The Meaning of Matthew 7:24 Explained

Matthew 7:24

KJV: Therefore whosoever heareth these sayings of mine, and doeth them, I will liken him unto a wise man, which built his house upon a rock:

YLT: 'Therefore, every one who doth hear of me these words, and doth do them, I will liken him to a wise man who built his house upon the rock;

Darby: Whoever therefore hears these my words and does them, I will liken him to a prudent man, who built his house upon the rock;

ASV: Every one therefore that heareth these words of mine, and doeth them, shall be likened unto a wise man, who built his house upon the rock:

What does Matthew 7:24 Mean?

Context Summary

Matthew 7:24-29 - Building On Secure Foundations
In the Syrian summer, when the soil is baked hard by the intense heat, any spot will serve equally well as the site of a house. No one can say whether his neighbor has built well or ill-only the builder knows. But in the winter the rain falls in torrents and the valleys are filled with foaming floods, which sap all foundations that have not gripped the living rock.
To believe about Christ is not enough; we must believe in Him. We must come to Him as a Living Stone and become living stones, 1 Peter 2:4-8. We must not only listen to Him; we must obey Him. There must be living, unbroken unity and fellowship between Him and us. Then we may proceed to erect the structure of godly and holy living which shall grow into a holy temple in the Lord, 1 Corinthians 3:10-15. May we receive, with meekness, the engrafting of the Word, which is able to save the soul! [source]

Chapter Summary: Matthew 7

1  Do Not Judge
7  Ask, Seek, Knock
13  Enter through the Narrow Gate
15  A Tree and Its Fruit
24  The Wise and the Foolish Builders
28  Jesus ends his sermon, and the people are astonished

Greek Commentary for Matthew 7:24

And doeth them [και ποιει αυτους]
That is the point in the parable of the wise builder, “who digged and went deep, and laid a foundation upon the rock” (Luke 6:48). [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Matthew 7:24

Matthew 13:3 Many things in parables [πολλα εν παραβολαις]
It was not the first time that Jesus had used parables, but the first time that he had spoken so many and some of such length. He will use a great many in the future as in Luke 12 to 18 and Matt. 24 and 25. The parables already mentioned in Matthew include the salt and the light (Matthew 5:13-16), the birds and the lilies (Matthew 6:26-30), the splinter and the beam in the eye (Matthew 7:3-5), the two gates (Matthew 7:13.), the wolves in sheep‘s clothing (Matthew 7:15), the good and bad trees (Matthew 7:17-19), the wise and foolish builders (Matthew 7:24-27), the garment and the wineskins (Matthew 9:16.), the children in the market places (Matthew 11:16.). It is not certain how many he spoke on this occasion. Matthew mentions eight in this chapter (the Sower, the Tares, the Mustard Seed, the Leaven, the Hid Treasure, the Pearl of Great Price, the Net, the Householder). Mark adds the Parable of the Lamp (Mark 4:21; Luke 8:16), the Parable of the Seed Growing of Itself (Mark 4:26-29), making ten of which we know. But both Mark (Mark 4:33) and Matthew (Matthew 13:34) imply that there were many others. “Without a parable spake he nothing unto them” (Matthew 13:34), on this occasion, we may suppose. The word parable There are parables in the Old Testament, in the Talmud, in sermons in all ages. But no one has spoken such parables as these of Jesus. They hold the mirror up to nature and, as all illustrations should do, throw light on the truth presented. The fable puts things as they are not in nature, Aesop‘s Fables, for instance. The parable may not be actual fact, but it could be so. It is harmony with the nature of the case. The allegory John does not use the word parable, but only παροιμια — paroimia a saying by the way (John 10:6; John 16:25, John 16:29). As a rule the parables of Jesus illustrate one main point and the details are more or less incidental, though sometimes Jesus himself explains these. When he does not do so, we should be slow to interpret the minor details. Much heresy has come from fantastic interpretations of the parables. In the case of the Parable of the Sower (Matthew 13:3-8) we have also the careful exposition of the story by Jesus (Matthew 13:18-23) as well as the reason for the use of parables on this occasion by Jesus (Matthew 13:9-17). [source]
Luke 6:47 I will shew you to whom he is like []
Peculiar to Luke. See on Matthew 7:24. [source]
Luke 16:8 Wisely [φρονίμως]
See on Matthew 10:16. Wyc., prudently. I would suggest shrewdly, though in the modern sense of sagaciously, since the earlier sense of shrewd was malicious, or wicked. Plato says: “All knowledge separated from righteousness and other virtue appears to be cunning and not wisdom. ” In Matthew 7:24-26, it is applied to the sagacious man who built his house on the rock, opposed to the foolish ( μωρός ) man who built on the sand. “It is a middle term, not bringing out prominently the moral characteristics, either good or evil, of the action to which it is applied, but recognizing in it a skilful adaptation of the means to the end - affirming nothing in the way of moral approbation or disapprobation, either of means or end, but leaving their worth to be determined by other considerations” (Trench, “Parables”). [source]
Luke 6:47 Hears and does [ακουων και ποιων]
Present active participles. So in Matthew 7:24. (Present indicative.) [source]
Luke 8:21 These which hear the word of God and do it [οι τον λογον του τεου ακουοντες και ποιουντες]
The absence of the article with “mother” and “brothers” probably means, as Plummer argues, “Mother to me and brothers to me are those who &c.” No one is a child of God because of human parentage (John 1:13). “Family ties are at best temporal; spiritual ties are eternal” (Plummer). Note the use of “hear and do” together here as in Matthew 7:24; Luke 6:47 at the close of the Sermon on the Mount. The parable of the sower is almost like a footnote to that sermon. Later Jesus will make “doing” a test of friendship for him (John 15:14). [source]
John 14:2 House [οἰκίᾳ]
The dwelling-place. Used primarily of the edifice (Matthew 7:24; Matthew 8:14; Matthew 9:10; Acts 4:34). Of the family or all the persons inhabiting the house (Matthew 12:25; John 4:53; 1 Corinthians 16:15; Matthew 10:13). Of property (Matthew 23:14; Mark 12:40). Here meaning heaven. [source]
John 12:47 If any one [εαν τις]
Third-class condition with εαν — ean and first aorist active subjunctive Purpose clause again (cf. ινα κρινω — hina krinō just before) with ινα — hina and first aorist active of sōzō Exaggerated contrast again, “not so much to judge, but also to save.” See John 3:17 for same contrast. And yet Jesus does judge the world inevitably (John 8:15.; John 9:39), but his primary purpose is to save the world (John 3:16). See close of the Sermon on the Mount for the same insistence on hearing and keeping (obeying) the words of Jesus (Matthew 7:24, Matthew 7:26) and also Luke 11:28. [source]
1 John 3:10 Doeth not righteousness [ο μη ποιων δικαιοσυνην]
Habit (linear present participle) again of not doing righteousness, as in 1 John 3:7 of doing it. Cf. ποιει — poiei and μη ποιων — mē poiōn (doing and not doing) in Matthew 7:24, Matthew 7:26.Neither (και — kai). Literally, “and,” but with the ellipsis of ουκ εστιν εκ του τεου — ouk estin ek tou theou (is not of God). The addition here of this one item about not loving (μη αγαπων — mē agapōn) one‘s brother is like Paul‘s summary in Romans 13:9, a striking illustration of the general principle just laid down and in accord with 1 John 2:9-11. [source]
Revelation 1:3 And keep [και τηρουντες]
Present active participle of τηρεω — tēreō a common Johannine word (1 John 2:4, etc.). Cf. Matthew 7:24. “The content of the Apocalypse is not merely prediction; moral counsel and religious instruction are the primary burdens of its pages” (Moffatt).Written (γεγραμμενα — gegrammena). Perfect passive participle of γραπω — graphō the time is at hand (ο γαρ καιρος εγγυς — ho gar kairos eggus). Reason for listening and keeping. On καιρος — kairos see Matthew 12:1, time of crisis as in 1 Corinthians 7:29. How near εγγυς — eggus (at hand) is we do not know any more than we do about εν ταχει — en tachei (shortly) in Revelation 1:1. [source]
Revelation 1:3 He that readeth [ο αναγινωσκων]
Present active singular articular participle of αναγινωσκω — anaginōskō (as in Luke 4:16). Christians in their public worship followed the Jewish custom of public reading of the Scriptures (2 Corinthians 3:14.). The church reader Present active plural articular participle of ακουω — akouō (the audience).And keep Present active participle of τηρεω — tēreō a common Johannine word (1 John 2:4, etc.). Cf. Matthew 7:24. “The content of the Apocalypse is not merely prediction; moral counsel and religious instruction are the primary burdens of its pages” (Moffatt).Written (γεγραμμενα — gegrammena). Perfect passive participle of γραπω — graphō the time is at hand (ο γαρ καιρος εγγυς — ho gar kairos eggus). Reason for listening and keeping. On καιρος — kairos see Matthew 12:1, time of crisis as in 1 Corinthians 7:29. How near εγγυς — eggus (at hand) is we do not know any more than we do about εν ταχει — en tachei (shortly) in Revelation 1:1. [source]

What do the individual words in Matthew 7:24 mean?

Everyone therefore whoever hears My - words these and does them will be like a man wise who built his - house upon the rock
Πᾶς οὖν ὅστις ἀκούει μου τοὺς λόγους τούτους καὶ ποιεῖ αὐτούς ὁμοιωθήσεται ἀνδρὶ φρονίμῳ ὅστις ᾠκοδόμησεν αὐτοῦ τὴν οἰκίαν ἐπὶ τὴν πέτραν

Πᾶς  Everyone 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: πᾶς  
Sense: individually.
ὅστις  whoever 
Parse: Personal / Relative Pronoun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: ὅστις  
Sense: whoever, whatever, who.
ἀκούει  hears 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἀκουστός 
Sense: to be endowed with the faculty of hearing, not deaf.
μου  My 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive 1st Person Singular
Root: ἐγώ  
Sense: I, me, my.
τοὺς  - 
Parse: Article, Accusative Masculine Plural
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
λόγους  words 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Plural
Root: λόγος  
Sense: of speech.
τούτους  these 
Parse: Demonstrative Pronoun, Accusative Masculine Plural
Root: οὗτος  
Sense: this.
ποιεῖ  does 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ποιέω  
Sense: to make.
ὁμοιωθήσεται  will  be  like 
Parse: Verb, Future Indicative Passive, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ὁμοιόω  
Sense: to be made like.
ἀνδρὶ  a  man 
Parse: Noun, Dative Masculine Singular
Root: ἀνήρ  
Sense: with reference to sex.
φρονίμῳ  wise 
Parse: Adjective, Dative Masculine Singular
Root: φρόνιμος  
Sense: intelligent, wise.
ᾠκοδόμησεν  built 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: οἰκοδομέω 
Sense: to build a house, erect a building.
αὐτοῦ  his 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Root: αὐτός  
Sense: himself, herself, themselves, itself.
τὴν  - 
Parse: Article, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
οἰκίαν  house 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: οἰκία  
Sense: a house.
ἐπὶ  upon 
Parse: Preposition
Root: ἐπί  
Sense: upon, on, at, by, before.
πέτραν  rock 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: πέτρα  
Sense: a rock, cliff or ledge.