The Meaning of Revelation 18:10 Explained

Revelation 18:10

KJV: Standing afar off for the fear of her torment, saying, Alas, alas, that great city Babylon, that mighty city! for in one hour is thy judgment come.

YLT: from afar having stood because of the fear of her torment, saying, Woe, woe, the great city! Babylon, the strong city! because in one hour did come thy judgment.

Darby: standing afar off, through fear of her torment, saying, Woe, woe, the great city, Babylon, the strong city! for in one hour thy judgment is come.

ASV: standing afar off for the fear of her torment, saying, Woe, woe, the great city, Babylon, the strong city! for in one hour is thy judgment come.

What does Revelation 18:10 Mean?

Study Notes

Babylon
, note 2.
The city, Babylon is not in view here, as the immediate context shows. It is important to note the significance of the name when used symbolically. "Babylon" is the Greek form: invariably in the O.T. Hebrew the word is simply Babel, the meaning of which is confusion, and in this sense the word is used symbolically.
(1) In the prophets, when the actual city is not meant, the reference is to the "confusion" into which the whole social order of the world has fallen under Gentile world-domination. (See "Times of the Gentiles," Luke 21:24 ; Revelation 16:14 ; Isaiah 13:4 gives the divine view of the welter of warring Gentile powers. The divine order is given in Isaiah 11. Israel in her own land, the centre of the divine government of the world and channel of the divine blessing; and the Gentiles blessed in association with Israel. Anything else is, politically, mere "babel."
(2) In Revelation 14:8-11 ; Revelation 16:19 the Gentile world-system is in view in connection with Armageddon; Revelation 16:14 ; Revelation 19:21 while in Revelation 17. the reference is to apostate Christianity, destroyed by the nations Revelation 17:16 headed up under the Beast; Daniel 7:8 ; Revelation 19:20 and false prophet. In Isaiah the political Babylon is in view, literally as to the then existing city, and symbolically as to the times of the Gentiles. In the Revelation both the symbolical- political and symbolical-religious Babylon are in view, for there both are alike under the tyranny of the Beast. Religious Babylon is destroyed by political Babylon Revelation 17:16 political Babylon by the appearing of the Lord Revelation 19:19-21 . That Babylon the city is not to be rebuilt is clear from; Isaiah 13:19-22 ; Jeremiah 51:24-26 ; Jeremiah 51:62-64 . By political Babylon is meant the Gentile world-system. (See "World,"; John 7:7 ; Revelation 13:8 ) It may be added that, in Scripture symbolism, Egypt stands for the world as such; Babylon for the world of corrupt power and corrupted religion; Nineveh for the pride, the haughty glory of the world.
burden
A "burden," Heb. massa= a heavy, weighty thing, is a message, or oracle concerning Babylon, Assyria, Jerusalem, etc. It is "heavy" because the wrath of God is in it, and grievous for the prophet to declare.
Babylon
The city, Babylon is not in view here, as the immediate context shows. It is important to note the significance of the name when used symbolically. "Babylon" is the Greek form: invariably in the O.T. Hebrew the word is simply Babel, the meaning of which is confusion, and in this sense the word is used symbolically.
(1) In the prophets, when the actual city is not meant, the reference is to the "confusion" into which the whole social order of the world has fallen under Gentile world-domination. (See "Times of the Gentiles," Luke 21:24 ; Revelation 16:14 ; Isaiah 13:4 gives the divine view of the welter of warring Gentile powers. The divine order is given in Isaiah 11. Israel in her own land, the centre of the divine government of the world and channel of the divine blessing; and the Gentiles blessed in association with Israel. Anything else is, politically, mere "babel."
(2) In Revelation 14:8-11 ; Revelation 16:19 the Gentile world-system is in view in connection with Armageddon; Revelation 16:14 ; Revelation 19:21 while in Revelation 17. the reference is to apostate Christianity, destroyed by the nations Revelation 17:16 headed up under the Beast; Daniel 7:8 ; Revelation 19:20 and false prophet. In Isaiah the political Babylon is in view, literally as to the then existing city, and symbolically as to the times of the Gentiles. In the Revelation both the symbolical- political and symbolical-religious Babylon are in view, for there both are alike under the tyranny of the Beast. Religious Babylon is destroyed by political Babylon Revelation 17:16 political Babylon by the appearing of the Lord Revelation 19:19-21 . That Babylon the city is not to be rebuilt is clear from; Isaiah 13:19-22 ; Jeremiah 51:24-26 ; Jeremiah 51:62-64 . By political Babylon is meant the Gentile world-system. (See "World,"; John 7:7 ; Revelation 13:8 ) It may be added that, in Scripture symbolism, Egypt stands for the world as such; Babylon for the world of corrupt power and corrupted religion; Nineveh for the pride, the haughty glory of the world.

Verse Meaning

Babylon will fall quickly, in "one hour" ( Revelation 18:10, cf. Revelation 18:19; Jeremiah 51:8; Ezekiel 27). These kings mourn because they have lost their power suddenly. These rulers must be different from the10 kings who destroy the city ( Revelation 17:16). These woes are an exclamation of sorrow; the earlier ones in the book are announcements of doom ( Revelation 8:13; Revelation 12:12). [1] Doubling the woes increases the perception of the strength of the sorrow (cf. Revelation 18:6). This city was strong, but its Judge is stronger.

Context Summary

Revelation 18:1-13 - "her Sins Have Reached Unto Heaven"
We have seen that the scarlet woman represents the false religion of human wit and fashion. It is found in every age. There is not a city, town, or village where it does not seek to allure men from Christ. The mischief is that so many really godly people are misled by it. In this they resemble Obadiah, who hid the prophets in a cave and fed them but was hand and glove with Ahab. To all such, who are endeavoring to keep in touch with the true Bride and with the apostate Church, the summons of Revelation 18:4 has a very profound significance.
It was the unanimous verdict of the reformers that the great city here described, Revelation 18:10, was intended to represent Rome, as the seat of the great apostasy. If that be the case, the merchandise described here does not refer to literal commerce, but to the carnal delights which are often permitted and fostered by false religious systems to win the adhesion of the worldly and unclean. [source]

Chapter Summary: Revelation 18

1  Babylon is fallen
4  People commanded to depart out of her
9  The kings of the earth, with the merchants and mariners, lament over her
20  The saints rejoice for the judgments of God upon her

Greek Commentary for Revelation 18:10

Standing afar off [απο μακροτεν εστηκοτες]
Perfect active (intransitive) participle of ιστημι — histēmi Vivid picture of the terrible scene, fascinated by the lurid blaze (cf. Nero‘s delight in the burning of Rome in a.d. 64), and yet afraid to draw near. On απο μακροτεν — apo makrothen see Mark 5:6. There is a weird charm in a burning city. They feared the same fate (cf. Revelation 18:7 for βασανισμου — basanismou torment). [source]
Woe, woe, the great city [ουαι ουαι η πολις η μεγαλη]
Only example in the Apocalypse of the nominative with μιαι ωραι — ouai except Revelation 18:16, Revelation 18:19, though in Luke 6:25 and common in lxx (Isa 5:7, 11, etc.). For the dative see Revelation 8:13, once so “strong” Repeated in Revelation 18:16, Revelation 18:19, and like ποιαν ωραν — miāi hēmerāi (in one day) in Revelation 18:8. Some MSS. have here ο κρινας — mian hōran like η κρισις σου — poian hōran (accusative of extent of time) in Revelation 3:3. See Revelation 18:8 (ho krinas) for hē krisis sou (thy judgment). This is the dirge of the kings. [source]
In one hour [μιαν ωραν]
Repeated in Revelation 18:16, Revelation 18:19, and like ποιαν ωραν — miāi hēmerāi (in one day) in Revelation 18:8. Some MSS. have here ο κρινας — mian hōran like η κρισις σου — poian hōran (accusative of extent of time) in Revelation 3:3. See Revelation 18:8 This is the dirge of the kings. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Revelation 18:10

1 Peter 5:13 Babylon []
Some understand in a figurative sense, as meaning Rome; others, literally, of Babylon on the Euphrates. In favor of the former view are the drift of ancient opinion and the Roman Catholic interpreters, with Luther and several noted modern expositors, as Ewald and Hoffmann. This, too, is the view of Canon Cook in the “Speaker's Commentary.” In favor of the literal interpretation are the weighty names of Alford, Huther, Calvin, Neander, Weiss, and Reuss. Professor Salmond, in his admirable commentary on this epistle, has so forcibly summed up the testimony that we cannot do better than to give his comment entire: “In favor of this allegorical interpretation it is urged that there are other occurrences of Babylon in the New Testament as a mystical name for Rome (Revelation 14:8; Revelation 18:2, Revelation 18:10); that it is in the highest degree unlikely that Peter should have made the Assyrian Babylon his residence or missionary centre, especially in view of a statement by Josephus indicating that the Emperor Claudius had expelled the Jews from that city and neighborhood; and that tradition connects Peter with Rome, but not with Babylon. The fact, however, that the word is mystically used in a mystical book like the Apocalypse - a book, too, which is steeped in the spirit and terminology of the Old Testament - is no argument for the mystical use of the word in writings of a different type. The allegorical interpretation becomes still less likely when it is observed that other geographical designations in this epistle (1 Peter 1:1) have undoubtedly the literal meaning. The tradition itself, too, is uncertain. The statement in Josephus does not bear all that it is made to bear. There is no reason to suppose that, at the time when this epistle was written, the city of Rome was currently known among Christians as Babylon. On the contrary, wherever it is mentioned in the New Testament, with the single exception of the Apocalypse (and even there it is distinguished as 'Babylon, the great ')it gets its usual name, Rome. So far, too, from the Assyrian Babylon being practically in a deserted state at this date, there is very good ground for believing that the Jewish population (not to speak of the heathen) of the city and vicinity was very considerable. For these and other reasons a succession of distinguished interpreters and historians, from Erasmus and Calvin, on to Neander, Weiss, Reuss, Huther, etc., have rightly held by the literal sense.” [source]
Revelation 11:8 In [επι]
“Upon,” as in Revelation 11:6, with genitive Clearly Jerusalem in view of the closing clause (οπουεσταυρωτη — hopou- ητις — estaurōthē), though not here called “the holy city” as in Revelation 11:2, and though elsewhere in the Apocalypse Babylon (Rome) is so described (Revelation 14:8; Revelation 16:19; Revelation 17:5; Revelation 18:2, Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:16, Revelation 18:18, Revelation 18:19, Revelation 18:21).Which Which very city, not “whichever.”Spiritually (πνευματικος — pneumatikōs). This late adverb from πνευματικος — pneumatikos (spiritual) occurs in the N.T. only twice, in 1 Corinthians 2:14 for the help of the Holy Spirit in interpreting God‘s message and here in a hidden or mystical (allegorical sense). For this use of οπου και ο κυριος αυτων εσταυρωτη — pneumatikos see 1 Corinthians 10:3. Judah is called Sodom in Isaiah 1:9.; Ezekiel 16:46, Ezekiel 16:55. See also Matthew 10:15; Matthew 11:23. Egypt is not applied to Israel in the O.T., but is “an obvious symbol of oppression and slavery” (Swete).Where also their Lord was crucified First aorist passive indicative of stauroō to crucify, a reference to the fact of Christ‘s crucifixion in Jerusalem. This item is one of the sins of Jerusalem and the disciple is not greater than the Master (John 15:20). [source]
Revelation 11:8 Of the great city [της πολεως της μεγαλης]
Clearly Jerusalem in view of the closing clause (οπουεσταυρωτη — hopou- ητις — estaurōthē), though not here called “the holy city” as in Revelation 11:2, and though elsewhere in the Apocalypse Babylon (Rome) is so described (Revelation 14:8; Revelation 16:19; Revelation 17:5; Revelation 18:2, Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:16, Revelation 18:18, Revelation 18:19, Revelation 18:21). [source]
Revelation 12:12 Rejoice [ευπραινεστε]
Present middle imperative of ευπραινω — euphrainō as in Revelation 11:10; Revelation 18:20.O heavens (οι ουρανοι — hoi ouranoi). Plural here alone in the Apocalypse, though common elsewhere in the N.T. Satan is no longer in the heavens.They that dwell therein Present active articular participle of σκηνοω — skēnoō (see Revelation 7:15; Revelation 13:6) to dwell (tabernacle) as of Christ in John 1:14 and of God in Revelation 21:3. The inhabitants of heaven (angels and saints) have cause to rejoice, and earth reason to mourn.Woe for the earth and for the sea (ουαι την γην και την ταλασσαν — ouai tēn gēn kai tēn thalassan). The accusative after ουαι — ouai as in Revelation 8:13, but nominative in Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:16, Revelation 18:19 in place of the usual dative (Matthew 11:21; Matthew 18:7, etc.).Is gone down Second aorist (effective) active indicative of καταβαινω — katabainō “did go down.”But a short time (ολιγον καιρον — oligon kairon). Accusative of extent of time, “a little time.” The devil‘s departure from his warfare in the heavens reveals (ειδως — eidōs knowing, perfect active participle) to him that his time for doing harm to men is limited, and hence his great wrath (τυμον — thumon boiling rage). [source]
Revelation 12:12 Woe for the earth and for the sea [ουαι την γην και την ταλασσαν]
The accusative after ουαι — ouai as in Revelation 8:13, but nominative in Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:16, Revelation 18:19 in place of the usual dative (Matthew 11:21; Matthew 18:7, etc.). [source]
Revelation 14:8 Babylon the great [αβυλων]
The adjective πεποτικεν — megalē occurs with ποτιζω — Babulōn each time in the Apocalypse (Revelation 14:8; Revelation 16:19; Revelation 17:5; Revelation 18:2, Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:21) as a reminder of Nebuchadrezzar. There is no doubt that Rome is meant by Babylon, as is probably seen already in 1 Peter 5:13. As a prisoner in Patmos John can speak his mind by this symbolism. [source]
Revelation 17:12 As kings [ως βασιλεις]
Compared to kings (see ως — hōs in Revelation 1:10; Revelation 4:6; Revelation 9:7; Revelation 13:3; Revelation 14:3; Revelation 16:21) without identification with the emperors, though succeeding them with “quasi-imperial powers” with the beast.For one hour (μιαν ωραν — mian hōran). Accusative of extent of time, and that a brief time (Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:16, Revelation 18:19) in comparison with the beast (Revelation 13:2). [source]
Revelation 12:12 They that dwell therein [οι εν αυτοις σκηνουντες]
Present active articular participle of σκηνοω — skēnoō (see Revelation 7:15; Revelation 13:6) to dwell (tabernacle) as of Christ in John 1:14 and of God in Revelation 21:3. The inhabitants of heaven (angels and saints) have cause to rejoice, and earth reason to mourn.Woe for the earth and for the sea (ουαι την γην και την ταλασσαν — ouai tēn gēn kai tēn thalassan). The accusative after ουαι — ouai as in Revelation 8:13, but nominative in Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:16, Revelation 18:19 in place of the usual dative (Matthew 11:21; Matthew 18:7, etc.).Is gone down Second aorist (effective) active indicative of καταβαινω — katabainō “did go down.”But a short time (ολιγον καιρον — oligon kairon). Accusative of extent of time, “a little time.” The devil‘s departure from his warfare in the heavens reveals (ειδως — eidōs knowing, perfect active participle) to him that his time for doing harm to men is limited, and hence his great wrath (τυμον — thumon boiling rage). [source]
Revelation 14:8 Fallen, fallen [επεσεν επεσεν]
Prophetic aorist active indicative of πεπτωκεν πεπτωκεν — piptō repeated as a solemn dirge announcing the certainty of the fall. The English participle “fallen, fallen” is more musical and rhythmical than the literal rendering “fell, fell.” The language is an echo of Isaiah 21:9, though B in the lxx has αβυλων η μαγαλη — peptōkenμεγαλη — peptōken (perfect).Babylon the great (αβυλων — Babulōn hē magalē). The adjective πεποτικεν — megalē occurs with ποτιζω — Babulōn each time in the Apocalypse (Revelation 14:8; Revelation 16:19; Revelation 17:5; Revelation 18:2, Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:21) as a reminder of Nebuchadrezzar. There is no doubt that Rome is meant by Babylon, as is probably seen already in 1 Peter 5:13. As a prisoner in Patmos John can speak his mind by this symbolism.Hath made to drink Perfect active indicative of potizō old causative verb (from potos drinking, 1 Peter 4:3), as in Matthew 25:35. The remarkable phrase that follows seems based on Jeremiah 51:8 (Jeremiah 25:15). It is a combination also of Revelation 14:10 (the wine of God‘s wrath, also in Revelation 16:19; Revelation 19:15) and Revelation 17:2. There is no doubt of the dissoluteness of the old Babylon of Jeremiah‘s day as of the Rome of John‘s time. Rome is pictured as the great courtesan who intoxicates and beguiles the nations to fornication (Revelation 17:2, Revelation 17:4, Revelation 17:6), but the cup of God‘s wrath for her and her paramours is full (Revelation 14:10; Revelation 16:19; Revelation 18:2). [source]
Revelation 17:12 For one hour [μιαν ωραν]
Accusative of extent of time, and that a brief time (Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:16, Revelation 18:19) in comparison with the beast (Revelation 13:2). [source]
Revelation 18:8 In one day [εν μιαι ημεραι]
Symbolical term for suddenness like μιαι ωραι — miāi hōrāi in one hour (Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:16, Revelation 18:19). John has in mind still Isaiah 47:7-9.Shall come (ηχουσιν — hēxousin). Future active of ηκω — hēkō Her plagues are named (death, mourning, famine).She shall be utterly burned Future passive of κατακαιω — katakaiō (perfective use of κατα — kata).With fire (εν πυρι — en puri). “In fire,” as in Revelation 17:16.Which judged her Articular first aorist active participle of κρινω — krinō referring to κυριος ο τεος — kurios ho theos (the Lord God). The doom of Babylon is certain because of the power of God. [source]
Revelation 18:15 Who were made rich by her [οι πλουτησαντες απ αυτης]
“Those who grew rich (ingressive aorist active participle of πλουτεω — plouteō for which see Revelation 18:3, Revelation 18:13) from her.”Shall stand afar off (απο μακροτεν στησονται — apo makrothen stēsontai). Future middle of ιστημι — histēmi Repeating the picture in Revelation 18:10. Again in Revelation 18:17. See Revelation 18:11 for the two participles κλαιοντες και πεντουντες — klaiontes kai penthountes f0). [source]
Revelation 18:15 Shall stand afar off [απο μακροτεν στησονται]
Future middle of ιστημι — histēmi Repeating the picture in Revelation 18:10. Again in Revelation 18:17. See Revelation 18:11 for the two participles κλαιοντες και πεντουντες — klaiontes kai penthountes f0). [source]
Revelation 18:17 That saileth any whither [ο επι τοπον πλεων]
“The one sailing to a place.” See Acts 27:2, τους κατα την Ασιαν πλεοντας — tous kata tēn Asian pleontas (those sailing down along Asia). Nestle suggests ποντον — ponton (sea) here for τοπον — topon (place), but it makes sense as it is.Mariners (ναυται — nautai). Old word (from ναυς — naus ship), in N.T. only here and Acts 27:27, Acts 27:30.Gain their living by the sea “Work the sea.” This idiom is as old as Hesiod for sailors, fishermen, etc. See Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:15. [source]
Revelation 18:17 Gain their living by the sea [την ταλασσαν εργαζονται]
“Work the sea.” This idiom is as old as Hesiod for sailors, fishermen, etc. See Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:15. [source]
Revelation 18:18 As they looked [βλεποντες]
Present active participle of βλεπω — blepō See οταν βλεπωσιν — hotan blepōsin in Revelation 18:10. [source]
Revelation 18:19 They cast dust [εβαλον χουν]
Second aorist active of βαλλω — ballō Χους — Chous is old word (from χεω — cheō to pour) for heap of earth, dust, in N.T. only here and Mark 6:11. Cf. Ezekiel 27:30; Luke 10:13. This is the dirge of the sea-folk (cf. Revelation 18:10, and Revelation 18:16). [source]
Revelation 8:13 Woe, woe, woe [ουαι ουαι ουαι]
Triple because three trumpets yet to come. In Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:16, Revelation 18:19 the double κατοικεω — ouai is merely for emphasis. [source]
Revelation 8:13 For them that dwell on the earth [εκ των λοιπων πωνων]
Accusative of the articular present active participle of εκ — katoikeō is unusual (Aleph Q here and also in Revelation 12:12) as in Matthew 11:21. There is even a nominative in Revelation 18:10.By reason of the other voices (των τριων αγγελων των μελλοντων σαλπιζειν — ek tōn loipōn phōnōn). “As a result of (ek) the rest of the voices.” There is more and worse to come, “of the three angels who are yet to sound” (tōn triōn aggelōn tōn mellontōn salpizein). [source]
Revelation 9:5 Torment [βασανισμος]
Late word for torture, from βασανιζω — basanizō in N.T. only in Revelation 9:5; Revelation 14:11; Revelation 18:7, Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:15. The wound of the scorpion was not usually fatal, though exceedingly painful.When it striketh a man (οταν παισηι αντρωπον — hotan paisēi anthrōpon). Indefinite temporal clause with οταν — hotan and the first aorist active subjunctive of παιω — paiō (Matthew 26:51), old verb, to smite, “whenever it smites a man.” [source]
Revelation 8:13 Flying in mid-heaven [πετομενου εν μεσουρανηματι]
Like the angel in Revelation 14:6 and the birds in Revelation 19:17. Μεσουρανημα — Mesouranēma (from μεσουρανεω — mesouraneō to be in mid-heaven) is a late word (Plutarch, papyri) for the sun at noon, in N.T. only these three examples. This eagle is flying where all can see, and crying so that all can hear.Woe, woe, woe (ουαι ουαι ουαι — ouaiουαι — ouaiτους κατοικουντας — ouai). Triple because three trumpets yet to come. In Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:16, Revelation 18:19 the double κατοικεω — ouai is merely for emphasis.For them that dwell on the earth Accusative of the articular present active participle of εκ — katoikeō is unusual (Aleph Q here and also in Revelation 12:12) as in Matthew 11:21. There is even a nominative in Revelation 18:10.By reason of the other voices (των τριων αγγελων των μελλοντων σαλπιζειν — ek tōn loipōn phōnōn). “As a result of (ek) the rest of the voices.” There is more and worse to come, “of the three angels who are yet to sound” (tōn triōn aggelōn tōn mellontōn salpizein). [source]
Revelation 9:5 But that they should be tormented [αλλ ινα βασανιστησονται]
Sub-final clause again with ινα — hina but this time with the first future passive indicative (like Revelation 3:9; Revelation 6:4; Revelation 8:3; Revelation 13:12) of βασανιζω — basanizō old verb, to test metals (from βασανος — basanos Matthew 4:24) by touchstone, then to torture like Matthew 8:29, further in Revelation 11:10; Revelation 12:2; Revelation 14:10; Revelation 20:10.Five months (μηνας πεντε — mēnas pente). Accusative of extent of time. The actual locust is born in the spring and dies at the end of summer (about five months).Torment Late word for torture, from βασανιζω — basanizō in N.T. only in Revelation 9:5; Revelation 14:11; Revelation 18:7, Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:15. The wound of the scorpion was not usually fatal, though exceedingly painful.When it striketh a man (οταν παισηι αντρωπον — hotan paisēi anthrōpon). Indefinite temporal clause with οταν — hotan and the first aorist active subjunctive of παιω — paiō (Matthew 26:51), old verb, to smite, “whenever it smites a man.” [source]

What do the individual words in Revelation 18:10 mean?

from afar standing because of the fear of the torment of her saying Woe woe the city - great Babylon strong For [in] one hour has come the judgment of you
ἀπὸ μακρόθεν ἑστηκότες διὰ τὸν φόβον τοῦ βασανισμοῦ αὐτῆς λέγοντες Οὐαὶ οὐαί πόλις μεγάλη Βαβυλὼν ἰσχυρά ὅτι μιᾷ ὥρᾳ ἦλθεν κρίσις σου

μακρόθεν  afar 
Parse: Adverb
Root: μακρόθεν  
Sense: from afar, afar.
ἑστηκότες  standing 
Parse: Verb, Perfect Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root: ἵστημι  
Sense: to cause or make to stand, to place, put, set.
διὰ  because  of 
Parse: Preposition
Root: διά  
Sense: through.
φόβον  fear 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: φόβος  
Sense: fear, dread, terror.
τοῦ  of  the 
Parse: Article, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
βασανισμοῦ  torment 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: βασανισμός  
Sense: to torture, a testing by the touchstone, which is a black siliceous stone used to test the purity of gold or silver by the colour of the streak produced on it by rubbing it with either metal.
αὐτῆς  of  her 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive Feminine 3rd Person Singular
Root: αὐτός  
Sense: himself, herself, themselves, itself.
λέγοντες  saying 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root: λέγω 
Sense: to say, to speak.
Οὐαὶ  Woe 
Parse: Interjection
Root: οὐαί  
Sense: alas, woe.
οὐαί  woe 
Parse: Interjection
Root: οὐαί  
Sense: alas, woe.
πόλις  city 
Parse: Noun, Vocative Feminine Singular
Root: πόλις  
Sense: a city.
  - 
Parse: Article, Vocative Feminine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
μεγάλη  great 
Parse: Adjective, Vocative Feminine Singular
Root: μέγας  
Sense: great.
Βαβυλὼν  Babylon 
Parse: Noun, Vocative Feminine Singular
Root: Βαβυλών  
Sense: a very large and famous city, the residence of the Babylonian kings, situated on both banks of the Euphrates.
ἰσχυρά  strong 
Parse: Adjective, Vocative Feminine Singular
Root: ἰσχυρός  
Sense: strong, mighty.
ὅτι  For  [in] 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: ὅτι  
Sense: that, because, since.
μιᾷ  one 
Parse: Adjective, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: εἷς  
Sense: one.
ὥρᾳ  hour 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: ὥρα  
Sense: a certain definite time or season fixed by natural law and returning with the revolving year.
ἦλθεν  has  come 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἔρχομαι  
Sense: to come.
κρίσις  judgment 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Feminine Singular
Root: κρίσις  
Sense: a separating, sundering, separation.
σου  of  you 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive 2nd Person Singular
Root: σύ  
Sense: you.