The Meaning of Revelation 1:6 Explained

Revelation 1:6

KJV: And hath made us kings and priests unto God and his Father; to him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen.

YLT: and did make us kings and priests to his God and Father, to him is the glory and the power to the ages of the ages! Amen.

Darby: and made us a kingdom, priests to his God and Father: to him be the glory and the might to the ages of ages. Amen.

ASV: and he made us to be a kingdom, to be priests unto his God and Father; to him be the glory and the dominion for ever and ever. Amen.

What does Revelation 1:6 Mean?

Verse Meaning

Jesus Christ also has made us a kingdom (corporately) and priests (individually; cf. Revelation 5:10; Revelation 20:6; Exodus 19:6; Isaiah 61:6; 1 Peter 2:5; 1 Peter 2:9) to His God and Father, another evidence of His present love for us. John never spoke of God as the Father of believers in Revelation , only as the Father of Jesus (cf. Revelation 2:27; Revelation 3:5; Revelation 3:21; Revelation 14:1). We are a kingdom and priests now, but in the future faithful Christians, His bond-servants, will also reign with Jesus Christ on the earth (cf. Revelation 5:10).
"Amen" means "So be it!" Here it signifies the writer"s assent to the truthfulness of these affirmations about Jesus Christ (cf. Revelation 1:7; Revelation 5:14; Revelation 7:12 [1]; Revelation 19:4; Revelation 22:20)
It is interesting that John , the apostle of love, would emphasize God"s love in this first doxology as the dominating divine emotion (cf. Deuteronomy 4:37). In view of the following revelation of much judgment to come on humanity, it is comforting to remember that God does everything because He loves us.

Context Summary

Revelation 1:1-8 - The Revelation Of Jesus Christ
In His capacity as mediator, our Lord receives from the Father and transmits to His servants, that they may in turn transmit to the world of men, the great panorama of the future, known to Him from before the foundation of the world. Let us not miss the special benediction which is attached to the patient reading and consideration of this wonderful book.
The seven churches represent the one Church under different phases and possibly in successive stages of its history; the letters addressed to them are therefore universally applicable. Notice the august reference to the Holy Trinity-the eternal Father, the sevenfold Spirit, and our Lord. Our Lord bore a faithful witness even to death; that death was a birth into the risen life, as ours may be; all kings are His vassals.
How wonderful it is to be told in the next verse that He loves us, and has not only washed, but loosed us, as though He had broken the terrible entail. "He breaks the power of canceled sin." Jesus often comes with clouds. We cannot understand His dealings with us, yet those clouds are gold with His light. So He shall come at last. As Alpha He begins, but He never begins without carrying into full effect His purpose as our Omega. [source]

Chapter Summary: Revelation 1

1  The preface
4  John's salutation to the seven churches of Asia
7  The coming of Christ
8  His glorious power and majesty

Greek Commentary for Revelation 1:6

And he made [και εποιησεν]
Change from the participle construction, which would be και ποιησαντι — kai poiēsanti (first aorist active of ποιεω — poieō) like λυσαντι — lusanti just before, a Hebraism Charles calls it, but certainly an anacoluthon of which John is very fond, as in Revelation 1:18; Revelation 2:2, Revelation 2:9, Revelation 2:20; Revelation 3:9; Revelation 7:14; Revelation 14:2.; Revelation 15:3. [source]
Kingdom [βασιλειαν]
So correctly Aleph A C, not βασιλεις — basileis (P cursives). Perhaps a reminiscence of Exodus 19:6, a kingdom of priests. In Revelation 5:10 we have again “a kingdom and priests.” The idea here is that Christians are the true spiritual Israel in God‘s promise to Abraham as explained by Paul in Gal 3; Rom 9.To be priests (ιερεις — hiereis). In apposition with βασιλειαν — basileian but with και — kai (and) in Revelation 5:10. Each member of this true kingdom is a priest unto God, with direct access to him at all times.Unto his God and Father Dative case and αυτου — autou (Christ) applies to both τεωι — theōi and πατρι — patri Jesus spoke of the Father as his God (Matthew 27:46; John 20:17) and Paul uses like language (Ephesians 1:17), as does Peter (1 Peter 1:3).To him (αυτωι — autōi). Another doxology to Christ. “The adoration of Christ which vibrates in this doxology is one of the most impressive features of the book” (Moffatt). Like doxologies to Christ appear in Revelation 5:13; Revelation 7:10; 1 Peter 4:11; 2 Peter 3:18; 2 Timothy 4:18; Hebrews 13:21. These same words (η δοχα και το κρατος — hē doxa kai to kratos) in 1 Peter 4:11, only η δοχα — hē doxa in 2 Peter 3:18; 2 Timothy 4:18, but with several others in Revelation 5:13; Revelation 7:10. [source]
To be priests [ιερεις]
In apposition with βασιλειαν — basileian but with και — kai (and) in Revelation 5:10. Each member of this true kingdom is a priest unto God, with direct access to him at all times. [source]
Unto his God and Father [τωι τεωι και πατρι αυτου]
Dative case and αυτου — autou (Christ) applies to both τεωι — theōi and πατρι — patri Jesus spoke of the Father as his God (Matthew 27:46; John 20:17) and Paul uses like language (Ephesians 1:17), as does Peter (1 Peter 1:3).To him (αυτωι — autōi). Another doxology to Christ. “The adoration of Christ which vibrates in this doxology is one of the most impressive features of the book” (Moffatt). Like doxologies to Christ appear in Revelation 5:13; Revelation 7:10; 1 Peter 4:11; 2 Peter 3:18; 2 Timothy 4:18; Hebrews 13:21. These same words (η δοχα και το κρατος — hē doxa kai to kratos) in 1 Peter 4:11, only η δοχα — hē doxa in 2 Peter 3:18; 2 Timothy 4:18, but with several others in Revelation 5:13; Revelation 7:10. [source]
To him [αυτωι]
Another doxology to Christ. “The adoration of Christ which vibrates in this doxology is one of the most impressive features of the book” (Moffatt). Like doxologies to Christ appear in Revelation 5:13; Revelation 7:10; 1 Peter 4:11; 2 Peter 3:18; 2 Timothy 4:18; Hebrews 13:21. These same words (η δοχα και το κρατος — hē doxa kai to kratos) in 1 Peter 4:11, only η δοχα — hē doxa in 2 Peter 3:18; 2 Timothy 4:18, but with several others in Revelation 5:13; Revelation 7:10. [source]
Kings [βασιλεῖς]
The correct reading is, βασιλείαν akingdom. The term King is never applied in the New Testament to individual Christians. The reigning of the saints is emphasized in this book. See Revelation 5:10; Revelation 20:4, Revelation 20:6; Revelation 22:5. Compare Daniel 7:18, Daniel 7:22. [source]
Priests [ἱερεῖς]
Kingdom describes the body of the redeemed collectively. Priests indicates their individual position. Peter observes the same distinction (1 Peter 2:5) in the phrases living stones (individuals) and a spiritual house (the body collectively), and combines both kings and priests in another collective term, royal priesthood (1 Peter 2:9). The priesthood of believers grows out of the priesthood of Christ (Psalm 60:4; Zechariah 6:13; Exodus href="/desk/?q=ex+19:6&sr=1">Exodus 19:6). In the kingdom of Christ each individual is a priest. The priest's work is not limited to any order of the ministry. All may offer the sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving: all have direct access to the holiest through the blood of Jesus: all Christians, as priests, are to minister to one another and to plead for one another. The consummation of this ideal appears in Revelation 21:22, where the heavenly Jerusalem is represented as without temple. It is all temple. “It is the abolition of the distinction between holy and profane (Zechariah 14:20, Zechariah 14:21) - nearer and more remote from God - through all being henceforth holy, all being brought to the nearest whereof it is capable, to Him” (Trench). [source]
Unto God and His Father [τῷ Θεῷ καὶ πατρὶ αὐτοῦ]
Lit., to the God and Father of Him. Hence Rev., correctly, His God and Father. For the phrase compare Romans 15:6; 2 Corinthians 1:3; Ephesians 1:3. [source]
Glory and dominion [ἡ δόξα καὶ τὸ κράτος]
Rev., correctly, rendering the two articles, “the glory and the dominion.” The articles express universality: all glory; that which everywhere and under every form represents glory and dominion. The verb be (the glory) is not in the text. We may render either as an ascription, be, or as a confession, is. The glory is His. Δόξα glorymeans originally opinion or judgment. In this sense it is not used in Scripture. In the sacred writers always of a good or favorable opinion, and hence praise, honor, glory (Luke 14:10; Hebrews 3:3; 1 Peter 5:4). Applied to physical objects, as light, the heavenly bodies (Acts 22:11; 1 Corinthians 15:40). The visible brightness in manifestations of God (Luke 2:9; Acts 7:55; Luke 9:32; 2 Corinthians 3:7). Magnificence, dignity (Matthew 4:8; Luke 4:6). Divine majesty or perfect excellence, especially in doxologies, either of God or Christ (1 Peter 4:11; Judges 1:25; Revelation 4:9, Revelation 4:11; Matthew 16:27; Mark 10:37; Mark 8:38; Luke 9:26; 2 Corinthians 3:18; 2 Corinthians 4:4). The glory or majesty of divine grace (Ephesians 1:6, Ephesians 1:12, Ephesians 1:14, Ephesians 1:18; 1 Timothy 1:11). The majesty of angels (Luke 9:26; Judges 1:8; 2 Peter 2:10). The glorious condition of Christ after accomplishing His earthly work, and of the redeemed who share His eternal glory (Luke 24:26; John 17:5; Philemon 3:21; 1 Timothy 3:16; Romans 8:18, Romans 8:21; Romans 9:23; 2 Corinthians 4:17; Colossians 1:27).| Trench remarks upon the prominence of the doxological element in the highest worship of the Church as contrasted with the very subordinate place which it often occupies in ours. “We can perhaps make our requests known unto God, and this is well, for it is prayer; but to give glory to God, quite apart from anything to be directly gotten by ourselves in return, this is better, for it is adoration.” Dr. John Brown in his Memoir of his father, one of the very finest biographical sketches in English literature, records a formula used by him in closing his prayers on specially solemn occasions: “And now unto Thee, O Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, the one Jehovah and our God, we would - as is most meet - with the Church on earth and the Church in heaven, ascribe all honor and glory, dominion and majesty, as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end, Amen” (“Horae Subsecivae”). Compare the doxologies in |1 Peter 4:11|; |Galatians 1:5|; |Revelation 4:9|, |Revelation 4:11|; |Revelation 5:13|; |Revelation 7:12|; |Judges 1:25|; |1 Chronicles 29:11|.|Forever and ever ( εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας τῶν αἰώνων )|Lit., unto the ages of the ages. For the phrase compare Galatians 1:5; Hebrews 13:21; 1 Peter 4:11. It occurs twelve times in Revelation, but not in John's Gospel or Epistles. It is the formula of eternity.|Amen ( ἀμὴν )|The English word is a transcription of the Greek and of the Hebrew. A verbal adjective, meaning firm, faithful. Hence ὁ ἀμὴν , the Amen, applied to Christ (Revelation 3:14). It passes into an adverbial sense by which something is asserted or confirmed. Thus often used by Christ, verily. John alone uses the double affirmation, verily, verily. See on John 1:51; see on John 10:1.| [source]
Forever and ever [εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας τῶν αἰώνων]
Lit., unto the ages of the ages. For the phrase compare Galatians 1:5; Hebrews 13:21; 1 Peter 4:11. It occurs twelve times in Revelation, but not in John's Gospel or Epistles. It is the formula of eternity. [source]
Amen [ἀμὴν]
The English word is a transcription of the Greek and of the Hebrew. A verbal adjective, meaning firm, faithful. Hence ὁ ἀμὴν , the Amen, applied to Christ (Revelation 3:14). It passes into an adverbial sense by which something is asserted or confirmed. Thus often used by Christ, verily. John alone uses the double affirmation, verily, verily. See on John 1:51; see on John 10:1. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Revelation 1:6

Matthew 1:21 Jesus [Ιησοῦν]
The Greek form of a Hebrew name, which had been borne by two illustrious individuals in former periods of the Jewish history - Joshua, the successor of Moses, and Jeshua, the high-priest, who with Zerubbabel took so active a part in the re-establishment of the civil and religious polity of the Jews on their return from Babylon. Its original and full form is Jehoshua, becoming by contraction Joshua or Jeshua. Joshua, the son of Nun, the successor of Moses, was originally named Hoshea (saving )which was altered by Moses into Jehoshua (Jehovah (our )Salvation ) (Numbers 13:16). The meaning of the name, therefore, finds expression in the title Saviour, applied to our Lord (Luke 1:47; Luke 2:11; John 4:42). Joshua, the son of Nun, is a type of Christ in his office of captain and deliverer of his people, in the military aspect of his saving work (Revelation 19:11-16). As God's revelation to Moses was in the character of a law-giver, his revelation to Joshua was in that of the Lord of Hosts (Joshua 5:13, Joshua 5:14). Under Joshua the enemies of Israel were conquered, and the people established in the Promised Land. So Jesus leads his people in the fight with sin and temptation. He is the leader of the faith which overcomes the world (Hebrews 12:2). Following him, we enter into rest. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The priestly office of Jesus is foreshadowed in the high-priest Jeshua, who appears in the vision of Zechariah (Zechariah 3:1-10; compare Ezra 2:2) in court before God, under accusation of Satan, and clad in filthy garments. Jeshua stands not only for himself, but as the representative of sinning and suffering Israel. Satan is defeated. The Lord rebukes him, and declares that he will redeem and restore this erring people; and in token thereof he commands that the accused priest be clad in clean robes and crowned with the priestly mitre. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Thus in this priestly Jeshua we have a type of our “Great High-Priest, touched with the feeling of our infirmities, and in all points tempted and tried like as we are;” confronting Satan in the wilderness; trying conclusions with him upon the victims of his malice - the sick, the sinful, and the demon-ridden. His royal robes are left behind. He counts not “equality with God a thing to be grasped at,” but “empties-DIVIDER-
himself,” taking the “form of a servant,” humbling himself and becoming “obedient even unto death” (Philemon 2:6, Philemon 2:7, Rev.). He assumes the stained garments of our humanity. He who “knew no sin” is “made to be sin on our behalf, that we might become the righteousness of God in him” (2 Corinthians 5:21). He is at once priest and victim. He pleads for sinful man before God's throne. He will redeem him. He will rebuke the malice and cast down the power of Satan. He will behold him” as lightning fall from heaven” (Luke 10:18). He will raise and save and purify men of weak natures, rebellious wills, and furious passions - cowardly braggarts and deniers like Peter, persecutors like Saul of Tarsus, charred brands - and make them witnesses of his grace and preachers of his love and power. His kingdom shall be a kingdom of priests, and the song of his redeemed church shall be, “unto him that loveth us, and loosed us from our sins by his own blood, and made us to be a kingdom, to be priests unto his God and Father; to him be the glory and the dominion forever and ever. Amen” (Revelation 1:5, Revelation 1:6, in Rev.). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
It is no mere fancy which sees a suggestion and a foreshadowing of the prophetic work of Jesus in the economy of salvation, in a third name closely akin to the former. Hoshea, which we know in our English Bible as Hosea, was the original name of Joshua (compare Romans 9:25, Rev.) and means saving. He is, in a peculiar sense, the prophet of grace and salvation, placing his hope in God's personal coming as the refuge and strength of humanity; in the purification of human life by its contact with the divine. The great truth which he has to teach is the love of Jehovah to Israel as expressed in the relation of husband, an idea which pervades his prophecy, and which is generated by his own sad domestic experience. He foreshadows Jesus in his pointed warnings against sin, his repeated offers of divine mercy, and his patient, forbearing love, as manifested in his dealing with an unfaithful and dissolute wife, whose soul he succeeded in rescuing from sin and death (Hosea 1-3). So long as he lived, he was one continual, living prophecy of the tenderness of God toward sinners; a picture of God's love for us when alien from him, and with nothing in us to love. The faithfulness of the prophetic teacher thus blends in Hosea, as in our Lord, with the compassion and sympathy and sacrifice of the priest. [source]

Romans 3:23 The glory of God [τῆς δόξης τοῦ Θεοῦ]
Interpretations vary greatly. The glory of personal righteousness; that righteousness which God judges to be glory; the image of God in man; the glorying or boasting of righteousness before God; the approbation of God; the state of future glory. The dominant meanings of δόξα in classical Greek are notion, opinion, conjecture, repute. See on Revelation 1:6. In biblical usage: 1. Recognition, honor, Philemon 1:11; 1 Peter 1:7. It is joined with τιμή honor 1 Timothy 1:17; Hebrews 2:7, Hebrews 2:9; 2 Peter 1:17. Opposed to ἀτιμὶα dishonor 1 Corinthians 11:14, 1 Corinthians 11:15; 1 Corinthians 15:43; 2 Corinthians 6:8. With ζητέω toseek, 1 Thessalonians 2:6; John 5:44; John 7:18. With λαμβάνω toreceive, John 5:41, John 5:44. With δίδωμι togive, Luke 17:18; John 9:24. In the ascriptive phrase glory be to, Luke 2:14, and ascriptions in the Epistles. Compare Luke 14:10. 2. The glorious appearance which attracts the eye, Matthew 4:8; Luke 4:6; Luke 12:27. Hence parallel with εἰκών image μορφή form ὁμοίωμα likeness εἶδος appearancefigure, Romans 1:23; Psalm 17:15; Numbers 12:8. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The glory of God is used of the aggregate of the divine attributes and coincides with His self-revelation, Exodus 33:22; compare πρόσωπον face Exodus 33:23. Hence the idea is prominent in the redemptive revelation (Isaiah 60:3; Romans 6:4; Romans 5:2). It expresses the form in which God reveals Himself in the economy of salvation (Romans 9:23; 1 Timothy 1:11; Ephesians 1:12). It is the means by which the redemptive work is carried on; for instance, in calling, 2 Peter 1:3; in raising up Christ and believers with Him to newness of life, Romans 6:4; in imparting strength to believers, Ephesians 3:16; Colossians 1:11; as the goal of Christian hope, Romans 5:2; Romans 8:18, Romans 8:21; Titus 2:13. It appears prominently in the work of Christ - the outraying of the Father's glory (Hebrews 1:3), especially in John. See John 1:14; John 2:11, etc. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The sense of the phrase here is: they are coming short of the honor or approbation which God bestows. The point under discussion is the want of righteousness. Unbelievers, or mere legalists, do not approve themselves before God by the righteousness which is of the law. They come short of the approbation which is extended only to those who are justified by faith. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
[source]

Romans 9:5 Amen []
See on Revelation 1:6. [source]
Philippians 2:3 Vain glory [κενοδοξίαν]
Only here in the New Testament. The kindred adjective κενόδοξοι desirousof vain glory, occurs only at Galatians 5:26. In the Septuagint the word is used to describe the worship of idols as folly (see Revelation href="/desk/?q=re+1:6&sr=1">Revelation 1:6. [source]
Colossians 3:16 Psalms []
See the parallel passage, Ephesians 5:19. A psalm was originally a song accompanied by a stringed instrument. See on 1 Corinthians 14:15. The idea of accompaniment passed away in usage, and the psalm, in New-Testament phraseology, is an Old-Testament psalm, or a composition having that character. A hymn is a song of praise, and a song ( ᾠδή ode) is the general term for a song of any kind. Hymns would probably be distinctively Christian. It is supposed by some that Paul embodies fragments of hymns in his epistles, as 1 Corinthians 13:1-13; Ephesians 5:14; 1 Timothy 3:16; 2 Timothy 2:11-14. James 1:17, and Revelation 1:5, Revelation 1:6; Revelation 15:3, are also supposed to be of this character. In both instances of his use of ᾠδή songPaul adds the term spiritual. The term may, as Trench suggests, denote sacred poems which are neither psalms nor hymns, as Herbert's “Temple,” or Keble's “Christian Year.” This is the more likely, as the use of these different compositions is not restricted to singing nor to public worship. They are to be used in mutual christian teaching and admonition. [source]
Colossians 1:3 God the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ [τωι τεωι πατρι του κυριου ημων Ιησου Χριστου]
Correct text without και — kai (and) as in Colossians 3:17, though usually “the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (2 Corinthians 1:3; 2 Corinthians 11:31; Romans 15:6; 1 Peter 1:3; Revelation 1:6). In Colossians 1:2 we have the only instance in the opening benediction of an epistle when the name of “Jesus Christ” is not joined with “God our Father.” [source]
1 Peter 2:5 To be a holy priesthood [εις ιερατευμα αγιον]
Late word (from ιερατευω — hierateuō to serve as priest, Luke 1:8 alone in N.T.), in lxx (Exodus 19:6), in N.T. only here and 1 Peter 2:9, either the office of priest (Hort) or an order or body of priests. At any rate, Peter has the same idea of Revelation 1:6 (ιερεις — hiereis priests) that all believers are priests (Hebrews 4:16) and can approach God directly. [source]
1 Peter 2:9 A royal priesthood [βασιλειον ιερατευμα]
From Exodus 19:6 (cf. Revelation 1:6; Revelation 5:10). The official in Christian churches is πρεσβυτεροσεπισχοπος — presbuteros =ιερευς — episcopos not ιερεις — hiereus We are all ετνος αγιον — hiereis (priests). Cf. 1 Peter 2:5. [source]
1 Peter 4:11 Whose is [ωι εστιν]
“To whom (dative) is,” that is to Jesus Christ the immediate antecedent, but in Romans 16:27; Judges 1:25 the doxology is to God through Christ. For other doxologies see 1 Peter 5:11; 2 Peter 3:18; Galatians 1:5; Romans 9:5; Romans 11:36; Philemon 4:20; Ephesians 3:21; 1 Timothy 1:17; 1 Timothy 6:16; 2 Timothy 4:18; Hebrews 13:21; Revelation 1:6; Revelation 5:13; Revelation 7:12. The others addressed to Christ are 2 Peter 3:18; 2 Timothy 4:18; Revelation 1:6. [source]
1 Peter 2:5 Are built up a spiritual house [οικοδομειστε οικος πνευματικος]
Present passive indicative second person plural of οικοδομεω — oikodomeō the very verb used by Jesus to Peter in Matthew 16:18 This “spiritual house” includes believers in the five Roman provinces of 1 Peter 1:1 and shows clearly how Peter understood the metaphor of Christ in Matthew 16:18 to be not a local church, but the church general (the kingdom of Christ).To be a holy priesthood (εις ιερατευμα αγιον — eis hierateuma hagion). Late word (from ιερατευω — hierateuō to serve as priest, Luke 1:8 alone in N.T.), in lxx (Exodus 19:6), in N.T. only here and 1 Peter 2:9, either the office of priest (Hort) or an order or body of priests. At any rate, Peter has the same idea of Revelation 1:6 (ιερεις — hiereis priests) that all believers are priests (Hebrews 4:16) and can approach God directly.To offer up First aorist active infinitive (of purpose here) of αναπερω — anapherō the usual word for offering sacrifices (Hebrews 7:27). Only these are “spiritual” Late (Plutarch) double compound verbal adjective (ευ προσ δεχομαι — euprosdechomai) as in 2 Corinthians 6:2. [source]
1 Peter 2:9 An elect race [γενος εκλεκτον]
From Isaiah 43:20. The blood relation of the spiritual Israel (not the Jewish race) through the new birth (1 Peter 1:23).A royal priesthood (βασιλειον ιερατευμα — basileion hierateuma). From Exodus 19:6 (cf. Revelation 1:6; Revelation 5:10). The official in Christian churches is πρεσβυτεροσεπισχοπος — presbuteros =ιερευς — episcopos not ιερεις — hiereus We are all ετνος αγιον — hiereis (priests). Cf. 1 Peter 2:5.A holy nation Also from Exodus 19:6, but here applied, not to the national Israel, but to the spiritual Israel of believers (both Jews and Gentiles).A people for God‘s own possession (λαος περιουσιος — laos eis peripoiēsin). The idea here occurs in Exodus 19:5; Deuteronomy 7:6; Deuteronomy 14:2; Deuteronomy 26:18, where we have εις περιποιησιν — laos periousios as in Titus 2:14 (alone in the N.T.), and in Malachi 3:17 we find Περιουσιος λαος — eis peripoiēsin (for a possession). περιποιησις — Periousios laos is a people over and above the others and περιεποιησατο — peripoiēsis is a possession in a special sense (Ephesians 1:14). See Paul‘s use of οπως εχαγγειλητε — periepoiēsato in Acts 20:28. The old rendering, “a peculiar people,” had this idea of possession, for “peculiar” is from pecus (Latin for flock).That ye may shew forth Purpose clause with ινα — hopōs rather than εχαγγελλω — hina with the first aorist active subjunctive of τας αρετας — exaggellō old verb, to tell out, here alone in N.T.The excellencies (τα μεγαλεια του τεου — tas aretas). From Isaiah 43:21. Old word for any preeminence (moral, intellectual, military), often for “virtue,” but not in that sense in the O.T. or the N.T. The word has the sense of moral worth in 2 Peter 1:3, 2 Peter 1:5; Philemon 4:8; and the Apocrypha. In Isaiah (here quoted) it means praise and glory to God. So also Isaiah 42:12. See Acts 2:11 σκοτους — ta megaleia tou theou (the mighty works of God).Darkness Heathenism.His marvellous light (ταυμαστον — to thaumaston autou phōs). Christianity. For ταυμαζω — thaumaston (from thaumazō) see Matthew 21:42. For the change from heathenism to Christianity see Colossians 1:12; Ephesians 5:8-14. [source]
1 Peter 4:11 Speaking as it were oracles of God [ως λογια τεου]
No predicate in this conclusion of the condition. For λογια τεου — logia theou see Acts 7:38 (Mosaic law); Romans 3:2 (the Old Testament); Hebrews 5:12 (the substance of Christian teaching), here of the utterances of God through Christian teachers. Λογιον — Logion (old word) is a diminutive of λογος — logos (speech, word). It can be construed here as nominative or as accusative. The verb has to be supplied.If any one ministereth (ει τις διακονει — ei tis diakonei). First-class condition again. See Acts 6:2-4 for the twofold division of service involved here.Which God supplieth Ablative case Peter has the compound επιχορηγεω — epichorēgeō in 2 Peter 1:5, 2 Peter 1:11. God is the supplier of strength.That God may be glorified (ινα δοχαζηται ο τεος — hina doxazētai ho theos). Purpose clause with ινα — hina and the present passive subjunctive of δοχαζω — doxazō See John 15:8.Whose is “To whom (dative) is,” that is to Jesus Christ the immediate antecedent, but in Romans 16:27; Judges 1:25 the doxology is to God through Christ. For other doxologies see 1 Peter 5:11; 2 Peter 3:18; Galatians 1:5; Romans 9:5; Romans 11:36; Philemon 4:20; Ephesians 3:21; 1 Timothy 1:17; 1 Timothy 6:16; 2 Timothy 4:18; Hebrews 13:21; Revelation 1:6; Revelation 5:13; Revelation 7:12. The others addressed to Christ are 2 Peter 3:18; 2 Timothy 4:18; Revelation 1:6. [source]
1 Peter 4:11 Which God supplieth [ης χορηγει ο τεος]
Ablative case Peter has the compound επιχορηγεω — epichorēgeō in 2 Peter 1:5, 2 Peter 1:11. God is the supplier of strength.That God may be glorified (ινα δοχαζηται ο τεος — hina doxazētai ho theos). Purpose clause with ινα — hina and the present passive subjunctive of δοχαζω — doxazō See John 15:8.Whose is “To whom (dative) is,” that is to Jesus Christ the immediate antecedent, but in Romans 16:27; Judges 1:25 the doxology is to God through Christ. For other doxologies see 1 Peter 5:11; 2 Peter 3:18; Galatians 1:5; Romans 9:5; Romans 11:36; Philemon 4:20; Ephesians 3:21; 1 Timothy 1:17; 1 Timothy 6:16; 2 Timothy 4:18; Hebrews 13:21; Revelation 1:6; Revelation 5:13; Revelation 7:12. The others addressed to Christ are 2 Peter 3:18; 2 Timothy 4:18; Revelation 1:6. [source]
Revelation 7:12 Blessing, etc. []
On the doxologies, see on Revelation 1:6. [source]
Revelation 5:12 Power, etc. []
Rev., “the power.” Compare the ascription in Revelation 4:11, on which see note, and notice that each separate particular there has the article, while here it is attached only to the first, the power, the one article including all the particulars, as if they formed but one word. On the doxologies, see on Revelation 1:6. [source]
Revelation 5:10 Us [ἡμᾶς]
Read αὐτοὺς themKings ( βασιλεῖς )Read, βασιλείαν akingdom. See on Revelation 1:6. [source]
Revelation 5:10 Read αὐτοὺς them Kings [βασιλεῖς]
Read, βασιλείαν akingdom. See on Revelation 1:6. [source]
Revelation 4:11 Power []
Instead of the thanks in the ascription of the living creatures. In the excess of gratitude, self is forgotten. Their thanksgiving is a tribute to the creative power which called them into being. Note the articles, “the glory,” etc. (so Rev.), expressing the absoluteness and universality of these attributes. See on Revelation 1:6. [source]
Revelation 21:22 No temple []
The entire city is now one holy temple of God. See on Revelation 1:6. [source]
Revelation 19:1 Hallelujah [ἀλληλούΐ́α]
Hebrew. Praise ye the Lord. Only in Revelation and in this chapter. Fifteen of the Psalms either begin or end with this word. The Jewish anthem of praise (Revelation href="/desk/?q=re+1:6&sr=1">Revelation 1:6. [source]
Revelation 1:18 For evermore []
See on Revelation 1:6. [source]
Revelation 1:18 Forevermore [εις τους αιωνας των αιωνων]
“Unto the ages of the ages,” a stronger expression of eternity even than in Revelation 1:6. [source]
Revelation 2:26 Unto the end [αχρι τελους]
That is, αχρι ου αν ηχο — achri hou an hēxo above.Authority over the nations (εχουσιαν επι των ετνων — exousian epi tōn ethnōn). From Psalm 2:8. The followers of the Messiah will share in his victory over his enemies (Revelation 1:6; Revelation 12:5; Revelation 19:15). [source]
Revelation 2:26 Authority over the nations [εχουσιαν επι των ετνων]
From Psalm 2:8. The followers of the Messiah will share in his victory over his enemies (Revelation 1:6; Revelation 12:5; Revelation 19:15). [source]
Revelation 20:6 Priests of God and of Christ [ιερεις του τεου και του Χριστου]
As in Revelation 1:6; Revelation 5:10; Revelation 22:3, Revelation 22:5.Shall reign with him (βασιλευσουσιν μετ αυτου — basileusousin met' autou). As promised in the same passages. The servants of God are to be priests with Christ and to reign with him (Matthew 19:28). In Revelation 5:10 επι της γης — epi tēs gēs (upon earth) occurs, but this item does not appear here. “No hint is given as to where this service is to be rendered and this royalty to be exercised” (Swete). [source]
Revelation 20:10 They shall be tormented [βασανιστησονται]
Return to the prophetic future of Revelation 20:7, Revelation 20:8. For βασανιζω — basanizō see Revelation 9:5; Revelation 14:10. For “day and night” (ημερας και νυκτος — hēmeras kai nuktos) see Revelation 4:8; Revelation 7:15; Revelation 12:10; Revelation 14:11. For “for ever and ever” (εις τους αιωνας τον αιωνων — eis tous aiōnas ton aiōnōn) see Revelation 1:6, Revelation 1:18; Revelation 4:9, Revelation 4:10; Revelation 5:13; Revelation 7:12; Revelation 10:6; Revelation 11:15, etc. The devil was cast down from heaven (Revelation 12:9), then imprisoned (Revelation 20:2.), now he received his final doom. [source]
Revelation 22:5 They shall reign [βασιλευσουσιν]
Future active of βασιλευω — basileuō Reign eternally in contrast with the limited millennial reign of Revelation 20:4, Revelation 20:6. This glorious eternal reign with Christ occurs repeatedly in the book (Revelation 1:6; Revelation 3:21; Revelation 5:10) as in Luke 22:30. Christ‘s Kingdom is spiritual (John 18:36.). “The visions of the Apocalypse are now ended; they have reached their climax in the New Jerusalem” (Swete). Now John gives the parting utterances of some of the speakers, and it is not always clear who is speaking. [source]
Revelation 4:7 Like a lion [ομοιον λεοντι]
Associative-instrumental case again. In Ezek (Revelation 1:6, Revelation 1:10) each ζωον — zōon has four faces, but here each has a different face. “The four forms represent whatever is noblest, strongest, wisest, and swiftest in nature” (Swete). But it is not necessary to try to find a symbolism in each face here like the early baseless identification with the Four Evangelists (the lion for Mark, the man for Matthew, the calf for Luke, the eagle for John). Μοσχος — Moschos is first a sprout, then the young of animals, then a calf (bullock or heifer) as in Luke 15:23, Luke 15:27, Luke 15:30, or a full-grown ox (Ezekiel 1:10). [source]
Revelation 1:5 The first-born of the dead [ο πρωτοτοκος των νεκρων]
A Jewish Messianic title (Psalm 89:27) and as in Colossians 1:18 refers to priority in the resurrection to be followed by others. See Luke 2:7 for the word.The ruler of the kings of the earth (ο αρχων των βασιλεων της γης — ho archōn tōn basileōn tēs gēs). Jesus by his resurrection won lordship over the kings of earth (Revelation 17:14; Revelation 19:16), what the devil offered him by surrender (Matthew 4:8.).Unto him that loveth us Dative of the articular present (not aorist αγαπησαντι — agapēsanti) active participle of αγαπαω — agapaō in a doxology to Christ, the first of many others to God and to Christ (Revelation 1:6; Revelation 4:11; Revelation 5:9, Revelation 5:12.; Revelation 7:10, Revelation 7:12, etc.). For the thought see John 3:16.Loosed (λυσαντι — lusanti). First aorist active participle of λυω — luō (Aleph A C), though some MSS. (P Q) read λουσαντι — lousanti (washed), a manifest correction. Note the change of tense. Christ loosed us once for all, but loves us always.By his blood As in Revelation 5:9. John here as in the Gospel and Epistles states plainly and repeatedly the place of the blood of Christ in the work of redemption. [source]
Revelation 1:5 Unto him that loveth us [τωι αγαπωντι ημας]
Dative of the articular present (not aorist αγαπησαντι — agapēsanti) active participle of αγαπαω — agapaō in a doxology to Christ, the first of many others to God and to Christ (Revelation 1:6; Revelation 4:11; Revelation 5:9, Revelation 5:12.; Revelation 7:10, Revelation 7:12, etc.). For the thought see John 3:16.Loosed (λυσαντι — lusanti). First aorist active participle of λυω — luō (Aleph A C), though some MSS. (P Q) read λουσαντι — lousanti (washed), a manifest correction. Note the change of tense. Christ loosed us once for all, but loves us always.By his blood As in Revelation 5:9. John here as in the Gospel and Epistles states plainly and repeatedly the place of the blood of Christ in the work of redemption. [source]
Revelation 1:18 I am alive [ζων ειμι]
Periphrastic present active indicative, “I am living,” as the words ο ζων — ho zōn just used mean.Forevermore (εις τους αιωνας των αιωνων — eis tous aiōnas tōn aiōnōn). “Unto the ages of the ages,” a stronger expression of eternity even than in Revelation 1:6.The keys One of the forms for the accusative plural along with κλειδας — kleidas the usual one (Matthew 16:19).Of death and of Hades (του τανατου και του αιδου — tou thanatou kai tou hāidou). Conceived as in Matthew 16:18 as a prison house or walled city. The keys are the symbol of authority, as we speak of honouring one by giving him the keys of the city. Hades here means the unseen world to which death is the portal. Jesus has the keys because of his victory over death. See this same graphic picture in Revelation 6:8; Revelation 20:13. For the key of David see Revelation 3:7, for the key of the abyss see Revelation 9:1; Revelation 20:1. [source]
Revelation 20:10 Into the lake of fire and brimstone [εις την λιμνην του πυρος και τειου]
As in Revelation 19:20 with the two beasts, as he adds, “where are also the beast and the false prophet” Return to the prophetic future of Revelation 20:7, Revelation 20:8. For βασανιζω — basanizō see Revelation 9:5; Revelation 14:10. For “day and night” (ημερας και νυκτος — hēmeras kai nuktos) see Revelation 4:8; Revelation 7:15; Revelation 12:10; Revelation 14:11. For “for ever and ever” (εις τους αιωνας τον αιωνων — eis tous aiōnas ton aiōnōn) see Revelation 1:6, Revelation 1:18; Revelation 4:9, Revelation 4:10; Revelation 5:13; Revelation 7:12; Revelation 10:6; Revelation 11:15, etc. The devil was cast down from heaven (Revelation 12:9), then imprisoned (Revelation 20:2.), now he received his final doom. [source]
Revelation 22:5 They need [εχουσιν χρειαν]
Present active indicative, “They have need,” though A has εχουσιν — hexousin (shall have), future like εσται — estai Here again there is repetition of part of Revelation 21:23, but for the purpose of showing the delightsomeness of the New Jerusalem with no need of lamp or sun (change to πως — phōs with ηλιου — hēliou instead of πωτος — phōtos “they have no light of sun”).Shall give them light (πωτισει — phōtisei). Future active of πωτιζω — phōtizō while aorist επωτισεν — ephōtisen in Revelation 21:23.They shall reign Future active of βασιλευω — basileuō Reign eternally in contrast with the limited millennial reign of Revelation 20:4, Revelation 20:6. This glorious eternal reign with Christ occurs repeatedly in the book (Revelation 1:6; Revelation 3:21; Revelation 5:10) as in Luke 22:30. Christ‘s Kingdom is spiritual (John 18:36.). “The visions of the Apocalypse are now ended; they have reached their climax in the New Jerusalem” (Swete). Now John gives the parting utterances of some of the speakers, and it is not always clear who is speaking. [source]
Revelation 5:10 A kingdom and priests [βασιλειαν και ιερεις]
As the correct text in Revelation 1:6.They reign (βασιλευουσιν — basileuousin). Present active indicative, futuristic use, though Aleph P have the future βασιλευσουσιν — basileusousin (shall reign) as in Revelation 20:6. [source]
Revelation 7:14 And they washed [και επλυναν]
First aorist active indicative of πλυνω — plunō old verb, to wash, in N.T. only Luke 5:2; Revelation 7:14; Revelation 22:14. This change of construction after οι ερχομενοι — hoi erchomenoi from οι πλυνησαντες — hoi plunēsantes to και επλυναν — kai eplunan is common in the Apocalypse, one of Charles‘s Hebraisms, like και εποιησεν — kai epoiēsen in Revelation 1:6 and και πλαναι — kai planāi in Revelation 2:20. [source]
Revelation 7:14 My lord [Κυριε μου]
“An address of reverence to a heavenly being” (Vincent), not an act of worship on John‘s part.Thou knowest (συ οιδας — su oidas). “At once a confession of ignorance, and an appeal for information” (Swete), not of full confidence like συ οιδας — su oidas in John 21:15.They which come out of the great tribulation Present middle participle with the idea of continued repetition. “The martyrs are still arriving from the scene of the great tribulation” (Charles). Apparently some great crisis is contemplated (Matthew 13:19.; Matthew 24:21; Mark 13:10), though the whole series may be in mind and so may anticipate final judgment.And they washed (και επλυναν — kai eplunan). First aorist active indicative of πλυνω — plunō old verb, to wash, in N.T. only Luke 5:2; Revelation 7:14; Revelation 22:14. This change of construction after οι ερχομενοι — hoi erchomenoi from οι πλυνησαντες — hoi plunēsantes to και επλυναν — kai eplunan is common in the Apocalypse, one of Charles‘s Hebraisms, like και εποιησεν — kai epoiēsen in Revelation 1:6 and και πλαναι — kai planāi in Revelation 2:20.Made them white First aorist active indicative of λευκαινω — leukainō to whiten, old verb from λευκος — leukos (Revelation 7:13), in N.T. only here and Mark 9:3. “Milligan remarks that robes are the expression of character and compares the word habit used of dress” (Vincent). The language here comes partly from Genesis 49:11 and partly from Exodus 19:10, Exodus 19:14. For the cleansing power of Christ‘s blood see also Romans 3:25; Romans 5:9; Colossians 1:20: Ephesians 1:7; 1 Peter 1:2; Hebrews 9:14; 1 John 1:7; Revelation 1:5; Revelation 5:9; Revelation 22:14. “The aorists look back to the life on earth when the cleansing was effected” (Swete). See Philemon 2:12. for both divine and human aspects of salvation.In the blood of the Lamb (εν τωι αιματι του αρνιου — en tōi haimati tou arniou). There is power alone in the blood of Christ to cleanse from sin (1 John 1:7), not in the blood of the martyrs themselves. The result is “white,” not “red,” as one might imagine. [source]
Revelation 7:14 They which come out of the great tribulation [οι ερχομενοι εκ της τλιπσεως της μεγαλης]
Present middle participle with the idea of continued repetition. “The martyrs are still arriving from the scene of the great tribulation” (Charles). Apparently some great crisis is contemplated (Matthew 13:19.; Matthew 24:21; Mark 13:10), though the whole series may be in mind and so may anticipate final judgment.And they washed (και επλυναν — kai eplunan). First aorist active indicative of πλυνω — plunō old verb, to wash, in N.T. only Luke 5:2; Revelation 7:14; Revelation 22:14. This change of construction after οι ερχομενοι — hoi erchomenoi from οι πλυνησαντες — hoi plunēsantes to και επλυναν — kai eplunan is common in the Apocalypse, one of Charles‘s Hebraisms, like και εποιησεν — kai epoiēsen in Revelation 1:6 and και πλαναι — kai planāi in Revelation 2:20.Made them white First aorist active indicative of λευκαινω — leukainō to whiten, old verb from λευκος — leukos (Revelation 7:13), in N.T. only here and Mark 9:3. “Milligan remarks that robes are the expression of character and compares the word habit used of dress” (Vincent). The language here comes partly from Genesis 49:11 and partly from Exodus 19:10, Exodus 19:14. For the cleansing power of Christ‘s blood see also Romans 3:25; Romans 5:9; Colossians 1:20: Ephesians 1:7; 1 Peter 1:2; Hebrews 9:14; 1 John 1:7; Revelation 1:5; Revelation 5:9; Revelation 22:14. “The aorists look back to the life on earth when the cleansing was effected” (Swete). See Philemon 2:12. for both divine and human aspects of salvation.In the blood of the Lamb (εν τωι αιματι του αρνιου — en tōi haimati tou arniou). There is power alone in the blood of Christ to cleanse from sin (1 John 1:7), not in the blood of the martyrs themselves. The result is “white,” not “red,” as one might imagine. [source]

What do the individual words in Revelation 1:6 mean?

and He has made us a kingdom priests to the God Father of Him to Him [be] the glory the dominion to the ages of the ages Amen
καὶ ἐποίησεν ἡμᾶς βασιλείαν ἱερεῖς τῷ Θεῷ Πατρὶ αὐτοῦ αὐτῷ δόξα τὸ κράτος εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας τῶν αἰώνων ἀμήν

ἐποίησεν  He  has  made 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ποιέω  
Sense: to make.
ἡμᾶς  us 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Accusative 1st Person Plural
Root: ἐγώ  
Sense: I, me, my.
βασιλείαν  a  kingdom 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: βασιλεία  
Sense: royal power, kingship, dominion, rule.
ἱερεῖς  priests 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Plural
Root: ἱερεύς  
Sense: a priest, one who offers sacrifices and in general in busied with sacred rites.
τῷ  to  the 
Parse: Article, Dative Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
Θεῷ  God 
Parse: Noun, Dative Masculine Singular
Root: θεός  
Sense: a god or goddess, a general name of deities or divinities.
Πατρὶ  Father 
Parse: Noun, Dative Masculine Singular
Root: προπάτωρ 
Sense: generator or male ancestor.
αὐτοῦ  of  Him 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Root: αὐτός  
Sense: himself, herself, themselves, itself.
αὐτῷ  to  Him  [be] 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Dative Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Root: αὐτός  
Sense: himself, herself, themselves, itself.
δόξα  glory 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Feminine Singular
Root: δόξα  
Sense: opinion, judgment, view.
κράτος  dominion 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Neuter Singular
Root: κράτος  
Sense: force, strength.
αἰῶνας  ages 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Plural
Root: αἰών  
Sense: for ever, an unbroken age, perpetuity of time, eternity.
τῶν  of  the 
Parse: Article, Genitive Masculine Plural
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
αἰώνων  ages 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Plural
Root: αἰών  
Sense: for ever, an unbroken age, perpetuity of time, eternity.
ἀμήν  Amen 
Parse: Hebrew Word
Root: ἀμήν  
Sense: firm.