The Meaning of Romans 7:1 Explained

Romans 7:1

KJV: Know ye not, brethren, (for I speak to them that know the law,) how that the law hath dominion over a man as long as he liveth?

YLT: Are ye ignorant, brethren -- for to those knowing law I speak -- that the law hath lordship over the man as long as he liveth?

Darby: Are ye ignorant, brethren, (for I speak to those knowing law,) that law rules over a man as long as he lives?

ASV: Or are ye ignorant, brethren (for I speak to men who know the law), that the law hath dominion over a man for so long time as he liveth?

What does Romans 7:1 Mean?

Study Notes

sin
Sin.
sinned
Sin, Summary: The literal meanings of the Heb. and (Greek - ἀλεκτοροφωνία sin," "sinner," etc)., disclose the true nature of sin in its manifold manifestations. Sin is transgression, an overstepping of the law, the divine boundary between good and evil Psalms 51:1 ; Luke 15:29 , iniquity, an act inherently wrong, whether expressly forbidden or not; error, a departure from right; Psalms 51:9 ; Romans 3:23 , missing the mark, a failure to meet the divine standard; trespass, the intrusion of self-will into the sphere of divine authority Ephesians 2:1 , lawlessness, or spiritual anarchy 1 Timothy 1:9 , unbelief, or an insult to the divine veracity John 16:9 .
Sin originated with Satan Isaiah 14:12-14 , entered the world through Adam Romans 5:12 , was, and is, universal, Christ alone excepted; Romans 3:23 ; 1 Peter 2:22 , incurs the penalties of spiritual and physical death; Genesis 2:17 ; Genesis 3:19 ; Ezekiel 18:4 ; Ezekiel 18:20 ; Romans 6:23 and has no remedy but in the sacrificial death of Christ; Hebrews 9:26 ; Acts 4:12 availed of by faith Acts 13:38 ; Acts 13:39 . Sin may be summarized as threefold: An act, the violation of, or want of obedience to the revealed will of God; a state, absence of righteousness; a nature, enmity toward God.

Verse Meaning

The Romans would not have argued with Paul that law has authority only over living people. We can anticipate where Paul would go with his argument since he earlier explained the believer"s death with Christ. Since we have died with Christ law has no authority over us (cf. Romans 6:14).

Context Summary

Romans 7:1-13 - The Law Makes Sin Known
To make his meaning clear the Apostle now enters upon a parable drawn from domestic life. He says that we are married to the Law as our first husband, and seek, through union with it, to bring forth fruit unto God. Every convert earnestly endeavors, in the first impulse of the new life, to be good and to form, by incessant effort, a life that is pleasing to God. Like Cain we bring the fruit of the ground, extorted from the soil by the sweat of the brow.
But we are soon disappointed in the result. Our laborious care ends in failure. Sinful desires are too masterful. As Luther said, "The old Adam is too strong for the young Melanchthon." Then we see that the Cross has put death between us and our painful effort. We learn that the marriage contract which bound us to our first husband, the Law, has been dissolved. We are set free to enter into marriage union with the blessed Lord, and He, by His indwelling Spirit, effects in us what our own energies have failed to produce. We are joined to Him that was raised up from the dead, and bring forth fruit unto God. [source]

Chapter Summary: Romans 7

1  No law has power over a man longer than he lives
4  But we are dead to the law
7  Yet is not the law sin;
12  but holy, just and good;
16  as I acknowledge, who am grieved because I cannot keep it

Greek Commentary for Romans 7:1

To men that know the law [γινωσκουσιν νομον]
Dative plural of present active participle of γινωσκω — ginōskō The Romans, whether Jews or Gentiles, knew the principle of law. [source]
A man [του αντρωπου]
“The person,” generic term αντρωπος — anthrōpos not ανηρ — anēr f0). [source]
Brethren []
All Christians, not only Jews but Gentiles who are assumed to be acquainted with the Old Testament. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Romans 7:1

Matthew 1:19 Not willing [ἐβουλήθη]
These two words, describing the working of Joseph's mind, and evidently intended to express different phases of thought, open the question of their distinctive meanings in the New Testament, where they frequently occur ( θέλω much oftener than βούλομαι ), and where the rendering, in so many eases by the same words, furnishes no clue to the distinction. The original words are often used synonymously in eases where no distinction is emphasized; but their use in other eases reveals a radical and recognized difference. An interchange is inadmissible when the greater force of the expression requires θέλειν . For instance, βαούλεσθαι , would be entirely inappropriate at Matthew 8:3, “I will, be thou cleansed;” or at Romans 7:15. The distinction, which is abundantly illustrated in Homer, is substantially maintained by the classical writers throughout, and in the New Testament. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Θέλειν is the stronger word, and expresses a purpose or determination or decree, the execution of which is, or is believed to be, in the power of him who wills. Βούλεσθαι expresses wish, inclination, or disposition, whether one desires to do a thing himself or wants some one else to do it. Θέλειν , therefore, denotes the active resolution, the will urging on to action. Βούλεσθαι is to have a mind, to desire, sometimes a little stronger, running into the sense of purpose. Θέλειν indicates the impulse of the will; βούλεσθαι , its tendency. Βούλεσθαι can always be rendered by θέλειν , but θέλειν cannot always be expressed by βούλεσθαι . -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Thus, Agamemnon says, “I would not ( οὐκ ἔθελον )-DIVIDER-
receive the ransom for the maid (i.e., Irefused to receive), because I greatly desire ( βούλομαι )-DIVIDER-
to have her at home” (Homer, “II.,” 1:112). So Demosthenes: “It is fitting that you should be willing ( ἐθέλειν ) to listen to those who wish ( βουλομένων ) to-DIVIDER-
advise” (“Olynth.,” 1:1). That is to say, It is in your power to determine whether or not you will listen to those who desire to advise you, but whose power to do so depends on your consent. Again: “If the gods will it ( θέλωσι ) and you wish it ( βούλησθε )”-DIVIDER-
(Demosth., “Olynth.,” 2:20). -DIVIDER-
In the New Testament, as observed above, though the words are often interchanged, the same distinction is recognized. Thus, Matthew 2:18, “Rachael would not ( ἤθελε ) be comforted;” obstinately and positively refused. Joseph, having the right and power under the (assumed) circumstances to make Mary a public example, resolved ( θέλων )-DIVIDER-
to spare her this exposure. Then the question arose - What should he do? On this he thought, and, having thought ( ἐνθυμηθέντος )his mind inclined (tendency), he was minded ( ἐβουλήθη )-DIVIDER-
to put her away secretly. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Some instances of the interchanged use of the two words are the following: Mark 15:15, “Pilate willing ”-DIVIDER-
( βουλόμενος ); compare Luke 23:20, “Pilate willing ”-DIVIDER-
( θέλων ). Acts 27:43, “The centurion willing ”-DIVIDER-
( βουλόμενος ) Matthew 27:17, “Whom will ye that I release” ( θέλετε ); so Matthew 27:21. John 18:39, “Will ye that I release” ( βούλεσθε ); Matthew 14:5, “When he would have put him to death” ( θέλων ). Mark 6:48, “He would have passed by them” ( ἤθελε ); Acts 19:30, “Paul would have entered” ( βουλόμενος ). Acts 18:27, “He was disposed to pass” ( βουλόμενος ). Titus 3:8, “I will that thou affirm” ( βούλομαι ) Mark 6:25, “I will that thou give me” ( θέλω ), etc., etc. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
In the New Testament θέλω occurs in the following senses:1.A decree or determination of the will. (a ) Of God (Matthew 12:7; Romans 9:16, Romans 9:18; Acts 18:21; 1 Corinthians 4:19; 1 Corinthians 12:18; 1 Corinthians 15:38). (b ) Of Christ (Matthew 8:3; John 17:24; John 5:21; John 21:22). (c ) Of men (Acts 25:9). Festus, having the power to gratify the Jews, and determining to do so, says to Paul, who has the right to decide, “Wilt thou go up to Jerusalem?” John 6:67, Others of the disciples had decided to leave Jesus. Christ said to the twelve, “Will ye also go away?” Is that your determination? John 7:17, If any man sets his will, is determined to do God's will. John 8:44, The lusts of your father your will is set to do. Acts 24:6.2. A wish or desire. Very many of the passages, however, which are cited under this head (as by Grimm) may fairly be interpreted as implying something stronger than a wish; notably Mark 14:36, of Christ in Gethsemane. Our Lord would hardly have used what thou wilt in so feeble a sense as that of a desire or wish on God's part. Mark 10:43, “Whosoever will be great,” expresses more than the desire for greatness. It is the purpose of the life. Matthew 27:15, It was given to the Jews to decide what prisoner should be released. Luke 1:62, The name of the infant John was referred to Zacharias' decision. John 17:24, Surely Christ does more than desire that those whom the Father has given him shall be with him. Luke 9:54, It is for Jesus to command fire upon the Samaritan villages if he so wills. (See, also, John 15:7; 1 Corinthians 4:21; Matthew 16:25; Matthew 19:17; John 21:22; Matthew 13:28; Matthew 17:12.) In the sense of wish or desire may fairly be cited 2 Corinthians 11:12; Matthew 12:38; Luke 8:20; Luke 23:8; John 12:21; Galatians 4:20; Matthew 7:12; Mark 10:35.3. A liking (Mark 12:38; Luke 20:46; Matthew 27:43). (See note there.) Βούλομαι occurs in the following senses:1.Inclination or disposition (Acts 18:27; Acts 19:30; Acts 25:22; Acts 28:18; 2" translation="">2 Corinthians 1:15).2.Stronger, with the idea of purpose (1 Timothy 6:9; James 1:18; James 3:4; 1 Corinthians 12:11; Hebrews 6:17).In most, if not all of these cases, we might expect θέλειν ; but in this use of βούλομαι there is an implied emphasis on the element of free choice or self-determination, which imparts to the desire or inclination a decretory force. This element is in the human will by gift and consent. In the divine will it is inherent. At this point the Homeric usage may be compared in its occasional employment of βούλομαι to express determination, but only with reference to the gods, in whom to wish is to will. Thus, “Whether Apollo will ( βου.λεται ) ward off the plague” (“II.,” 1:67). “Apollo willed ( βούλετο ) victory to the Trojans” (“Il.,” 7:21).To make a public example ( δειγματίσαι )The word is kindred to δείκνυμι , to exhibit, display, point out. Here, therefore, to expose Mary to public shame (Wyc., publish her; Tynd., defame her). The word occurs in Colossians 2:15, of the victorious Saviour displaying the vanquished powers of evil as a general displays his trophies or captives in a triumphal procession. “He made a show of them openly.” A compound of the same word ( παραδειγματίζω ) appears in Hebrews 6:6, “They crucify the Son of God afresh, and put him to an open shame. ” [source]

John 8:44 Murderer [ἀνθρωποκτόνος]
Only here and 1 John 3:15. Literally, a manslayer; from ἄνθρωπος , man, and κτείνω , to kill. The epithet is applied to Satan, not with reference to the murder of Abel, but to the fact of his being the author of death to the race. Compare Romans 7:8, Romans 7:11; Hebrews 2:14. [source]
John 3:21 Doeth the truth [ποιῶν τὴν ἀλήθειαν]
The phrase occurs only here and in 1 John 1:6. Note the contrasted phrase, doeth evil (John 3:20). There the plural is used: doeth evil things; evil being represented by a number of bad works. Here the singular, the truth, or truth; truth being regarded as one, and “including in a supreme unity all right deeds.” There is also to be noted the different words for doing in these two verses: doeth evil ( πράσσων ); doeth truth ( ποιῶν ). The latter verb contemplates the object and end of action; the former the means, with the idea of continuity and repetition. Πράσσων is the practice, while ποιῶν may be the doing once for all. Thus ποιεῖν is to conclude a peace: πράσσειν , to negotiate a peace. So Demosthenes: “He will do ( πράξει ) these things, and will accomplish them ( ποιήσει ).” In the New Testament a tendency is observable to use ποιεῖν in a good sense, and πράσσωιν in an evil sense. Compare the kindred word πρᾶξις , deed or work, which occurs six times, and in four out of the six of evil doing (Matthew 16:27; Luke 23:51; Acts 19:18; Romans 8:13; Romans 12:14; Colossians 3:9). With this passage compare especially John 5:29, where the two verbs are used with the two nouns as here. Also, Romans 7:15, Romans 7:19. Bengel says: “Evil is restless: it is busier than truth.” In Romans 1:32; Romans 2:3, both verbs are used of doing evil, but still with a distinction in that πράσσω is the more comprehensive term, designating the pursuit of evil as the aim of the activity. [source]
John 3:21 Doeth the truth [ποιῶν τὴν ἀλήθειαν]
The phrase occurs only here and in 1 John 1:6. Note the contrasted phrase, doeth evil (John 3:20). There the plural is used: doeth evil things; evil being represented by a number of bad works. Here the singular, the truth, or truth; truth being regarded as one, and “including in a supreme unity all right deeds.” There is also to be noted the different words for doing in these two verses: doeth evil ( πράσσων ); doeth truth ( ποιῶν ). The latter verb contemplates the object and end of action; the former the means, with the idea of continuity and repetition. Πράσσων is the practice, while ποιῶν may be the doing once for all. Thus ποιεῖν is to conclude a peace: πράσσειν , to negotiate a peace. So Demosthenes: “He will do ( πράξει ) these things, and will accomplish them ( ποιήσει ).” In the New Testament a tendency is observable to use ποιεῖν in a good sense, and πράσσωιν in an evil sense. Compare the kindred word πρᾶξις , deed or work, which occurs six times, and in four out of the six of evil doing (Matthew 16:27; Luke 23:51; Acts 19:18; Romans 8:13; Romans 12:14; Colossians 3:9). With this passage compare especially John 5:29, where the two verbs are used with the two nouns as here. Also, Romans 7:15, Romans 7:19. Bengel says: “Evil is restless: it is busier than truth.” In Romans 1:32; Romans 2:3, both verbs are used of doing evil, but still with a distinction in that πράσσω is the more comprehensive term, designating the pursuit of evil as the aim of the activity. [source]
Romans 9:11 Purpose according to election [ἡ κατ ' ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις]
For πρόθεσις purposesee on the kindred verb προέθετο , Romans 3:25, and compare Romans 8:28. The phrase signifies a purpose so formed that in it an election was made. The opposite of one founded upon right or merit. For similar phrases see Acts 19:20; κατὰ κράτος accordingto might, mightily; Romans 7:13, καθ ' ὑπερβολὴν accordingto excess, exceedingly. See note. [source]
Romans 7:8 Wrought [κατειργάσατο]
The compound verb with κατά downthrough always signifies the bringing to pass or accomplishment. See 1 Timothy 2:9; 1 Corinthians 5:3; 2 Corinthians 7:10. It is used both of evil and good. See especially Romans 7:15, Romans 7:17, Romans 7:18, Romans 7:20. “To man everything forbidden appears as a desirable blessing; but yet, as it is forbidden, he feels that his freedom is limited, and now his lust rages more violently, like the waves against the dyke” (Tholuck). [source]
Romans 8:2 The law of the Spirit of life [ὁ νόμος τοῦ πνεύματος τῆς ζωῆς]
The law, the regulative principle; the Spirit, the divine Spirit who inspires the law (compare Romans 7:14). Of life, proceeding from the life of Jesus and producing and imparting life. Compare John 16:15. [source]
Romans 7:2 The law of the husband []
Her legal connection with him She dies to that law with the husband's death. There is an apparent awkwardness in carrying out the figure. The law, in Romans 7:1, Romans 7:2, is represented by the husband who rules (hath dominion ). On the death of the husband the woman is released. In Romans 7:4, the wife (figuratively) dies. “Ye are become dead to the law that ye should be married to another.” But as the law is previously represented by the husband, and the woman is released by the husband's death, so, to make the figure consistent, the law should be represented as dying in order to effect the believer's release. The awkwardness is relieved by taking as the middle term of comparison the idea of dead in a marriage relation. When the husband dies the wife dies (is brought to nought ) so far as the marriage relation is concerned. The husband is represented as the party who dies because the figure of a second marriage is introduced with its application to believers (Romans 7:4). Believers are made dead to the law as the wife is maritally dead - killed in respect of the marriage relation by her husband's death. [source]
Romans 7:19 Do not - do. [ποιῶ - πράσσω]
See on Romans 7:15. [source]
Romans 7:18 In me []
The entire man in whom sin and righteousness struggle, in whose unregenerate condition sin is the victor, having its domain in the flesh. Hence in me considered as carnal (Romans 7:14). That another element is present appears from “to will is present with me;” but it is the flesh which determines his activity as an unregenerate man. There is good in the I, but not in the I considered as carnal. This is brought out in Romans 7:25, “With the flesh (I serve) the law of sin.” Hence there is added that is, in my flesh. [source]
Romans 7:17 I [ἐγὼ]
My personality proper; my moral self-consciousness which has approved the law (Romans 7:16) and has developed vague desires for something better. [source]
Romans 7:15 I would [θέλω]
See on Matthew 1:19. Rather desire than will in the sense of full determination, as is shown by I consent (Romans 7:16), and I delight in (Romans 7:22). [source]
Romans 5:20 Might abound [πλεονάσῃ]
Not primarily of the greater consciousness and acknowledgment of sin, but of the increase of actual transgression. The other thought, however, may be included. See Romans 7:7, Romans 7:8, Romans 7:9, Romans 7:11. [source]
Romans 11:2 Or [ἢ]
Compare Romans 6:3; Romans 7:1. Confirming what precedes by presenting the only alternative in the cave. Or is omitted in the A.V. [source]
Romans 7:5 In the flesh [ἐν τῇ σαρκί]
Σάρξ fleshoccurs in the classics in the physical sense only. Homer commonly uses it in the plural as denoting all the flesh or muscles of the body. Later the singular occurs in the same sense. Paul's use of this and other psychological terms must be determined largely by the Old-Testament usage as it appears in the Septuagint. 1. In the physical sense. The literal flesh. In the Septuagint τὰ κρέα flesh(plural) is used where the reference is to the parts of animals slain, and αἱ σάρκες , flesh (plural) where the reference is to flesh as the covering of the living body. Hence Paul uses κρέα in Romans 14:21; 1 Corinthians 8:13, of the flesh of sacrificed animals. Compare also the adjective σάρκιμος fleshy 2 Corinthians 3:3; and Ezekiel 11:19; Ezekiel 36:26, Sept. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
2. Kindred. Denoting natural or physical relationship, Romans 1:3; Romans 9:3-8; Romans 11:14; Galatians 4:23, Galatians 4:29; 1 Corinthians 10:18; Philemon 1:16. This usage forms a transition to the following sense: the whole human body. Flesh is the medium in and through which the natural relationship of man manifests itself. Kindred is conceived as based on community of bodily substance. Therefore:-DIVIDER-
3. The body itself. The whole being designated by the part, as being its main substance and characteristic, 1 Corinthians 6:16; 1 Corinthians 7:28; 2 Corinthians 4:11; 2 Corinthians 7:5; 2 Corinthians 10:3; 2 Corinthians 12:7. Romans 2:28; Galatians 6:13, etc. Paul follows the Septuagint in sometimes using σῶμα bodyand sometimes σάρξ fleshin this sense, so that the terms occasionally seem to be practically synonymous. Thus 1 Corinthians 6:16, 1 Corinthians 6:17, where the phrase one body is illustrated and confirmed by one flesh. See Genesis 2:24; Ephesians 5:28, Ephesians 5:31, where the two are apparently interchanged. Compare 2 Corinthians 4:10, 2 Corinthians 4:11; 1 Corinthians 5:3, and Colossians 2:5. Σάρξ , however, differs from σῶμα in that it can only signify the organism of an earthly, living being consisting of flesh and bones, and cannot denote “either an earthly organism that is not living, or a living organism that is not earthly” (Wendt, in Dickson). Σῶμα not thus limited. Thus it may denote the organism of the plant (1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:38) or the celestial bodies (1 Corinthians 15:40). Hence the two conceptions are related as general and special: σῶμα bodybeing the material organism apart from any definite matter (not from any sort of matter), σάρξ , flesh, the definite, earthly, animal organism. The two are synonymons when σῶμα is used, from the context, of an earthly, animal body. Compare Philemon 1:22; 2 Corinthians 5:1-8. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Σῶμα bodyand not σάρξ fleshis used when the reference is to a metaphorical organism, as the church, Romans 12:4sqq.; 1 Corinthians 10:16; 12:12-27; Ephesians 1:23; Ephesians 2:16; Colossians 1:18, etc. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The σάρξ is described as mortal (2 Corinthians 4:11); subject to infirmity (Galatians 4:13; 2 Corinthians 12:7); locally limited (Colossians 2:15); an object of fostering care (Ephesians 5:29). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
4. Living beings generally, including their mental nature, and with a correlated notion of weakness and perishableness. Thus the phrase πᾶσα σάρξ allflesh (Genesis 6:12; Isaiah 49:26; Isaiah 49:23). This accessory notion of weakness stands in contrast with God. In Paul the phrase all flesh is cited from the Old Testament (Romans 3:20; Galatians 2:16) and is used independently (1 Corinthians 1:29). In all these instances before God is added. So in Galatians 1:16, flesh and blood implies a contrast of human with divine wisdom. Compare 1 Corinthians 15:50; Ephesians 6:12. This leads up to-DIVIDER-
5. Man “either as a creature in his natural state apart from Christ, or the creaturely side or aspect of the man in Christ.” Hence it is correlated with ἄνθρωπος man 1 Corinthians 3:3; Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:17. Compare Romans 6:6; Ephesians 4:22; Colossians 3:9; Galatians 5:24. Thus the flesh would seem to be interchangeable with the old man. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
It has affections and lusts (Galatians 5:24); willings (Ephesians 2:3; Romans 8:6, Romans 8:7); a mind (Colossians 2:18); a body (Colossians 2:11). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
It is in sharp contrast with πνεῦμα spirit(Galatians 3:3, Galatians 3:19; Galatians 5:16, Galatians 5:17, Galatians 5:19-24; Galatians 6:8; Romans 8:4). The flesh and the spirit are thus antagonistic. Σάρξ fleshbefore or in contrast with his reception of the divine element whereby he becomes a new creature in Christ: the whole being of man as it exists and acts apart from the influence of the Spirit. It properly characterizes, therefore, not merely the lower forms of sensual gratification, but all - the highest developments of the life estranged from God, whether physical, intellectual, or aesthetic. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
It must be carefully noted:-DIVIDER-
1. That Paul does not identify flesh and sin. Compare, flesh of sin, Romans 8:3. See Romans 7:17, Romans 7:18; 2 Corinthians 7:1; Galatians 2:20. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
2. That Paul does not identify σάρξ withthe material body nor associate sin exclusively and predominantly with the body. The flesh is the flesh of the living man animated by the soul ( ψυχή ) as its principle of life, and is distinctly used as coordinate with ἄνθρωπος manAs in the Old Testament, “it embraces in an emphatic manner the nature of man, mental and corporeal, with its internal distinctions.” The spirit as well as the flesh is capable of defilement (2 Corinthians 7:1; compare 1 Corinthians 7:34). Christian life is to be transformed by the renewing of the mind (Romans 12:2; compare Ephesians 4:23). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
3. That Paul does not identify the material side of man with evil. The flesh is not the native seat and source of sin. It is only its organ, and the seat of sin's manifestation. Matter is not essentially evil. The logical consequence of this would be that no service of God is possible while the material organism remains. See Romans 12:1. The flesh is not necessarily sinful in itself; but as it has existed from the time of the introduction of sin through Adam, it is recognized by Paul as tainted with sin. Jesus appeared in the flesh, and yet was sinless (2 Corinthians 5:21).The motions of sins ( τὰ παθήματα τῶν ἁμαρτιῶν )Motions used in earlier English for emotions or impulses. Thus Bacon: “He that standeth at a stay where others rise, can hardly avoid motions of envy” (“Essay” xiv.). The word is nearly synonymous with πάθος passion(Romans 1:26, note). From πάθειν tosuffer; a feeling which the mind undergoes, a passion, desire. Rev., sinful passions: which led to sins.Did work ( ἐνηργεῖτο )Rev., wrought. See 2 Corinthians 1:6; 2 Corinthians 4:12; Ephesians 3:20; Galatians 5:6; Philemon 2:13; Colossians 1:29. Compare Mark 6:14, and see on power, John 1:12. [source]

Romans 7:22 I delight in [συνήδομαι]
Lit., I rejoice with. Stronger than I consent unto (Romans 7:16). It is the agreement of moral sympathy. [source]
Romans 3:9 We before laid to the charge [προηιτιασαμετα]
First aorist middle indicative of προαιτιαομαι — proaitiaomai to make a prior accusation, a word not yet found anywhere else. Paul refers to Romans 1:18-32 for the Greeks and 2:1-29 for the Jews. The infinitive ειναι — einai with the accusative παντας — pantas is in indirect discourse. Under sin (υπο αμαρτιαν — hupo hamartian). See note on Galatians 3:22; Romans 7:14. [source]
Romans 3:9 Under sin [υπο αμαρτιαν]
See note on Galatians 3:22; Romans 7:14. [source]
Romans 6:19 Unto sanctification [eis hagiasmon)]
This the goal, the blessed consummation that demands and deserves the new slavery without occasional lapses or sprees (Romans 6:15). This late word appears only in lxx, N.T., and ecclesiastical writers so far. See note on 1 Thessalonians 4:3; 1 Corinthians 1:30. Paul includes sanctification in his conception of the God-kind (Romans 1:17) of righteousness (both justification, 1:18-5:21 and sanctification, chapters 6-8). It is a life process of consecration, not an instantaneous act. Paul shows that we ought to be sanctified (6:1-7:6) and illustrates the obligation by death (Romans 6:1-14), by slavery (Romans 6:15-23), and by marriage (Romans 7:1-6). [source]
Romans 7:5 In the flesh [εν τηι σαρκι]
Same sense as in Romans 6:19 and Romans 7:18, Romans 7:25. The “flesh” is not inherently sinful, but is subject to sin. It is what Paul means by being “under the law.” He uses σαρχ — sarx in a good many senses. [source]
Romans 3:9 Are we in worse case than they? [προεχομετα]
The American Revisers render it: “Are we in better case than they?” There is still no fresh light on this difficult and common word though it occurs alone in the N.T. In the active it means to have before, to excel. But here it is either middle or passive. Thayer takes it to be middle and to mean to excel to one‘s advantage and argues that the context demands this. But no example of the middle in this sense has been found. If it is taken as passive, Lightfoot takes it to mean, “Are we excelled” and finds that sense in Plutarch. Vaughan takes it as passive but meaning, “Are we preferred?” This suits the context, but no other example has been found. So the point remains unsettled. The papyri throw no light on it. No, in no wise (ου παντως — ou pantōs). “Not at all.” See note on 1 Corinthians 5:10. We before laid to the charge First aorist middle indicative of προαιτιαομαι — proaitiaomai to make a prior accusation, a word not yet found anywhere else. Paul refers to Romans 1:18-32 for the Greeks and 2:1-29 for the Jews. The infinitive ειναι — einai with the accusative παντας — pantas is in indirect discourse. Under sin (υπο αμαρτιαν — hupo hamartian). See note on Galatians 3:22; Romans 7:14. [source]
Romans 6:19 Because of the infirmity of your flesh [δια την αστενειαν της σαρκος υμων]
Because of defective spiritual insight largely due to moral defects also. Servants to uncleanness (δουλα τηι ακαταρσιαι — doula tēi akatharsiāi). Neuter plural form of δουλος — doulos to agree with μελη — melē (members). Patently true in sexual sins, in drunkenness, and all fleshly sins, absolutely slaves like narcotic fiends. So now Now that you are born again in Christ. Paul uses twice again the same verb παριστημι — paristēmi to present Servants to righteousness (εις αγιασμον — doula tēi dikaiosunēi). Repeats the idea of Romans 6:18. Unto sanctification This the goal, the blessed consummation that demands and deserves the new slavery without occasional lapses or sprees (Romans 6:15). This late word appears only in lxx, N.T., and ecclesiastical writers so far. See note on 1 Thessalonians 4:3; 1 Corinthians 1:30. Paul includes sanctification in his conception of the God-kind (Romans 1:17) of righteousness (both justification, 1:18-5:21 and sanctification, chapters 6-8). It is a life process of consecration, not an instantaneous act. Paul shows that we ought to be sanctified (6:1-7:6) and illustrates the obligation by death (Romans 6:1-14), by slavery (Romans 6:15-23), and by marriage (Romans 7:1-6). [source]
Romans 6:19 So now [ουτως νυν]
Now that you are born again in Christ. Paul uses twice again the same verb παριστημι — paristēmi to present Servants to righteousness (εις αγιασμον — doula tēi dikaiosunēi). Repeats the idea of Romans 6:18. Unto sanctification This the goal, the blessed consummation that demands and deserves the new slavery without occasional lapses or sprees (Romans 6:15). This late word appears only in lxx, N.T., and ecclesiastical writers so far. See note on 1 Thessalonians 4:3; 1 Corinthians 1:30. Paul includes sanctification in his conception of the God-kind (Romans 1:17) of righteousness (both justification, 1:18-5:21 and sanctification, chapters 6-8). It is a life process of consecration, not an instantaneous act. Paul shows that we ought to be sanctified (6:1-7:6) and illustrates the obligation by death (Romans 6:1-14), by slavery (Romans 6:15-23), and by marriage (Romans 7:1-6). [source]
Romans 7:18 In me [εν εμοι]
Paul explains this by “in my flesh” (εν τηι σαρκι μου — en tēi sarki mou), the unregenerate man “sold under sin” of Romans 7:14. [source]
Romans 7:20 It is no more I that do it [ουκετι εγω κατεργαζομαι αυτο]
Just as in Romans 7:17, “no longer do I do it” (the real Εγο — Ego my better self), and yet there is responsibility and guilt for the struggle goes on. [source]
Romans 7:21 The law [τον νομον]
The principle already set forth (αρα — ara accordingly) in Romans 7:18, Romans 7:19. This is the way it works, but there is no surcease for the stings of conscience. [source]
Romans 7:23 The law of my mind [τωι νομωι του νοος]
The reflective intelligence Paul means by νοος — noos “the inward man” of Romans 7:22. It is this higher self that agrees that the law of God is good (Romans 7:12, Romans 7:16, Romans 7:22). [source]
Romans 7:23 Bringing me into captivity [αιχμαλωτιζοντα]
See note on this late and vivid verb for capture and slavery Luke 21:24; note on 2 Corinthians 10:5. Surely it is a tragic picture drawn by Paul with this outcome, “sold under sin” (Romans 7:14), “captivity to the law of sin” (Romans 7:23). The ancient writers (Plato, Ovid, Seneca, Epictetus) describe the same dual struggle in man between his conscience and his deeds. [source]
Romans 7:24 Out of the body of this death [εκ του σωματος του τανατου τουτου]
So the order of words demands. See Romans 7:13 for “death” which finds a lodgment in the body (Lightfoot). If one feels that Paul has exaggerated his own condition, he has only to recall 1 Timothy 1:15 when he describes himself a chief of sinners. He dealt too honestly with himself for Pharisaic complacency to live long. [source]
Romans 7:15 I know not [ου γινωσκω]
“I do not recognize” in its true nature. My spiritual perceptions are dulled, blinded by sin (2 Corinthians 4:4). The dual life pictured here by Paul finds an echo in us all, the struggle after the highest in us (“what I really wish,” ο τελω — ho thelō to practise it steadily, πρασσω — prassō) and the slipping into doing (ποιω — poiō) “what I really hate” (ο μισω — ho misō) and yet sometimes do. There is a deal of controversy as to whether Paul is describing his struggle with sin before conversion or after it. The words “sold under sin” in Romans 7:14 seem to turn the scale for the pre-conversion period. “It is the unregenerate man‘s experience, surviving at least in memory into regenerate days, and read with regenerate eyes” (Denney). [source]
Romans 7:23 Warring against [αντιστρατευομενον]
Rare verb (Xenophon) to carry on a campaign against. Only here in N.T. The law of my mind (τωι νομωι του νοος — tōi nomōi tou noos). The reflective intelligence Paul means by νοος — noos “the inward man” of Romans 7:22. It is this higher self that agrees that the law of God is good (Romans 7:12, Romans 7:16, Romans 7:22). Bringing me into captivity See note on this late and vivid verb for capture and slavery Luke 21:24; note on 2 Corinthians 10:5. Surely it is a tragic picture drawn by Paul with this outcome, “sold under sin” (Romans 7:14), “captivity to the law of sin” (Romans 7:23). The ancient writers (Plato, Ovid, Seneca, Epictetus) describe the same dual struggle in man between his conscience and his deeds. [source]
Romans 8:9 Not in the flesh [ουκ εν σαρκι]
Not sold under sin (Romans 7:14) any more. [source]
1 Corinthians 3:1 Carnal [σαρκίνοις]
Made of flesh. See on Romans 7:14, and see on flesh, Romans 7:5. [source]
1 Corinthians 3:1 But as unto carnal [αλλ ως σαρκινοις]
Latin carneus. “As men o‘flesh,” Braid Scots; “as worldlings,” Moffatt. This form in ινος — ̇inos like λιτινος — lithinos in 2 Corinthians 3:3 means the material of flesh, “not on tablets of stone, but on fleshen tablets on hearts.” So in Hebrews 7:16. But in Romans 7:14 Paul says, “I am fleshen It is not culpable to a babe in Christ It is one of the tragedies of the minister‘s life that he has to keep on speaking to the church members “as unto babes in Christ” (ως νηπιοις εν Χριστωι — hōs nēpiois en Christōi), who actually glory in their long babyhood whereas they ought to be teachers of the gospel instead of belonging to the cradle roll. Paul‘s goal was for all the babes to become adults (Colossians 1:28). [source]
2 Corinthians 4:7 Excellency [ὑπερβολὴ]
Lit., a throwing beyond. Hence preeminence, excellence. See on exceeding, Romans 7:13. Rev. renders exceeding greatness. The reference is to the fullness of power apparent in the apostolic ministry. [source]
2 Corinthians 3:3 Fleshy tables of the heart [πλαξὶν καρδίας σαρκίναις]
The best texts read καρδίαις the dative case in apposition with tables. Render, as Rev., tables which are hearts of flesh. Compare Ezekiel 11:19; Jeremiah 17:1; Jeremiah 31:33. For of flesh, see on Romans 7:14. [source]
2 Corinthians 3:3 Not with ink [ου μελανι]
Instrumental case of μελας — melas black. Plato uses το μελαν — to melan for ink as here. See also 2 John 1:12; 3 John 1:13. Of stone (λιτιναις — lithinais). Composed of stone (λιτος — lithos and ending ινος — ̇inos). Of flesh “Fleshen” as in 1 Corinthians 3:1; Romans 7:14. [source]
2 Corinthians 3:3 Of flesh [σαρκιναις]
“Fleshen” as in 1 Corinthians 3:1; Romans 7:14. [source]
Galatians 5:24 Have crucified the flesh [τὴν σάρκα ἐσταύρωσαν]
The phrase only here. Comp. Galatians 2:20; Galatians 6:14; Romans 6:6. The line of thought as regards death to sin is the same as in Romans 6:2-7, Romans 6:11; as regards death to the law, the same as in Romans 7:1-6. [source]
Galatians 3:19 In the hand of a mediator [ἐν χειρὶ μεσίτου]
Ἑν χειρὶ bythe agency of. A Hebraism. In this sense, not elsewhere in N.T. See lxx, Genesis 38:20Leviticus 16:21. In the hand of Moses, Leviticus 26:46; Numbers 4:37, Numbers 4:41, Numbers 4:45, Numbers 4:49. Comp. σὺν χειρὶ ἀγγέλου withthe hand of the angel, Acts 7:35. For μεσίτης mediatorsee on 1 Timothy 2:5, and comp. Hebrews 8:6; Hebrews 9:15; Hebrews 12:24. It is a later Greek word signifying also umpire, arbitrator, and appears in lxx only in Job 9:33. The mediator here is Moses, who is often so designated by rabbinical writers. The object is not (as Meyer) to enable the reader to realize the glory of the law in the dignity and formal solemnity of its ordination, but to indicate the inferior, subordinate position held by the law in comparison with the promise, not the gospel. A glorification of the law cannot be intended, since if that were contemplated in the mention of angels and the mediator, the statement would tend to the disparagement of the promise which was given without a mediator. Paul, in the section Galatians 3:6-9, Galatians 3:7, aims to show that the law does not, as the Judaisers assume, stand in a relation to the divine plan of salvation as direct and positive as does the promise, and that it has not, like the promise and its fulfillment, an eternal significance. On the contrary, it has only a transitory value. This estimate of the law does not contradict Paul's assertions in Romans 7:12-25. In representing the law as subordinate and temporary he does not impugn it as a divine institution. [source]
Galatians 3:19 Because of transgressions [τῶν παραβάσεων χάριν]
In order to set upon already existing sins the stamp of positive transgression of law. Comp. Romans 4:5; Romans 5:13. Note the article, the transgressions, summing them up in one mass. Not, in order to give the knowledge of sins. This, it is true, would follow the revelation of sins as transgressions of law (Romans 3:20; Romans 7:13); but, 1. the phrase because of transgressions does not express that thought with sufficient definiteness. If that had been his meaning, Paul would probably have written τῆς ἀπιγνώσεως τῶν παραβάσεων χάριν onaccount of the knowledge of transgressions. 2. He meant to describe the office of the law as more than giving the knowledge of sins. Its office was, in revealing sin as positive transgression, to emphasize the objective, actual, contrary fact of righteousness according to the divine ideal, and to throw sin into contrast with that grand ideal. [source]
Ephesians 2:3 Fulfilling [ποιοῦντες]
Rev., doing. The verb implies carrying out or accomplishing, so that the A.V. is more nearly correct. See on Romans 7:15; see on John 3:21. [source]
Philippians 3:9 Be found [εὑρεθῶ]
Discovered or proved to be. See on Phlippians 2:8. Compare Romans 7:10; Galatians 2:17. [source]
1 Thessalonians 5:15 That which is good [τὸ ἀγαθὸν]
Not to be limited to profitable, beneficent (as Lightfoot, Lünemann), although ἀγαθός commonly includes a corresponding beneficent relation of its subject to another subject, which is emphasized here by to all men. See on Romans 5:7. It may also include what is absolutely, morally good, as Romans 2:10. So Hebrews 13:21; 1 Peter 3:11; Romans 7:18. [source]
1 Thessalonians 3:6 Good remembrance [μνείαν ἀγαθὴν]
Better kindly remembrance. Comp. Romans 5:7(see note); Romans 7:12; Titus 2:6; 1 Peter 2:18. See on 1 Thessalonians 1:3. [source]
1 Thessalonians 2:7 Her own children []
Note the inversion of metaphor. Paul is first the babe, then the nurse or mother. For similar instances see 1 Thessalonians 5:2, 1 Thessalonians 5:4; 2 Corinthians 3:13-16; Romans 7:1ff. See Introduction to 2Corinthians, Vol. 3, p. 19. [source]
1 Thessalonians 1:10 The wrath to come [τῆς ὀργῆς τῆς ἐρχομένης]
Lit. the wrath which is coming. The wrath, absolutely, of the wrath of God, as Romans 5:9Romans 7:19; 1 Thessalonians 2:16. Sometimes for the punishment which wrath inflicts, as Romans 12:4; Ephesians 5:6; Colossians 3:6. See on John 3:36. The phrase wrath to come is found in Matthew 3:7; Luke 3:7. Coming does not necessarily imply the thought of speedy or imminent approach, but the general tone of the Epistle points in that direction. [source]
1 Timothy 3:7 A good report [μαρτυριαν καλὴν]
Comp. Acts 6:3. Not only does καλός occur in the Pastorals nearly twice as many times as in Paul, but the usage is different. Out of 16 instances in Paul, there is but one in which καλός isnot used substantively (Romans 7:16), while in the Pastorals it is, almost without exception, used adjectively. Μαρτυρίαν , better testimony. Comp. Titus 1:13. Not in Paul, who uses μαρτύριον . [source]
1 Timothy 1:8 Good [καλός]
Comp. Romans 7:16. Morally excellent and salutary. See on John 10:11. This is the only instance of χρᾶσθαι touse with νόμος lawLawfully ( νομίμως )Pastoolxx. The nature of the proper use of the law - is indicated by the next clause. [source]
1 Timothy 2:14 Being beguiled [εχαπατητεισα]
First aorist passive participle of εχαπατεω — exapateō old compound verb, in N.T. only by Paul (2 Thessalonians 2:3; 1 Corinthians 3:18; 2 Corinthians 11:3; Romans 7:11; Romans 16:18; 1 Timothy 2:14). Not certain that εχ — eẋ here means “completely deceived” in contrast to simplex (ουκ ηπατητη — ouk ēpatēthē) used of Adam, though possible. [source]
2 Timothy 1:5 Having been reminded [υπομνησιν λαβων]
“Having received (second aorist active participle of λαμβανω — lambanō) a reminder” (old word from υπομιμνησκω — hupomimnēskō to remind, in N.T. only here and 1 Peter 1:13). For the idiom see note on Romans 7:8, Romans 7:11. A reminder by another while αναμνησις — anamnēsis remembrance (1 Corinthians 11:24.) is rather a recalling by oneself (Vincent). [source]
Hebrews 3:13 So long as it is called today [αχρις ου το σημερον καλειται]
The only instance in the N.T. of this conjunction Lest any one of you be hardened Negative purpose clause with ινα μη — hina mē (that not) and the first aorist passive subjunctive of σκληρυνω — sklērunō the vivid verb from Hebrews 3:8. By the deceitfulness of sin Instrumental case απατηι — apatēi (trick, fraud) as is always the case with sin (Romans 7:11; 2 Thessalonians 2:10). Apostasy (Hebrews 12:4) is their peril and it is a trick of sin. [source]
James 1:25 The perfect law [νομον τελειον]
For τελειον — teleion see James 1:17. See Romans 7:12 for Paul‘s idea of the law of God. James here refers to the word of truth (James 1:18), the gospel of grace (Galatians 6:2; Romans 12:2).The law of liberty (τον της ελευτεριας — ton tēs eleutherias). “That of liberty,” explaining why it is “perfect” (James 2:12 also), rests on the work of Christ, whose truth sets us free (John 8:32; 2 Corinthians 3:16; Romans 8:2).And so continueth First aorist active articular participle again of παραμενω — paramenō parallel with παρακυπσας — parakupsas Παραμενω — Paramenō is to stay beside, and see Philemon 1:25 for contrast with the simplex μενω — menō Rather, “having become” (second aorist middle participle of γινομαι — ginomai to become).Not a hearer that forgetteth (ουκ ακροατης επιλησμονης — ouk akroatēs epilēsmonēs). “Not a hearer of forgetfulness” (descriptive genitive, marked by forgetfulness). Επιλησμονη — Epilēsmonē is a late and rare word (from επιλησμων — epilēsmōn forgetful, from επιλαντομαι — epilanthomai to forget, as in James 1:24), here only in N.T.But a doer that worketh “But a doer of work,” a doer marked by work (descriptive genitive εργου — ergou), not by mere listening or mere talk.In his doing (εν τηι ποιησει αυτου — en tēi poiēsei autou). Another beatitude with μακαριος — makarios as in James 1:12, like the Beatitudes in Matthew 5:3-12. Ποιησις — Poiēsis is an old word (from ποιεω — poieō for the act of doing), only here in N.T. [source]
2 Peter 2:21 Not to have known [μη επεγνωκεναι]
Perfect active infinitive of επιγινωσκω — epiginōskō (cf. επιγνωσει — epignōsei 2 Peter 2:20) to know fully.The way of righteousness (την οδον της δικαιοσυνης — tēn hodon tēs dikaiosunēs). For the phrase see Matthew 21:33, also the way of truth (2 Peter 2:2), the straight way (2 Peter 2:15).After knowing it Second aorist active participle of επιγινωσκω — epiginōskō (just used) in the dative plural agreeing with αυτοις — autois (for them).To turn back (υποστρεπσαι — hupostrepsai). First aorist active infinitive of υποστρεπω — hupostrephō old and common verb, to turn back, to return.From Out of. So in Acts 12:25 with υποστρεπω — hupostrephō With ablative case. See Romans 7:12 for αγια — hagia applied to η εντολη — hē entolē (cf. 1 Timothy 6:14). 2 Peter strikes a high ethical note (2 Peter 1:5.).Delivered (παραδοτεισης — paradotheisēs). First aorist passive participle feminine ablative singular of παραδιδωμι — paradidōmi f0). [source]
2 Peter 2:21 After knowing it [επιγνουσιν]
Second aorist active participle of επιγινωσκω — epiginōskō (just used) in the dative plural agreeing with αυτοις — autois (for them).To turn back (υποστρεπσαι — hupostrepsai). First aorist active infinitive of υποστρεπω — hupostrephō old and common verb, to turn back, to return.From Out of. So in Acts 12:25 with υποστρεπω — hupostrephō With ablative case. See Romans 7:12 for αγια — hagia applied to η εντολη — hē entolē (cf. 1 Timothy 6:14). 2 Peter strikes a high ethical note (2 Peter 1:5.).Delivered (παραδοτεισης — paradotheisēs). First aorist passive participle feminine ablative singular of παραδιδωμι — paradidōmi f0). [source]
2 Peter 2:21 From [εκ]
Out of. So in Acts 12:25 with υποστρεπω — hupostrephō With ablative case. See Romans 7:12 for αγια — hagia applied to η εντολη — hē entolē (cf. 1 Timothy 6:14). 2 Peter strikes a high ethical note (2 Peter 1:5.).Delivered (παραδοτεισης — paradotheisēs). First aorist passive participle feminine ablative singular of παραδιδωμι — paradidōmi f0). [source]

What do the individual words in Romans 7:1 mean?

Or are you ignorant brothers to those knowing for law I speak that the law rules over the man for as long as [the] time he is alive
ἀγνοεῖτε ἀδελφοί γινώσκουσιν γὰρ νόμον λαλῶ ὅτι νόμος κυριεύει τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ἐφ’ ὅσον χρόνον ζῇ

ἀγνοεῖτε  are  you  ignorant 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 2nd Person Plural
Root: ἀγνοέω  
Sense: to be ignorant, not to know.
ἀδελφοί  brothers 
Parse: Noun, Vocative Masculine Plural
Root: ἀδελφός  
Sense: a brother, whether born of the same two parents or only of the same father or mother.
γινώσκουσιν  to  those  knowing 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Active, Dative Masculine Plural
Root: γινώσκω  
Sense: to learn to know, come to know, get a knowledge of perceive, feel.
νόμον  law 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: νόμος  
Sense: anything established, anything received by usage, a custom, a law, a command.
λαλῶ  I  speak 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 1st Person Singular
Root: ἀπολαλέω 
Sense: to utter a voice or emit a sound.
ὅτι  that 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: ὅτι  
Sense: that, because, since.
νόμος  law 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: νόμος  
Sense: anything established, anything received by usage, a custom, a law, a command.
κυριεύει  rules  over 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: κυριεύω  
Sense: to be lord of, to rule, have dominion over.
ἀνθρώπου  man 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: ἄνθρωπος  
Sense: a human being, whether male or female.
ὅσον  as  long  as 
Parse: Personal / Relative Pronoun, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: ὅσος  
Sense: as great as, as far as, how much, how many, whoever.
χρόνον  [the]  time 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: χρόνος  
Sense: time either long or short.
ζῇ  he  is  alive 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ζάω  
Sense: to live, breathe, be among the living (not lifeless, not dead).