upon Aaron in his public activities (Exodus 9:13; Exodus 9:22; Exodus 9:33). Aaron, however, continued to support Moses, especially in prayer (Exodus 17:12). ...
Aaron was one of the privileged few who went with Moses up on to the mountain of God. Aaron proved to be a weak leader, and was easily persuaded to build an idol as a visible symbol of the invisible God (Exodus 32:1-6; Exodus 32:21-25). ...
Levi was the tribe to which Moses and Aaron belonged (Exodus 6:16-20). God had already told Moses that in the new religious order, Aaron and his sons were to be the priests, with Aaron the high priest (Exodus 28:1-4). In the generations to follow, although all Levites were to be religious officials, only those of the family of Aaron could be priests (Numbers 3:3-10; see LEVITE; PRIEST). ...
Troubles along the way...
In spite of his devoted service to God, Aaron had his disappointments and failures. When Miriam, who had led the criticism, was punished with leprosy, Aaron confessed his wrong and asked God to heal her (Numbers 12:1-2; Numbers 12:9-12). ...
Just as Aaron had been jealous of Moses’ position as supreme leader, so other Levites grew jealous of Aaron’s position as high priest (Numbers 16:1-11). God destroyed the rebels (Numbers 16:31-35) and sent a plague on the people who had supported them; but Aaron prayed for them and the plague stopped (1618388525_94). By the miraculous budding of Aaron’s rod, God emphasized afresh that only those of the family of Aaron were to be priests (Numbers 17:1-11). ...
Moses and Aaron were guilty of disobedience to God when, in anger at the people’s constant complaining, they struck the rock at Meribah. Soon after, when the journeying Israelites reached Mt Hor, Aaron died. Before he died, however, there was a public ceremony to appoint Eleazar, Aaron’s eldest surviving son, as the replacement high priest (Numbers 20:22-29)
Eleazar - Son of Aaron, and his successor in the priestly office. His history commences from the death of his father Aaron
Abihu - Second son of Aaron by Elisheba (Exodus 6:23; Numbers 3:2). With Aaron, Nadab, and the 70 elders, he accompanied Moses up Sinai to a limited distance (Exodus 24:1). On his death by fire from heaven, in punishment for offering strange fire, (See Aaron above
Levi - See Tribes, Priest, Aaron
Chief Priest - See Aaron ; Priests; Levites
Aaron - Hebrews 5:4 (c) Aaron is a type of CHRIST in many ways. ...
Aaron bore the names of the twelve tribes on his shoulders, so the Lord JESUS carries His people and their burdens on His shoulders. ...
Aaron bore the breastplate of twelve stones over his heart, and our Saviour bears His own children on His heart. ...
Aaron wore a gold band on his forehead bearing the inscription "Holiness to the Lord. ...
Aaron pleaded with GOD for the people, and pleaded with the people for GOD. ...
Aaron was chosen by GOD to be the High Priest, and GOD chose CHRIST to be our High Priest. ...
Aaron's garments were prescribed by GOD and were called holy garments
Aaron - ...
Aaron's parents Amram and Jochebed were from the tribe of Levi, Israel's tribe of priests. With his wife Elisheba, Aaron had four sons: Nadab, Abihu, Eleazar, and Ithamar. ...
Aaron experienced the joy of starting Israel's formal priesthood, being consecrated to the office (Exodus 28-29 ; Leviticus 8-9 ), wearing the first priestly garments, and initiating the sacrificial system (Leviticus 1-7 ). In his imperfection, Aaron still served as a symbol or type of the perfect priest as seen in Psalm 110:4 , where the future king was described as eternal priest. Thus the imperfect Aaron established an office full of symbolic meaning for Israel. ...
Aaron's life. With all his faults, Aaron was a man chosen by God. We do not know what Aaron did during Moses' forty-year exile from Egypt, but he maintained the faith, kept contact with Israel's leaders, and did not forget his brother (Exodus 4:27-31 ). In the wilderness Aaron and Hur helped Moses hold up the staff, the symbol of God's power, so that Israel would prevail over Amalek (Exodus 17:12 ). ...
At Sinai, Aaron and his two older sons, Nadab and Abihu, were called to go up the mountain with Moses and seventy elders (Exodus 24:9 ). As Moses and Joshua went farther up, Moses left Aaron and Hur in charge (Exodus 24:14 ). But as Moses delayed on the mountain, the people asked Aaron for action. Aaron all too easily obliged and made a calf and apparently led in its worship. How far into sin Aaron went we do not know. Was it giving in or active error? The text does not say, but Aaron was not specifically judged. The Levites, the tribe of Moses and Aaron, rallied to Moses and were blessed accordingly (Exodus 32:26-29 ). ...
On another occasion Aaron appeared in a bad light. Anyway, Aaron and Miriam were jealous of their younger brother. Again, Aaron was not as harshly judged. When Korah, Dathan, and Abiram opposed Moses and Aaron, Aaron's intercession stopped the plague (Numbers 16:1 ). Aaron's leadership was vindicated by God in the miraculous blossoming of his staff (Numbers 17:1 ). When the people cried for water at Kadesh in the desert of Zin, Aaron joined in Moses' sin as they seized the power of the Lord for themselves (Numbers 20:7-13 ). In consequence, Aaron, like Moses, was not to enter the Promised Land. Nearby on the border of Edom after forty years of his priesthood, Moses took Aaron up mount Hor, transferred his garments to his son, Eleazar, and Aaron died there at the age of 123 years (Numbers 20:23-28 )
Aaron - ' Jehovah declared that his brother Aaron who was coming to meet him could speak well and should be his spokesman. Aaron accompanied Moses in his interviews with Pharaoh, and with his rod some of the miraculous plagues were called forth. Aaron with his two sons Nadab and Abihu with seventy of the elders, went with Moses into the mount where "they saw the God of Israel: and there was under his feet as it were a paved work of a sapphire stone, and as it were the body of heaven in his clearness. When Moses retired higher into the mount, he left Israel in charge of Aaron and Hur. ...
Aaron, alas, had not the stability of his brother,* but at the request of the people, and apparently without a protest, made for them the golden calf: he also built an altar before it, and made proclamation of a feast to Jehovah on the morrow. ...
* Moses was with God — Aaron with the people. The stability of Moses was dependent upon the fact, that he was sustained by sovereign grace in communion with the thoughts of God: while Aaron below fell in with the thoughts of the people. ...
He was thus engaged while God was directing Moses respecting the tabernacle and its offerings, and declaring that Aaron and his sons were to be the appointed priests. †...
† Aaron's rod that budded had more to do with the tribe of Levi being chosen for the priesthood than with Aaron as an individual. ...
Aaron with Miriam (priest and prophetess) spake against Moses, with whom as mediator God had established His covenant for Israel in sovereign mercy, Exodus 34:27 ; and to whom God spake 'mouth to mouth' at that time. Aaron humbled himself and interceded for Miriam. Aaron also sinned with Moses at the waters of Meribah, and was not allowed to enter the promised land. Viewed officially Aaron is a striking type of Christ
Aaronites - (awehr' uhn ite) A term used only in the KJV to translate the name Aaron where it refers to the descendants of Aaron (1 Chronicles 12:27 ; 1 Chronicles 27:17 ). Equivalent to the phrases “sons of Aaron” and “descendants of Aaron” used often in the Old Testament
Calf - (1 Samuel 28:24 ; Luke 15:23 ) The molten calf prepared by Aaron for the people to worship, (Exodus 32:4 ) was probably a wooden figure laminated with gold, a process which is known to have existed in Egypt. [1]
Aar'Onites - (1 Chronicles 12:27 ) priests of the family of Aaron
Abiram - A Reubenite, son of Eliab; conspired with Dathan and On, Reubenites, and Korah, a Levite, against Moses and Aaron (Numbers 16). (See Aaron; KORAH
Elisheba - Daughter of Amminadab and wife of Aaron ( Exodus 6:23 )
Aaronical - ) Pertaining to Aaron, the first high priest of the Jews
Aaron - Aaron . In examining the Biblical account of Aaron, we must deal separately with the different ‘sources’ of the Hexateuch. ]'>[1] , Aaron plays a very subordinate part. In Exodus 32:25 Aaron ‘let the people loose for a derision among their enemies. ]'>[3] , the mention of Aaron is probably due to a later hand. In Exodus 4:13-16 Moses is allowed to nave Aaron as a spokesman. The verses probably belong to a time when ‘Levite’ had become a technical term for one trained in priestly functions, and when such priestly officials traced their descent from Aaron. In the narratives of the plagues Aaron is a silent figure, merely summoned with Moses four times when Pharaoh entreats for the removal of the plagues ( Exodus 8:8 ; Exodus 8:25 , Exodus 9:27 , Exodus 10:16 ). In Exodus 10:3 Moses and Aaron went in to announce the plague, but Moses alone ‘turned and went out’ ( Exodus 10:6 ). The occurrence of Aaron’s name seems to be due, in each case, to later redaction. ]'>[2] , Aaron is the brother of Miriam ( Exodus 15:20 ). ]'>[2] has survived in the narrative of the plagues, and Aaron is not mentioned. Aaron is related to have abused this authority, in making the golden bull ( Exodus 32:1-6 ; Exodus 32:21-24 ). It has some connexion with the story of 1 Kings 12:26-30 , for Jeroboam’s words, which are suitable in reference to two bulls, are placed in Aaron’s mouth. ] In Exodus 18:12 Aaron, with the elders, was called to Jethro’s sacrifice an incident which must he placed at the end of the stay at Horeb. In Numbers 12:1-16 Aaron and Miriam claimed that they, no less than Moses, received Divine revelations; only Miriam, however, was punished. In Joshua 24:5 there is a general reference to the part played by Aaron in the Exodus. ]'>[2] , which suggests that Aaron was a priest. ]'>[2] the belief had begun to grow up that Aaron was the founder of an hereditary priesthood. ]'>[11] , Aaron was probably not mentioned. Outside the Hexateuch, two early passages ( 1 Samuel 12:6 ; 1 Samuel 12:8 , Micah 6:4 ) refer to Aaron merely as taking a leading part in the Exodus. ]'>[3] , the process by which the tradition grew up that Moses delegated his priesthood to Aaron is not known. trained official priests, at local sanctuaries throughout the country traced their descent to Aaron. But at the Exile the priests who were in Jerusalem were carried off, leaving room in the city for many country (Aaronite) priests, who would establish themselves firmly in official prestige with the meagre remnant of the population. Thus, when the Zadokite priests returned from Babylon, they would find it advisable to trace their descent from Aaron (see Ezra 2:61 f. ...
This explains the great importance assigned to Aaron in the priestly portions of the Hexateuch. ]'>[1] ), the 3rd and the 6th, in each of which Aaron is conspicuous. Aaron as well as Moses suffered from the murmurings of the people ( Exodus 16:2 , Numbers 14:2 ; Numbers 16:3 ; Numbers 16:41 ; Numbers 20:2 ); both were consulted by the people ( Numbers 9:6 ; Numbers 15:33 ); and to both were addressed many of God’s commands ( Exodus 9:8-10 ; Exodus 12:1 ; Exodus 12:43 , Leviticus 11:1 ; Leviticus 13:1 ; Leviticus 14:33 ; Leviticus 15:1 , Numbers 2:1 ). Aaron stayed a plague by offering incense ( Numbers 16:46-48 ). 16, 17 see Aaron’s Rod, Korah]'>[17]
Duchening - (Yiddish) The blessing by the descendents of the priestly family of Aaron
Kohen; kohanim - priest, descendant of Aaron, responsible for the service in the Holy Temple ...
Aaronites - The descendants of Aaron
Birchat kohanim - (Priestly Blessings): The blessing by the descendents of the priestly family of Aaron
Ointment, the Holy - Aaron and his sons also were anointed and consecrated to the priest's office. After speaking of Aaron arid his sons, this remarkable injunction is given: "Upon man's flesh shall it not be poured:" that is, not upon man as man, only upon Aaron and his sons as priests
Aaron - Aaron had the distinctive privilege of being Moses' close associate and also the one selected as the first high priest of God's people. ...
Aaron, the first priest of ancient Israel, was the older brother of Moses. Two aspects of Aaron's earlier years provided a matrix out of which he responded to God's call to help Moses when he returned to Egypt. First, Aaron was committed to the God of the “fathers”—Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob (Exodus 3:1-6 ). Aaron agreed to help his brother Moses in the cause of seeking the release of his people from bondage. God graciously granted both Moses and Aaron new revelation during Israel's encampment at Sinai. Moses and Aaron were allowed to enter into God's holy presence on Sinai (Exodus 19:24 ; 24:9-10 ). ...
Second, Aaron and Moses were leader-participants in the covenant Yahweh made between himself and the people of Israel. ...
Third, Yahweh delivered specific instructions to Aaron and Moses at Sinai about how they were to lead Israel to become his holy nation and kingdom of priests. Aaron was directly responsible for a grave offense against God when Moses was on Mount Sinai receiving the written law of Israel (Exodus 32:1-10 ). " Aaron then set up an altar and proceeded to lead the people in worshiping the calf. ...
Aaron acted against what he knew God wanted. In spite of his sin, Aaron was restored to his position of high priest. Aaron was duly attired and dedicated as God's priest (Leviticus 8-9 ). ...
Aaron was chief as he ministered with other priests in presenting offerings and sacrifices to Yahweh for himself and for the people of Israel
Elisheba - God is her oath, the daughter of Amminadab and the wife of Aaron (Exodus 6:23 )
Miriam - The sister of Moses and Aaron, and daughter of Amram. She was older than Moses, for she watched over him when placed in the ark on the river, and it is probable that she was older than Aaron
Elisheba - The wife of Aaron, Exodus 6:23
Jochebed - Wife and aunt of Amram, and mother of Aaron, Moses, and Miriam
Aaron - On this occasion he was attended by Aaron and Hur, his sister's husband, who held up his wearied hands till Joshua and the chosen warriors of Israel gained the victory (17:8-13). ...
Afterwards, when encamped before Sinai, and when Moses at the command of God ascended the mount to receive the tables of the law, Aaron and his two sons, Nadab and Abihu, along with seventy of the elders of Israel, were permitted to accompany him part of the way, and to behold afar off the manifestation of the glory of Israel's God (Exodus 19:24 ; 24:9-11 ). While Moses remained on the mountain with God, Aaron returned unto the people; and yielding through fear, or ignorance, or instability of character, to their clamour, made unto them a golden calf, and set it up as an object of worship (Exodus 32:4 ; Psalm 106:19 ). On the return of Moses to the camp, Aaron was sternly rebuked by him for the part he had acted in this matter; but he interceded for him before God, who forgave his sin (Deuteronomy 9:20 ). ...
On the mount, Moses received instructions regarding the system of worship which was to be set up among the people; and in accordance therewith Aaron and his sons were consecrated to the priest's office (Leviticus 8 ; 9 ). Aaron, as high priest, held henceforth the prominent place appertaining to that office. ...
When Israel had reached Hazeroth, in "the wilderness of Paran," Aaron joined with his sister Miriam in murmuring against Moses, "because of the Ethiopian woman whom he had married," probably after the death of Zipporah. Aaron acknowledged his own and his sister's guilt, and at the intercession of Moses they were forgiven. ...
Twenty years after this, when the children of Israel were encamped in the wilderness of Paran, Korah, Dathan, and Abiram conspired against Aaron and his sons; but a fearful judgment from God fell upon them, and they were destroyed, and the next day thousands of the people also perished by a fierce pestilence, the ravages of which were only stayed by the interposition of Aaron (Numbers 16 ). That there might be further evidence of the divine appointment of Aaron to the priestly office, the chiefs of the tribes were each required to bring to Moses a rod bearing on it the name of his tribe. And these, along with the rod of Aaron for the tribe of Levi, were laid up overnight in the tabernacle, and in the morning it was found that while the other rods remained unchanged, that of Aaron "for the house of Levi" budded, blossomed, and yielded almonds (Numbers 17:1-10 ). ...
Aaron was implicated in the sin of his brother at Meribah (Numbers 20:8-13 ), and on that account was not permitted to enter the Promised Land. When the tribes arrived at Mount Hor, "in the edge of the land of Edom," at the command of God Moses led Aaron and his son Eleazar to the top of that mountain, in the sight of all the people. There he stripped Aaron of his priestly vestments, and put them upon Eleazar; and there Aaron died on the top of the mount, being 123 years old (Numbers 20:23-29 . Of Aaron's sons two survived him, Eleazar, whose family held the high-priesthood till the time of Eli; and Ithamar, in whose family, beginning with Eli, the high-priesthood was held till the time of Solomon. Aaron's other two sons had been struck dead (Leviticus 10:1,2 ) for the daring impiety of offering "strange fire" on the alter of incense. ...
The Arabs still show with veneration the traditionary site of Aaron's grave on one of the two summits of Mount Hor, which is marked by a Mohammedan chapel. His descendants, "the house of Aaron," constituted the priesthood in general. Aaron was a type of Christ in his official character as the high priest
Dathan - One of the rebels, in company with Korah, against the authority of Moses, and Aaron, Numbers 16:1-50
Ahram - The father of Aaron, Miriam, and Moses
Elisheba - ” Wife of Aaron, the high priest (Exodus 6:23 )
Jochebed - The mother of Miriam, Aaron, and Moses
Hor - The mountain where Aaron died, the fortieth year of Israel's departure from Egypt
Amramites - Branch of the Kohathite family, descended from Amram, father of Aaron, Moses and Miriam
Aaron - Aaron (âr'on or â'ron). Aaron was noted for his eloquence, and was appointed by Jehovah to speak for Moses in the court of Pharaoh. While Moses was absent in Mount Sinai receiving the law, Aaron weakly yielded to the people's demand to have some image of a deity for them to worship. Aaron joined Miriam, his sister, in sedition against Moses, Numbers 12:1-12, and, with Moses, neglected to acknowledge the power of God at Kadesh. While the Hebrews were encamped at Moserah, in the fortieth year after leaving Egypt, Aaron, at the divine command, ascended Mount Hor and died, at the age of 123 years. The sons and descendants of Aaron served as priests at the sanctuary; while the other families of the tribe of Levi performed those religious duties which were of an inferior kind. Aaron is called the "saint of the Lord" with reference to his official character, Psalms 106:16, but, as the most superficial study of his life shows, he had many faults. ...
Aaron married Elisheba, daughter of Amminadab, probably a prince of the tribe of Judah, and had four sons, Nadab, Abihu, Eleazar and Ithamar. The Jewish priesthood began in the family of Aaron and remained in its possession, though not uninterruptedly, in the line of Eleazar; it passed into the family of Ithamar, the brother of Eleazar, in the person of Eli; but, in consequence of the wickedness of Ell's sons, God declared that it should be taken from his family, 1 Samuel 2:30, and this prophecy was fulfilled in the time of Solomon, who took the priesthood from Abiathar and restored it to Zadok, of the line of Eleazar
Amram - Grandson of Levi; husband of Jochebed; father of Miriam, Aaron and Moses
Miriam - Sister of Aaron and Moses, oldest child of Amram and Jochebed. Aaron being three years older than Moses was nine years younger than her. In Micah 6:4 God mentions among benefits conferred on Israel, "I sent before thee Moses, Aaron, and Miriam," Miriam as the leader of and pattern to Israel's women. She as "the prophetess, the sister of Aaron," with timbrel in hand, led the female choir who, with timbrels (round tambourines, an Egyptian word) and dances following her, sang the song of triumph at the Red Sea; they responsively took up the first strophe of the men's song (Exodus 15:1-20-21; so Judges 11:34; 1 Samuel 18:6). "Miriam and Aaron spake against Moses because of the Ethiopian woman whom he had married (Numbers 12) . Hath the Lord indeed spoken only by Moses? Hath He not spoken also by us?" But the phrase "sister of Aaron" (a phrase not likely to have been applied to Miriam by a later writer than Moses) marks her as ranking, not with Moses but with Aaron, and like him subordinate to Moses, the mediator of the Old Testament, and standing to Aaron "instead of God" (Exodus 4:16). Aaron was influenced to evil by his sister, as before by the people (Exodus 32), with characteristic pliability. Aaron interceded with Moses piteously for her: "let her not be as one dead, of whom the flesh is half consumed when he cometh out of his mother's womb
Elisabeth - A devout woman, "of the daughters of Aaron," the wife of Zacharias, and mother of John the Baptist, Luke 1:5-25,36,39-80
Elisheba - By marrying Aaron (Exodus 6:23) she connected the royal and priestly tribes
Mosera, Moseroth - One of the encampments of Israel, connected with Mount Hor, where Aaron died and was buried
pu'ti-el - One of the daughters of Putiel was wife of Eleazar the son of Aaron, and mother of Phinehas
Abiram - , conspired to overthrow the authority of Moses and Aaron in the wilderness, Numbers 16:1-50
Kehunah - "priesthood"); G-d's sanctification of Aaron and his descendants to serve Him in the Holy Temple as the emissaries of the people of Israel...
Hor - The mountain on which Aaron died. It was during the encampment at Kadesh that Aaron died. It is now called Jebel Nebi-Harûn, "the mountain of the prophet Aaron. The mountain is marked far and near by its double top, which rises like a huge castellated building from a lower base and is now surmounted by a circular dome of the tomb of Aaron, a distinct white spot on the dark red surface of the mountain. The chief interest of Mount Hor consists in the prospect from its summit, the last view of Aaron—that view which was to him what Pisgah was to Moses
Miriam -
The sister of Moses and Aaron (Exodus 2:4-10 ; 1 Chronicles 6:3 ). (See Aaron; MOSES
Peleth -
A Reubenite whose son was one of the conspirators against Moses and Aaron (Numbers 16:1 )
Mishael ben uzziel - (14th century BCE) First cousin of Miriam, Aaron, and Moses
Hor -
The mountain on which Aaron died. (Numbers 21:4 ) It was during the encampment at Kadesh that Aaron was gathered to his fathers. It is now the Jebel Nebi-Harim "the mountain of the prophet Aaron. The mountain is marked far and near by its double top, which rises like a huge castellated building from a lower base, and is surmounted by a circular dome of the tomb of Aaron, a distinct white spot on the dark red surface of the mountain. The chief interest of Mount Hor consists in the prospect from its summit, the last view of Aaron --that view which was to him what Pisgah was to his brother
Joch'Ebed - (whose glory is Jehovah ), the wife and at the same time the aunt of Amram and the mother of Moses and Aaron
Ithamar - ” Fourth son of Aaron the priest (Exodus 6:23 ). See Aaron ; Priests and Levites
Abihu - ” The second son of Aaron; one of Israel's first priests (Exodus 6:23 ; Exodus 28:1 ). He saw God with Moses, Aaron, his brother, and 70 elders (Exodus 24:1 )
Hor - It is still called Jebel Neby Haroon, mount of the prophet Aaron; and on its summit stands a Mohammedan tomb of Aaron, on the site of a still more ancient structure, and marking perhaps the place of his burial
Aaronites - Aaronites (âr'on-îtes or ă'ron-ites). Levites of the family of Aaron: the priests who served the sanctuary. Eleazar, Aaron's son, was their chief Numbers 4:16
Consecration - This principally refers to the consecration of Aaron and his sons to the priestly office, which is given in detail in Exodus 29 , and Leviticus 8 . Aaron and his sons were sprinkled with blood and anointed with oil. Parts of the ram were placed in the hands of Aaron and his sons, these were waved before the Lord, and then burnt on the altar upon the burnt offering. Aaron and his sons ate of the flesh and other consecrations at the door of the Tabernacle
Hor - It was during the encampment here that Aaron died (Numbers 33:37-41 ). (See Aaron . It has two summits, in the hallow between which it is supposed that Aaron died
Miriam - The sister of Moses and Aaron, probably older than either. In the course of the wilderness wanderings she combined with Aaron against Moses, and was punished by leprosy, which was healed in answer to the prayer of Moses ( Numbers 12:1-15 ). Her story is referred to in Deuteronomy 24:8-9 in connexion with the ceremonial law of leprosy, and in Micah 6:4 she is spoken of along with Moses and Aaron as a leader of the people
Aaronites - Descendants of Aaron the high priest, so called 1 Chronicles 12:27 ; 27:17
Nadab - Eldest son of Aaron
Mount Hor - This place was rendered memorable by the death of Aaron
Elish'Eba - (God is her oath ), the wife of Aaron
Abihu - Second son of Aaron
Jochebed - The wife and at the same time the aunt of Amram and the mother of Moses and Aaron
Bukki - Son of Abishua, descendant of Aaron
Aaron (2) - AARON. Three of the passages contain historical references only: Luke 1:5 where Elisabeth is described as ‘of the daughters of Aaron’; Acts 7:40 which refers to the request of the Israelites that Aaron would ‘make them gods’; and Hebrews 9:4 ‘Aaron’s rod that budded. ’ The other two passages refer to Aaron’s office as high priest, and are directly concerned with the Christian doctrine of the priesthood of Christ. In Hebrews 5:4 we read, ‘And no man taketh the honour unto himself, but when he is called of God, even as was Aaron’; and Hebrews 7:11 speaks of another priest after the order of Melchizedek, who should ‘not be reckoned after the order of Aaron. ’ It is as the representative high priest that Aaron has been regarded as a type of Christ. On the one hand, Christ, like Aaron, did not take His priestly office on Himself, but was directly appointed by God (Hebrews 5:5); on the other, the Aaronic type of priesthood is sharply distinguished from that of our Lord in certain fundamental respects. Thus far He was Aaron’s antitype. ...
Thus Christ may well be spoken of as the second Adam, but not as a second Aaron. The lines of Bishop Wordsworth’s hymn, ‘Now our heavenly Aaron enters, Through His blood within the veil,’ can be defended only in so far as the name Aaron is synonymous with high priest. So far as the doctrine of Christ is concerned, it is well to follow Scripture usage and to speak of Him as our Eternal High Priest, rather than to press an analogical or typical relation to Aaron, which fails at many cardinal points
Ethiopian Woman - His marriage of this "woman" descended from Ham gave offence to Aaron and Miriam
Abishua - A Levite, the great-grandson of Aaron (1 Chronicles 6:4 )
Jochebed - Wife of Amram, and mother of Moses, Aaron, and Miriam, Numbers 26:59
Eleazar - Of the many people named Eleazar whom the Old Testament mentions, the most important was Eleazar, the third of Aaron’s four sons (Numbers 3:2). When Aaron became high priest, his four sons became his priest-assistants (Exodus 28:1-4). ...
God had prepared Eleazar to succeed Aaron as high priest (cf. Numbers 16:37; Numbers 19:3-4), and directed that Aaron, before he died, publicly appoint Eleazar to office (Numbers 20:23-28). Eleazar then assisted Moses as Aaron had previously (Numbers 26:63; Numbers 27:2; Numbers 31:12; Numbers 32:2)
Nahashon the son of amminadab - Brother-in-law of Aaron
Ithamar - The fourth son of Aaron
Amram - Levite, fatherof Aaron, Moses and Miriam
Hur - A chief man among the Hebrews in the desert, associated with Aaron in upholding the hands of Moses at Rephidim, and in supplying his place while on the summit of Sinai, Exodus 17:10 ; 24:14
Beeroth of the Children of Jaakan - ) Israel's halting place next before Mosera, where Aaron died
Moserah, Moseroth - Moserah is named in Deuteronomy 10:6 as the place where Aaron died and was buried: Moseroth in Numbers 33:30-31 as a ‘station’ on the route to Mt
Jochebed - Jehovah is her glory, the wife of Amram, and the mother of Miriam, Aaron, and Moses (Numbers 26:59 )
Aaron - And when we consider, to what an high honour Aaron was called; to be the type of Him, who, in the everlasting nature of his office, was, and is, JEHOVAH'S High Priest; both the altar, and the offering, the sacrifice, and the sacrificer, through whom alone, all offerings must be presented: surely, none taken from among men, could be more great and lofty in office than Aaron. The history of Aaron, incorporated as it is with that of Moses, fills a large part in the books of Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers
Nahshon - Son of Amminadab, prince of Judah; assisted Moses and Aaron at the first numbering in the wilderness (1 Chronicles 2:10; Exodus 6:23; Numbers 1:7). His sister Elisheba married Aaron
Ithamar - When Aaron and his four sons established Israel’s priestly order, Aaron became the high priest and his sons were the priests who assisted him
Dathan - Leaders of a revolt against Moses and Aaron (Numbers 16) which took place probably at Cades, shortly after the Israelites left Sinai
Abiron - Leaders of a revolt against Moses and Aaron (Numbers 16) which took place probably at Cades, shortly after the Israelites left Sinai
Aaron - On the way to Mount Sinai, during the battle with Amalek, Aaron with Hur stayed up the weary hands of Moses when they were lifted up for the victory of Israel. Left, on Moses' departure into Sinai, to guide the people, Aaron is tried for a moment on his own responsibility, and he fails from a weak inability to withstand the demand of the people for visible "gods to go before them," by making an image of Jehovah, in the well-known form of Egyptian idolatry (Apis or Mnevis). (9:20) Aaron was not consecrated by Moses to the new office of the high priesthood. (Exodus 29:9 ) From this time the history of Aaron is almost entirely that of the priesthood, and its chief feature is the great rebellion of Korah and the Levites. (Numbers 20:10-12 ) Aaron's death seems to have followed very speedily. (Numbers 20:28 ) This mount is still called the "Mountain of Aaron. The wife of Aaron was Elisheba, (Exodus 6:23 ) and the two sons who survived him, Eleazar and Ithamar
Elisabeth - She was a descendant of Aaron
Abi'hu - (he (God) is my father ), the second son, ( Numbers 3:2 ) of Aaron by Elisheba
Nahshon or Naasson - One of our Lord's ancestors, Matthew 1:4 Luke 3:32 ; chief of the tribe of Judah in the desert, Numbers 1:7 2:3 7:12 ; and brother-in-law of Aaron, Exodus 6:23 Ruth 4:20 1 Chronicles 2:10
Aaron - IS NOT Aaron THE LEVITE THY BROTHER? I KNOW THAT HE CAN SPEAK WELL...
WHAT a gifted house! What an honour to that man of the house of Levi who took to wife a daughter of Levi! What a rich slave-hut was that with Miriam and Aaron and Moses all born of God into it! What splendid wages to have three such children given to that son and daughter of Levi to nurse up for the Lord, and for Israel, and for all the world; three such goodly children as Miriam the prophetess, and Aaron the high priest, and Moses the deliverer and leader and lawgiver of Israel. Aaron, again, must have been the most eloquent of all eloquent men, since the fame of his eloquence had reached up to heaven itself till it was acknowledged and talked of and boasted about there. What oratory must Aaron's oratory have been when God Himself both felt and confessed its power. And till all that Israel could ever need as a nation and as a church, as fathers and as mothers, as masters and as servants, as slaves and as redeemed from slavery, as sinners and as the chosen people of God-all Israel was complete in Moses and Aaron and Miriam, even as they also were complete in God and in one another. Whereas certain others of our great divines are like Aaron in this, that they can speak well. And the Lord said to Moses, 'Who hath made man's voice? Is not Aaron the Levite thy brother? And he shall be thy spokesman unto the people; he shall be to thee instead of a mouth, and thou shalt be to him instead of God. Let all our young orators, and, especially, let all our sacred and Aaronic orators, study the delightful Institutes, that perfect treasure-house of ancient letters, ancient wisdom, and ancient truth and beauty. Now, Aaron was one of Cato's good men skilled in speaking. We are sure of that, because for Aaron's goodness as a man we have not only his long lifetime in the most sacred of all services, but also the psalmist's testimony that Aaron, with all his great trespass, was a great saint of God. The sword had entered Aaron's soul also. The iron furnace of Egypt had been burning for long in Aaron's covenant heart also. But when Aaron looked at the tremendous and impossible task of delivering Israel out of Egypt, he felt that he was helpless and hopeless. And thus it was that Aaron set out to Horeb to seek for Moses just at the moment when the bush began to burn on Horeb, and when the Lord began to speak to Moses out of the bush. 'Behold, Aaron thy brother cometh forth to meet thee, and when he soeth thee he will be glad in his heart. ' And Aaron went and met Moses in the mount of God. And Aaron kissed Moses, and Moses told Aaron all that the Lord bad said concerning him, till Aaron answered, and shrank back, and said: Surely it is not so. For even as Aaron so spake, Moses saw to his delight that Aaron had always the right word ready. No man could resist Aaron. No man could refuse Aaron, Pharaoh himself would not be able to resist and refuse Aaron. Moses felt beside Aaron that he would never open his mouth again. Whereas Aaron bad but to open his mouth and the right word always came out of his mouth. Till, with Aaron beside him, Moses felt that he could face without fear of failure both all Israel and Pharaoh with all his priests and all his magicians. ...
Now, as we have already seen, we have always had men among ourselves more or less like Moses, and other men more or less like Aaron. On the other hand, what are those men to do, who, like Aaron, have no such depth, and grasp, and originality, and productivity of mind as Moses and the great thinkers and great scholars of our race have had? A common man and a man of no gifts may be set in a place, and may have a calling of God that he cannot escape-a place and a calling which demand constant speaking and constant teaching at his hands. I would take no rest till I had found them, and then, as God said of Aaron, I would be glad when I saw them, and I would kiss them, and claim them as my own. ...
All went well with Aaron as long as he had Moses beside him to inspire him, and to support him, and to be to him instead of God. Aaron faced the elders of Israel, and scattered all their objections and all their fears as a rushing mighty wind scatters chaff; and the long struggle with Pharaoh and with his magicians lias surely been preserved to us by Aaron's eloquent pen. And, whatever part Aaron and Aaron's great gifts may have had in all that, at any rate, all went well with Aaron through all that. Aaron did splendid service through all that, and both his great name and his great service would have gone on growing in love and in honour to the end if only he had never let Moses out of his sight. But always when Moses was for any length of time out of sight, Aaron was a reed shaken with the wind; he was as weak and as evil as any other man. Those forty days that Moses was away on the Mount brought out, among other things, both Moses' strength and greatness and Aaron's littleness and weakness in a way that nothing else could have done. ' And Aaron went down like a broken reed before the idolatrous and licentious clamour of the revolted people. What would the people like me to say to them on that subject? Will they crowd to hear it? How will they take it? And what will be said about what I have said after I have said it and cannot unsay it? And, in my heart of hearts, can I let them go? Shall I not tune my pulpit just a touch or, two, so as to attract this man, and so as to keep that other man from going away? Moses had his own temptations and snares that even he did not always escape and overcome; but it was the good speaker's temptation, it was the popular preacher's temptation, that led Aaron into the terrible trespass of the golden calf. And it was because Aaron's penitence was at once so saintly, and so laid out in service, that we hear so little, and in as many words, about it. We would be nearer the truth about Aaron if we put him at the very head of all Old Testament penitents, both for his own sins and for the sins of all other men. Now, Aaron had to be Jesus Christ till Jesus Christ came. And while Aaron was Jesus Christ in type and by imputation, at the same time, and to give the uttermost reality and the uttermost intensity to that, he was himself Aaron all the time, Aaron of the golden calf and of many other untold transgressions besides. And you may be quite sure that Aaron never slew a sacrifice for sin that he did not lay the golden calf, and the nakedness, and the dancing, and the shame, and all the never-to-be-forgotten sin upon its bleeding head. You may be quite sure that Aaron never went into the holy place any day for the sin of others till he had gone first for his own sin. Little did the penitents in Israel think how much of his high priesthood Aaron had put on under Sinai and on the scene of that idolatrous and licentious revelry. And Aaron kept in the holy place, and beside the pot of manna and the rod that budded, a silver chest full of that same accursed ashes, and out of which chest he always sprinkled, and with many tears, all that he ate and all that he drank on every returning day of atonement
Ethiopian Woman - ]'>[1] ), when the children of Israel were at Hazeroth, Miriam and Aaron ‘spake against’ Moses on account of his marriage with an Ethiopian (RV Elders of Israel - Moses and Aaron treated the elders as representatives of the nation, Exodus 3:16 4:29 12:21 . When the law was given, God directed Moses to take the seventy elders, as well as Aaron, and Nadab and Abihu his sons, that they might be witnesses, Exodus 24:1,9
Miriam - Sister of Aaron and Moses: she is emphatically called 'Miriam the prophetess. With Aaron she took the lead in murmuring against Moses, on the plea that he had married an Ethiopian woman. Aaron humbled himself and confessed their sin, and Moses prayed for the restoration of Miriam
Hup'Pim -
A man who is mentioned with Moses and Aaron on the occasion of the battle with Amalek at Raphidim, (Exodus 17:10 ) when with Aaron he stayed up the hands of Moses. (Exodus 24:14 ) as being, with Aaron, left in charge of the people by Moses during his ascent of Sinai
Aaronites - The descendants of Aaron, and therefore priests. Jehoiada, the father of Benaiah, led 3,700 Aaronites as "fighting men" to the support of David at Hebron (1 Chronicles 12:27 )
Rephidim - Place near Horeb, where the Israelites encamped; water gushed from the rock when Moses had smitten it, and there Joshua fought with Amalek, while Moses lifted up his hands to heaven, assisted by Aaron and Hur
Aaron - Aaron was three years older than his brother Moses; and when God appeared in the burning bush, Moses having excused himself from the undertaking committed to him, by urging that he was slow of speech, Aaron, who was an eloquent man, was made his interpreter, and spokesman; and in effecting the deliverance of the Hebrews we therefore find them constantly associated. During the march of the children of Israel through the wilderness, Aaron and his sons were appointed by God to exercise for ever the office of priests in the tabernacle. ...
Moses having ascended the mountain to receive the law from God, Aaron, his sons, and seventy elders, followed him, Exodus 24:1-2 ; Exodus 24:9-11 ; not indeed to the summit, but "afar off," "and they saw the God of Israel," that is, the glory in which he appeared, "as it were the paved work of a sapphire stone, and as it were the body of heaven for clearness;"—a clear and dazzling, azure, a pure, unmingled splendour like that of the heavens. "And upon the nobles of Israel," Aaron, his sons, and the seventy elders, "he laid not his hand,"—they were not destroyed by a sight which must have overwhelmed the weakness of mortal men had they not been strengthened to bear it; "and they did eat and drink,"—they joyfully and devoutly feasted before the Lord, as a religious act, upon the sacrifices they offered. ...
During this period, the people, grown impatient at the long absence of Moses, addressed themselves to Aaron in a tumultuous manner, saying, "Make us gods which shall go before us: for, as for this Moses, the man that brought us up out of the land of Egypt, we wot not what is become of him. " Aaron sinfully yielded to the importunities of the people; and having ordered them to bring the pendants and the earrings of their wives and children, he melted them down, and then made a golden calf, probably in imitation of the Egyptian Apis, an ox or calf dedicated to Osiris. He also indignantly reproved Aaron, whose sin indeed had kindled against him the anger of the Lord, so that he would "have destroyed him but that Moses prayed for him. "...
After the tabernacle was built, Moses consecrated Aaron to the high priesthood with the holy oil, and invested him with his priestly robes,—his garments "of glory and beauty;" but Aaron's weakness was again manifested in concurring with Miriam, his sister, to censure and oppose Moses, through envy. Aaron, as being the elder brother, could not perhaps brook his superiority. What the motive of Miriam might be does not appear; but she being struck with leprosy, this punishment, as being immediately from God, opened Aaron's eyes; he acknowledged his fault, and asked forgiveness of Moses both for himself and his sister. ...
Aaron himself became also the object of jealousy; but two miraculous interpositions confirmed him in his office of high priest, as of Divine appointment. The second was the blossoming of Aaron's rod, which was designed "to cause the murmurings of the Israelites against him to cease," by showing that he was chosen of God. Moses having, at the command of God, taken twelve rods of an almond tree from the princes of the twelve tribes, and Aaron's separately, he placed them in the tabernacle before the sanctuary, after having written upon each the name of the tribe which it represented, and upon the rod of Aaron the name of Aaron. The day following, when the rods were taken out, that of Aaron "was budded, and brought forth buds, and bloomed blossoms, and yielded almonds. " This rod therefore was laid up by the ark, to perpetuate the remembrance of the miracle, and to be a token of Aaron's right to his office. ...
Aaron married Elisheba, the daughter of Amminadab, of the tribe of Judah, by whom he had four sons, Nadab and Abihu, Eleazar and Ithamar, Exodus 6:23 . ...
The account of the death of Aaron is peculiarly solemn and affecting. Soon after, the Lord commanded Moses, "Take Aaron, and Eleazar, his son, and bring them up to mount Hor; and strip Aaron of his garments,"—his splendid pontifical vestments,—"and put them upon Eleazar, his son; and Aaron shall be gathered unto his people, and shall die there. " This command was carried into effect in the presence of all Israel, who were encamped at the foot of the mountain; and his son being invested with the father's priestly dress, Aaron died, and all the people mourned for him thirty days. In Deuteronomy it is said that Aaron died at Mosera; because that was the name of the district in which mount Hor was situated. The PRIESTHOOD being established in Aaron and his family, the nature of this office among the Israelites, and the distinction between the high priest and the other priests, require here to be pointed out. But after the Lord had chosen the family of Aaron, and annexed the priesthood to that line, then the right of sacrificing to God was reserved to that family only. Aaron was a TYPE of Christ, not personally, but as the high priest of the Jewish church. All the priests, as offering gifts and sacrifices, were in their office types of Christ; but Aaron especially,...
1. But though the offices of Aaron were typical, the priesthood of Christ is of a different and higher ORDER than his, namely, that of MELCHIZIDECK
Appoint - Four examples can be noted: (1) the consecration of Aaron and his sons ( Exodus 28-29 ); (2) the appointment of Levites as servants of God (Numbers 3-8 ); (3) the naming of seventy elders to assist Moses (Numbers 11,24-25 ); and (4) the commissioning of Moses' successor (Numbers 27 ). ...
Of primary significance is the ordination of Aaron and the Levites. Aaron and his sons alone were to serve as priests (Exodus 28:1 ), to offer sacrifices (Numbers 8:1-7 ), and to bless the people (Numbers 6:22-27 ). Aaron was anointed (Leviticus 8:12 ) and the special vestments previewed those worn by preexilic monarchs (see Exodus 28 ). Because it marked the beginning of the priesthood in Israel, the consecration of Aaron to this office was of special significance. ...
As an extension of the appointment of Aaron and his sons, they were to bless the people (Numbers 6:22-27 ). God himself commanded Aaron and his sons to place the Lord's name on the Israelites (6:27)
Priests - Jethro, the priest of Midian, brought sacrifices to God and worshiped with Moses, Aaron, and the elders of Israel (Exodus 18:12 ). On the mount, God told Moses to appoint Aaron and his four sons to serve as priests, that is, to serve at the altar and in the sanctuary (Exodus 28:1 ,Exodus 28:1,28:41 ). Aaron and his descendants of the tribe of Levi served in the tabernacle and Temple as priests. Members of the tribe of Levi not related to Aaron assisted the priests but did not offer sacrifices. See Levites ; High Priest ; Aaron
Moserah - Near Mount Hor whereon Aaron died
Gibeah of Phinehas - Here Eleazar the son of Aaron was buried
Abidan - ” Representative of the tribe of Benjamin in helping Moses and Aaron number the people in the wilderness (Numbers 1:11 ) and captain of the tribe in the wilderness marches (Numbers 2:22 ; Numbers 7:60 ,Numbers 7:60,7:65 ; Numbers 10:24 )
Nadab - The son of Aaron
Rationale - ...
(2) Episcopal clasp of precious metal ornamented with diamonds worn over chasuble, like the breast ornament of Aaron
Moseroth - This place was made memorable by the death and burial of Aaron. What a thought! If the ashes of Adam, or Aaron, or any, or all of the patriarchs were to arise this hour, their bodies would be all alike unconscious whether they had slept a single night, or several thousand years
Kohath, Kohathites - He was the grandfather of Moses and Aaron. ...
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|¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯| Korah Hebronites Uzzielites...
Aaron
Bukki - High priestly descendant of Aaron (1Chronicles 6:5,1 Chronicles 6:51 ) and ancestor of Ezra (Ezra 7:4 )
Nadab - son of Aaron, and brother to Abihu
Dathan - Son of Eliab the Reubenite: he joined with Korah and Abiram in rebellion against Moses and Aaron, and was with Abiram swallowed up by the earth
Aaron - Jochebed, mother of Moses and Aaron, bore them three centuries after the death of Levi (Hebrews 5:4-527); "daughter of Levi, whom her mother bore to Levi," means "a daughter of a Levite whom her mother bore to a Levite. " The point of Numbers 26:59 is, Moses and Aaron were Levites both on the father's side and mother's side, Hebrew of Hebrew. Miriam was the oldest of the three, as appears from her being old enough, when Moses was only three months old and Aaron three years, to offer to go and call a Hebrew nurse for Pharaoh's daughter, to tend his infant brother. ...
The first mention of Aaron is in Ephesians 5:18-193; where, in answer to Moses' objection that he did not have the eloquence needed for such a mission as that to Pharaoh, Jehovah answers: "Is not Aaron, the Levite, thy brother? I know that he can speak well: and thou shalt speak unto him, and put words in his mouth; and I will be with thy mouth, and with his mouth, and will teach you what ye shall do; and he shall be thy spokesman unto the people; and he shall be instead of a mouth, and thou shalt be to him instead of God. There Aaron, evidently a man of influence already among the Israelites, introduced Moses to their assembled elders; and, as his mouthpiece, declared to them the divine commission of Moses with such persuasive power, under the Spirit, that the people "believed, bowed their heads, and worshipped" (Exodus 4:29-31). During Moses' forty years' absence in Midian, Aaron had married Elisheba or Elizabeth, daughter of Amminadab, and sister of Naashon, a prince of the children of Judah (Exodus 6:23; 1 Chronicles 2:10). ...
On the way to Sinai, in the battle with Amalek, Aaron, in company with Hur, supported Moses' weary hands, which uplifted the miracle-working rod of God (Exodus 17:9-13); and so Israel prevailed. ) But Moses is always made the principal, and Aaron subordinate. Whereas Moses ascended Sinai, and there received the tables of the law direct from God, as the mediator (Galatians 3:19), Aaron has only the privilege of a more distant approach with Nadab and Abihu and the seventy elders, near enough indeed to see Jehovah's glory, but not to have access to His immediate presence. Perhaps Aaron had hoped that their love of their personal finery and jewelry, which is the idol of so many in our own days, would prove stronger than their appetite for open idolatry; but men will for superstition part with that which they will not part with for a pure worship. Aaron's words, "These are thy gods elohim (a title of the true God), O Israel, which brought thee up out of Egypt," as also his proclamation, "Tomorrow is a feast to JEHOVAH," show that he did not mean an open apostasy from the Lord, but rather a concession to the people's sensuous tastes, in order to avert a total alienation from Jehovah. Aaron alleged, as an excuse, the people's being "set on mischief," and seemingly that he had only cast their gold into the fire, and that by mere chance "there came out this calf. "...
Aaron's humiliation and repentance must have been very deep; for two months after this great sin, God's foreappointed plan (Exodus 29) was carried into effect in the consecration of Aaron to the high priesthood (Leviticus 8). Aaron's very fall would upon his recovery make him the more fit as a priest, to have compassion on the ignorant and on them that are out of the way, for that he himself also is compassed with infirmity (Hebrews 5:2); compare the case of Peter, Luke 22:31-32. ...
The consecration comprised a sin offering for reconciliation, a burnt offering to express whole-hearted self-consecration to God, and a meat offering (minchah ), unbloody, of flour, salt, oil, and frankincense, to thank God for the blessings of nature (these marking the blessings and duties of man); then also the special tokens of the priestly office, the ram of consecration, whose blood was sprinkled on Aaron and his sons to sanctify them, the sacred robes "for glory and for beauty," breast-plate, ephod, robe, embroidered coat, mitre, and girdle, and linen breeches (Exodus 28); and the anointing with the holy oil, which it was death for anyone else to compound or use (Exodus 30:22-38), symbolizing God's grace, the exclusive source of spiritual unction. Aaron immediately offered sacrifice and blessed the people, and the divine acceptance was marked by fire from the Lord consuming upon the altar the burnt offering and the fat, so that the people shouted at the sight and fell on their faces. Nothing could more clearly mark how grace had raised Aaron above his natural impulsiveness than the touching picture, so eloquent in its brevity, of Aaron's submissiveness under the crushing stroke, "and Aaron held his peace. The only token of anguish Aaron manifested was his forbearing to eat that day the flesh of the people's sin offering: Leviticus 10:12-20. ...
Miriam, in a fit of feminine jealousy, some time afterward acted on Aaron so as to induce him to join in murmuring against Moses: the former relying on her prophetic inspiration (Exodus 15:20), the latter on his priesthood, as though equal with Moses in the rank of their commission. That Miriam was the instigator appears from her name preceding that of Aaron (Numbers 12), and from the leprosy being inflicted on her alone. Aaron, with characteristic impressibleness, repented of his sin almost immediately after he had been seduced into it, upon Jehovah's sudden address to Moses, Aaron, and Miriam, declaring His admission of Moses to speak with Him "mouth to mouth, apparently," so that he should "behold the similitude of the Lord," a favor far above all "visions" vouchsafed to prophets. At Aaron's penitent intercession with Moses, and Moses' consequent prayer, Miriam was healed. ), in the wilderness of Paran, the rebellion took place of Korah and the Levites against Aaron's monopoly of the priesthood, and of Dathan, Abiram, and the Reubenites against Moses' authority as civil leader. As Aaron jealously murmured against Moses, so Korah murmured against him. "...
A plague from the Lord had threatened to destroy utterly the people for murmuring against Moses and Aaron as the murderers of Korah, Dathan, Abiram, and their accomplices, when Aaron proved the efficacy of his priesthood by risking his own life for his ungrateful people, and "making atonement for the people" with incense in a censer, and "standing between the living and the dead," so that the plague was stopped (Numbers 16). To prevent future rivalry for the priesthood, God made Aaron's rod alone of the twelve rods of Israel, suddenly to blossom and bear almonds, and caused it to be kept perpetually "before the testimony for a token against the rebels" (Numbers 17; Hebrews 9:4). ...
Inclined to lean on his superior brother, Aaron naturally fell into Moses' sin at Meribah, and shared its penalty in forfeiting entrance into the promised land (Numbers 20:1-13). As Moses' self-reliance was thereby corrected, so was Aaron's tendency to be led unduly by stronger natures than his own. To mark also the insufficiency of the Aaronic priesthood to bring men into the heavenly inheritance, Aaron must die a year before Joshua (the type of Jesus) leads the people into their goodly possession. There Moses stripped him of his pontifical robes, and put them upon Eleazar his son; and Aaron died, 123 years old, and was buried on the mountain (Numbers 20:28; Numbers 20:38; Deuteronomy 10:6; Deuteronomy 32:50). The mountain is now surmounted by the circular dome of the tomb of Aaron, a white spot on the dark red surface. For the Jews' opinion of Aaron, see the apocryphal Ecclesiasticus 45. Aaron's descendants, to the number of 3,700 fighting men, with Jehoiada, father of Benaiah, their head, joined David at Hebron (1 Chronicles 12:27; 1 Chronicles 27:17); subsequently, Zadok was their chief, "a young man mighty of valor
Jochebed - In Exodus 6:20 , the wife of Amram and the mother of Miriam, Aaron, and Moses
Rite - 6th ed; Godwyn's Moses and Aaron; Edwards's Survey of all Religions, vol
Jattir - A town in the hills of Judah (Joshua 15:48), one of the nine allotted to the sons of Aaron (Joshua 21:14; 1 Chronicles 6:57)
Jochebed - A sister of Kohath, married to Amram her nephew, and mother of Aaron and Moses ( Exodus 6:20 ) and Miriam ( Numbers 26:59 )
Miriam - The daughter of Amram, and the sister of Moses and Aaron, 1 Chronicles 6:3, appointed to watch the ark of bulrushes in which her infant brother was laid among the flags of the river. After the passage of the Red Sea, she led the choir of the women of Israel in the sublime song of deliverance, Exodus 15:20, but afterward, having joined Aaron in murmuring against Moses, she was smitten with leprosy, and restored only in answer to the prayers of Moses
Hur - One who with Aaron supported the hands of Moses during the battle of Israel with Amalek. He was also left with Aaron in charge of the camp when Moses ascended mount Sinai
Amariah - Son of Meraioth, a descendant of Aaron in the line of Eleazar
Nahshon - ” Leader of the tribe of Judah during the wilderness years (Numbers 1:7 ; Numbers 2:3 ; Numbers 7:12 ,Numbers 7:12,7:17 ; Numbers 10:14 ), brother-in-law of Aaron (Exodus 6:23 ), and an ancestor of King David (Ruth 4:20-22 ) and of Jesus (Matthew 1:4 ; Luke 3:32 )
Phinehas - (a) Son of Elazar, grandson of Aaron
Abiram - Leader of rebellion against Moses and Aaron seeking priestly authority
iz'Har - (oil ), son of Kohath grandson of Levi, uncle of Aaron and Moses and father of Korah
Urim - When Aaron was arrayed, Moses himself put the Urim and Thummin into the breastplate
Ger'Shon - ) But, though the eldest born, the families of Gershon were outstripped in fame by their younger brethren of Kohath, from whom sprang Moses and the priestly line of Aaron
High Priest - Aaron was constantly called 'the priest;' but as his sons were also called priests, he was necessarily the 'chief' and would correspond to what is called high priest in the N. Aaron did not take the honour upon himself, nor did Christ. See Aaron, AaronIC PRIESTHOOD, MELCHISEDEC
Nahshon - His sister Elisheba was the wife of Aaron
Jochebed - 1523 BCE) Daughter of Levi; wife of Amram; mother of Miriam, Aaron, and Moses
Buk'ki -
Son of Abishua and father of Uzzi fifth from Aaron in the line of the high priests in (1 Chronicles 6:5 ; 6:5,51 ) (Authorized Version), and in the genealogy of Ezra
Jether - Aaron
Uzzi - A descendant of Aaron ( 1Ch 6:5 ; 1 Chronicles 6:9 ; 1 Chronicles 6:51 , Ezra 7:4 [1])
Phinehas - Aaron, Eleazar and Phinehas
Amram - He married Jochebed, "his father's sister," and was the father of Aaron, Miriam, and Moses (Exodus 6:18,20 ; Numbers 3:19 )
Amminadab - His daughter Elisheba was married to Aaron (Exodus 6:23 )
Hor - A mountain ‘in the edge of the land of Edom’ ( Numbers 33:37 ), where Aaron died. Constant tradition, at least since Josephus, sees Mount Hor in Jebel Harûn , ‘the Mountain of Aaron,’ above Petra
Urim - So that when Aaron was thus adorned and went in before the propitiatory, he represented our Almighty Aaron, who was, and is himself, both the light and the life, the perfection, and the glory of all his redeemed
Nahshon - Brother-in-law of Aaron ( Exodus 6:23 ) descendant in the 5th generation from Judah ( 1 Chronicles 2:10 f
Abihu - Second son of Aaron ( Exodus 6:23 , Numbers 3:2 ; Numbers 26:60 , 1 Chronicles 6:3 ; 1 Chronicles 24:1 ); accompanied Moses to the top of Sinai ( Exodus 24:1 ; Exodus 24:9 ); admitted to the priest’s office ( Exodus 28:1 ); slain along with his brother Nadab for offering strange fire ( Leviticus 10:1-2 , Numbers 3:4 ; Numbers 26:61 , 1 Chronicles 24:2 )
Mera'Ioth -
A descendant of Eleazar the son of Aaron and head of a priestly house
Korah - ...
...
A Levite, the son of Izhar, the brother of Amram, the father of Moses and Aaron (Exodus 6:21 ). The institution of the Aaronic priesthood and the Levitical service at Sinai was a great religious revolution. This gave rise to murmurings and discontent, while the Israelites were encamped at Kadesh for the first time, which came to a head in a rebellion against Moses and Aaron, headed by Korah, Dathan, and Abiram. The whole company demanded of Moses and Aaron that the old state of things should be restored, alleging that "they took too much upon them" (Numbers 16:1-3 ). " A plague thereafter began among the people who sympathized in the rebellion, and was only stayed by Aaron's appearing between the living and the dead, and making "an atonement for the people" (16:47)
Golden Calf - The former passage records that the people summoned Aaron to make an image to go before them. All other references to this subject in the Bible (Deuteronomy 9:16 ,Deuteronomy 9:16,9:21 ; 2 Kings 10:29 ; 2 Kings 17:16 ; 2 Chronicles 11:15 ; 2 Chronicles 13:8 ; Nehemiah 9:18 ; Psalm 106:19 ; Acts 7:41 ) have in view either the incident involving Aaron or the one involving Jeroboam I. See Aaron ; Bethel ; Bull ; Dan ; Exodus ; Jeroboam I; Moses ; Yahweh
Korah, Dathan, Abiram - 17) describes a revolt of Korah, at the head of 250 princes of the congregation, against Moses and Aaron , in the interests of the people al large as against the tribe of Levi . 17 the blossoming of Aaron’s rod. , Numbers 16:36-40 ) represents Korah at the head of 250 Levites , opposing, in the interests of the tribe of Levi, the monopoly of the priesthood claimed by Aaron. These last two narratives are memorials of the struggles that took place, and the various stages that were passed through, before the prerogatives of Levi were admitted by the other tribes, and those of the house of Aaron by the other Levitical families
Miriam - sister of Moses and Aaron, and daughter of Amram and Jochebed, was born about A. When Zipporah, the wife of Moses, arrived in the camp of Israel, Miriam and Aaron disputed with her, speaking against Moses on her account, Numbers 12. Aaron interceded with Moses for her recovery, and besought the Lord, who ordered her to be shut out of the camp seven days
Miriam - AARON AND MOSES, AND MIRIAM THEIR SISTER...
WATCH well, Miriam, and never let thine eyes off that ark of bulrushes Watch that little ark with all thy wit, for no other maiden shall ever have such another watch till the fulness of time, when another Miriam shall watch over another child still more fair to God. Could you have so hardened your heart till you got him home? And could you have always been on your guard to hold him at arm's length when an Egyptian neighbour came near as Moses' Hebrew nurse did? A mother worthy of prophets, and priests, and prophetesses; and, best of all, God-her-glory!...
By the next time we see Miriam, Moses and Aaron and Miriam are at the head of the children of Israel. Some sharp-eyed scholars who are able to read between the lines assure us that they see tokens of Aaron and of his eloquence in the triumphant song that Miriam took down from Aaron's lips and taught to the devout and talented women, till Aaron and Miriam, with Moses so proudly looking on, made that day a day to be remembered for its songs and for its dances, as well as for its great deliverance, in the house of Israel. And we have the promise that if we flee from Egypt, and do not return to it, we ourselves also shall one day join Moses and Aaron and Miriam on the sea of glass, where, with the harps of God in our hands, we shall all sing together the song of Moses and the Lamb, saying, Great and marvellous are Thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true are Thy ways, Thou King of saints. Miriam had sat at the council-table with Moses and Aaron and the assembled elders of Israel. What Moses and Aaron were to the one half of the people, Miriam the sister of Moses was to the other half. ...
Aaron had great gifts of the intellectual kind, and he performed great services both of that and of the spiritual kind; but Aaron had little or no strength of character. Aaron could speak well when some stronger man inspired him and held him up, but that was all. Aaron never had much mind of his own. We have not a thousandth part of what Miriam said to Aaron. 'Hath the Lord spoken only by Moses?' Miriam demanded of Aaron. 'Hath He not also spoken by us?' And Aaron had pride enough and ambition enough and envy enough smouldering in his own heart, that when Miriam blew long enough upon it, Aaron's heart also burned up into an answering flame. And the Lord spake suddenly unto Moses, and unto Aaron, and unto Miriam-Come out, ye three, unto the tabernacle of the congregation. Moses the leader and lawgiver of Israel, and Aaron the high priest, and Miriam the prophetess, and all Israel looking after them in terror, and the anger of the Lord kindling round about them. And that in Aaron is what comes of weakness and softness and easiness under temptation. Aaron feels now the full shame of letting Miriam come to his tent and sit and whisper and backbite, when he should have turned her to the door, prophetess and all. How they both wish now that he had! And the Lord called Aaron and Miriam, and they both came forth. And Aaron looked upon Miriam, and behold, she was leprous. Look at her hiding her shame all day behind the sandhills of the wilderness, and coming out at night to look at the lights in Moses' tent and in Aaron's tabernacle. What Aaron's thoughts were as he exercised his office on his sister, and pronounced it leprosy, and passed sentence upon her, and hurried her out of the camp, and shut the gate upon her-what Aaron's thoughts all that week were let him tell us who has had to bear witness against, and to sentence, and to execute judgment on some one in whose sin he himself had been a partaker. I tell you the lepers in Israel had extra-tender treatment at Aaron's hands ever after that awful week. Was she glad in her heart when she heard of Miriam's leprosy? Did she laugh behind the door like Sarah? Did she say, Let her rot in the wilderness, for she deserves it? Was she sad all the eighth day and night after Miriam had been healed? Or, did she go up to the court of the Ethiopians, and there importune her brother Aaron to importune his God on behalf of his sister? Did she look out at the gate many times every day all that week, but could never see or hear Miriam for weeping? Did she buy the two birds for the cleansing of a leper with her own money, and did she have them all ready with her own hands for days before Aaron could as yet take Miriam back? I do not know. I can well believe that was the best week for the whole house of Israel till that week came when a Greater than Moses and Aaron and Miriam all put together suffered without the gate for their envy and for all their other trespasses. Where is Miriam all this week? Why is Aaron always so sad? Why is Moses always walking alone? Why is my mother always weeping so? And why, when the seventh day came to a close, was there such gladness again? Imagine for yourselves the questions and the answers in every tent in Israel that week. All the sprinklings, and all the bathings, and all the thanksgivings, and all the benedictions of Aaron her brother; and all the love, and honour, and trust, and confidence of Moses her other brother; and all the sisterly tenderness of Moses wife; and all the sports, and plays, and leaps, and laughters of Moses children-all could not heal Miriam's broken heart. That is Miriam the prophetess, the sister of Moses and Aaron, who is taking out meat and medicine and linen for the lips of the lepers. She is pledging herself to speak to Aaron her brother for them
Amminadab - He was one of the ancestors of Christ; and his daughter Elisheba was the wife of Aaron, Exodus 6:23 Ruth 4:20 Matthew 1:4
Mishael - Cousin of Moses and Aaron (Exodus 6:22 ) who helped bury Nadab and Abihu (Leviticus 10:4 )
Miriam - (a) (1400-1274 BCE) A prophetess, daughter of Amram and Jochebed, older sister of Aaron and Moses
Levite - They were subordinate to the priests, the descendants of Aaron, who was also of the family of Levi
Nah'Shon, - His sister, Elisheba, was wife to Aaron, and his son, Salmon, was husband to Rahab after the taking of Jericho
Nadab - Aaron's oldest son by Elisheba (Exodus 6:23; Numbers 3:2). With Aaron and Abihu and 70 elders he had the privilege of nearer access to Jehovah at Sinai than the mass of the people, but not so near as Moses (Exodus 24:1). (See Aaron; ABIHU
Abihu - Son of Aaron, whose awful death, by the immediate judgment of the Lord, With his brother Nadab, is recorded Leviticus 10:2. And they have formed this opinion, on the precept in the ninth verse: where it is said to Aaron, "Do not drink wine nor strong drink, thou, nor thy sons with thee, when ye go into the tabernacle of the congregation; lest ye die
Zadok - Son of Ahitub and father of Ahimaaz, descended from Aaron through Eleazar and was a priest in the time of David (2 Samuel 8:17 ; 1 Chronicles 6:3-8 ). He is named in company with Abiathar, who was descended from Aaron through Ithamar (1 Chronicles 24:3 ). The genealogy of Zadok is given in 1 Chronicles 6:3-15 from Aaron through Eleazar on down to Jehozadak of postexilic times (compare Zechariah 6:11 ). This statement agrees with the genealogies of Chronicles which list only two families as far as the captivity—David of Judah and Zadok the descendant of Aaron through Eleazar
Amram - He married Jochebed his father’s sister, by whom he begat Aaron and Moses ( Exodus 6:18-20 ) and Miriam ( Numbers 26:59 , 1 Chronicles 6:3 )
Abiram - A Reubenite, son of Eliab, who rose in the conspiracy headed by Korah against Moses and Aaron, and who perished by the judgement of God, Numbers 16 : See KORAH...
2
Amminadab, Aminadab - Prince of the tribe of Judah, father of Naashon, Naasson, or Nahshon, and of Elisheba wife of Aaron
Bukki - Abishua's son; father of Uzzi; fifth in the high priestly line through Eleazar from Aaron (1 Chronicles 6:5; 1 Chronicles 6:51)
Phinehas - Grandson of Aaron and high priest who, on several occasions, aided Moses and Joshua
Noetians - Christian heretics in the third century, followers of Noetius, a philosopher of Ephesus, who pretended that he was another Moses sent by God, and that his brother was a new Aaron
Abiram - "
One of the sons of Eliab, who joined Korah in the conspiracy against Moses and Aaron
Censer - When Aaron made an atonement for himself and his house, he was to take a censer full of burning coals of fire from off the altar of the Lord, Leviticus 16:12
Hor - The mount in which Aaron died (Numbers 20:22-23; Numbers 20:25-28). On the northernmost of its two summits is shown a square building with dome, called the tomb of Aaron. (See Aaron. " Moses' death was in solitude, but with Gilead's heights, and Benjamin's hills, and the rich Jordan valley in view; whereas Aaron's last looks rested on rugged Edom, and chalky mount Seir, and the red sandstone rocks round Petra, and the dreary Arabah
Hur - With Aaron Hur. Again with Aaron had charge of the People in Moses' absence on mount Sinai, as his representative (Exodus 24:14)
Miriam - Sister of Moses and Aaron and the daughter of Jochebed and Amram. ...
At Hazeroth, Miriam sided with Aaron in an act of rebellion against Moses when he married an Ethiopian woman (Numbers 12:1-15 )
Amminadab - His daughter Elisheba married Aaron, and bore Nadab (named from Amminadab), Abihu, Eleazar, and Ithamar; the earliest alliance of the kingly line of Judah and the priestly line of Aaron
Elisabeth - A righteous woman, of the tribe of Aaron, wife of Zacharias, and mother of John the Baptist
Mish'Ael -
One of the sons of Uzziel, the uncle of Aaron and Moses
Ithamar - Palm isle, the fourth and youngest son of Aaron (1 Chronicles 6:3 )
Elisabeth - (Aaron's wife) "swearing by God" (Exodus 6:23). Of the daughters of Aaron; related ("cousin") to the Virgin Mary (Luke 1:5; Luke 1:36)
Bukki - Son of Abishua and father of Uzzi, fifth in descent from Aaron in the line of the high priests through Phinehas ( 1 Chronicles 6:6 ; 1 Chronicles 6:51 , Ezra 7:4 )
Hor, Mount - The mountain on which Aaron died when the Israelites were near the end of their wanderings
Attire - ...
With the linen miter shall Aaron be attired
Immer - One had charge of the sixteenth course of priestly service, and some returned from exile, two of whom had married strange wives; but there is no genealogy of their descent from Aaron
Nadab - The oldest son of Aaron, slain by the lord for presumptuously offering strange fire on the altar of burnt offering, Leviticus 10:1-20
Kohath - From him sprang Moses and Aaron (1 Chronicles 6:2); but (See AMRAM their father is separated from the Amram, Kohath's son, by many omitted links in the genealogy, for at the Exodus Kohath's posterity numbered 2,750 between 30 and 50 years old (Numbers 4:35-36), and the males young and old 8,600, divided into the Amramites, Izharites, Hebronites, and Uzzielites (Numbers 3:25-27, etc. side of the tabernacle, to bear (Numbers 4:15) the ark, the table, the candlestick, the altars, and vessels of the sanctuary, and the hangings, but not to take off the coverings put on by the sons of Aaron or touch them, on pain of death; Uzzah's fatal error (2 Samuel 6:6-7)
Hur - With Aaron he held up Moses’ hands, in order that by the continual uplifting of the sacred staff Israel might prevail over Amalek ( Exodus 17:10 ; Exodus 17:12 E Abihu - the son of Aaron, the high priest, was consumed, together with his brother Nadab, by fire sent front God, because he had offered incense with strange fire, instead of taking it from the altar, Leviticus 10:1-2 . 2514; within eight days after the consecration of Aaron and his sons
Priest, Priesthood - At first it was said that they should all be priests (Exodus 19:6 ), but law afterwards came in, and the service of priesthood was very definitely confined to the house of Aaron. ...
The Lord was not nor could be a priest on earth, for He was not of the order of Aaron (Hebrews 7:14 ; Hebrews 8:4 ); but on the cross He offered Himself to God, the antitype of Aaron on the day of atonement. See AaronIC PRIESTHOOD
Genealogies - As the priesthood was restricted to the sons of Aaron, it was essential that they should preserve their genealogy. On the return from the exile some were unable to show their descent from Aaron, and they were put out of the priesthood. Zacharias was of the 'course of Abia,' and Elizabeth was 'of the daughters of Aaron
Aaron - By name Aaron is mentioned in the NT only by St. ), and gradually the conceptions involved in high-priesthood were identified with the name of Aaron. ...
In this typical relation between Aaron as the embodiment of priestly ideas and Christ as their final expression, an attempt was made to trace differences as well as correspondences. Christ was thought of, not as identical with His prototype, but as invested with higher qualities, of which only the germ and promise are to be found in Aaron. In regard to vocation, both were appointed by God (Hebrews 5:4); yet to the priesthood of Christ no Aaronic (Hebrews 7:11), or Levitical (Hebrews 7:14), or legal (Hebrews 9:9) measure may he put. He was a man like Aaron (Hebrews 2:16 f. In function Aaron stood between God and the congregation, representing each to the other. -See article ‘Aaron’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) , Dict
Hazeroth - There Aaron and Miriam challenged Moses' sole authority, using his Cushite wife as an excuse (Numbers 12:1 )
Jannes And Jambres - (jan' neess uhnd jam' breess) Two opposers of Moses and Aaron (2 Timothy 3:8 )
Uzzi -
The son of Bukki, and a descendant of Aaron (1 Chronicles 6:5,51 ; Ezra 7:4 )
Moses - Son of Amram and Jochebed, younger brother of Miriam and Aaron
Calf - Golden calf, which it is said Aaron made, Exodus 32:1-4, It is remarkable, that though it is expressly said, that this was but one idol, yet the children of Israel addressed it as in the plural, and said, "These are thy gods, O Israel!" Did the Israelites, in direct defiance of the divine law, make this idol to resemble, according to their gross conceptions, the true God? Wherefore, do they otherwise call it gods? Certainly, there is somewhat mysterious in it
Eleazar - The third son of Aaron, and high priest after him, Exodus 6:23 ; Numbers 20:25-28
Miriam - The sister of Moses and Aaron, probably the one who watched over Moses in the ark of bulrushes, Exodus 2:4,5 Numbers 26 59 Micah 6 4
Elea'Zar -
Third son of Aaron. (Numbers 3:32 ) With his brother Ithamar he ministered as a priest during their father's lifetime, and immediately before his death was invested on Mount Hor with the sacred garments, as the successor of Aaron in the office of high priest
Levite - A hereditary priesthood in the family of Aaron was then instituted (Exodus 28:1 ). They were selected for this purpose because of their zeal for the glory of God (Exodus 32:26 ), and because, as the tribe to which Moses and Aaron belonged, they would naturally stand by the lawgiver in his work. ...
The Levitical order consisted of all the descendants of Levi's three sons, Gershon, Kohath, and Merari; whilst Aaron, Amram's son (Amram, son of Kohat), and his issue constituted the priestly order. They were given to Aaron and his sons the priests to wait upon them and do work for them at the sanctuary services (Numbers 8:19 ; 18:2-6 )
Aaron - The rod of Aaron blossomed as a sign that he had been chosen by God to be first high priest (Leviticus 8). His son Eleazar and descendants, Aaronites, were consecrated as an hereditary priesthood
Ithamar - Youngest son of Aaron: he was anointed with Nadab, Abihu, and Eleazar to minister in the priest's office
Nadab - Eldest son of Aaron
Zoan - It was here that Moses and Aaron met with Pharaoh and here the 'plagues' were wrought; for it was in the 'field of Zoan' that God did marvellous things
Ith'Amar - (land of palms ), the youngest son of Aaron
Leviticus - 1-7, the laws of offerings; 8-10, the consecration of Aaron and his family; 11-15, the laws concerning that which is clean and that which is unclean; 16, the atonement as the sum-total of all means of grace; 17-20, the separation of Israel from heathendom in food, marriage, etc
Abihu - Abihu and Nadab, sons of Aaron, with seventy of the elders of Israel, were invited to ascend with Moses, where they saw God and did eat and drink, Exodus 24:1,9-11 . Their death followed, and Aaron and his other sons were not to leave the tabernacle nor mourn for the dead
Rod - The rod of Aaron is the staff commonly used by the high priest. See Aaron
Ab - On its first day, a fast was observed for the death of Aaron, Numbers 33:38 ; and on its ninth, another was held in memory of the divine edicts which excluded so many that came out of Egypt from entering the promised land; and also, of the overthrow of the first and second temple
Amariah -
One of the descendants of Aaron by Eleazar (1 Chronicles 6:7,52 )
Elisabeth - ” A woman descended from Aaron who was the wife of Zacharias the priest (Luke 1:5 )
Holiness - , the Israelites as people of God (Leviticus 20); Aaron as priest (1Par
Calf - A calf was offered for a sin-offering for Aaron, and a calf and a lamb for a burnt-offering for the people, at the commencement of Aaron's service
Antiquities - Ritualibus; Godwyn's Moses and Aaron; Bingham's Antiquities of the Christian Church; Brown's Antiquities of the Jews; Potter's and Harwood's Greek and Kennett's and Adam's Roman Antiquities; Preface to the Prussian Testament, published by L'Enfant and Beausobre; Prideaux and Shuckford's Connections; Jones's Asiatic Researches; and Maurice's Indian Antiquities
Elizabeth, Saint - According to the Gospel of Saint Luke she was "of the daughters of Aaron," and a kinswoman of the Blessed Virgin Mary, although their actual relationship is unknown
Eleazar - the third son of Aaron, and his successor in the dignity of high priest, Exodus 6:23
Meribah - This was the scene of the transgression of Moses and Aaron, for which they were precluded from crossing the Jordan
Eleazar -
The third son of Aaron (Exodus 6:23 ). On Mount Hor he was clothed with the sacred vestments, which Moses took from off his brother Aaron and put upon him as successor to his father in the high priest's office, which he held for more than twenty years (Numbers 20:25-29 ). "And Eleazar the son of Aaron died; and they buried him in a hill that pertained to Phinehas his son" (Joshua 24:33 )
Meribah - " Thirty-eight years afterward at Kadesh, bordering on the promised laud, again, untaught by the severe discipline of the wilderness (Isaiah 9:13), Israel in want of water cried, "would God we had died when our brethren died before the Lord!"...
God's glory appeared, and the Lord said to Moses and Aaron, "take the rod, and speak unto the rock before their eyes, and it shall give forth his water. " So Jehovah excluded Moses and Aaron from entering Canaan, for not "sanctifying" Him (Numbers 20:1-13). Moses and Aaron typify ministers
Kohathites - Since Kohath was the grandfather of Aaron, Moses, and Miriam (Exodus 6:20 ; Numbers 26:59 ; see Amram), the Kohathites were considered the most important of the three major Levitical families (that is, Kohathites, Gershonites, and Merarites). The Kohathites could not touch these objects and could move them only after they had been properly prepared by Aaron and his sons. ...
After the conquest, Kohathites descended from Aaron received thirteen cities from the tribes of Judah, Simeon, and Benjamin (Joshua 21:4 ,Joshua 21:4,21:9-19 ; 1 Chronicles 6:54-60 )
Atonement, Day of - Aaron, on account of the failure of his sons in the priestly office, could not enter there at all times, but, as the representative of the people, once a year on the Day of Atonement, and he must enter alone. Aaron must offer sacrifices for himself and his house: a young bullock for a sin offering and a ram for a burnt offering. Aaron and his sons represent the saints who now form the church as a company of priests, and were thus, in the type, distinct from the people (Israel) as an earthly company who formed the camp. This, as with the bullock for Aaron and his house, was the atonement offering Godward. The other, after being presented before the Lord, was brought forth: on him Aaron laid both his hands and confessed over him "all the iniquities of the children of Israel and all their transgressions in all their sins, putting them upon the head of the goat," Leviticus 16:21 , which was then sent away into the wilderness, a land of forgetfulness
Nadab - The eldest son of Aaron
Stranger - In Genesis 23:4 it denotes one resident in a foreign land; Exodus 23:9 , one who is not a Jew; Numbers 3:10 , one who is not of the family of Aaron; Psalm 69:8 , an alien or an unknown person
Magic - , magic formed an essential element, and of the Egyptian magicians, in their conflict with Moses and Aaron, Exodus gives a vivid Censer - Aaron ran with a censer and incense between the living and the dead, and the plague was stayed
Aaron's Rod - The rod Aaron used to demonstrate to the Pharaoh that the God of the Hebrews was Lord
Amram - Father of Moses, Aaron, and Miriam and grandson of Levi (Exodus 6:18-20 )
Numbers - a canonical book of the Old Testament, being the fourth of the Pentateuch, or five books of Moses; and receives its denomination from the numbering of the families of Israel by Moses and Aaron, who mustered the tribes, and marshalled the army, of the Hebrews in their passage through the wilderness
Phinehas - son of Eleazar, and grandson of Aaron, third high priest of the Jews, A
Amminadab - His daughter, Elisheba, was the wife of Aaron; and his son Naashon, or Nahshon, prince of Judah in the wilderness
Leviticus - ...
A full account of the consecration of Aaron and his sons as priests, is followed by the instructive narrative of Nadab and Abihu. The book is generally held to be the work of Moses, though he was probably assisted by Aaron
High Priest - Aaron was the first who was solemnly set apart to this office (Exodus 29:7 ; 30:23 ; Leviticus 8:12 ). ...
It is supposed that there were in all eighty-three high priests, beginning with Aaron (B. At its first institution the office of high priest was held for life (but Compare 1 Kings 2:27 ), and was hereditary in the family of Aaron (Numbers 3:10 ). The office continued in the line of Eleazar, Aaron's eldest son, for two hundred and ninety-six years, when it passed to Eli, the first of the line of Ithamar, who was the fourth son of Aaron
on - Son of Peleth, a Reubenite: he joined with Korah in murmuring against Moses and Aaron
Abihu - One of the sons of Aaron, who, together with his brothers, Nadab, Eleazar, and Ithamar, were set apart by God to the office of the priesthood
Phinehas - A son of Eleazar and grandson of Aaron, Exodus 6:25; 1 Chronicles 6:4; 1 Chronicles 6:50, was high priest of the Jews for nearly 20 years
Ithamar - The fourth and youngest son of Aaron and Elisheba ( Exodus 6:23 etc
Consecrate - Thou shalt consecrate Aaron and his sons
Incense - Nadab and Abihu, the sons of Aaron, took either of them his censer, and put fire therein and put incense thereon
Garment - The “holy garments” Moses was commanded to make for Aaron included everything he was to wear while officiating before the Lord: “… A breastplate, and an ephod, and a robe, and an embroidered coat, a mitre, and a [3]; and they shall make holy garments for Aaron …” ( Calf - The first was when Aaron, at the demand of the people, made of their golden earrings a molten calf, hollow probably, or of gold plating upon wood. For example, Aaron proclaimed "a feast to the Lord," Exodus 32:5; and Jeroboam, we may fairly believe, never hoped to keep his subjects from resorting to Jerusalem, by at once setting up a god in downright opposition to Jehovah
Levitical Priesthood - Institution founded by God when He chose Aaron and his sons to minister to Him in the sanctuary (Exodus 28)
Nadab - The eldest son of Aaron ( Exodus 6:23 , Numbers 3:2 ; Numbers 26:60 , 1 Chronicles 6:3 ; 1 Chronicles 24:1 ); accompanied Moses to Sinai ( Exodus 24:1 ; Exodus 24:9 f
Appoint - Aaron and his sons shall appoint every one to his service
Atonement - And Moses said to Aaron, go to the altar, and offer thy sin-offering, and thy burnt-offering, and make an atonement for thyself and for the people
Alcimus - Either because he was not of high priestly family (though of the stock of Aaron, 1Ma 7:14 ), or, more probably, from his Hellenizing tendencies, his appointment was stoutly opposed by Judas Maccabæus, and received hut scanty recognition at Jerusalem
Flour - Hence the consecration of Aaron was with the finest wheat flour
Cast Down - 15:25); Aaron claimed he “threw” gold into the fire and a golden calf walked out ( Abijah - Called, in Luke 1:5 , Abia; founder of a family among the posterity of Aaron
Adaiah - A Levite of the family of Aaron, Nehemiah 11:12 ; probably the same as No
Levites - Aaron and his sons were chosen for the priesthood (Exodus 8); the subordinate offices of the Temple and many other public services were assigned to the rest of the tribe
Abihu - The second son of Aaron, consecrated to the priesthood with his three brethren, Exodus 28:21 ; but consumed shortly after by fire from the Lord, with Nadab his brother, for burning incense with common fire instead of that kept perpetually on the altar of burnt-offering, Leviticus 10:1-2 16:12 Numbers 16:46
Jer'Oham - ) ...
A descendant of Aaron, of the house of Immer, the leader of the sixteenth course of priests; son of Pashur, and father of Adaiah
Eleazar - 13th century BCE) Third son of Aaron, overseer of the Levites� dismantling and reconstruction of the Tabernacle during the Israelites� desert journeys
Hazeroth - ), being displeased that Moses had married a Cushite wife (Numbers 12:1 ), induced Aaron to join with her in rebelling against Moses
Blessing - Aaron and the priests pronounced the benediction (Numbers 6:22-27; Deuteronomy 10:8)
Abihu - , "worshipper of God", the second of the sons of Aaron (Exodus 6:23 ; Numbers 3:2 ; 26:60 ; 1 Chronicles 6:3 )
Washing - The same difference was typified in the cleansing of Aaron and his sons
Phinehas - Son of Eleazar and grandson of Aaron
Profane - The priests of the race of Aaron were enjoined to distinguish between sacred and profane, between pure and polluted, Leviticus 10:10 ; Leviticus 19:7-8
Egypt, Plagues of - Of the ten plagues seven were directly wrought through the agency of Moses and Aaron, or of Moses alone
Mir'Iam - (Exodus 15:1-19 ) She took the lead, with Aaron, in the complaint against Moses for his marriage with a Cushite, (Numbers 12:1,2 ) and for this was attacked with leprosy
Mourn - Abraham mourned for Sarah (Genesis 23:2 ); Jacob for Joseph (37:34,35); the Egyptians for Jacob (50:3-10); Israel for Aaron (Numbers 20:29 ), for Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8 ), and for Samuel (1 Samuel 25:1 ); David for Abner (2 Samuel 3:31,35 ); Mary and Martha for Lazarus (John 11 ); devout men for Stephen (Acts 8:2 ), etc. For Jacob it was seventy days (Genesis 50:3 ); for Aaron (Numbers 20:29 ) and Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8 ) thirty days; and for Saul only seven days (1 Samuel 31:13 )
Priest, Christ as - The priestly activity of drawing near to God in sacrifice and prayer is introduced in the Old Testament through Abel the head of a family (Genesis 4:4 ), Melchizedek the king of Salem and priest of God Most High (Genesis 14:18 ), Jethro the priest of Midian (Deuteronomy 17:8-12 ), Aaron (Exodus 28:1 ), and the Levites (Exodus 32:28-29 ; Numbers 1:47-53 ). ...
Although the Levites served in the tabernacle and temple, caring for its furnishings and maintenance, and assisting the priests (1 Chronicles 23:28-32 ), the responsibility of presenting offerings and leading ceremonial rituals was restricted to the levitical family of Aaron and his descendants (Numbers 3:5-10 ; 16:8-11 ; 2 Chronicles 13:9 ). ...
The ritual of ordination consecrating Aaron to the office of high priest lasted seven days (Luke 10:30-35 ). Aaron and his sons laid their hands on a bull and one of two rams without defect, which were sacrificed as offerings (Exodus 29:10-28 ). A feast followed on that first day, during which Aaron and his sons ate the meat of the ram with unleavened bread (Exodus 29:32 ). While at a dinner given in his honor, Mary took an alabaster jar of very expensive perfume and anointed Jesus' head (Matthew 26:6-13 ; Mark 14:3-9 ; John 12:2-8 ), which echoed the anointing of Aaron to the office of high priest (cf. As with Melchizedek, Jesus was without the ancestral, genealogical credentials necessary for the Aaronic priesthood (7:3,13, 16), he was also before Aaron and the transitory, imperfect law and levitical priesthood (7:11-12,17-18; 8:7). Melchizedek, Aaron, and his descendants all died, preventing them from continuing in office (7:23). Whereas the blood of Aaronic sacrifices could make the people outwardly clean but had to be repeated (9:13; 10:1-4,11), Jesus continues in the presence of God (9:25) as the perfect High Priest (9:25-26), offering his own blood as the perfect sacrifice to take away sins and cleansing the consciences of many people (9:28; cf
Hor - Place where Aaron, the high priest, died, fulfilling God's word that he would be punished for rebelling at the water of Meribah (Numbers 20:22-29 ; Numbers 33:38-39 ). Moses installed Aaron's son Eleazar as high priest on the mountain. Numbers 34:7-8 places Aaron's death at Mosera, an unknown site which may be under Mount Hor
Thumb - In the ritual of the consecration of Aaron and his sons ( Exodus 29:20 , Leviticus 8:23-24 ) blood was sprinkled on ‘the tip of the right ear, upon the thumb of the right hand and the great toe of the right foot
Zoan - Here Pharaoh was holding his court at the time of his various interviews with Moses and Aaron
Miriam - ...
Later, Miriam and Aaron became jealous of Moses because of the supreme power he exercised in Israel (Numbers 12:1-2)
Beth-Shemesh - , called Ir-Shemesh in Joshua 19:41 ) allotted to the children of Aaron ( Joshua 21:15 )
Calves, Golden - As Moses was on Mount Sinai, Aaron formed a golden calf to use in a “feast to Yahweh” (Exodus 32:4-5 )
Table of Showbread - ...
This table was typical of Israel's place before God in the acceptability of Christ, who, as the true Aaron, maintains them even now before God: it is a perpetual covenant, Leviticus 24:8 ; and possibly also of God's bounty to man through His people Israel
Encampment - The former, with Moses and Aaron at their head, were encamped on the eastern side
Elizabeth - Both Zechariah and Elizabeth, the parents of John the Baptist, belonged to the vast priestly family descended from Aaron (Luke 1:5)
Zadok - ]'>[1] in 2 Samuel 8:17 (= 1 Chronicles 18:16 ) being doubtful, there is no definite information concerning his family except in the genealogical lists in 1 Chronicles 6:4-15 ; 1Ch 6:50-53 ; 1 Chronicles 24:3 , in which his descent is traced from Eleazar the elder son of Aaron; but these details are of doubtful reliability. A warrior of David’s, of the house of Aaron ( 1 Chronicles 12:28 ), identified by Josephus ( Ant
Hands, Laying on of - At the consecration of Aaron and his sons, they laid their hands on the bullock for the sin offering, on the ram for the burnt offering, and on the ram of consecration, showing identification of the offerers with the sacrifices. On the day of atonement Aaron laid his hands upon the head of the scapegoat, and confessed over it all the iniquities of the children of Israel, and it was sent away into the wilderness to signify the putting away of the sins confessed over the goat
za'Dok - Zadok was of the house of Eleazar the son of Aaron, (1 Chronicles 24:3 ) and eleventh in descent from Aaron
High Priest - The first distinct separation of Aaron to the office of the priesthood, which previously belonged to the first-born was that recorded (Exodus 28:1 ) . We find from the very first the following characteristic attributes of Aaron and the high priests his successors, as distinguished from the other priests: Aaron alone was anointed, (Leviticus 8:12 ) whence one of the distinctive epithets of the high priest was "the anointed priest. " (Leviticus 4:3,5,16 ; 21:10 ) see (Numbers 35:25 ) The anointing of the sons of Aaron, i
Elders - Moses and Aaron treat the elders of Israel as the representatives of the nation. When God gave the law to Moses, he said, "Take Aaron, Nadab, and Abihu, his sons, and the seventy elders of Israel, and worship ye afar off,"...
Exodus 24:1 ; Exodus 24:9-10 . But it is credible, that as there were twelve tribes, there were seventy-two elders, six from each tribe, and that seventy is set down, instead of seventy-two; or rather, that Moses and Aaron should be added to the number seventy, and that, exclusive of them, there were but four elders from the tribe of Levi
Calf - Having been conducted through the wilderness by a pillar of cloud and fire, which preceded them in their marches, while Moses was receiving the divine commands that cloud covered the mountain, and they probably imagined that it would no longer be their guide; and, therefore, applied to Aaron to make for them a sacred sign or symbol, as other nations had, which might visibly represent God. With this request, preferred tumultuously, and in a menacing manner, Aaron in a moment of weakness complied. It is plain from Aaron's proclaiming a fast to Jehovah, ...
Exodus 32:4 , and from the worship of Jeroboam's calves being so expressly distinguished from that of Baal, 2 Kings 10:28-31 , that both Aaron and Jeroboam meant the calves they formed and set up for worship to be emblems of Jehovah. Nevertheless, the inspired Psalmist speaks of Aaron's calf with the utmost abhorrence, and declares that, by worshipping it, they forgat God their Saviour, (see 1 Corinthians 10:9 ,) who had wrought so many miracles for them, and that for this crime God threatened to destroy them, Psalms 106:19-24 ; Exodus 32:10 ; and St
Hebrew of the Hebrews - Godwin, in his "Moses and Aaron," understands by this expression, a Hebrew both by father's and mother's side
Phinehas - Of the biblical characters named Phinehas, the most important was the zealous priest who was Aaron’s grandson (Exodus 6:25). Phinehas’ father, Eleazar, had succeeded Aaron as high priest (Numbers 20:25-26), and Phinehas proved himself to be a loyal supporter
Against - Aaron lighted the lamps over against the candlesticks
Ark of the Covenant Item - Sacred chest measuring about 45 x27 x27 inches (Exodus 37) and containing the Tables of the Law and perhaps also a golden vessel of manna and the rod of Aaron (Exodus 16; Numbers 17; 3Kings 8; Hebrews 9)
Forehead - Aaron wore a plate of gold on his forehead, with 'Holiness to the Lord' engraved thereon, that he might bear the iniquity of the holy things which the children of Israel should offer
ko'Rah - He was leader of the famous rebellion against his cousins Moses and Aaron in the wilderness, for which he paid the penalty of perishing with his followers by an earthquake and flames of fire
na'Dab -
The eldest son of Aaron and Elisheba
Calf, Golden - The Israelites on their leaving had been amply supplied with jewels by the Egyptians and no doubt more trinkets were given to Aaron than those actually being worn. Aaron said, "This is thy god, O Israel, which brought thee up out of the land of Egypt" (as it should read); and "To-morrow is a feast to Jehovah
Abijah - A descendant of Eleazar, son of Aaron. Nor does his inclusion in the course of Abijah carry with it lineal descent through that line from Aaron
Levi - The waters of Meribah was that memorable spot where the people, soon after the children of Israel came out of Egypt, did chide with Moses and Aaron for want of water. (See Exodus 17:1-7) Here Moses and Aaron stemmed the torrent of the people's anger; and it should seem to have been in allusion to this, that the man of God, speaking of Levi, said, "whom thou didst prove, and didst find faithful," who did not acknowledge the feelings of nature when those calls of grace demanded faithfulness. See another instance, (Exodus 32:25-28) The other instance at Meribah, sets forth the frailty both of Moses and Aaron: (see Numbers 20:1-13) But by taking into one view both instances at Meribah, we are certainly constrained to look farther than to the Aarons, or to all the sons of Levi, under the Old Testament dispensation, for the accomplishment of Moses's dying prediction that the Urim and Thummim of JEHOVAH might be with the Lord's Holy One; and to none can we make the smallest application, but to the Almighty Aaron of "a better covenant, established upon better promises
Jehoiada - Leader of the Aaronites (or 'prince of Aaron') who resorted to David at Hebron
Amariah - A priest in line of Aaron (1Chronicles 6:7,1 Chronicles 6:52 ; Ezra 7:3 )
Gibeah - In mount Ephraim, called Gibeah of Phinehas, where Eleazar the son of Aaron was buried, Joshua 24:33
Kadesh or Kadesh-Barnea - At their second visit occurred the death of Miriam, the murmuring of the people for water, the miraculous supply, the sin of Aaron and Moses in smiting the rock, and the fruitless request for a passage through Edom, Numbers 20:1-22
Priest, Priesthood - Related terms are the verb kahan [ Exodus 29:9 ; 40:15 ; Leviticus 24:5-90 ; 18:1,7 ; 1 Samuel 2:36 ; Ezra 2:62 ; Nehemiah 7:64 ; 13:29 , ; referring to the exclusivity, perpetuity, and responsibility of the Aaronic office of "priesthood" cf. Numbers 16:10 ; for Korah's rebellion against the Aaronic exclusivity, and Joshua 18:7 ; for the "priesthood" of the tribe of Levi as a whole), and the Aramaic masculine noun kahen [ 2 Kings 23:5 ; Hosea 10:5 ; Zephaniah 1:4 ) referring exclusively to priests of foreign gods. Jethro, Moses' father-in-law and the priest of Midian, was also recognized as non-Israelite priest of the true God of Sinai by Moses, Aaron, and the elders of Israel (Exodus 2:16 ; 3:1 ; 18:1,10-12 ). , other descendants of Aaron). There is a striking similarity between this ritual in Exodus 24 and the consecration of the Aaronic priests by putting some of the blood of the ordination peace offering on the right ear, thumb, and big toe of Aaron and his sons, and afterwards splashing some of it around on the altar ( Exodus 29:20 ; Leviticus 8:23-24 ). ...
The Aaronic Priesthood . Moses functioned as the original priest of Israel by initially consecrating (1) the whole kingdom of priests (Exodus 24:3-8 ), (2) the perpetual priesthood of Aaron and his descendants, who would in turn mediate for that kingdom of priests (Exodus 29 ; Leviticus 8 ), and (3) the tabernacle (Numbers 7:1 ). However, there are several passages that seem to indicate that Aaron and his sons functioned as priests in Israel even before the official consecration of the Aaronic priesthood (Exodus 19:24 ; 24:1 ; 32:3-6 ). Of course, as brothers and sons of Amram and Jochebed (Exodus 6:20 ) Moses and Aaron were both from the tribe of Levi through Kohath. Therefore, it was natural that the Lord should then choose the whole tribe of Levi to assist the clan of Aaron with all their priestly duties in place of the firstborn of all Israel (Numbers 8:14-19 ). ...
So, although the entire nation constituted "a kingdom of priests, " the Lord established Aaron's descendants as the perpetual priestly clan in Israel. ...
It was not just the sons of Aaron but the whole tribe of Levi who were responsible for maintaining proper levels of sanctity and purity in regard to the sanctuary presence of the Lord as a whole (Numbers 18:1 a; "You [1], your sons and your father's family
On the other hand, although the Levites assisted the priests, it was the priests alone, Aaron and his descendants (no other Levites), who were responsible for dealing directly with the burnt offering altar or anything inside the Holy Place or Holy of Holies (Numbers 18:1 b). ...
Second, the Aaronic priests were responsible to maintain the sanctity and purity of the sanctuary (Leviticus 10:10 )
Priest (2) - The underlying thought in the Psalm is of a priesthood other than that of Aaron, and suggests a consciousness, however dim, on the part of spiritually-minded Jews, of something beyond and superior to the Aaronic priesthood. The functions, or acts, are considered in connexion and contrast with the functions of the Aaronic priesthood. He was a royal person (which Aaron was not); an abiding person (which Aaron was not); a unique person (which Aaron was not). It is the personal superiority in these respects over the priesthood of Aaron that is dwelt upon in connexion with Melchizedek. There is, of course, no comparison drawn between Melchizedek and Christ, but use is made of Melchizedek to symbolize the personal superiority of Christ’s priesthood over all others—a priesthood that is older, wider, more lasting than that of Aaron. —It is in connexion with the Aaronic priesthood that the work of Christ’s priesthood is considered. Our Lord never was a priest of the Aaronic line (Hebrews 7:13-14, Hebrews 8:4), but it was necessary to use the illustration of the Aaronic priesthood to denote Christ’s priestly functions, because no characteristic priestly functions are recorded of Melchizedek. A series of comparisons between Aaron’s and Christ’s priesthood needs careful attention: (a) first generally in Hebrews 2:17-18 with reference to personal qualification; (b) then after bare mention in Hebrews 3:1, more fully in Mark 12:36,. In Hebrews 5:1-5 the requirements of the Aaronic priesthood are stated in regard to (α) office (Hebrews 5:1), (β) character (Hebrews 5:2-3), (γ) Divine appointment (Hebrews 5:4-5). 7 we have the comparison and contrast between Melchizedek and Aaron, with the superiority of the former, on three grounds: (α) Aaron was not royal, (β) Aaron did not abide, by reason of death, (γ) Aaron had many successors. 8–10 the superiority of the work of Christ is compared with that of Aaron under three aspects: (α) a better covenant (ch. The term ‘high priest’ occurs only nine times in the OT, of which but two are in the Pentateuch, and it is curious that the term is never once applied to Aaron. This clearly shows that there is no real distinction between the two offices, for if there had been an essential difference from the first, Aaron would have been called ‘high priest. ’ Christ is never termed ‘High Priest’ in connexion with Melchizedek, but only when Aaron is under consideration. ...
(c) The use of the two priesthoods, Melchizedek’s and Aaron’s, is not to be interpreted of two aspects of priesthood,—one on earth and the other in heaven successively realized by Christ,—for this would be quite opposed to Hebrews 7:18, Hebrews 8:4. It means that there is one priesthood, of which Melchizedek is used for the person, and Aaron for the work. If Christ’s death is associated with the Aaronic priesthood (against Hebrews 8:4), then the entrance into heaven must also be associated with Aaron (against Hebrews 6:20 et al. The order or nature of the priesthood according to Melchizedek gives validity and perpetuity to the acts which are symbolized in the Aaronic priesthood. The Divine qualifications are: (a) His Divine appointment (Hebrews 5:10); (b) His indissoluble life (Hebrews 7:16), involving an uninterrupted tenure of office as contrasted with the constant deaths in the Aaronic priesthood; (c) His inviolable or intransmissible priesthood (Hebrews 7:24), involving the impossibility of succession or delegation (ἀπαράβατον); (d) His perpetual life of intercession (Hebrews 7:25); (e) His fitness through character (Hebrews 7:26); (f) the Divine guarantee in the Divine oath of appointment (Hebrews 7:28); (g) His position on the throne (Hebrews 8:1); (h) His perfect offering (Hebrews 9:12; Hebrews 9:24, Hebrews 10:12) These Divine and human qualifications of priesthood are based upon His Divine Sonship (ch
Zadok - ...
Since Zadok belonged to the line of chief priests that went back through Phinehas and Eleazar to Aaron (Ezra 7:2-5), his appointment to the high priesthood was in keeping with the plan and promise of God (Numbers 25:10-13)
Eliab - The representative, or ‘prince,’ of the tribe of Zebulun, who assisted Moses and Aaron in numbering the children of Israel in the wilderness of Sinai ( Numbers 1:1 ff
Almond - ...
Numbers 17:8 (c) Only Aaron's rod yielded almonds. Israel was to learn from this miracle that the family of Aaron was to be the fruit-bearing family in the service of the GOD of Israel
Keeper - And the Holy Ghost, by Moses the man of God, when giving directions to Aaron to bless the people, appointed this form in reference to the Father
Feast - First, Aaron proclaimed a “feast to the Lord” at the foot of Mt
Lot - ...
Gôrâl represents the “lot” which was cast to discover the will of God in a given situation: “And Aaron shall cast lots upon the two goats; one lot for the Lord, and the other lot for the scapegoat” ( Melchisedec, Melchizedek - Melchisedec was a priest of an entirely different order from that of Aaron, which passed from father to son
Melchizedek - Scripture tells us nothing of his father or mother, of his genealogy, his birth, or his death; he stands alone, without predecessor or successor, a royal priest by the appointment of God; and thus he was a type of Jesus Christ, who is "a priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek," and not after the order of Aaron, whose origin, consecration, life, and death, are known, Psalm 110:4 Hebrews 7:1-28
Eleazar - Thirdson of Aaron and Elisheba (a descendant of Judah through Pharez)
u'Rim And Thum'Mim - In it are to be set four rows of precious stones, each stone with the name of a tribe of Israel engraved on it, that Aaron "may bear them on his heart. In side the breastplate, as the tables of the covenant were placed inside the ark, ( Exodus 25:16 ; 28:30 ) are to be placed "the Urim and the Thummim," the light and the perfection; and they too are to be on Aaron's heart when he goes in before the Lord. (Leviticus 8:8 ) They pass from Aaron to Eleazar with the sacred ephod and other pontificalia
Melchizedek - Neither of these affirmations applied to the Aaronic order of priesthood. The author draws directly from Psalm 110:4 several crucial points to explain that the high priesthood of Christ has superseded and is superior to the priesthood of Aaron. In contrast, the priesthood of Aaron had a history of disruptions and termination
Levites - But the "sons of Aaron" were separated from the rest of the descendants of Levi and consecrated priests; hence, after this the Levites comprised only those descendants of Levi who were not "sons of Aaron"—that is, priests
Kohath, Kohathites - Amram is of peculiar importance, because his children were Aaron and Moses ( Exodus 6:20 , 1 Chronicles 23:13-17 ); and Korah, a son of Izhar, was notorious in priestly tradition ( Numbers 16:1-50 ). The importance of these families after the Exile was small, with the exception of the priests who traced their descent from Aaron. (1) During the desert wanderings the Kohathites were on the south side of the Tent ( Numbers 3:30 ), and they carried the screen of the sanctuary and its furniture, after it had been prepared for travel by the greatest of all the descendants of Kohath Aaron and his sons ( Numbers 3:31 , Numbers 4:4-18 , Numbers 10:21 ); they were privileged to carry their burden upon their shoulders ( Numbers 7:9 ), instead of in waggons, as the Gershonites and Merarites; they were superintended by Eleazar, Aaron’s son ( Numbers 4:16 )
Levites - Under this name may be comprised all the descendants of Levi; but it principally denotes those who were employed in the lowest ministries of the temple, by which they were distinguished from the priests, who, being descended from Aaron, were likewise of the race of Levi by Kohath, but were employed in higher offices. The Levites were descendants of Levi, by Gershom, Kohath, and Merari, excepting the family of Aaron; for the children of Moses had no part in the priesthood, and were only common Levites. The Levites were divided into different classes: Gershonites, Kohathites, Merarites, and Aaronites or priests, Numbers 3, &c. The Gershonites, whose number was seven thousand five hundred, were employed in the marches through the wilderness in carrying the veils and curtains of the tabernacle; the Kohathites, whose number was eight thousand six hundred, in carrying the ark and sacred vessels of the tabernacle; the Merarites, whose number was six thousand two hundred, in carrying the several pieces of the tabernacle which could not be placed upon the chariots; and the Aaronites were the priests who served the sanctuary. When the Hebrews encamped in the wilderness, the Levites were placed around the tabernacle; Moses and Aaron at the east, Gershon at the west, Kohath at the south, and Merari at the north
Calf, Golden - Image of God made by Aaron at the foot of Mount Sinai, pursuant to the request of the Hebrews wearied by the protracted stay of Moses on the mountain (Exodus 32). In the minds of the people the golden calf was not to be the formal object of their worship, but a representation of Yahweh, as is clear from Aaron's attributing to God the deliverance from Egypt, and proclaiming a feast to Yahweh. These apparently must be looked upon, like Aaron's golden calf, as representations of Yahweh
Golden Calf - Image of God made by Aaron at the foot of Mount Sinai, pursuant to the request of the Hebrews wearied by the protracted stay of Moses on the mountain (Exodus 32). In the minds of the people the golden calf was not to be the formal object of their worship, but a representation of Yahweh, as is clear from Aaron's attributing to God the deliverance from Egypt, and proclaiming a feast to Yahweh. These apparently must be looked upon, like Aaron's golden calf, as representations of Yahweh
Jethro - " He also took a burnt offering and sacrifices for God: and Aaron and all the elders of Israel came to eat bread with him before God
Urim And Thummim - ' They were distinct from the gems on the breastplate, for Moses put the breastplate upon Aaron, "also he put in [1] the breastplate the Urim and the Thummim. The first mention of them is in Exodus 28:30 ; "Thou shalt put in [1] the breastplate of judgement the Urim and the Thummim; and they shall be upon Aaron's heart when he goeth in before the Lord," as if God had given them to Moses, and had merely to tell him what to do with them — if indeed they were material things; but what they were, and how the answers were given, is not revealed
Camp And Encamp - The tabernacle was placed in the centre; and round it were the tents of the house of Levi, in four divisions; Moses and Aaron, with the priests, on the east side, the Gershonites westward, Numbers 3:1-51, the Kohathites southward, and the Memrites northward
Heifer - Moses and Aaron were instructed to deliver the divine command to the children of Israel that they should procure "a red heifer, without spot," that is, one that was entirely red, without one spot of any other colour; "free from blemish, and on which the yoke had never yet come," that is, which had never yet been employed in ploughing the ground or in any other work; for according to the common sense of all mankind, those animals which had been made to serve other uses, became unfit to be offered to God,—a sentiment which we find in Homer and other Heathen writers
Jethro - Jethro of Midian (Abraham's descendant) celebrated a sacrificial meal with Aaron and Israel's elders; the representative firstfruits of the pagan who would afterward enter into fellowship with God and His people; as Amalek, another descendant of Abraham, represents on the contrary the pagan world hostile to the Lord and His people
Mourning - It was an occasion of studied publicity and ceremonial; so Abraham for Sarah (Genesis 23:2), Jacob for Joseph (Genesis 37:34-35), Joseph and the Egyptians for Jacob 70 days and a further period of seven (Genesis 50:3-10), Israel for Aaron 80 days (Numbers 20:29), and for Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8). ...
So Aaron in the case of Nadab and Abihu (Leviticus 10:2-6); Ezekiel for his wife (Ezekiel 24:16-18); "the bread of men" is that usually brought to mourners by friends in sympathy
Oil - "...
And what a blessed thought it is, that as the holy oil was poured on the head of Aaron, the great high priest of the Jewish dispensation, which ran down to the skirts of his clothing, so God the Holy Ghost anointed Jesus, our great and almighty High Priest, to whom Aaron was but the shadow, with "the oil of joy and gladness above and for his fellows;" yea, the Spirit was not given by measure unto him, for in him all fulness dwelleth? And Christ and his church being one and the same, he the glorious Head, and they his members, of "his fulness do we all receive, and grace or grace
Priest - ...
Aaronic (or Levitical) priesthood...
At the establishment of Israel’s religious system, Aaron and his sons were the priests, Aaron being set apart as the high priest. In the generations that followed, only male descendants of Aaron could be priests. Those who belonged to the same tribe as Aaron (the tribe of Levi), but who were not of Aaron’s family, were responsible for many of the practical aspects of Israel’s religious affairs, but they were not priests (Exodus 6:16-25; Exodus 32:25-29; Numbers 3:2-3; Numbers 3:9-10; see LEVITE)
Levite - ...
Although the Levites had general duties in the tabernacle and temple ceremonies, only those of one family within the tribe, the family of Aaron, were priests (Exodus 6:16-25; Exodus 29:9). ...
In a dedication ceremony involving cleansing rituals and sacrificial offerings, Moses and Aaron presented the Levites to God for his service (Numbers 8:5-13). God then gave the Levites back to Aaron to help him and the other priests in their work (Numbers 8:14-19). There were forty-eight Levitical cities and these were divided among four groups – the priestly Kohathites (Aaron was a Kohathite; 1618388525_67), the non-priestly Kohathites, the Gershonites, and the Merarites
Numbers, Book of - Those who participate in a religious system under the authority of the Aaronite priesthood and ministry of the Levites (Numbers 3:1 ; Numbers 4:1 );...
D. Aaron is a prime spiritual authority due to God's active support (Numbers 17:1 );...
C. Even Moses and Aaron are inadequate without God's support (Numbers 20:1 );...
D. See Aaron ; Balaam ; Eleazer; Joshua ; Moses ; Pentateuch ; Holy War; Sacred Calendar; Tabernacle ; Tribal Confederation
Melchizedek - The apostle there points out the superiority of his priesthood to that of Aaron in these several respects, (1) Even Abraham paid him tithes; (2) he blessed Abraham; (3) he is the type of a Priest who lives for ever; (4) Levi, yet unborn, paid him tithes in the person of Abraham; (5) the permanence of his priesthood in Christ implied the abrogation of the Levitical system; (6) he was made priest not without an oath; and (7) his priesthood can neither be transmitted nor interrupted by death: "this man, because he continueth ever, hath an unchangeable priesthood
Snake - It seems that Egyptian magicians hypnotized snakes to stiffen them, and in this way could imitate Aaron’s miracle of turning a stick into a snake. But Aaron showed that his actions were miracles, not tricks, when his snake swallowed up those of the magicians (Exodus 7:8-12; cf
Urim And Thummim - After Aaron's and Moses' death, Eleazar was to carry and to use the lots to inquire of the Lord (Numbers 27:18-23 ). This probably refers to the ability to receive an answer from the Lord, however, rather than a return of the lots given to Aaron
Manna - And we have other evidence, that the present version is correct for in the same chapter, Moses directed Aaron to "take a pot and put a homer full of manna therein
Calf - It was certainly for this reason that the bull was chosen as the symbol of Jahweh by Aaron (Acts 7:41) and Jeroboam (B
Sprinkling - Aaron and his sons were sprinkled with blood
Abiathar - He became an adherent of David, and was acknowledged as high priest; but becoming involved in Adonijah's rebellion he was deprived of the priesthood by Solomon and sent to dwell in the city of Anathoth which belonged to the sons of Aaron
Censer - Exodus 27:3; but the Jews suppose that the one used by the high priest was of gold; and this supposition is to a certain extent corroborated by the fact that Aaron is bidden to use some particular censer—the definite article being prefixed to the word
Eleazar - The third son of Aaron
Calf - ...
THE GOLDEN CALF worshipped by the Jews at mount Sinai, while Moses was absent in the mount, was cast by Aaron from the earrings of the people
e'li - (ascension ), a descendant of Aaron through Ithamar, the youngest of his two surviving sons
Calf Worship - (See Aaron. But Aaron's golden calf he expressly calls, "thy Elohim which brought thee up out of Egypt"; and the feast to it "a feast to Jehovah" (Exodus 32:4-8; Exodus 32:17-19). It was notorious that it was Jehovah who delivered Israel out of Egypt; and, like Aaron, Jeroboam says of the calves, thereby identifying them with Jehovah, "Behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of Egypt
Moses - Son of Amram and Jochebed, of the tribe of Levi, brother of Aaron and Miriam. Though Aaron was the elder brother, Moses had the place of leader and apostle. ...
When Miriam and Aaron complained of Moses because he had married an Ethiopian woman, and said, "Hath the Lord indeed spoken only by Moses? hath he not spoken also by us?" it does not appear that Moses rebuked them; but on that very occasion it is recorded, "Now the man Moses was very meek, above all the men which were upon the face of the earth. ...
When Korah, Dathan, and Abiram, and their company rose against Moses and Aaron, 'he fell on his face,' and left the matter in God's hands. Moses took "the rod from before the Lord as he commanded him," and with Aaron said unto the people, "Hear now, ye rebels; must we fetch you water out of this rock? And Moses lifted up his hand, and with his rod he smote the rock twice: and the water came out abundantly
Abijah - A priestly descendant of Aaron (1 Chronicles 24:10 )
Girdle - The priests wore girdles, and one for Aaron was a 'linen' girdle, Leviticus 16:4 , and with the breastplate was the CURIOUS(i
Calf - The golden calf which Aaron made (Exodus 32:4 ) was probably a copy of the god Moloch rather than of the god Apis, the sacred ox or calf of Egypt
Mercy Seat - This Aaron "offered for himself, and for the errors of the people:" typical of Christ entering into heaven, having obtained eternal redemption for us
Consecration - The whole race of Abraham was in a peculiar manner consecrated to his worship; and the tribe of Levi and family of Aaron were more immediately consecrated to the service of God, Exodus 13:2 ; Exodus 13:12 ; Exodus 13:15 ; Numbers 3:12 ; 1 Peter 2:9
Incense - (Exodus 30:9 ) Aaron, as high priest, was originally appointed to offer incense each morning and evening
Pharaoh - And indeed, he was no sooner sat down on his throne, we no sooner begin to hear his royal voice, than he at once exhibits all the ignorance and all the arrogance of his ancestors in the answer he gives to Moses and Aaron: Who is the Lord that I should obey Him? I know not the Lord, neither will I let Israel go. Go, therefore, for there shall no straw be given you, and yet you shall deliver your tale of bricks! The father had not known Joseph, and the son knew neither Joseph, nor Moses, nor Aaron, nor God. What! Moses! of all men in the world, to come into my presence with a demand like that! Had Moses been some great ambassador who had come in a ship from some far country; had Moses and Aaron come with great gifts and in a great name to negotiate a royal league with Egypt, Pharaoh would have done them honour. A banquet would have been spread for Moses and Aaron, and the great council of the kingdom would have been called together to receive them, and to hear what they had to say. But Moses and Aaron! Why, they should have been at their tasks! Who are they, to come like ambassadors to me? No; to your bricks and to your burdens, you Moses and Aaron! And if only your minister were some great one, it would go so much better with him and with you. ...
What sign showest Thou, said the unbelieving Jews to our Lord, that we may see, and believe Thee? What dost Thou work? Let me see a miracle, said Pharaoh to Moses and Aaron, and then I will let Israel go. And to satisfy Pharaoh, and to soften his heart, Aaron cast down his rod before Pharaoh, and before his servants, and it became a serpent. We would have said that it was a very promising and a very hopeful state of mind in Pharaoh to ask for some proof of the divine embassy of Moses and Aaron, and then he would obey. For, innocent as it looked, and hopeful as it sounded, Pharaoh's demand put upon God, and upon Moses and Aaron, the first step of Pharaoh's repentance and obedience. And, as it was, when his magicians did something sufficiently like Aaron's rod, then Pharaoh fell back and took his stand upon that, till the miracle upon which he had suspended his obedience was wrought in vain. Then Pharaoh called for Moses and Aaron, and said, Entreat the Lord and I will let the people go
Mourning - In the case of Jacob it was seventy days, Genesis 50:3; of Aaron, Numbers 20:29, and Moses, Deuteronomy 34:8, thirty
Ablution - , when Aaron and his sons were set apart to the priest's office, they were washed with water previous to their investiture with the priestly robes (Leviticus 8:6 )
Levite - In Hebrews 7:11 the writer coins a word to enable him to write of ‘the Levitical priesthood,’ as though the hallowing of the tribe were concentrated in ‘the order of Aaron’ (so Westcott, ad loc
Breastplate, High Priest's - " "Aaron shall bear the judgement of the children of Israel before the Lord continually
Candlestick - ' It should rather be read 'burn continuously,' that is, every evening, for in the next verse it adds 'from evening to morning;' and in Exodus 30:8 it distinctly says "when Aaron lighteth the lamps at even
Ezra - Son of Seraiah, and descendant of Aaron, priest and scribe
Express - Moses and Aaron took these men, who are expressed by their names
Fashion - ...
Aaron fashioned the calf with a graving tool
Aaronic Priesthood - After the death of Nadab and Abihu, Aaron was allowed to enter the holiest of all only once a year, and then not without blood
Testimony - 25:22) or simply “the testimony”: “As the Lord commanded Moses, so Aaron laid it up before the Testimony, to be kept” ( Phin'Ehas -
Son of Eleazar and grandson of Aaron
Ephod - On the shoulders were fastened two stones, engraved with the names of the twelve tribes, sixnames on each stone; so that whenever Aaron wore the ephod the twelve tribes were represented. These with the mitre constituted Aaron's garments 'for glory and for beauty. Apparently the ordinary priestly garments worn by Aaron's sons are also said to be 'for glory and for beauty. In all the above passages the ephod bears the character of a priestly garment, though David was not of the tribe of Aaron
Rephidim - So Aaron and Hur (the husband of Miriam, according to Josephus) held up both his hands steadily till sunset, and thereby gave a decided victory to Israel. While the Israelites were encamped at Rephidim, on the western side of Horeb, the mount of God, Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses, who lived in that neighbourhood, and was priest and prince of Midian, came to visit him, with his wife Zipporah, and his two sons, Eleazar and Gershom, who had accompanied him part of the way to Egypt, but returned home again; and they rejoiced with him "for all the goodness which the Lord had done for Israel, whom he had delivered out of the hand of the Egyptians;" and upon this occasion, Jethro, as "a priest of the most high God," of the order of Melchizedek, "offered a burnt-offering and sacrifices of thanksgiving to God, at which Aaron and all the elders of Israel ate bread with Jethro before God," by a repetition of the eucharistic feast upon a sacrifice which Melchizedek formerly administered to Abraham, Genesis 14:18 ; Exodus 18:1-12
Anointing - (b) Priests, at the first institution of the Levitical priesthood, were all anointed to their offices, the sons of Aaron as well as Aaron himself, Exodus 40:15; Numbers 3:3; but afterwards, anointing seems not to have been repeated at the consecration of ordinary priests, but to have been especially reserved for the high priest, Exodus 29:29; Leviticus 16:32; so that "the priest that is anointed," Leviticus 4:3, is generally thought to mean the high priest, (c) Kings
Ephod - On the shoulders were fastened two stones, engraved with the names of the twelve tribes, sixnames on each stone; so that whenever Aaron wore the ephod the twelve tribes were represented. These with the mitre constituted Aaron's garments 'for glory and for beauty. Apparently the ordinary priestly garments worn by Aaron's sons are also said to be 'for glory and for beauty. In all the above passages the ephod bears the character of a priestly garment, though David was not of the tribe of Aaron
Kadesh - Because of this act of his, in which Aaron too was involved, neither of them was to be permitted to set foot within the Promised Land (Numbers 20:12,24 )
Kadesh - Because of this act of his, in which Aaron too was involved, neither of them was to be permitted to set foot within the Promised Land (Numbers 20:12,24 )
Diadem - Aaron the High Priest wore one (Exodus 28:37 ; Exodus 29:6 ; Leviticus 16:4 ; Zechariah 3:5 ) as did Queens Vashti (Esther 1:11 ) and Esther (Esther 2:17 )
Massah And Meribah - Moses and Aaron also sin against Him
Jannes And Jambres - Later Jewish fancy ran wild on these names; according to some they were Balaam’s sons; according to others they were drowned in the Red Sea; or they were put to death, either for inciting Aaron to make the Golden Calf or at a later stage of the history
Minister - ...
I will sanctify also both Aaron and his sons, to minister to me in the priest's office
Fire - When Aaron began his ministrations in the tabernacle fire came out "from before the Lord, and consumed upon the altar the burnt offering and the fat
Prophecy, Prophet - Aaron was called the prophet of Moses
Saint - Aaron is called 'the saint of Jehovah
Korah - He with Dathan and Abiram headed the rebellion against Moses and Aaron, saying that they took too much upon themselves, whereas all the people were holy
Genealogy - But to this the Jews reply, that either Elias, or some other inspired priest or prophet, shall come, and restore their genealogical tables before the Messiah's appearance; a tradition, which they ground on a passage in Nehemiah 7:64-65 , to this effect: the genealogical register of the families of certain priests being lost, they were not able to make out their lineal descent from Aaron; and therefore, "as polluted, were put from the priesthood;" the "Tirshatha said unto them, that they should not eat of the most holy things till there stood up a priest with Urim and Thummim
Jeroboam - He also superseded the sons of Aaron by priests chosen from "the lowest of the people
Phinehas - The son of Eleazar, who was the third son of Aaron
Wait - Aaron and his sons shall wait on their priests office
Ark of the Covenant - It was also probably a reliquary for the pot of manna and the rod of Aaron
Levites - ...
The tribe of Levi included at least three separate families: Gershon, Kohath and Merari (with the families of Moses and Aaron being treated somewhat separately from the rest of the tribe of Gershon). In some passages (Deuteronomy 17:9 ,Deuteronomy 17:9,17:18 ; Deuteronomy 18:1 ; Deuteronomy 24:8 ), the terms priest and Levite (or Levitical priests) seem identical, but in Exodus 28:1 and Levitcus 8–10 it is clear that only the family of Aaron fulfilled the priestly duties of offering sacrifices in the tabernacle
Priest - The priesthood was made hereditary in the family of Aaron; and the first-born of the oldest branch of that family, if he had no legal blemish, was always the high-priest. ...
There is sufficient reason, however, to believe, that it was never disposed of but to some descendant of Aaron capable of filling it, had the older branches been extinct
Plagues of Egypt - He called for Moses and Aaron, and said, "Go, serve the Lord your God: but who are they that shall go?" All must go, and the flocks and herds. The devastation of the locusts was such that Pharaoh sent for Moses and Aaron 'in haste,' confessed that he had sinned against Jehovah, and begged that 'this death' might be removed. Moses and Aaron were called for, and told to depart with flocks and herds
Moses - God appeared to him in the burning bush and commanded him to go and deliver his brethren (3), with the help of his brother Aaron, but Pharao stubbornly refused to let the Israelites go, and the terrible chastisements known as the Ten Plagues of Egypt, only hardened his heart (7-10)
City - ...
Forty-eight cities were assigned to the Levites, of which 13 were for the family of Aaron, nine were in Judah, four were in Benjamin, and six were cities of refuge
Korah - A leader of rebellion against Moses and Aaron while Israel was camped in the wilderness of Paran (Numbers 16:1 ). Korah, Dathan, and Abiram led a confederacy of 250 princes of the people against Aaron's claim to the priesthood and Moses' claim to authority in general
Abiathar - ” The son of Ahimelech and the eleventh high priest in succession from Aaron through the line of Eli
Prince - The “princes” (“leaders”) of Israel did not only participate in the civil leadership; they were also regarded as pillars in Israelite religious life, the upholders of the covenantal way of life: “And Moses called unto them; and Aaron and all the rulers of the congregation returned unto him: and Moses talked with them” ( Genealogy - His priesthood was of a different kind from that of Aaron and his sons
Neth'Inim - We must not forget that the Levites were given to Aaron and his sons, i
Incense - This restriction prompted Korah and other Levites to rebel against Moses and Aaron
Kadesh Barnea - Here water failed, and Moses by impatient striking of the rock, attribution of the miracle to himself and Aaron ("must we fetch," etc. ), and unbelief ("ye believed Me not, to sanctify Me") in the goodness of God to an unworthy people, dishonoured God, and he and Aaron were adjudged the penalty of not entering Canaan (Numbers 20:12-13; compare Psalms 106:32-33). ...
On the messengers' return Israel turned from Edom, leaving Kadesh finally, and after Aaron's death at Mount Hor marched around Edom to Moab (Numbers 33:41-49)
Camp - | T | 62,700 DAN, | T ...
H | 151,450 | T | | E | 157,600 | H...
| | E ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ S | | ...
| | S MOSES, Aaron, | |...
| SIMEON, | AND THE PRIESTS. As we might have expected, Moses, Aaron, and the priests were nearest to the door of the Tabernacle, and the Levites surrounded the three other sides
Rejoice - This emotion is usually described as the product of some external situation, circumstance, or experience, such as found in the first biblical appearance of śâmach: God told Moses that Aaron was coming to meet him and “when he seeth thee, he will be glad in his heart” ( Aaron saw Moses, he was overcome with joy and kissed him (v
Moses - To assist him, also, in his arduous mission, when Moses had represented that he was "not eloquent, but slow of speech," and of a slow or stammering tongue, God inspired Aaron, his elder brother, to go and meet Moses in the wilderness, to be his spokesman to the people, Exodus 4:1-31 , and his prophet to Pharaoh; while Moses was to be a god to both, as speaking to them in the name, or by the authority, of God himself, Exodus 7:1-2 . ...
At their second interview with Pharaoh, in obedience to the divine command, again requiring him to let the children of Israel go out of his land; Pharaoh, as foretold, demanded of them to show a miracle for themselves, in proof of their commission, when Aaron cast down his rod, and it became a serpent before Pharaoh and before his servants, or officers of his court. The king then called upon his wise men and magicians, to know if they could do as much by the power of their gods, "and they did so with their enchantments; for they cast down every man his rod, and they became serpents; but Aaron's rod swallowed up their serpents. And though Aaron's serpent swallowed up their serpents, showing the superiority of the true miracle over the false, 2 Thessalonians 2:9 , it might only lead the king to conclude, that Moses and Aaron were more expert jugglers than Jannes and Jambres, who opposed them, 2 Timothy 3:8 . ...
In the affair of the Golden Calf, ( See CALF ,) the conduct of Moses showed the greatest zeal for God's honour, and a holy indignation against the sin of Aaron and the people. And, to confirm his authority with the people on his return, after the second conference of forty days, he imparted to him a portion of that glory or light by which his immediate presence was manifested: for the face of Moses shone so that Aaron and all the people were afraid to come nigh him, until he had put a veil on his face, to hide its brightness. All these, except Caleb and Joshua, having brought "an evil report," so discouraged the people, that they murmured against Moses and against Aaron, and said unto them, "Would God that we had died in the land of Egypt; or would God that we had died in the wilderness! And wherefore hath the Lord brought us unto this land to fall by the sword, that our wives and our children shall be a prey? Were it not better for us to return into Egypt? And they said one to another, let us make a captain, and return into Egypt. The ill success of the expedition against the Amalekites, according to Josephus, occasioned the rebellion of Korah, which broke out shortly after, against Moses and Aaron, with greater violence than any of the foregoing, under Korah, the ringleader, who drew into it Dathan and Abiram, the heads of the senior tribe of Reuben, and two hundred and fifty princes of the assembly, among whom were even several of the Levites. ) But although "all Israel round about had fled at the cry of the devoted families of Dathan and Abiram, for fear that the earth should swallow them up also;" yet, on the morrow, they returned to their rebellious spirit, and murmured against Moses and Aaron, saying, "Ye have killed the people of the Lord. " On this occasion also, the Lord threatened to consume them as in a moment; but, on the intercession of Moses, only smote them with a plague, which was stayed by an atonement made by Aaron, after the destruction of fourteen thousand seven hundred souls, Numbers 16:41-50 . ...
On the return of the Israelites, after many years' wandering, to the same disastrous station of Kadesh-barnea, even Moses himself was guilty of an offence, in which his brother Aaron was involved, and for which both were excluded, as a punishment, from entering the promised land. At Meribah Kadesh the congregation murmured against Moses, for bringing them into a barren wilderness without water; when the Lord commanded Moses to take his rod, which had been laid up before the Lord, and with Aaron to assemble the congregation together, and to speak to the rock before their eyes; which should supply water for the congregation and their cattle. And the Lord spake unto Moses and Aaron, Because ye believed me not, to sanctify me in the eyes of the children of Israel; therefore ye shall not bring this congregation into the land which I have given them," Numbers 20:1-13 ; and afterward in stronger terms: "Because ye rebelled against my commandment," &c
Numbers, Book of - Aaron and Miriam attacked Moses; Miriam’s leprosy. Aaron’s rod budded, ( o ) Numbers 18:1-7 P [15] ); the sin of Moses and Aaron at Meribah (P Priest - But after the Lord had chosen the tribe of Levi to serve him in his tabernacle, and the priesthood was annexed to the family of Aaron, then the right of offering sacrifices to God was reserved to the priests alone of this family. The Lord ordained, Numbers 16:40 , that no stranger, which was not of the seed of Aaron, should come near to offer incense unto the Lord, that he might not be as Korah and his company. Of the three sons of Levi, Gershon, Kohath, and Merari, the Lord chose the family of Kohath, and out of this the house of Aaron, to exercise the functions of the priesthood. ...
The posterity of the sons of Aaron, namely, Eleazar and Ithamar, Leviticus 10:1-5 ; 1 Chronicles 24:1-2 , had so increased in number in the time of David, that they were divided into twenty-four classes, which officiated a week at a time alternately. ...
Aaron, the high priest, was set apart to his office by the same ceremonies with which his sons the priests were, with this exception, that the former was clothed in his robes, and the sacred oil was poured upon his head, Exodus 29:5-9 ; Leviticus 8:2 . See Aaron
Prophets - Thus Aaron is said to be Moses's prophet: "The Lord said unto Moses, See, I have made thee a God to Pharaoh, and Aaron thy brother shall be thy prophet," Exodus 7:1 ; because Aaron received the divine messages, which he carried immediately from Moses; whereas other prophets receive their messages immediately from God himself. In this respect, as Moses stood in the place of God to Pharaoh, so Aaron acted in the character of his prophet. " Perhaps Miriam, the sister of Aaron, may be called a prophetess only on this account, that she led the concert of the women, who sung the song of Moses with timbrels and with dances, Exodus 15:20-21
Priest - ), for Melchizedek, it is evident, was not merely a pre-Aaronic but a Gentile priest. He finds certain points of contact between the priesthood of Aaron and that of Christ. , was Divinely called and commissioned, even as Aaron was ( Hebrews 5:4 ; Hebrews 5:6 ). But it is pre-eminently by way of antithesis and not of likeness that the Aaronic priesthood is used to illustrate the priesthood of Christ. ...
And this contrast between the priesthood of Aaron and the priesthood of Christ is brought to a head when Jesus is declared to be a priest not after the order of Aaron at all, but after the order of Melchizedek (Hebrews 7:11 ff. ...
It is a mistake, therefore, to attempt, as some do, to distinguish between an Aaronic priesthood exercised by Christ on earth and a Melchizedek priesthood exercised by Him in heaven; and equally a mistake to attempt to confine His priestly ministry to a work of mediation and intercession that begins after His exaltation
Water - So Aaron and his sons were to be washed with “water” as a part of the rite consecrating them to the priesthood: “And Aaron and his sons thou shalt bring unto the door of the tabernacle of the congregation, and shalt wash them with water” ( Aaron, Take thy rod, and stretch out thine hand upon the waters of Egypt, upon their streams, upon their rivers, and upon their ponds, and upon all their pools of water, that they may become blood …” ( Samaritans - Manasseh brought with him some other apostate priests, with many other Jews, who disliked the regulations made by Nehemiah at Jerusalem; and now the Samaritans, having obtained a high priest, and other priests of the descendants from Aaron, were soon brought off from the worship of the false gods, and became as much enemies to idolatry as the best of the Jews. ...
The Samaritans are now few in number; though it is not very long since they pretended to have priests descended directly from the family of Aaron. In the first of these answers, written in the name of the assembly of Israel, in Egypt, they declare that they celebrate the passover every year, on the fourteenth day of the first month, on Mount Gerizim, and that he who then did the office of high priest was called Eleazar, a descendant of Phinehas, son of Aaron
Bethel - Here the ark of the covenant was kept for a long time under the care of Phinehas, the grandson of Aaron (20:26-28)
Bells - Through the robe, with this pendant attached, Aaron wits represented as the receiver and transmitter of the word from heaven
Censer - Korah and his company were told to take censers, with which they had furnished themselves as aspiring to share in Aaron's priesthood. But Aaron was told to take "the censer" (Hebrew), namely, that of the sanctuary or of the high priest, and make atonement to stay the plague (Numbers 16:46)
Abstinence - So the priests, from wine, during their ministration (See Aaron) (Leviticus 10:1-9); also the Nazarites during their separation (Numbers 6:3-4); also the Rechabites, constantly, by voluntary vow (Jeremiah 35)
Candlestick - Aaron lit it each evening; in the morning it was allowed to go out, as 1 Samuel 3:3 proves; compare also 2 Chronicles 13:11; Leviticus 24:2-3, "from the evening unto the morning before the Lord continually. Aaron or his successor was "always" at the appointed time to light the lamp every evening, and dress it every morning with the golden snuffers, removing the snuff in golden dishes
Calf, Golden - At the request of the people, who had begun to despair of Moses’ return from the mount, Aaron consented to make a god who should go before them on the journey to Canaan. Of the workmanship of Jeroboam’s ‘calves,’ as of that of Aaron, it is impossible to speak with certainty
Remove, Depart - 28:38, where it is said that Aaron “may bear the iniquity of the holy things”; the sin of the holy things will be on Aaron, who is “holy to the Lord” (v
Aaron - ...
Aaron's chief distinction consisted in the choice of him and his male posterity for the priesthood. In his office as high priest, Aaron was an eminent type of Christ, being "called of God," and anointed; bearing the names of the tribes on his breast; communicating God's will by Urim and Thummim; entering the Most Holy place on the Day of Atonement, "not without blood;" and interceding for and blessing the people of God
Priest - Under the Levitical arrangements the office of the priesthood was limited to the tribe of Levi, and to only one family of that tribe, the family of Aaron
High Priest - Aaron was the first to hold the office, Exodus 28:1, and his descendants filled it after him
Glory - The word represents “beauty,” in the sense of the characteristic enhancing one’s appearance: “And thou shalt make holy garments for Aaron thy brother for glory and for beauty” ( Glory - Moses, with Aaron, Nadab, Abihu, and seventy elders of Israel, went up to Mount Sinai, and "saw the glory of the Lord
Exodus, Book of - " The people were sprinkled with blood, then Moses, Aaron, Nadab, and Abihu, and seventy of the elders ascended the mount; "they saw God, and did eat and drink. While Moses was in the mount the people, under the plea of not knowing what had become of Moses, requested Aaron to make them 'gods to go before' them, and the golden calf was made
Fire - Knobel observes the rule Leviticus 1:7, "the sons of Aaron shall put fire upon the altar, and lay the wood in order upon the fire," must refer to the first burnt offering; the rule afterwards was to be that in Leviticus 6:13; Exodus 40:29; Leviticus 8:16; Leviticus 8:21-28; Leviticus 9:10; Leviticus 9:13-14; Leviticus 9:17; Leviticus 9:20. So, the fire of the holy God (Exodus 19:18), which had just sanctified Aaron's service, consumed his two oldest sons. (See Aaron
Amalekites - Moses commanded Joshua, with a chosen band, to attack the Amalekites; while he, with Aaron and Hur, went up the mountain Horeb. Aaron and Hur, seeing this, held up his hands till the latter were entirely defeated with great slaughter, Exodus 17
Atonement - In one of the stranger passages of the Law, God instructs Moses and Aaron about the purification rites they are to apply to a house that has "a spreading mildew" and declares that, if a house responds to the treatment, then it can be declared clean (Leviticus 14:33-53 ). Five characteristics relating to the ritual of the Day of Atonement are worthy of note because they are generally true of atonement as it is found throughout Scripture: (1) the sovereignty of God in atonement; (2) the purpose and result of making atonement; (3) the two goats emphasize two different things, and the burning another, about the removal of sin; (4) that Aaron had to make special sacrifice for himself; (5) the comprehensive quality of the act. Aaron's two sons, Nadab and Abihu, had been recently put to death by the Lord for disobeying his command by offering "unauthorized fire" before the Lord (Leviticus 10:1-3 ). Here God gives Aaron precise instructions concerning how he wants the sacrifices to be made, down to the clothes Aaron is to wear, the bathing rituals in which he is to engage, and the types of sacrificial animals he is to bring. ...
Particularly important for the full biblical picture of atonement as it is found in Christ is the sacrifice Aaron makes for himself and his family (Leviticus 16:11-14 ). The Old Testament sacrifices are shown to be but shadows of the real sacrifice of Christ on the cross by the fact of Aaron's sinfulness; an imperfect high priest cannot offer a true sacrifice, just as the blood of bulls and goats could never truly pay for the offense of human sin or substitute for the shedding of human blood
Numbers, Book of - As the number of the firstborn exceeded that of the Levites, the residue were redeemed: a type of the saints looked at as firstborn ones, and as redeemed, being wholly claimed as God's, and given to Aaron (that is to Christ), to serve in God's house, over which He is set as Lord. This peculiar separation to Jehovah is followed by instructions to Aaron and his sons as to the manner of blessing the people, the words they were to use being given, closing with "They shall put my name upon the children of Israel; and I will bless them. ...
Numbers 12 : Miriam and Aaron spoke against Moses, the meekest of men; the Lord vindicated Moses and smote Miriam with leprosy, but at the intercession of Moses it was removed from her, though she was shut out of the camp seven days. ...
By the budding of Aaron's rod God bore witness as to whom He had chosen for the priesthood, and He gave instructions as to the responsibility and the portions of the priests and Levites; the people were not to draw nigh the tabernacle. See AaronIC PRIESTHOOD, and LEVITES. Aaron dies in Mount Hor, and is succeeded by Eleazar. ...
Then after the death of Aaron the high priest, which is the proper end of responsibility and its testing, we have a second part of the book, in which are seen the means by which the elect of God are brought to light, namely, the brazen serpent, and the springing well — the acceptance of the cross, and the power of the Spirit
Leviticus - ...
An historical section (8-10), giving an account of the consecration of Aaron and his sons (8); Aaron's first offering for himself and the people (9); Nadab and Abihu's presumption in offering "strange fire before Jehovah," and their punishment (10)
Nethinim - So the Levites were "given" (nethunim ) unto Jehovah instead of the firstborn, and by Jehovah "given" to Aaron (see Numbers 3:9; Numbers 8:16-19)
Joshua - He was Moses' general, who led the troops in the actual fighting while Aaron and Hur held up Moses' hands (Exodus 17:8-13 )
Seir, Mount - ...
Mount Hor alone of the range retains the old name of the Horites; it overhangs Petra; now jebel Haroon or Mount Aaron, where he died and was buried
Christ - Some types of CHRIST:...
Aaron, Exodus 28:2 (c)...
Adam, Genesis 5:2 (c)...
Ark, (covenant), Exodus 25:10 (c)...
Ark, (Noah's), Genesis 6:14 (c)...
Ass, Genesis 49:14 (c)...
Author, Hebrews 5:9 (c)...
Bishop, 1 Peter 2:25 (a)...
Body, 1 Corinthians 12:12 (a)...
Branch, Zechariah 3:8 (a)...
Bread, John 6:51 (a)...
Bridegroom, Matthew 25:1 (b)...
Bullock, Leviticus 1:5 (c)...
Burnt Offering, Leviticus 1:3 (b)...
Calf, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Captain, Hebrews 2:10 (a)...
Chief, Song of Solomon 5:10 (b)...
Commander, Isaiah 55:4 (b)...
Cornerstone, Isaiah 28:16 (a)...
Covert, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
David, 2 Samuel 19:10 (c)...
Day, Psalm 118:24 (b)...
Door, John 10:9 (a)...
Eagle, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Flour, Leviticus 2:1 (c)...
Foundation, Isaiah 28:16 (b)...
Fountain, Zechariah 13:1 (b)...
Garment, Isaiah 61:10 (b), Romans 13:14...
Gate, Psalm 118:20 (b)...
Gold, Isaiah 13:12 (a)...
Headstone, Psalm 113:22 (b)...
Heir, Hebrews 1:2 (a)...
Hen, Matthew 23:37 (a)...
Hiding Place, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
High Priest, Hebrews 4:14 (a)...
Isaac, Genesis 24:36 (c)...
Jacob, Genesis 32:28 (c)...
Jonah, Matthew 12:40 (a)...
Joseph, Genesis 37:7 (c)...
Joshua, Joshua 1:1 (c)...
Judge, Acts 17:31 (a)...
King, Psalm 2:6 (a)...
Lamb, Revelation 5:6 (a)...
Leaves, Revelation 22:2 (c)...
Light, John 8:12 (a)...
Lily of the Valleys, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Lion, Revelation 5:5 (a)...
Manna, John 6:32 (a)...
Master of the House, Luke 13:25 (b)...
Meal, 2 Kings 4:41 (c)...
Mediator (umpire), 1 Timothy 2:5 (a)...
Melchizedek, Genesis 14:18 (c)...
Merchantman, Matthew 13:45 (b)...
Owl, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Ox:, Ezekiel 1:10 (b)...
Passover, 1 Corinthians 5:7 (a)...
Peace Offering, Leviticus 3:1 (c)...
Pelican, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Physician, Jeremiah 8:22 (c)...
Pigeon, Leviticus 12:6 (c)...
Propitiation (mercy seat), Romans 3:25 (a)...
Ram, Genesis 22:13 (a)...
Rock, Matthew 16:18 (a)...
Rock of Ages, Isaiah 26:4 (margin) (a)...
Rose of Sharon, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Root, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sabbath, Colossians 2:16-17 (b)...
Seed, Genesis 3:15 (a)...
Serpent, John 3:14 (a)...
Shepherd, John 10:11 (a)...
Sin, 2 Corinthians 5:21 (a)...
Sin Offering, Leviticus 4:32 (c)...
Solomon, 1 Kings 10:13 (c)...
Sower, Matthew 13:37 (a)...
Sparrow, Psalm 102:7 (a)...
Star, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sun, Malachi 4:2 (a)...
Temple, John 2:19 (a)...
Thief, Revelation 3:3 (a)...
Tree, Revelation 22:2 (b)...
Trespass Offering, Leviticus 5:6 (c)...
Turtle dove, Leviticus 1:14 (c)...
Vine, John 15:5 (a)...
Worm, Psalm 22:6 (a)...
Finger - It appears, that the Lord permitted the magicians, in certain instances, to be led into the persuasion, that their arts produced similar effects to the works of Moses and Aaron. Such as in the case of the rods becoming serpents; but even here, is if to draw the striking difference, Aaron's rod swallowed up their rods
Continually - 30:7-8, Aaron is commanded to burn incense morning and evening when he trims the lamps
Samuel - In Psalm 99:6 he is ranked with Moses and Aaron
ma'ry the Virgin, - (Psalm 132:11 ; Luke 1:32 ; Romans 1:3 ) She had a sister, named, like herself, (John 19:25 ) and she was connected by marriage, (Luke 1:36 ) with Elizabeth, who was of the tribe of Levi and of the lineage of Aaron
Murmuring - The verb is used in the same connexion in 1 Corinthians 10:10 -‘Neither murmur ye, as some of them murmured, and perished by the destroyer,’ the allusion being apparently to the rebellion of Korah against the authority of Moses and Aaron, which was followed by the punishment of violent death (Numbers 16)
Moses - , the son of Amram and Jochebed, of the tribe of Levi, and the younger brother of Miriam and Aaron. In the composition of them he was probably assisted by Aaron, who kept a register of public transactions, Exodus 17:14 24:4,7 34:27 Numbers 33:1,2 Deuteronomy 31:24 , etc
Plagues of Egypt - The judgment then inflicted upon the river, and all the waters of Egypt, in the presence of Pharaoh and of his servants, as foretold,—when, as soon as Aaron had smitten the waters of the river, they were turned into blood, and continued in that state for seven days, so that all the fish died, and the Egyptians could not drink of the waters of the river, in which they delighted as the most wholesome of all waters, but were forced to dig wells, for pure water to drink,—was a significant sign of God's displeasure for their senseless idolatry in worshipping the river and its fish, and also "a manifest reproof of that bloody edict whereby the infants were slain," Wis_11:7 . But the appointed time of this plague was in the middle of winter; and, accordingly, this plague extorted Pharaoh's partial consent, "Go ye, sacrifice to your God, but in the land;" and when Moses and Aaron objected the offence they would give to the Egyptians, who would stone them for sacrificing "the abomination of the Egyptians," namely, animal sacrifices, he reluctantly consented, "only ye shall not go very far away;" for he was apprehensive of their flight, like his predecessor, who first enslaved the Israelites, Exodus 1:10 ; and he again desired them to "entreat for him. " It was immediately inflicted by God himself, after previous notification, and without the agency of Moses and Aaron, to manifest the divine indignation at Pharaoh's falsehood. " Pharaoh sent and called for Moses and Aaron, and said unto them, "I have sinned this time; the Lord is righteous, and I and my people are wicked: entreat the Lord," for it is enough, "that there might be no more mighty thunderings and hail; and I will let you go, and ye shall stay no longer. And Moses and Aaron did all these wonders before Pharaoh; and the Lord" ultimately "hardened Pharaoh's heart, so that he would not let the children of Israel go out of his land," Exodus 11:9-10 . ...
"For when all things were wrapt in still silence, ...
And night, in her proper speed, holding her mid course, Thy all powerful oracle leapt down from heaven, ...
Out of the royal throne, a fierce warrior, ...
Into the midst of the land of destruction, Wielding a sharp sword, thine unfeigned command, ...
And standing up, he filled the whole with death, ...
He touched the heavens, indeed, but trod upon the earth!" ...
"And Pharaoh rose up in the night, he and all his servants, and all the Egyptians; and he called for," or sent to, "Moses and Aaron by night, and said, Get you forth from among my people, both ye and the children of Israel; and go, serve the Lord, as ye said; take also your flocks and your herds, and be gone; and bless me also. " It is evident from the extreme urgency of the occasion, when all the Egyptians apprehended total destruction, if the departure of the Israelites was delayed any longer, that Pharaoh had no personal interview with Moses and Aaron, which would have wasted time, and was quite unnecessary; he only sent them a peremptory mandate to be one on their own terms
Moses - His older sister was Miriam and his older brother Aaron (Exodus 6:20; 1 Chronicles 6:1-3). In response to his excuse that he was not a good speaker, God gave him Aaron as a spokesman (Exodus 4:10-16; Exodus 7:1-2). God therefore worked through Moses and Aaron to send a series of plagues upon Egypt, resulting in the overthrow of Egypt and the release of Israel (Exodus 7:14-25; Exodus 8; Exodus 9; Exodus 10; Exodus 11; Exodus 12; Exodus 13; Exodus 14; Exodus 15:1-21; see PHARAOH; PLAGUE)
Priest - But after the Lord had chosen the tribe of Levi to serve him in his tabernacle, and the priesthood was annexed to the family of Aaron, the right of offering sacrifices and oblations to God was reserved to the priests of this family, Numbers 16:40 . Thus the whole tribe of Levi was appointed to the sacred ministry, but not all in the same manner; for of the three sons of Levi, Gershom, Kohath, and Merari, the heads of the three great families, the Lord chose the family of Kohath, and out of this family the house of Aaron, to exercise the functions of the priesthood. Christ, the everlasting priest according to the order of Melchizedek, abides forever, as Paul observes; whereas the priests according to the order of Aaron were mortal, and therefore could not continue long, Hebrews 7:1-28
Plagues, the Ten, - When Moses and Aaron came before Pharaoh, a miracle was required of them. Then Aaron's rod became "a serpent (Authorized Version), or rather "a crocodile. " Its being changed into an animal reverenced by all the Egyptians, or by some of them, would have been an especial warning to Pharaoh, The Egyptian magicians called by the king produced what seemed to be the same wonder, yet Aaron's rod swallowed up the others. After this warning to Pharaoh, Aaron, at the word of Moses, waved his rod over the Nile, and the river was turned into blood, with all its canals and reservoirs, and every vessel of water drawn from them; the fish died, and the river stank. They struck the ground, as Aaron did, and repeated their own incantations. Moses and Aaron were commanded to take ashes of the furnace, and to "sprinkle it toward the heaven in the sight of Pharaoh
Blue - ...
Exodus 28:31 (c) This color on Aaron was to remind him that he was always to be enveloped with a heavenly deportment
Abijah - ...
A descendant of Eleazar, the son of Aaron, a chief of one of the twenty-four orders into which the priesthood was divided by David (1Chronicles 24:10)
Choose - 7:7-8), sent Moses and Aaron to work miracles in Egypt ( Bells - Moses adds, "And it shall be upon Aaron to minister; and his sound shall be heard when he goeth in unto the holy place before the Lord, and when he cometh out; that he die not
Genealogy - The promise of the land of Canaan to the seed of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob successively, and the separation of the Israelites from the Gentile world; the expectation of Messiah as to spring from the tribe of Judah; the exclusively hereditary priesthood of Aaron with its dignity and emoluments; the long succession of kings in the line of David; and the whole division and occupations of the land upon genealogical principles by the tribes, occupation of the land upon genealogical principles by the tribes, families and houses of fathers, gave a deeper importance to the science of genealogy among the Jews than perhaps any other nation
Holy - All of the people are in a sense “holy,” as members of the covenant community, irrespective of their faith and obedience: “And they gathered themselves together against Moses and against Aaron, and said unto them, Ye take too much upon you, seeing all the congregation are holy, every one of them, and the Lord is among them: wherefore then lift ye up yourselves above the congregation of the Lord?” ( Aaron as the high priest was “the holy one of the Lord ( mo'Ses - The immediate pedigree of Moses is as follows: Levi was the father of: Gershon -- Kohath -- Merari Kohath was the father of: Amram = Jochebed Amram = Jochebed was the father of: Hur = Miriam -- Aaron = Elisheba -- Moses = Zipporah Aaron = Elisheba was the father of: Nadab -- Abihu -- Eleazar -- Ithamar Eleazar was the father of: Phineas Moses = Zipporah was the father of: Gershom -- Eliezer Gershom was the father of: Jonathan The history of Moses naturally divides itself into three periods of 40 years each. He meets Aaron, his next younger brother, whom God permitted to be the spokesman, and together they return to Goshen in Egypt. Aaron spoke and acted for Moses, and was the permanent inheritor of the sacred staff of power
Wanderings of the Israelites - At Hazeroth Miriam and Aaron spoke against Moses, and Miriam was smitten with leprosy. The people murmured, and the rock was smitten, on which occasion Moses and Aaron offended. At Mount Hor Aaron died and was buried
John the Baptist - His father, Zacharias, was a priest of the course of Abia (1 Chronicles 24:10 ), and his mother, Elisabeth, was of the daughters of Aaron (Luke 1:5 )
Hebron - Third son of Kohath; younger brother of Amram, father of Moses and Aaron (Exodus 6:18)
Merari, Merarites - , Numbers 10:17 ), for which they were given four waggons and eight oxen ( Numbers 7:8 ); and they were superintended by Ithamar, the youngest son of Aaron ( Numbers 4:33 )
Shiloh (1) - But the town Shiloh did not exist in Jacob's time, and Judah did not lose the preeminence there; nor indeed did Judah, but Moses and Aaron, lead Israel in the wilderness
Dancing - Hence, when "Miriam the prophetess, the sister of Aaron, took a timbrel in her hand, and all the women went after her with timbrels and with dances," at the triumph over the enemies of God and the church at the Red sea, we are told, that she answered them in holy song—"Sing ye to the Lord, for he hath triumphed gloriously; the horse and his rider hath he thrown into the sea
Pray - 21:7); he “prays” for Aaron ( Seir - The whole of this tract was probably before called Mount Hor, and was inhabited by the Horites, the descendants, as it is thought, of Hor, who is no otherwise known, and whose name is now only retained in that part of the plain where Aaron died
Ark of the Covenant - ...
Besides the tables of the covenant, placed by Moses in this sacred coffer, God appointed the blossoming rod of Aaron to be lodged there, Numbers 17:10 Hebrews 9:4 ; a golden vase of manna gathered in the wilderness, Exodus 16:33,34 , and a copy of the book of the law, Deuteronomy 31:26
Gibeah - A city closely connected with Phinehas, the high priest and grandson of Aaron
Rephidim - 118) interprets an inscription with a man's figure with uplifted hands on a rock, "the prophet upon a hard great stone prayeth unto God, Aaron and Hur sustaining his hands
Mary - She was connected by marriage, Luke 1:36, with Elisabeth, who was of the tribe of Levi and of the lineage of Aaron
Zadok - Son of Ahitub, of the house of Eleazar, son of Aaron (1 Chronicles 24:3). )...
David made him ruler over the Aaronites (1 Chronicles 27:17); their number in 1 Chronicles 12:27-28, is said to be 3,700 under Jehoiada
Gershon, Gershonites - , Numbers 10:17 ), for which they were given two wagons and four oxen ( Numbers 7:7 ); and they were superintended by Ithamar, the youngest son of Aaron ( Numbers 4:33 , Numbers 7:8 )
Mischna - The Mischna consists of various traditions of the Jews, and of explanations of several passages of Scripture: these traditions serving as an explication of the written law, and supplement to it, are said to have been delivered to Moses during the time of his abode on the Mount; which he afterwards communicated to Aaron, Eleazar, and his servant Joshua
Sing - 9:24 at the conclusion of the consecration of Aaron and his sons to the priesthood
Cloud - According to Jerom, in his Epistle to Fabiola, this cloud attended them from Succoth; or, according to others, from Rameses; or, as the Hebrews say, only from Ethan, till the death of Aaron; or, as the generality of commentators are of opinion, to the passage of Jordan
Mishna - These traditions, serving as an explication of the written law, and supplementary to it, are said to have been delivered to Moses during the time of his abode upon the mount; which he afterward communicated to Aaron, Eleazar, and his servant Joshua
Hair - The head of Aaron was anointed with a precious oil, compounded after the art of the apothecary; and in proof that they had already adopted the practice, the congregation were prohibited, under pain of being cut off, to make any other like it, after the composition of it, Exodus 30:32-33
Caleb - Moses and Aaron no sooner heard this than they fell upon their faces before the whole congregation, and Joshua and Caleb rent their clothes, imploring them to take courage and march boldly on; since, if God were with them, they might easily make a conquest of the whole land
Almond Tree - Such, we know from the testimony of Scripture, was the rod of Aaron; which renders it exceedingly probable, that the rods of the other chiefs were from the same tree
Daniel - A descendant of Ithamar, the fourth son of Aaron
Priest - Every other priest, even Aaron himself, acted no higher than as the type of JEHOVAH'S High Priest. Hence the Holy Ghost particularly caused it to be recorded for the church's confidence and joy in this particular, that Christ "glorified not himself to be made an High Priest, but was called of God, as was Aaron. All other priests, whether Aaron or his sons, Levitical or Christian, are no otherwise priests than as they act in the Lord Jesus's name, are ordained by his authority, and minister for his glory
Sanctify - The first use of qâdash in this stem focuses on the act: “And thou shalt take of the blood that is upon the altar, and of the anointing oil, and sprinkle it upon Aaronand upon his garments, and upon his sons, and upon the garments of his sons with him: and he shall be hallowed, and his garments, and his sons, and his sons’ garments with him” ( Aaron: “… And they shall make holy garments for Aaron thy brother, … that he may minister unto me in the priest’s office” ( Aaron and his sons were sprinkled with the blood of the atonement. ”...
In the causative stem the word means “to give for God’s use”: “And it shall be upon Aaron’s forehead, that Aaron may bear the iniquity of the holy things, which the children of Israel shall hallow …” (
le'Vites - --There is no trace of the consecrated character of the Levites till the institution of a hereditary priesthood in the family of Aaron, during the first withdrawal of Moses to the solitude of Sinai. They were, in the language of ( 1 Chronicles 23:24-32 ) to which we may refer as almost the locus classicus on this subject, "to wait on the sons of Aaron for the service of the house of Jehovah, in the courts, and the chambers, and the purifying of all holy things
Korah - Ringleader of the rebellion against Moses and Aaron (Numbers 16; Numbers 26:9-11); the one solitary anecdote recorded of the 38 years' wandering, uncircumcision, and shame, Not content with his honourable post as a Levite "minister" to the sanctuary, Korah "sought the priesthood also. Korah with "250 princes of the assembly, famous in the congregation, men of renown" (not restricted to the tribe of Reuben: Numbers 27:3), said to Moses and Aaron, "ye take too much upon you, seeing all the congregation are holy, every one of them, and the Lord is among them" (compare Exodus 19:6). ...
Korah's sin answers to that of sacerdotalist ministers who, not content with the honour of the ministry (nowhere in the New Testament are Christian ministers called "sacrificing" or "sacerdotal priests," hiereis, a term belonging in the strict and highest sense to Jesus alone; restricted to Him and the Aaronic and pagan priests, and spiritually applied to all Christians: Matthew 8:4; Acts 14:13; Hebrews 5:6; Revelation 1:6; Revelation 5:10; Revelation 20:6; 1 Peter 2:5; 1 Peter 2:9), usurp Christ's sacrificing and mediatorial priesthood; also to that of all men who think to be saved by their own doings instead of by His mediatorial work for us (Acts 4:12)
Prophesy - ...
The second occurrence of nâbı̂y' establishes its meaning: “And the Lord said unto Moses, See, I have made thee a god to Pharaoh: and Aaron thy brother shall be thy prophet” ( Aaron (Moses’ brother) to be the speaker: “And he shall be thy spokesman unto the people: and he shall be, even he shall be to thee instead of a mouth, and thou shalt be to him instead of God” ( Levite - There were three family clans within the tribe of Levi—Gershon, Kohath, and Meraribut it was only Kohath who supplied the Aaronic priests. Subsequent to the induction of Aaron and his sons into the priesthood, the entire tribe of Levi was "set apart" following the golden calf incident (Exodus 32:26-29 ). Their zeal for the Lord caused the male Levites (except for Aaron's family, who were already designated as priests) to be set apart as caretakers of the tabernacle and as aides to the priests (Numbers 1:47-53 ). Because this appointment came about due to their actions and was not based on their relationship with Aaron or his family, it was "providentially coincidental" that it was the tribe that contained the priests. ...
In summary, though the conclusions of the majority of modern critical scholars concerning the identity and purpose of the Levites (and priests) are in sharp contrast to the view presented here, the Scriptures clearly indicate that the Levites should be seen as a tribe that was below the priestly group of Aaronic priests but still distinct from other Israelites
Heart - ”...
“Heart” may refer to the organ of the body: “And Aaron shall bear the names of the children of Israel in the breastplate of judgment upon his heart, when he goeth in unto the holy place …” (
Mount Mountain - To the ancients mountains played a conspicuous part in religion; they were not infrequently the scenes of theophanies, and when great men, such as Aaron and Moses, died, they were buried on the tops of mountains. Even the furniture of the earthly tabernacle had its heavenly archetypes; so also the priesthood of Aaron and his descendants is but a copy of the priesthood of Jesus
Priest - --The priesthood was first established in the family of Aaron, and all the sons of Aaron were priests
Mount Mountain - To the ancients mountains played a conspicuous part in religion; they were not infrequently the scenes of theophanies, and when great men, such as Aaron and Moses, died, they were buried on the tops of mountains. Even the furniture of the earthly tabernacle had its heavenly archetypes; so also the priesthood of Aaron and his descendants is but a copy of the priesthood of Jesus
High Priest - ...
Responsibilities and Privileges The high priesthood was a hereditary office based on descent from Aaron (Exodus 29:29-30 ; Leviticus 16:32 ). Aaron, Eliezar, and Phineas are typically called the priest. The account of Eleazar's donning Aaron's priestly robe (Numbers 20:25-28 ; compare Deuteronomy 10:6 ) provides Scripture's best report of high priestly succession. ...
Aaron, Eleazar, and Phinehas appear in Biblical history as distinct personalities
Moses - ...
One of the Hebrew households into which this cruel edict of the king brought great alarm was that of Amram, of the family of the Kohathites (Exodus 6:16-20 ), who with his wife Jochebed and two children, Miriam, a girl of perhaps fifteen years of age, and Aaron, a boy of three years, resided in or near Memphis, the capital city of that time. On the way he was met by Aaron (q. He and Aaron had a hard task before them; but the Lord was with them (ch
Grief And Mourning - Leaders were mourned, often for 30 days: Aaron (Numbers 20:29 ), Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8 ), and Samuel (1 Samuel 25:1 )
Ezra - He was the son, or perhaps grandson, of Seraiah (2 Kings 25:18-21 ), and a lineal descendant of Phinehas, the son of Aaron (Ezra 7:1-5 )
Burial - There is no account of the actual burial of Aaron, which probably, however, took place on the summit of Mount Hor (Numbers 20:28,29 )
Idolatry - When the golden calf was made Aaron built an altar before it, and said, "To-morrow is a feast to Jehovah;" but the people said, "These be thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of the land of Egypt
All - ...
The word can be used alone, meaning “the entirety,” “whole,” or “all,” as in: “And thou shalt put all [1] in the hands of Aaron, and in the hands of his sons …” ( Ablutions - Aaron and his sons were washed before they were clothed with the priestly robes and anointed with oil (Exodus 29:4 ; Exodus 30:19-21 ; Leviticus 8:6 )
Stone - The expensiveness of the high priest’s garments corresponded to the special workmanship of the most holy place where Aaron served
Mourning - In the case of Jacob it was seventy days, (Genesis 50:3 ) of Aaron, (Numbers 20:29 ) and Moses, Deuteronomy 34:8 thirty
Purification - ’ Aaron, for instance, washed both before and after the act of atonement (Leviticus 16:4; Leviticus 16:23-24; W
Cabbala - Accordingly, the Jews believe that God gave to Moses on Mount Sinai, not only the law, but also the explication of that law; and that Moses, after his coming down, retiring to his tent, rehearsed to Aaron both the one and the other. When he had done, the sons of Aaron, Eleazar and Ithamar, were introduced to a second rehearsal. This being over, the seventy elders that composed the sanhedrim were admitted; and, lastly, the people, as many as pleased; to all of whom Moses again repeated both the law and explanation, as he received them from God: so that Aaron heard it four times, his sons thrice, the elders twice, and the people once
Offerings, the - Aaron had to put on his linen garments to remove the ashes from the altar to 'the place of ashes' beside the altar: he then changed his dress and carried the ashes outside the camp. The breast of the offering was waved for a wave offering, and was then food for Aaron and his sons and daughters. Thus at the consecration of Aaron and his sons, the fat, the fat tail, the caul, the kidneys, and the right shoulder of the ram, together with one loaf of bread, one cake of oiled bread, and one wafer, were placed in the hands of Aaron, and in the hands of his sons, to wave them for a wave offering before the Lord, and then they were burnt on the altar for a burnt offering. The breast of the ram was also waved for a wave offering before the Lord, and the shoulder was heaved up for a heave offering; these were eaten by Aaron and his sons
Moses - (See Aaron; EGYPT; EXODUS. ...
Son of Amram (a later one than Kohath's father) and Jochebed (whose name, derived from Jehovah, shows the family hereditary devotion); Miriam, married to Hur, was oldest; Aaron, married to Elisheba, three years older (Exodus 7:7, compare Exodus 2:7); next Moses, youngest. To Moses' disinterested and humble pleadings of inability to speak, and desire that some other should be sent, Jehovah answers: "Aaron shall be thy spokesman . " Aaron, when he heard of Moses leaving Midian, of his own accord went to meet him; Jehovah further directed him what way to go in order to meet him, namely, by the desert (Exodus 4:14; Exodus 4:27). Nor could magical feats derived from Egyptian education have enabled Moses to gain his point, for he was watched and opposed by the masters of this art, who had the king and the state on their side, while Moses had not a single associate save Aaron. Aaron and Hur supported Moses in the battle with Amalek (Exodus 17:12); Joshua was his minister
Hebrews Epistle to the - ...
(2) The mediators of the old covenant (angels, Moses, Joshua, Aaron) inferior to the one Mediator of the new. He is Priest not after the order of Aaron, but after the eternal order of Melchizedek (1618388526_67). Notice that the promise of this new priesthood, spoken while the Aaronic priests were in possession, shows that the order of Melchizedek is better than that of Aaron. ...
(4) The priestly ministrations of Aaron and of Christ: their sanctuaries, their basal covenants, their sacrifices. His Sonship raises Him far above angels (Hebrews 1:5-13), above Moses (Hebrews 3:6), and above Aaron (Hebrews 7:28). He was therefore called by God to be Priest, not after the order of Aaron, but after the eternal order of Melchizedek (Hebrews 5:4-6). The Aaronic order was only the shadow, not the reality of priesthood. For the members of that order held office by virtue of mere physical descent (Hebrews 7:16); their ministry could call sins to mind but could not cleanse them (Hebrews 10:1-3); they could not unite the people to God-even into the earthly symbol of His presence the high priest himself could enter only once a year alone (Hebrews 9:7); lastly, the Aaronic priests were mortal-their work was confined to one generation (Hebrews 7:23). ...
By contrast with the Aaronic priesthood, it follows that the perfect priest must be really, not ritually, holy, his office resting on his own perfect fitness to perform it; he must be able to take away sin and to unite men to God; lastly, he must be eternal-placed beyond the reach of sin and death
Woman - In the era of the deliverance from Egypt, Miriam is ranked with Moses and Aaron (cf
Fire - If fire was used for sacred purposes and obtained other than from the altar, it was called “strange fire” (1618388526_7 ), for which use Nadab and Abihu, two sons of Aaron, were punished immediately by divine execution
Theophany - Yet the record is unmistakable that people did see God, such as Moses and others at Sinai (Exodus 24:9-10 ); the Lord's rebuke of Aaron and Miriam (Numbers 12:4-8 ); and the majestic vision to Isaiah (Isaiah 6:1 ,Isaiah 6:1,6:5 )
Samuel - Psalm 99:6-7 relates that God spoke with Samuel from out of the pillar of cloud as God had previously with Moses and Aaron
Burial - Mourning for Jacob lasted seventy days (Genesis 50:3 ), while for Aaron and Moses it lasted thirty days (Numbers 20:29 ; Deuteronomy 34:5-8 )
Hand, Right Hand - These are performed by the hand of Moses and of Aaron who act as instruments of divine power, taking the staff of God in their hands (4:2; 14:16)
Levites - —According to one line of tradition, the Levites were appointed to assist the priests (Numbers 3:9; Numbers 8:19; Numbers 18:1-6), but were not themselves, like Aaron and his sons, to approach unto the most holy things (Numbers 4:19); yet according to another representation the priesthood belonged to them as an inheritance (Deuteronomy 33:8-11, Joshua 18:7)
Bless - Thus Moses instructed Aaron, and his descendants, to bless the congregation, "In this wise shall ye bless the children of Israel, saying unto them, The Lord bless thee, and keep thee; the Lord make his face to shine upon thee; the Lord lift up his countenance upon thee, and give thee peace," Numbers 4:23
High Priest - " Love is compared to it, streaming down from Aaron's head upon his beard, then to his skirts (Psalms 132:2). The first separation of Aaron to the priesthood, which previously belonged to the firstborn, occurs in Exodus 28, after the directions for the tabernacle and its furniture. "Judgment" was the breast-plate's chief significance (Hebrews 10:1-2), "Aaron shall bear the judgment of . ...
Superior to the Aaronic priests (Hebrews 7:11; Hebrews 7:16; Hebrews 7:22; Hebrews 8:1-2; Hebrews 8:6) in that He was "consecrated with an oath" (Hebrews 7:20-21), has an intransmissible priesthood (margin of Hebrews 7:23; Hebrews 7:28), was "holy, harmless, and undefiled," and without "infirmity" (Hebrews 7:26-28), "faithful to Him that appointed Him" as the "Son," whereas Moses the lawgiver was but a "servant"; needed no sacrifice for Himself (Hebrews 7:27); Himself the sacrifice, purifying "the heavenly things" (Hebrews 9:14; Hebrews 9:26), "better" than the sacrifices which "purified the patterns of things in the heavens" (Hebrews 7:13-14); not often, but offered once for all (Hebrews 7:27; 1618388526_49; Hebrews 9:28; Exodus 28:30; Hebrews 10:12; Hebrews 10:9-10; Hebrews 10:14; Hebrews 10:17-18); "making him that did the service perfect, as pertaining to the conscience," which the law sacrifices could not (Hebrews 9:9; Hebrews 10:1-2; Hebrews 10:16-22). Aaron was washed because sinful, Jesus was baptized "to fulfill all righteousness. " Aaron was anointed with oil, Jesus with the Holy Spirit without measure (Acts 10:38; John 3:34). Aaron was consecrated with the blood of beasts, Christ with His own blood
Priest - The male descendants of Aaron were priests by birthright, and the firstborn, in regular succession, was entitled to the office of high priest
Rod - It was a sign and proof to all Israel that Aaron was his chosen high priest to lead the people in their worship, and was His chosen mediator between Himself and the people of Israel
Levi - Jehovah "proved" Levi, and by the people's strivings "strove with" Levi (represented by Moses and Aaron. ...
Moses and Aaron's faithfulness, the Levites' drawing their swords against their Israelite brethren as God's avengers of the idolatry of the golden calf (Exodus 32:26-29), "slaying every man his brother
Tabernacle - This tent was cared for by Joshua (Exodus 33:11 ), while Aaron was responsible for the tabernacle (Leviticus 10:7 )
Priesthood of the Believer - Further, this priesthood of Christ is said to be “after the order of Melchizedek” (Hebrews 5:6 ), which means that God appointed Him directly and Jesus did not have to trace His priesthood through the human line of Aaron or Levi
Abiathar - ...
Abiathar adhered to David during all his wanderings, and was afflicted in all wherein David was afflicted; also when he assumed the throne in Hebron, the Aaronite priestly city of refuge. Moreover, Zadok and Abiathar represented rival houses: Zadok that of Eleazar, the oldest son of Aaron; Abiathar that of Ithamar, the youngest (1 Chronicles 24:3-4; 1 Chronicles 6:8)
Faithfulness - The first occurrence of the word refers to Moses’ hands: “But Moses’ hands were heavy; and they took a stone, and put it under him, and he sat thereon; and Aaron and Hur stayed up his hands, the one on the one side and the other on the other side; and his hands were steady until the going down of the sun” ( River; Wadi - ...
In some passages nâhâr may represent a “canal(s)”: “Say unto Aaron, Take thy rod, and stretch out thine hand upon the waters of Egypt, upon their streams [1], upon their rivers [2], and upon their ponds …” ( Fill - So God commands concerning Aaron and his sons: “And thou … shalt anoint them, and consecrate them, and sanctify them, that they may minister unto me in the priest’s office” ( Elder - We find them after the departure from Egypt, Exodus 17:6; Exodus 19:7; and from these, 70 were selected for special worship with Moses, Aaron, Nadab, and Abihu
That - Leviticus 10 ...
That here stands for the whole of what Aaron had said, or the whole of the preceding verse
Leviticus - Moses ordained Aaron and his four sons as priests, after which they began their duties (8:1-9:24)
Priest - The Aaronic priesthood became the temporary depository of all Israel's priesthood, until Christ the antitypical High Priest came; and they shall hereafter resume it when they turn to the Lord and shall be "the priests of Jehovah, the ministers of our God" to the Gentile nations in Christ's millennial kingdom (Isaiah 61:6; Isaiah 66:21). Aaron's priesthood has passed away: Christ's priesthood, which is after the order of Melchizedek, does "not pass from one to another" (Hebrews 7:24, aparabaton teen hierosuneen ), for "He ever liveth," not needing (as the Aaronic priests, through inability to continue through death) to transmit the priesthood to successors (Hebrews 7:23; Hebrews 7:25). Christian ministers are never in the New Testament called by the name "priests" (hiereis ), which is applied only to the Aaronic priests, and to Christ, and to all Christians; though it would have been the natural word for the sacred writers as Jews to have used; but the Holy Spirit restrained them from using it. , 61) writes: "Christ's origin from David is distributed into two families, a kingly and a priestly; Matthew descending traces the kingly, Luke ascending the priestly, family; so that our Lord Jesus, our King and Priest, drew kindred from a priestly stock (he supposes Nathan married a wife of Aaronic descent), yet was not of the priest tribe. The targums call these young men the firstborn sons; but all that seems to be meant is, Moses officiated as priest, (Aaron not being yet consecrated), and employed young men whose strength qualified them for slaying the sacrifices. ...
When the tabernacle was completed, and Aaron and his sons were made priests, Moses by Jehovah's command performed the priestly functions of setting the shewbread, lighting the lamps, burning incense, and offering the daily sacrifice (Exodus 40:23-29; Exodus 40:31-32). But at the consecration of Aaron and his sons Moses officiated as priest for the last time (Leviticus 8:14-29; Exodus 29:10-26). Their old garments were laid aside, their bodies washed with pure water (Leviticus 8:6; Exodus 29:4; Exodus 29:7; Exodus 29:10; Exodus 29:18; Exodus 29:20; Exodus 30:23-33); so all Christians as king priests (Hebrews 10:22; Ephesians 5:26), and anointed by sprinkling with the perfumed precious oil (Leviticus 8:4; Deuteronomy 14:27-29; Leviticus 8:21-23; Leviticus 8:30), but over Aaron it was poured until it descended to his skirts (Leviticus 8:12; Psalms 133:2); this anointing of the priest (symbolizing the Holy Spirit) followed the anointing of the sanctuary and vessels (Exodus 28:41; Exodus 29:7; Exodus 30:30; Exodus 40:15). ...
Moses, as representing God, consecrated, exercising for the time a higher priesthood than the Aaronic; so he is called priest (Psalms 99:6). The consequent judgment on the rebels, and the budding of Aaron's rod, taught that the new priesthood had a vitality which no longer resided in the old (Numbers 16)
Numbers, the Book of - ...
The people mustering all together exhausted the natural water supply; the smiting of the rock, and the sentence on Moses and Aaron followed (Numbers 20:2 ff; Numbers 20:12; Numbers 20:13); from Kadesh Israel sent the message to Edom (Numbers 20:14, etc. On the messengers' return Israel left Kadesh for Mount Hor, where Aaron dies; then proceeded by the marches in Numbers 33:41-49 round Edom to Moab. Aaron's death occurred in the first day of the fifth month of the 40th year (Numbers 33:38), the first encampment in the final march to Canaan (Numbers 20:22). Thus six months intervene between Aaron's death and Deuteronomy; in them the events of the fourth part of the Book of Numbers (Numbers 20:1 to the end) occurred, excepting Arad's defeat. The first month mourning for Aaron occupies, Numbers 20:29; part of the host in this month avenged Arad's attack during Israel's journey from Kadesh to Mount Hor. The war with Arad precedes in time Numbers 20, Aaron's burial at Mount Hor, and is the first of the series of victories under Moses narrated from this point
Exodus - " Pharaoh rose up in the night, and called for Moses and Aaron by night, and said, "Rise up, and get you forth from among my people, both ye and the children of Israel; and go, serve Jehovah, as ye have said. These words he spoke to Moses and Aaron "seem to gleam through the tears of the humbled king, as he lamented his son snatched from him by so sudden a death, and tremble with a sense of the helplessness which his proud soul at last felt when the avenging hand of God had visited even his palace
Exodus - , Exodus 2:23-25 ), and describes the call of Moses, which takes place in Egypt, the revelation of the name Jahweh , and the appointment of Aaron ( Exodus 6:1 to Exodus 7:13 ). ), which are wrought by Aaron, forma trial of strength with Pharaoh’s magicians
Hand - Examples of this concept include: Sarah's authority over Hagar (Genesis 16:6 ,Genesis 16:6,16:9 ), Joseph's administration of Potiphar's house (Genesis 39:3-8 ), and the role of Moses and Aaron as leaders of Israel (Numbers 33:1 )
Foreknowledge - During the first five plagues Pharaoh hardened his own heart, refusing to listen to Moses and Aaron; after that the Lord confirmed him in his hardened condition (Exodus 7:13-14 ; 8:15,19 , 32 )
Theophany - God also appeared to Moses, with Aaron and his sons and the seventy elders (Exodus 24:9-11 ) and in the transfer of leadership to Joshua (Deuteronomy 31:15 )
Amalekites - On Israel's route from Egypt to Palestine, Amalek in guerrilla warfare tried to stop their progress, and was defeated by Joshua, under Moses, whose hands were stayed up by Aaron and Hur, at Rephidim (Exodus 17:8-16)
Fathers - ...
The fathers praised are Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Israel, Moses, Aaron, Phinehas, Joshua, Caleb, the Judges, Samuel, Nathan, David, Solomon, Elijah, Elisha, Hezekiah, Isaiah, Josiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Job, the Twelve, Zerubbabel, Joshua the priest, Nehemiah
Joshua - His piety, courage, and disinterested integrity are conspicuous throughout his whole history; and, exclusive of the inspiration which enlightened his mind and writings, he derived divine information, sometimes by immediate revelation from God, Joshua 3:7 ; Joshua 5:13-15 ; at others from the sanctuary, through the medium of Eleazar, the high priest, the son of Aaron, who, having on the breast plate, presented himself before the mercy seat on which the Shechinah, or visible symbol of the divine presence, rested, and there consulted Jehovah by the Urim and Thummim, to which an answer was returned by an audible voice
John the Baptist - Son of Zacharias, priest of the order of Abia, or Abijah (1 Chronicles 24:10 ), and of Elizabeth, a descendant of Aaron, born when they were both old
Exodus - The book of Exodus brings before us many and singular types of Christ: Moses, Deuteronomy 18:15 ; Aaron, Hebrews 4:14-16 ; the paschal lamb, Exodus 12:46 John 19:36 1 Corinthians 5:7-8 ; the manna, Exodus 1:1-40:38 16:15 1 Corinthians 10:3 ; the rock in Horeb, Exodus 17:6 1 Corinthians 10:4 ; the mercy seat, Exodus 37:6 Romans 3:25 Hebrews 4:16 ; the tabernacle, Exodus 40:1 - 38 , "The Word tabernacled among us," John 1:14 . Soon after turning, they came to mount Hor, where Aaron died and was buried, Numbers 20:20-28
Prayer - , of Abraham (Genesis 17:18,20 ; 18:23-32 ; 20:7,17,18 ), of Moses for Pharaoh (Exodus 8:12,13,30,31 ; Exodus 9:33 ), for the Israelites (Exodus 17:11,13 ; 32:11-14,31-34 ; Numbers 21:7,8 ; Deuteronomy 9:18,19,25 ), for Miriam (Numbers 12:13 ), for Aaron (Deuteronomy 9:20 ), of Samuel (1 Samuel 7:5-12 ), of Solomon (1 Kings 8 ; 2 Chronicles 6 ), Elijah (1 Kings 17:20-23 ), Elisha (2 Kings 4:33-36 ), Isaiah (2 Kings 19 ), (Jeremiah 42:2-10 ), Peter (Acts 9:40 ), the church (12:5-12), Paul (28:8)
Responsibility - Aaron would not own up to the fact that he had formed the golden calf (Exodus 32:21-24 )
Ancestors - ...
Kings traced their lineage to David, and the priests traced their line to Aaron
Stretch Out - God told Moses to tell Aaron to take his staff in hand (cf. 4:2), Aaron’s rod ( Hand - ...
“To fill someone’s hand” may be a technical term for “installing him” in office: “And thou shalt put them upon Aaron thy brother, and his sons with him; and shalt anoint them, and consecrate them [7], and sanctify them, that they may minister unto me in the priest’s office” ( Mourning - That for Moses and Aaron was prolonged to thirty days, Numbers 20:29 Deuteronomy 34:8 ; and that for Jacob to seventy days, Genesis 50:3
Priests And Levites - The priests who belonged to the family of Aaron were consecrated by special ceremonies like those of the high priest, but less elaborate ( Exodus 29:1-46 , Leviticus 8:1-36 ). The Levites were said to have been given as a gift ( nĕthûnîm ) to Aaron and his sons. All the ‘sons’ of Aaron a descendant of Levi ( Exodus 6:14-20 ) were priests ( Leviticus 1:5 etc. Nadab and Ahihu, Aaron’s eldest sons, having perished, it passed to Eleazar, the next in age ( Numbers 20:22-29 , Exodus 6:23 ). The family of Kohath , as being that to which both Aaron and Moses belonged, had the most honourable work
Genealogy - Of the twenty-four courses of the sons of Aaron in 1 Chronicles 24:1 ff. In 1 Chronicles 6:4 there are, including Aaron, 23 priests from the Exodus to the Captivity an evidently artificial reconstruction; forty years is a generation, and 40×12 = 480 years to the building of the Temple ( 1 Kings 6:1 ), the other 11 priests filling up the period till the Exile, which took place in the eleventh generation after Solomon
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - Exodus 4:15-16 ): "Then the Lord said to Moses, See, I have made you like God to Pharaoh, and your brother Aaron will be your prophet. You are to say everything I command you, and your brother Aaron is to tell Pharaoh. " What could be clearer? A prophet (nabi [3]) is one who receives a word from God, just as Moses acted in the place of God in passing on the divine revelations he received from the Lord to his brother Aaron, now functioning as a prophet. Thus Aaron was to function as Moses' mouthpiece. " Many others could be included in this list of those who exercised this gift prior to the days of Samuel, including Moses, Aaron, Miriam (Exodus 15:20 ), Eldad, Medad, the seventy elders (Numbers 11:24-29 ), Balaam (Numbers 21-24 ), Deborah (Genesis 8:21-222 ), and Minoah and his wife (Judges 13:3,10,21 )
Melchizedek - He then proceeds to show the superiority of Christ’s priesthood over that of the Jewish priests, the descendants of Aaron, and seeks to illustrate it by the superiority of Melchizedek over Abraham, as he gathers it from Genesis 14:1-24
Levi - ]'>[2] ( Numbers 18:2 ; Numbers 18:4 ) playa upon the same word, saying to Aaron: ‘Bring the tribe of Levi … that it may be joined ( yillâwû ) unto thee
Sanctification - ...
Of course, the priests and Levites who functioned in the sanctuary, beginning with Aaron, were sanctified to the Lord by the anointing of oil (Exodus 30:30-32 ; Exodus 40:12-15 )
Presence of God - Aaron was confirmed as high priest in God's presence (Numbers 16:7 ; 17:9 )
Type - ...
(Consider also Enoch, Melchizedek, Joseph, Moses, Aaron, Joshua, Boaz, David, Solomon, Zerubbabel, Cyrus, Hagar, Ahithophel, and others
Host - 6:26: “These are that Aaron and Moses, to whom the Lord said, Bring out the children of Israel from the land of Egypt according to their armies
Remember - The names of the twelve tribes of Israel were engraved on two stones that were attached to the ephod as “stones of memorial unto the children of Israel: and Aaron shall bear their names before the Lord …” ( Judges - ...
Godwin, in his "Moses and Aaron," compares them to the Roman dictators, who were appointed only on extraordinary emergencies, as in case of war abroad, or conspiracies at home, and whose power, while they continued in office, was great, and even absolute
Sela - Upon the summit of the mountains, which closes the narrow valley on its western side, (Mount Hor,) is the tomb of Haroun, or Aaron
Prophecy, Prophet - ...
This definition of a prophet was well illustrated in the case of Aaron, who was Moses’ prophet, or spokesman (Exodus 4:10-16; Exodus 7:1-2). Moses was the leader of Israel, but Aaron was the person who announced Moses’ instructions to the people
Devote, Devoted - All devoted things belonged to Aaron and his sons as God's representatives (Numbers 18:14 )
Judgment Day - Other individuals became the object of God's wrath: Moses (Exodus 4:14 , Exodus 4:24 ; Deuteronomy 1:37 ); Aaron (Deuteronomy 9:20 ), Miriam (Numbers 12:9 ), Nadab and Abihu (Leviticus 10:1-2 )
Go Down - Yârad is used to indicate “coming away from” the altar: “And Aaron lifted up his hand toward the people, and blessed them, and came down from offering of the sin offering …” ( Leadership - He acted on behalf of God at the installation of Aaron and his sons to the priesthood. ...
The prophets/prophetesses were God's mouth to the people similarly as Aaron was Moses' mouth (Exodus 4:16 ). While God charged all Israel to be a people that functioned in a priestly ministry to the world (Exodus 19:6 ), it was Aaron and his family who were consecrated to do the service at the tabernacle (Leviticus 8 )
Fire - The two sons of Aaron should have used that fire for their censors. Aaron took his censer, placed the holy incense in it, and put the holy fire from off the altar in it. All those with the false fire and the false incense were killed, while Aaron with the true incense and the true fire, lived
Exodus, Book of - With his brother Aaron, he faced a stubborn pharaoh, who refused to release the Israelites. Impatient Israel got Aaron to build an object of worship they could see, so he made the golden calf
Levites - The men of Levi, the sacerdotal tribe, all ministers, out of whom the priests were taken, namely, Aaron's family. Amram, Aaron, and Moses belonged to his stock (Exodus 4:14). The duties of the Levites are defined by him (1 Chronicles 23:24-32), "to wait on the sons of Aaron for the service of the house of Jehovah," etc
Plagues of Egypt - ]'>[2] , Aaron (as usual) is bidden by Moses to bring the plague by stretching out his staff. ]'>[2] , through the stretching out of Aaron’s staff, ‘all the dust of Egypt became mosquitoes’ (EV Vision(s) - The prophetic use of dreams and visions is summarized in the Lord's dramatic defense of Moses in the face of Aaron and Miriam's revolt: "When a prophet of the Lord is among you, I reveal myself to him in visions, I speak to him in dreams" (Numbers 12:6 )
Excommunication - Godwyn, in his Moses and Aaron distinguishes three degrees or kinds of excommunication among the Jews
Fire - The first of these inaugurated Aaron's ministry as priest. Having blessed the people, Moses and Aaron witnessed the appearance of the glory of the Lord, a striking manifestation of which was fire that "came out from the presence of the Lord" to consume the sacrifices already placed on the altar (Leviticus 9:23-24 )
Melchizedek - As a person He is compared with Melchizedek, whose order of priesthood was confessedly above that of Aaron (q. ]'>[1] ); while in regard to priestly acts and functions His efficiency and freedom from limitations are exhibited in comparison with the necessary defects of the Aaronic office. (c) Accordingly, through these timeless and regal qualities his priesthood becomes unique, incomparably above all Aaronic and Levitical institutions, and with nothing like it in human history until the Incarnate comes upon the stage and takes to Himself a Priesthood in which He admits no peer, and of which eternal and superabundant adequacy is the note (see Priest)
Samuel, the Books of - Hence he is but twice mentioned in all Samuel, and then only as joined with Aaron in delivering Israel out of Egypt; the law is never mentioned (1 Samuel 12:6; 1 Samuel 12:8)
Call - 32:5: “…Aaron made proclamation, and said, Tomorrow is a feast to the Lord
Seek - Moses asked the Levites who rebelled against the unique position of Aaron and his sons: “… Seek ye the priesthood also?” ( Separate - ” The NIV translates this verse: “Tell Aaron and his sons to treat with respect the sacred offerings the Israelites consecrated to me, so that they will not profane my holy name
Idolatry, - until Aaron made the calf, the embodiment of Apis and emblem of the productive power of nature
Jubilee - It follows Leviticus 24 wherein Israel is seen ...
1, according to the mind of God as in the place of His light and administration — but all sustained by Aaron, that is, Christ; for ...
2, in its conduct, Israel actually fell under governmental judgement (Leviticus 24:13-23 ); but ...
3, are ultimately rescued and blessed according to God's purposes, and on the ground of the day of atonement
Hebrews, Letter to the - ...
As the God-sent leader of God’s people, Christ is greater than either Moses or Aaron (3:1-6)
Forgiveness - In Leviticus 16 Aaron (or his descendants) is instructed first to expiate himself and his house annually . Then, taking two goats, Aaron is to offer onechosen by lotas a sin offering for the expiation of the sanctuary (v. But Leviticus 16:21 stipulates that Aaron will confess over the goat "all the wickedness and rebellion of the Israelitesall their sins"; the fact that these three terms are used in tandem to denote sin in its totality implies that otherwise unforgivable violations of the Torah were forgiven on that day
Eli - Eli was not a great man like Moses or Aaron, but he took both the office of Moses and the office of Aaron upon his single self. And all the way up and all the way down again those fathers took their inquiring children by the hand and told them all about Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, and Joseph, and Moses, and Aaron, and the exodus, and the wilderness, and the conquest, and the yearly passover
Tabernacle - The tragedy of the story is that at the very moment they were demanding that Aaron meet their needs, God was giving Moses the instructions that would meet those needs in a much more complete way than Aaron's feeble efforts ever could. Aaron's rod represents the delivering grace of God, both in the exodus events and in God's selection of the priests as mediators; the manna represents God's sustaining grace; and the tablets of the Ten Commandments summarize the terms of the relationship. Oswalt...
See also Aaron ; Altar ; Ark ; Exodus, Theology of ; Hebrews, Theology of ; Israel ; Moses ; Offerings and Sacrifices ; Priest, Priesthood ; Temple ...
Bibliography
Mary - She was connected by marriage with Elisabeth, who was of the lineage of Aaron (Luke 1:36 )
Incense - Aaron originally offered it, but in the second temple one of the lower priests was chosen by lot to offer it daily morning and evening (Luke 1:9)
Leviticus - ...
(2) Investiture of Aaron and consecration of priests, Leviticus 8-10. ...
The only history in Leviticus is that of Aaron's consecration, Nadab and Abihu's death, and the doom of the blasphemer (Leviticus 8-10; Leviticus 24:10-23), a solemn exhibition of Jehovah's laws in their execution. Aaron's "holding his peace" under the stroke is a marvelous exhibition of grace; yet his not eating the sin offering in the holy place shows his keen paternal anguish which excused his violation of the letter of the law in Moses' judgment
Touch - On the one hand, God's holiness was severe: upon the threat of immediate death, no one was to touch Mount Sinai while God's glory was upon it (Exodus 19:12 ) or the sacred furnishings of the tabernacle except Aaron and his sons (Numbers 4:15 ; cf
High Priest (2) - He made reconciliation for the sins of the people (Hebrews 2:17); He was faithful, the recipient of a greater glory than Moses (Hebrews 3:1-6); sought not the office, but was chosen as was Aaron (Hebrews 5:4); He was of the order of Melchizedek (Hebrews 5:10, Hebrews 6:20); was competent to sympathize with men (Hebrews 2:18, Hebrews 4:15)
Water - When they came to Kadesh, and there happened to be in want of water, they made a sedition against him and his brother Aaron, Numbers 20:1 , &c
Jeroboam - To counteract this, he caused two golden calves to be made as objects of religious worship, one of which he placed at Dan, and the other at Bethel, the two extremities of his dominions; and caused a proclamation to be made throughout all his territories, that in future none of his subjects should go up to Jerusalem to worship; and, directing them to the two calves which had been recently erected, he cried out, "Behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of Egypt!" He also caused idolatrous temples to be built, and priests to be ordained of the lowest of the people, who were neither of the family of Aaron nor of the tribe of Levi
Prophets - But the word is sometimes used in a wider sense; thus Aaron was Moses; prophet, Exodus 7:1 , appointed to deliver to the people the messages that Moses received from God; the sacred musicians are said to prophecy, 1 Chronicles 25:1 ; and Paul gives the name, according to the custom of the Greeks, to the poet Aratus, "a prophet of their own," Titus 1:12
Type - The relation of type and antitype clearly underlies these two contrasts, but (c) in the next section of his work (Hebrews 4:14 to Hebrews 10:18), where a contrast is drawn out between the Levitical or Aaronic high priest of the OT and Christ, the Son, conceived as a High Priest after the order of Melchizedek, the author typologizes more boldly and directly, following here a suggestion derived from the OT itself (Psalms 110:4). Side by side, however, with this typology of likeness there is introduced a typology of contrast-the contrast between the order of Aaron and the order of Melchizedek (Hebrews 7:11). If Melchizedek typifies Christ as another priest of the same order, Aaron typifies Him as a priest of a higher order than his own, who becomes the surety of a better covenant than that given under the Levitical Law (Hebrews 7:22; cf. Aaron and his sons in their holy garments of glory and beauty (Exodus 28:1 ff
Samuel - 'Moses and Aaron among His priests, and Samuel among them that call on His name. ' As much as to say that Samuel stands at the head of all the men of prayer in Israel, just as Moses and Aaron stand at the head of all the prophets and priests in Israel. The successors of Moses and Aaron were a glorious enough succession; but all that fades and vanishes away before the far greater glory of pure and unceasing prayer, and especially of unceasing intercessory and undeserved prayer
Jews, Judaism - At first under Persian authority, then under the Greeks, the province was governed by high priests who were descendants of Aaron. The Maccabean revolt established an independent commonwealth under priest-kings of the Hasmonean house rather than the line of Aaron. The Qumran community opposed the loss of the Aaronide priesthood; they may have been associated with the Essenes
Pentateuch - The priesthood is in Aaron's family (Joshua 14:1). "Eleazar," Aaron's son, succeeds to his father's exalted position and with Joshua divides the land (Joshua 21:1), as Numbers 34:17 ordained; the Levites discharge their duties, scattered among the tribes and having 48 cities, as Jehovah by Moses commanded (Deuteronomy 2:26-34). Eli, high priest, is sprung from Aaron through Ithamar (1 Chronicles 24:3; 2 Samuel 8:17; 1 Kings 2:27). The historical facts of the Pentateuch are alluded to: Jacob's descent to Egypt, Israel's deliverance by Moses and Aaron (1 Samuel 12:8); the Egyptian plagues (1 Samuel 4:8; 1 Samuel 8:8); the Kenites' kindness (1 Samuel 15:6). Jeroboam in northern Israel set up golden calves on Aaron's model, with words from Exodus 32:28, "behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of Egypt" (1 Kings 12:28)
Teach, Teacher - Moses commands parents to teach their children (Exodus 13:9 ), teaches Israel's elders how to adjudicate civic matters (Exodus 18:20 ), and assigns responsibility for teaching the law to Aaron and his descendants, the priests and Levites (Leviticus 10:11 ; Deuteronomy 33:10 ; cf
Death - You behold Moses and Aaron bearing the ark of the covenant; David and Elijah presenting the oracle of testimony
Zacharias - A Jewish priest, a member of the family of Abijah, Zacharias had been so careful to observe the law regarding the marriage of priests (Leviticus 21:7-14), that he chose for wife one of the sacerdotal house, a daughter of Aaron (Luke 1:5), named after Aaron’s wife (Exodus 6:23), Elisabeth, who was as pious as himself. The worshippers in the Temple courts marvelled why he tarried so long; the thought likely to occur to them was that God had slain the priest as unworthy (Bruce); and when at last he did make his appearance, he could neither explain the reason for his delay, nor give them the Aaronic benediction (Numbers 6:22-24), which was pronounced after every morning and evening sacrifice by the priest with uplifted hands, the people responding to it with a loud Amen (Keil, Bibl
Israel - Here the human priesthood of the sons of Aaron and the sacrifices of bulls and goats are superseded by a Divine Mediator who offered Himself a sacrifice once for all (Hebrews 7:27; Hebrews 10:10)
Samaritan Pentateuch - The Samaritans pretend that the scroll in Nablus is inscribed: "I Abisha (or Abishua), son of Pinehas, son of Eleazar, son of Aaron
Scribes - The scribes, therefore, who lived after the time of Simon the Just, in order to give weight to their various interpretations of the law, at first pretended that they also were founded upon tradition, and added them to the opinions which Ezra had established as authentic; and in process of time it came to be asserted, that when Moses was forty days on Mount Sinai, he received from God two laws, the one in writing, the other oral; that this oral law was communicated by Moses to Aaron and Joshua, and that it passed unimpaired and uncorrupted from generation to generation, by the tradition of the elders, or great national council, established in the time of Moses; and that this oral law was to be considered as supplemental and explanatory of the written law, which was represented as being in many places obscure, scanty, and defective
Leviticus, Theology of - In this instance, he accomplished that goal by striking out against Aaron's two sons who had not paid due attention to the requirements of holiness as they approached and "offered
The Lord emphasized the important lesson to be learned from this incident when he spoke directly to Aaron (not Moses) in 10:9-11 and instructed him and his sons to: (1) avoid "strong drink" when approaching the Lord lest they die in his presence (v. , holy versus common and unclean versus clean) plus the concept of atonement, which Moses highlighted when he spoke to Aaron: "Why didn't you eat the sin offering in the sanctuary area? It is most holy; it was given to you to take away the guilt of the community by making atonement for them before the Lord" (v. The family of Aaronic priests, however, had charge of the tabernacle and, therefore, the responsibility to make sure that neither they nor the people (individually or as a whole) violated the holiness and purity of the tabernacle emphasized in chapters 1-16
Moses - Moses returned to Egypt, meeting Aaron on the way; they made their demand to Pharaoh, and were refused ( Exodus 4:17 f
Samuel - ...
His sacrificing was not as a priest, but as a Levite and prophet especially called to do so by God, though not of the family of Aaron; a presage of the better dispensation wherein not those alone of one favored family or caste, but all, are privileged to be king-priests to God
Advocate - We are told by God the Holy Ghost, (Hebrews 5:5-6) that Christ "glorified not himself to be made an High Priest, but was called of God, as was Aaron
John the Baptist - Son of Zacharias (of the course of Abijah, 1 Chronicles 24:10) and Elisabeth (of the daughters of Aaron), who both "walked in all the commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless. It is noteworthy that Jesus, of the Melchizedek order of priesthood, was related to but not descended from the Aaronic priests
Exodus, Book of - With his brother Aaron, who was his assistant, he tried to persuade Pharaoh to release the Israelites, but without success (4:18-6:27)
Solomon - There was this; There was what the inspired text calls largeness of heart-very much what we would call in our day openness and breadth of mind, hospitality and catholicity of mind, even to sympathy and symbolism with beliefs, with ways of worship, and with ways of no worship, against which it had been the divine call and whole ministry of Moses, and Aaron, and Joshua, and David to warn and to protect the children of Israel. ' And, if not in them, then in their children, all that Moses, and Aaron, and Joshua, and David had won for them and for their children at a great price is surrendered up and sold for naught, till the old great price has to be paid for it again in their children's sin, and suffering, and defeat, and captivity
Moses - The sign of his kingship included the golden calves of Aaron
Messiah - This authority was traced back to Aaron and his sons (Exodus 29:7-9 ; Exodus 30:22-33 ; compare Psalm 133:2 )
Election - The following persons are said to be elected in this sense: Abraham (Nehemiah 9:7 ), Moses (Psalm 106:23 ), Aaron (Numbers 16:1-17:13 ), David (Psalm 78:70 ), Solomon (1 Chronicles 28:10 ), and Zerubbabel (Micah 5:1-28 )
Genealogy - ...
The promise of Canaan, Israel's separation from the Gentiles, the prophecy of Messiah's descent from Judah, the hereditary priesthood in Aaron's family, and the limitation of ministerial offices to Levi, the promises to David's seed, and the division of Canaan by tribes and families, all combined to make Israel more careful of genealogies than: any other nation. Further traces of genealogies being preserved still appear in the mention of Zacharias as of "the course of Abra," Elizabeth as "of the daughters of Aaron," Anna, daughter of Phanuel, as "of the tribe of Aser
Bread - Since part of the frankincense put upon the bread was to be burnt on the altar for a memorial, even an offering made by fire unto the Lord; and since Aaron and his sons were to eat it in the holy place, Leviticus 24:5-9 , it is probable that this bread typified Christ, first presented as a sacrifice to Jehovah, and then becoming spiritual food to such as in and through him are spiritual priests to God, even his Father, Revelation 1:6 ; Revelation 5:10 ; Revelation 20:6 ; 1 Peter 2:5
Dead Sea Scrolls - Three figures are anticipated: the Prophet and two Messiahs—the Messiah of Aaron, presumably a priestly Messiah, and the Messiah of Israel, presumably a royal Messiah. The Damascus Rule seems to exhibit an expectation of one Messiah, the Messiah of Aaron and Israel, rather than two
Idolatry - This helps to explain the calf-worship, represented as first introduced by Aaron, and at a later period established by Jeroboam i
Sacrifice - In the consecration of Aaron and his sons, ( Leviticus 8:1 )
Mediator, Mediation - Both kinds of mediation are sometimes intertwined in the Bible, as when Moses used Aaron to mediate between himself and Pharaoh (Exodus 7:1-2 ) and Joab used the wise woman of Tekoa to mediate his message about Absalom to David (2 Samuel 14:2-20 )
Honor - 17:12 the word is used of physical weight: “But Moses’ hands were heavy; and they took a stone, and put it under him, and he sat thereon; and Aaron and Hur stayed up his hands
Jeremiah - The Prophet Jeremiah was of the sacerdotal race, being, as he records himself, one of the priests that dwelt at Anathoth, in the land of Benjamin, a city appropriated out of that tribe to the use of the priests, the sons of Aaron, Joshua 21:18 , and situate, as we learn from St
Sacrifice - But after Moses this was, among the Jews, confined to the family of Aaron
Jews - These two laws were recited by Moses to Aaron four times, to his sons three times, to the seventy elders twice, and to the rest of the people once: after this, the repetition was renewed by Aaron, his two sons, and the seventy elders. The first called up to hear it is a descendant of Aaron, the second of Levi, the third an Israelite of any tribe; the same order is then repeated: the seventh may be of any tribe
Ezra, Book of - He descended from Aaron through Phinehas and later Zadok (Ezra 7:1-5 ; 1 Chronicles 6:4-14 )
Tabernacle - Wherever they encamped, it was pitched in the midst of their tents, which were set up in a quadrangular form, under their respective standards, at a distance from the tabernacle of two thousand cubits; while Moses and Aaron, with the priests and Levites, occupied a place between them
Joshua - Had Moses house, then, been so divided against itself that it fell upon his two sons? And had Miriam and Aaron been right after all in their hot opposition to their brother's marriage with the Ethiopian woman? We ask these questions at the text, but we get no answer. Aaron, the high priest, under a like bereavement, held his peace
Atonement - The exceptions of atonement made with fine flour by one not able to afford the animal sacrifice (Leviticus 5:11), and by Aaron with incense on a sudden emergency (Numbers 16:47), confirm the rule
Leviticus - Exodus 28-29 recount the Lord's instructions for ordaining Aaron and his sons as priests
Joshua, Theology of - There follows a review of God's work among the patriarchs, as well as Moses and Aaron, in promising and bringing the people into the land
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - Mary and Elisabeth were kinswomen, though the latter was descended from Aaron ( Luke 1:5 ; Luke 1:36 )
Angel - Indeed, the ancient Sadducees are represented as denying all spirits; and yet the Samaritans, and Caraites, who are reputed Sadducees, openly allowed them: witness Abusaid, the author of an Arabic version of the Pentateuch; and Aaron, a Caraite Jew, in his comment on the Pentateuch; both extant in manuscript in the king of France's library
Sirach - Some have endeavoured to find a political programme in Sirach 45:24-25, where the author insists that the high-priesthood belongs for ever to the house of Aaron, but the royal title to the house of David. 563), the ‘crown of the house of Aaron and the crown of the house of David’ are still said to be inalienable
Offering - Part of that tithe was to be a terûmâh or “heave offering” to the priests, the descendants of Aaron (see Pharaoh - He resided at Zoan, where he had the various interviews with Moses and Aaron recorded in the book of Exodus
John - Elizabeth, his mother, was a descendant of Aaron
Chronicles, the Books of - The high priests' genealogy is given in the descending line ending with the captivity, in 1 Chronicles 6:1-15; in Ezra 7:1-5 in the ascending line from Ezra himself to Aaron, abridged by the omission of many links, as the writer had in Chronicles already given a complete register
Leviticus - (the rule as to the time and way for Aaron to approach the Holy Place which had thus vindicated its awful sanctity)
Atonement - ' With the altar of incense atonement was not made upon it, but for it; so for the holy place, and for or about Aaron and his house: the preposition is al
Exodus, the - The persecution that followed on their foretold multiplication, shortly before Moses' birth (no such difficulty attended Aaron's preservation just three years previously, Exodus 7:7), was divinely overruled toward weaning them from Egypt and binding them together as one people. But the Pharaoh of that day rejected with scorn Moses and Aaron's application for leave to depart; "Who is Jehovah, that I should obey His voice to let Israel go? I know not Jehovah, neither will I let Israel go" (Exodus 5:2). A small height at the entrance of the convent valley is named as the spot from whence Aaron witnessed the feast of the golden calf
Election - ); but within Israel are special elections, as of the tribe of Levi, the house of Aaron, Judah, David and his house, etc
Sacrifice And Offering - Other sacrifices provided Aaron and his sons a holy meal
Man - ...
'Âdâm is also used in reference to any given man, or to anyone male or female: “When a man [5] shall have in the skin of his flesh a rising, a scab, or bright spot, and it be in the skin of his flesh like the plague of leprosy; then he shall be brought unto Aaron …” ( Septuagint - The Jews entrusted this mission to Osar, the Samaritans to Aaron, to whom several other associates were added
Elijah - Some think that he was a priest descended from Aaron, and say that one Sabaca was his father; but this has no authority
Deuteronomy, the Book of - ...
The different way in which the priests and Levites respectively are regarded in Deuteronomy and in the preceding books (in these "the Levites" ministering to the priests "the sons of Aaron," as the priests minister to God (Numbers 3:5, etc. ), and not mentioned as "blessing" the people, the prerogative of the priests (Numbers 6:23-27, compare Deuteronomy 10:8-9); but in Deuteronomy (Deuteronomy 18:7; Deuteronomy 11:6) the Levites and Aaronite priests not being mutually distinguished, and Korah not being mentioned with Dathan and Abiram in their rebellion) is accounted for by the consideration that Moses in Deuteronomy is addressing the people, and for the time takes no notice of the distinction of orders among ministers, and, similarly referring to the rebellions of the people against God, takes no notice of the minister Korah's share in the rebellion, as not suiting his present purpose
Wilderness of the Wanderings - of Mount Her where Aaron died, and to which Israel marched as the first stage in their journey when denied a passage through Mount Seir (Numbers 20:21-22). , Numbers 16; Aaron's rod budding, Numbers 17; the Levites' and priests' charge and portion, Numbers 18; the red heifer water of separation, Numbers 19) are recorded in Numbers 15:1-19:22
Plants in the Bible - Aaron's walking stick budded and produced almonds overnight and proved that Aaron was God's man to assist Moses (Numbers 17:8 )
Elect, Election - In the religious sphere, the tribe of Levi was chosen as the priests (Deuteronomy 21:5 ; 2 Chronicles 29:5,11 ) and Aaron to be the high priest (Numbers 17:5,8 ; 1 Samuel 2:27-28 )
Sadducees - -The Sadducees held that Aaron and his family were the chosen of God from whom Messiah should proceed
Hebrews, Theology of - It is infinitely superior to the temporal earthly ministry exercised by Aaron and his descendants (4:14-5:11; 7:1-10:18). Like the Aaronic priests he holds his office by divine decree (5:4-5a), but in contrast to them his appointment derives from an entirely different covenant basis (7:11-14), which declares him to be a priest forever (7:15-22)
Heir Heritage Inheritance - Conversely, God is said to be the inheritance of the sons of Aaron or of the Levites (Numbers 18:20, Deuteronomy 10:9, etc
the Ethiopian Eunuch - Like the Scotch and English of our own day, the Jews of our Lord's day compassed sea and land to make money; but, almost more, to make converts to Moses and Aaron
Roman Catholics - And a succession in the church being now supposed necessary under the New Testament, as Aaron had his succession under the old dispensation, which was a figure of the new, this succession can now, they contend, be shown only in the chair of St
Joshua - Next as Moses' "minister" Joshua accompanied him along with Aaron, Nadab, Abihu, and 70 elders up the mountain of God; but Moses went alone into the cloud (Exodus 24:9; Exodus 24:13-15)
Sacrifices - Moses and Joshua and Aaron and Melchizedek Mere imperfect anticipations of Christ, besides the sacrifices
Exodus, the Book of - The same feature appears in subsequent books of the Pentateuch, his shrinking from self-vindication when assailed by Miriam and Aaron (Numbers 12); his impetuous temper at the water of Meribah Kadesh, smiting the rock irreverently and hence excluded by God from the promised land
Pentateuch - Leviticus 18-20 ; Leviticus 23-26 are directed to the people; Leviticus 17:1 ; Leviticus 21-22 are directed to the priests and the house of Aaron
Hannah - Aaron himself would have been provoked to say to Hannah to put away her wine
War, Holy War - At the end of the day the battle was won by Israel because Aaron and Hur kept Moses' hands held high
Hebrews, Epistle to the - High Priests among men, as Aaron, had their functions, but were called of God to the dignity. There was a setting aside of the Aaronic priesthood, because connected with the law which perfected nothing, and the bringing in of a better hope by which we draw nigh to God
Prophet - Prophet (Greek) means the interpreter (from pro , feemi , "speak forth" truths for another, as Aaron was Moses' prophet, i
Preaching - He himself set the example of each; and how he and Aaron preached, we may see by several parts of his writings
Pronunciation of Proper Names - Moses, Aaron, Solomon, Isaac, Samuel, Jeremiah) the forms adopted by the Authorized Version are borrowed from the Septuagint through the medium of the Vulgate
Christ, Christology - To fill the priestly office Moses was directed by the Lord to anoint Aaron and his sons: "anoint them and ordain them
Idol - In Exodus 32:4 "Aaron fashioned it with a graying tool (cheret ) after he had made it a golden calf. meat; Aaron's calf worship and Jeroboam's violated the second
Old Testament - Aaron ben Asher, a Palestinian, and R
Ebionism And Ebionites - In the former class they placed Adam, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Aaron, Moses, and Jesus; in the latter David, Solomon, Isaiah, Jeremiah, etc
Balaam - And even Aaron, who was Moses' mouth, never came within sight of the sacred eloquence of Balaam
Jesus Christ, Name And Titles of - ...
In the Old Testament Israel's leaders—Abraham (Genesis 18:19 ), Moses and Aaron (John 6:66-69 ; 1Col 1:1-304 ), priests and Levites (Deuteronomy 2:5 ), Saul (1 Samuel 10:24 ), David (1 Kings 8:16 ; 2 Chronicles 6:6 ; Psalm 89:3 ), and the Servant of the Lord (Isaiah 42:1 ; 43:10)— ;are said to be chosen by God
Sin - “Iniquity” is something to be confessed: “And Aaron shall lay both his hands upon the head of the live goat, and confess over him all the iniquities of the children of Israel …” ( Preaching - Himself set the example of each; and how he and Aaron sermonized, we may see by several parts of his writings
Priest - the original and typical high priest, Aaron, is introduced for the purpose of comparison with the priest of the New Covenant. (5) This freedom from limitations extends beyond the range of morality to all the infirmities to which man is subject (Hebrews 7:28; Hebrews 5:2), and lifts Christ altogether above the Aaronic order
Biblical Theology - Acts 3:20-23 )and the law, come Aaron and the priesthood
Feasts And Festivals of Israel - It is described in detail in Leviticus 16 , and the solemnity of the day is underscored by the notation that the Lord spoke to Moses "after the death of the two sons of Aaron who died when they approached the Lord" (Leviticus 16:1 )
Grace - The statement echoes the original conversation between Moses and God at the burning bush in chapter 3, where God promises to send Aaron with Moses to help him get the people out of Egypt
John the Baptist - Zacharias), and his wife Elisabeth who belonged to the family of Aaron (Luke 1:5 ff
Lord's Supper (ii) - It must be remembered that (α) the idea of communion with God by means of a sacred meal was familiar, as in many religious rites outside Judaism, so also in the literature and the religion which were well known to the disciples, as shown in the Levitical peace-offerings with the threefold division into the portion for God, the portion for the priest, and the portion for the worshipper (Leviticus 3; Leviticus 7:29-34); the bread and wine brought forth by Melchizedek, the ‘priest of God Most High’ (Genesis 14:18); the eating of the lamb in the Passover (Exodus 12); the meal of Moses and Aaron, Nadab and Abihu, and seventy of the elders in the presence of God (Exodus 24:1-11); the prophecy by Isaiah of the feast to be made by the Lord of hosts (Isaiah 25:6); and the invitations to a meal evidently of profound spiritual significance given by the personified ‘Wisdom’ of the Sapiential books (Proverbs 9:1-5, Sirach 24:19-21)
Covenant - While Moses was receiving instructions concerning worship (building of the tabernacle, its furnishings, ordaining Aaron and sons as priests) the Israelites made an idol and worshiped it (32:1-6)
Elijah - (See AHAB; Aaron
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - So much we may learn from the stories of Cain, of Jacob, of Moses, Aaron and Miriam, of Dathan and Abiram, and of David (iv. In this they followed the example of Moses, who appointed a succession of priests, and to prevent all future dispute, confirmed the appointment of Aaron’s line by the miracle of the budding rod (xliii
Jews - After they had been thus oppressed for about one hundred years, and on the very day that finished the four hundred and thirtieth year from God's first promise of a seed to Abraham, and about four hundred years after the birth of Isaac, God, by terrible plagues on the Egyptians, obliged them to liberate the Hebrews under the direction of Moses and Aaron
Expiation - On that day, to other prescribed sacrifices were to be added another ram for a burnt offering, and another goat, the most eminent of the sacrifices for a sin offering, whose blood was to be carried by the high priest into the inner sanctuary, which was not done by the blood of any other victim, except the bullock, which was offered the same day as a sin offering for the family of Aaron
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - They said: “O Mary, now hast thou done a strange thing, O sister of Aaron; Thy father was not a man of wickedness, nor unchaste thy mother