The Meaning of Matthew 26:2 Explained

Matthew 26:2

KJV: Ye know that after two days is the feast of the passover, and the Son of man is betrayed to be crucified.

YLT: 'Ye have known that after two days the passover cometh, and the Son of Man is delivered up to be crucified.'

Darby: Ye know that after two days the passover takes place, and the Son of man is delivered up to be crucified.

ASV: Ye know that after two days the passover cometh, and the Son of man is delivered up to be crucified.

What is the context of Matthew 26:2?

What does Matthew 26:2 Mean?

Context Summary

Matthew 26:1-13 - Love's Fragrant Ministry
How great the contrast between the plotting in the court of Caiaphas and the love-ministry of Bethany! Yet even there, a strain of needless sorrow was added to the cup of our Lord. While His foes were plotting His destruction, it became necessary for Him to speak on behalf of the devoted woman who was suffering criticism for His Name. It is probable that, of all people then living, Mary was the only one who had really entered into the meaning of the Lord's words and had realized the scenes of suffering that lay before Him. Through the succeeding hours the aroma of that ointment, lingering still on His person, must have sweetly reminded Jesus how dearly He was loved.
Mary is not named in this Gospel, perhaps because it was written during her lifetime and such a reference might have exposed her to suffering. But in the fourth Gospel she is named, because by that time the whole family had gone into the presence of Him whom they so devotedly loved. Do not be deterred by utilitarian calculations from the spontaneous expression of love to Jesus. [source]

Chapter Summary: Matthew 26

1  Jesus foretells his own death
3  The rulers conspire against him
6  The woman anoints his feet
14  Judas bargains to betray him
17  Jesus eats the Passover;
26  institutes his holy supper;
30  foretells the desertion of his disciples, and Peter's denial;
36  prays in the garden;
47  and being betrayed by a kiss,
57  is carried to Caiaphas,
69  and denied by Peter

Greek Commentary for Matthew 26:2

Cometh [γινεται]
Futuristic use of the present middle indicative. This was probably our Tuesday evening (beginning of Jewish Wednesday). The passover began on our Thursday evening (beginning of Jewish Friday). [source]
After two days [μετα δυο ημερας]
Another instance of the futuristic present passive indicative. The same form occurs in Matthew 26:24. Thus Jesus sets a definite date for the coming crucifixion which he has been predicting for six months. [source]
Is delivered up [παραδιδοται]
Another instance of the futuristic present passive indicative. The same form occurs in Matthew 26:24. Thus Jesus sets a definite date for the coming crucifixion which he has been predicting for six months. [source]
Is betrayed [παραδίδοται]
The present tense expresses here something which, though future, is as good as present, because already determined, or because it must ensue in virtue of an unalterable law. Thus the passover is ( γίνεται ): it must come round at the fixed season. The Son of Man is betrayed according to the divine decree. Compare Matthew 26:24. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Matthew 26:2

Matthew 26:64 Thou hast said []
An affirmation. You have spoken the truth. What thou hast asked me is the fact. Compare Matthew 26:25. [source]
Matthew 26:2 Is betrayed [παραδίδοται]
The present tense expresses here something which, though future, is as good as present, because already determined, or because it must ensue in virtue of an unalterable law. Thus the passover is ( γίνεται ): it must come round at the fixed season. The Son of Man is betrayed according to the divine decree. Compare Matthew 26:24. [source]
Matthew 26:2 After two days [μετα δυο ημερας]
Another instance of the futuristic present passive indicative. The same form occurs in Matthew 26:24. Thus Jesus sets a definite date for the coming crucifixion which he has been predicting for six months. [source]
Matthew 26:2 Is delivered up [παραδιδοται]
Another instance of the futuristic present passive indicative. The same form occurs in Matthew 26:24. Thus Jesus sets a definite date for the coming crucifixion which he has been predicting for six months. [source]
Matthew 26:17 To eat the passover [παγειν το πασχα]
There were two feasts rolled into one, the passover feast and the feast of unleavened bread. Either name was employed. Here the passover meal is meant, though in John 18:28 it is probable that the passover feast is referred to as the passover meal (the last supper) had already been observed. There is a famous controversy on the apparent disagreement between the Synoptic Gospels and the Fourth Gospel on the date of this last passover meal. My view is that the five passages in John (John 13:1., John 13:27; John 18:28; John 19:14, John 19:31) rightly interpreted agree with the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew 26:17, Matthew 26:20; Mark 14:12, Mark 14:17; Luke 22:7, Luke 22:14) that Jesus ate the passover meal at the regular time about 6 p.m. beginning of 15 Nisan. The passover lamb was slain on the afternoon of 14 Nisan and the meal eaten at sunset the beginning of 15 Nisan. According to this view Jesus ate the passover meal at the regular time and died on the cross the afternoon of 15 Nisan. See my Harmony of the Gospels for Students of the Life of Christ, pp.279-284. The question of the disciples here assumes that they are to observe the regular passover meal. Note the deliberative subjunctive (ετοιμασωμεν — hetoimasōmen) after τελεις — theleis with ινα — hina For the asyndeton see Robertson, Grammar, p. 935. [source]
Matthew 26:22 Is it I, Lord? [μητι εγω ειμι Κυριε]
The negative expects the answer No and was natural for all save Judas. But he had to bluff it out by the same form of question (Matthew 26:25). The answer of Jesus, [source]
Matthew 26:23 He that dipped [ο εμβαπσας]
They all dipped their hands, having no knives, forks, or spoons. The aorist participle with the article simply means that the betrayer is the one who dips his hand in the dish (εν τωι τρυβλιωι — en tōi trubliōi) or platter with the broth of nuts and raisins and figs into which the bread was dipped before eating. It is plain that Judas was not recognized by the rest as indicated by what Jesus has said. This language means that one of those who had eaten bread with him had violated the rights of hospitality by betraying him. The Arabs today are punctilious on this point. Eating one‘s bread ties your hands and compels friendship. But Judas knew full well as is shown in Matthew 26:25 though the rest apparently did not grasp it. [source]
Matthew 27:32 His cross [τον σταυρον αυτου]
Jesus had used the term cross about himself (Matthew 16:24). It was a familiar enough picture under Roman rule. Jesus had long foreseen and foretold this horrible form of death for himself (Matthew 20:19; Matthew 23:24; Matthew 26:2). He had heard the cry of the mob to Pilate that he be crucified (Matthew 27:22) and Pilate‘s surrender (Matthew 27:26) and he was on the way to the Cross (Matthew 27:31). There were various kinds of crosses and we do not know precisely the shape of the Cross on which Jesus was crucified, though probably the one usually presented is correct. Usually the victim was nailed (hands and feet) to the cross before it was raised and it was not very high. The crucifixion was done by the soldiers (Matthew 27:35) in charge and two robbers were crucified on each side of Jesus, three crosses standing in a row (Matthew 27:38). [source]
Mark 9:31 Is delivered []
The present tense is graphic. The future is realized by the Lord as already present. See on sa40" translation="">Matthew 26:2.sa40 [source]
Mark 14:24 Covenant []
See on Matthew 26:28. [source]
Mark 14:25 New []
See on Matthew 26:29. [source]
Mark 14:20 Dish [τρυβλίου]
See on Matthew 26:23. [source]
Mark 14:1 After two days [μετα δυο ημερας]
This was Tuesday evening as we count time (beginning of the Jewish Wednesday). In Matthew 26:2 Jesus is reported as naming this same date which would put it our Thursday evening, beginning of the Jewish Friday. The Gospel of John mentions five items that superficially considered seem to contradict this definite date in Mark and Matthew, but which are really in harmony with them. See discussion on Matthew 26:17 and my Harmony of the Gospels, pp. 279 to 284. Mark calls it here the feast of “the passover and the unleavened bread,” both names covering the eight days. Sometimes “passover” is applied to only the first day, sometimes to the whole period. No sharp distinction in usage was observed. [source]
Mark 14:20 One of the twelve [εις των δωδεκα]
It is as bad as that. The sign that Jesus gave, the one dipping in the dish with me (ο εμβαπτομενος μετ εμου εις το τρυβλιον — ho embaptomenos met' emou eis to trublion), escaped the notice of all. Jesus gave the sop to Judas who understood perfectly that Jesus knew his purpose. See Matthew 26:21-24 for further details. [source]
Mark 14:23 A cup [ποτηριον]
Probably the ordinary wine of the country mixed with two-thirds water, though the word for wine See notes on Matthew 26:26-29 for discussion of important details. Mark and Matthew give substantially the same account of the institution of the Supper by Jesus, while Luke 22:17-20 agrees closely with 1 Corinthians 11:23-26 where Paul claims to have obtained his account by direct revelation from the Lord Jesus. [source]
Luke 22:20 Testament [διαθήκη]
See on Matthew 26:28. [source]
Luke 13:26 In thy presence [ἐνώπιον σοῦ]
Not as beloved and familiar guests. Compare with you ( μεθ ' ὑμῶν ) Matthew 26:29. [source]
Luke 6:20 Kingdom of God [ἡ βασιλεία τοῦ θεοῦ]
Matthew has kingdom of heaven, or of the heavens ( τῶν οὐρανῶν )a phrase used by him only, and most frequently employed by Christ himself to describe the kingdom; though Matthew also uses, less frequently, kingdom of God. The two are substantially equivalent terms, though the pre-eminent title was kingdom of God, since it was expected to be fully realized in the Messianic era, when God should take upon himself the kingdom by a visible representative. Compare Isaiah 40:9, “Behold your God. ” The phrase kingdom of Heaven was common in the Rabbinical writings, and had a double signification: the historical kingdom and the spiritual and moral kingdom. They very often understood by it divine worship; adoration of God; the sum of religious duties; but also the Messianic kingdom. The kingdom of God is, essentially, the absolute dominion of God in the universe, both in a physical and a spiritual sense. It is “an organic commonwealth which has the principle of its existence in the will of God” (Tholuck). It was foreshadowed in the Jewish theocracy. The idea of the kingdom advanced toward clearer definition from Jacob's prophecy of the Prince out of Judah (Genesis 49:10), through David's prophecy of the everlasting kingdom and the king of righteousness and peace (Daniel 7:14-27; Daniel 4:25; Daniel 2:44). In this sense it was apprehended by John the Baptist. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The ideal kingdom is to be realized in the absolute rule of the eternal Son, Jesus Christ, by whom all things are made and consist (John 1:3; Colossians 1:16-20), whose life of perfect obedience to God and whose sacrificial offering of love upon the cross reveal to men their true relation to God, and whose spirit works to bring them into this relation. The ultimate idea of the kingdom is that of “a redeemed humanity, with its divinely revealed destiny manifesting itself in a religious communion, or the Church; asocial communion, or the state; and an aesthetic communion, expressing itself in forms of knowledge and art.”-DIVIDER-
This kingdom is both present (Matthew 11:12; Matthew 12:28; Matthew 16:19; Luke 11:20; Luke 16:16; Luke 17:21; see, also, the parables of the Sower, the Tares, the Leaven, and the Drag-net; and compare the expression “theirs, or yours, is the kingdom,” Matthew 5:3; Luke 6:20) and future (Daniel 7:27; Matthew 13:43; Matthew 19:28; Matthew 25:34; Matthew 26:29; Mark 9:47; 2 Peter 1:11; 1 Corinthians 6:9; Revelation 20:1-15 sq.). As a present kingdom it is incomplete and in process of development. It is expanding in society like the grain of mustard seed (Matthew 13:31, Matthew 13:32); working toward the pervasion of society like the leaven in the lump (Matthew 13:33). God is in Christ reconciling the world unto himself, and the Gospel of Christ is the great instrument in that process (2 Corinthians 5:19, 2 Corinthians 5:20). The kingdom develops from within outward under the power of its essential divine energy and law of growth, which insures its progress and final triumph against all obstacles. Similarly, its work in reconciling and subjecting the world to God begins at the fountain-head of man's life, by implanting in his heart its own divine potency, and thus giving a divine impulse and direction to the whole man, rather than by moulding him from without by a moral code. The law is written in his heart. In like manner the State and the Church are shaped, not by external pressure, like the Roman empire and the Roxnish hierarchy, but by the evolution of holy character in men. The kingdom of God in its present development is not identical with the Church. It is a larger movement which includes the Church. The Church is identified with the kingdom to the degree in which it is under the power of the spirit of Christ. “As the Old Testament kingdom of God was perfected and completed when it ceased to be external, and became internal by being enthroned in the heart, so, on the other hand, the perfection of the New Testament kingdom will consist in its complete incarnation and externalization; that is, when it shall attain an outward manifestation, adequately expressing, exactly corresponding to its internal principle” (Tholuck). The consummation is described in Revelation 21,22. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
[source]

Luke 22:1 Drew nigh [ηγγιζεν]
Imperfect active. Mark 14:1; Matthew 26:2 mention “after two days” definitely. [source]
Luke 22:18 The fruit of the vine [του γενηματος της αμπελου]
So Mark 14:25; Matthew 26:29 and not οινος — oinos though it was wine undoubtedly. But the language allows anything that is “the fruit of the vine.” [source]
Luke 22:20 The New Covenant [ε καινη διατηκη]
See note on Matthew 26:28; Mark 14:24 for “covenant.” Westcott and Hort reject “new” there, but accept it here and in 1 Corinthians 11:25. See Luke 5:38 for difference between kainē and nea “The ratification of a covenant was commonly associated with the shedding of blood; and what was written in blood was believed to be indelible” (Plummer).Poured out (καινη — ekchunnomenon). Same word in Mark 14:24; Matthew 26:28 translated “shed.” Late form present passive participle of νεα — ekchunnō of εκχυννομενον — ekcheō to pour out. [source]
Luke 22:20 Poured out [καινη]
Same word in Mark 14:24; Matthew 26:28 translated “shed.” Late form present passive participle of νεα — ekchunnō of εκχυννομενον — ekcheō to pour out. [source]
John 19:41 New [καινὸν]
See on Matthew 26:29. John omits the detail of the tomb being hewn in the rock, which is common to all the Synoptists. [source]
John 13:34 New [καινὴν]
See on Matthew 26:29. [source]
John 13:26 Dipped the sop []
Compare Matthew 26:23; Mark 14:20. The regular sop of the Paschal supper consisted of the following things wrapped together: flesh of the Paschal lamb, a piece of unleavened bread, and bitter herbs. The sauce into which it was dipped does not belong to the original institution, but had been introduced before the days of Christ. According to one authority it consisted of only vinegar and water (compare Rth 2:14 ); others describe it as a mixture of vinegar, figs, dates, almonds, and spice. The flour which was used to thicken the sauce on ordinary occasions was forbidden at the Passover by the Rabbins, lest it might occasion a slight fermentation. According to some, the sauce was beaten up to the consistence of mortar, in order to commemorate the toils of the Israelites in laying bricks in Egypt. [source]
John 13:11 Who should betray [τὸν παραδιδόντα]
Literally, him that is betraying. So in Matthew 26:2, the present tense is used, is being betrayed [source]
John 13:22 Looked one on another [εβλεπον εις αλληλους]
Inchoative imperfect of βλεπω — blepō “began to glance at one another in bewilderment” (doubting, απορουμενοι — aporoumenoi present passive participle of απορεω — aporeō to be at a loss, to lose one‘s way, α — a privative and πορος — poros way). They recalled their strife about precedence and Judas betrayed nothing. Concerning whom he spake Indirect question retaining present active indicative λεγει — legei See same on Mark 14:19; note on Matthew 26:22; and note on Luke 22:23. [source]
John 13:26 He [εκεινος]
Emphatic pronoun again. For whom I shall dip the sop Dative case of the relative Πσωμιον — Psōmion is a diminutive of πσωμος — psōmos a morsel, a common Koiné word (in the papyri often), in N.T. only in this passage. It was and is in the orient a token of intimacy to allow a guest to dip his bread in the common dish (cf. Rth 2:14). So Mark 14:20. Even Judas had asked: “Is it I?” (Mark 14:19; Matthew 26:22). Giveth it to Judas Unobserved by the others in spite of Christ‘s express language, because “it was so usual a courtesy” (Bernard), “the last appeal to Judas‘ better feeling” (Dods). Judas now knew that Jesus knew his plot. [source]
John 1:38 Turned [στραπεις]
Second aorist passive participle of στρεπω — strephō vividly picturing the sudden act of Jesus on hearing their steps behind him. Beheld First aorist middle participle of τεαομαι — theaomai (John 1:32). Both participles here express antecedent action to λεγει — legei (saith). Following Present active participle of ακολουτεω — akoloutheō (John 1:37). It was Christ‘s first experience of this kind and the two came from the Baptist to Jesus. What seek ye? Not “whom” Aramaic title for “Teacher” which John here translates by Διδασκαλε — Didaskale as he is writing late and for general readers. Luke, a Greek Christian, does not use it, but John recalls his first use of this term to Jesus and explains it. Matthew has it only in the greeting of Judas to the Master (Matthew 26:25, Matthew 26:49) and Mark once by Judas (Mark 14:45) and twice by Peter (Mark 9:5; Mark 11:21). John‘s Gospel has the disciples at first addressing Jesus by Rabbi while others address him by Κυριε — Kurie (Lord or Sir) as in John 4:11, John 4:49; John 5:7. Peter uses Κυριε — Kurie in John 6:68. In the end the disciples usually say Κυριε — Kurie (John 13:6, John 13:25, etc.), but Mary Magdalene says αββουνει — Rabbounei (John 20:16). Being interpreted Present passive participle of μετερμηνευω — methermēneuō late compound of μετα — meta and ερμηνευω — hermēneuō to explain (John 1:42), old word from ερμες — Hermes the god of speech (hermeneutics). John often explains Aramaic words (John 1:38, John 1:41, John 1:42; John 4:25; John 9:7, etc.). Where abidest thou? They wished a place for quiet converse with Jesus. [source]
John 13:1 Now before the feast of the passover [προ δε της εορτης του πασχα]
Just before, John means, not twenty-four hours before, that is our Thursday evening (beginning of 15th of Nisan, sunset to sunset Jewish day), since Jesus was crucified on Friday 15th of Nisan. Hence Jesus ate the regular passover meal at the usual time. The whole feast, including the feast of unleavened bread, lasted eight days. For a discussion of the objections to this interpretation of John in connexion with the Synoptic Gospels one may consult my Harmony of the Gospels, pp. 279-84, and David Smith‘s In the Days of His Flesh, Appendix VIII. The passover feast began on the 15th Nisan at sunset, the passover lamb being slain the afternoon of 14th Nisan. There seems no real doubt that this meal in John 13:1-30 is the real passover meal described by the Synoptics also (Mark 14:18-21; Matthew 26:21-25; Luke 22:21-23), followed by the institution of the Lord‘s Supper. Thus understood John 13:1 here serves as an introduction to the great esoteric teaching of Christ to the apostles (John 13:2-17:26), called by Barnas Sears The Heart of Christ. This phrase goes with the principal verb ηγαπησεν — ēgapēsen (loved). Knowing Second perfect active participle, emphasizing the full consciousness of Christ. He was not stumbling into the dark as he faced “his hour” See John 18:4; John 19:28 for other examples of the insight and foresight (Bernard) of Jesus concerning his death. See on John 12:23 for use before by Jesus. That he should depart Sub-final use of ινα — hina with second aorist active subjunctive of μεταβαινω — metabainō old word, to go from one place to another, here (John 5:24; 1 John 3:14) to go from this world (John 8:23) back to the Father from whom he had come (John 14:12, John 14:28; John 16:10, John 16:28; John 17:5). His own which were in the world His own disciples (John 17:6, John 17:9, John 17:11), those left in the world when he goes to the Father, not the Jews as in John 1:11. See Acts 4:23; 1 Timothy 5:8 for the idiom. John pictures here the outgoing of Christ‘s very heart‘s love (chs. John 13-17) towards these men whom he had chosen and whom he loved “unto the end” (εις τελος — eis telos) as in Matthew 10:22; Luke 18:15, but here as in 1 Thessalonians 2:16 rather “to the uttermost.” The culmination of the crisis (“his hour”) naturally drew out the fulness of Christ‘s love for them as is shown in these great chapters (John 13-17). [source]
John 13:21 He was troubled in the spirit [εταραχτη τοι πνευματι]
First aorist passive indicative of ταρασσω — tarassō and the locative case of πνευμα — pneuma See note on John 11:33 and note on John 12:27 for this use of ταρασσω — tarassō for the agitation of Christ‘s spirit. In John 14:1, John 14:27 it is used of the disciples. Jesus was one with God (John 5:19) and yet he had our real humanity (John 1:14). Testified First aorist active indicative of μαρτυρεω — martureō definite witness as in John 4:44; John 18:37. One of you shall betray me Future active of παραδιδωμι — paradidōmi to betray, the word so often used of Judas. This very language occurs in Mark 14:18; Matthew 26:21 and the idea in Luke 22:21. Jesus had said a year ago that “one of you is a devil” (John 6:70), but it made no such stir then. Now it was a bolt from the blue sky as Jesus swept his eyes around and looked at the disciples. [source]
John 15:1 The true vine [η αμπελος η αλητινη]
“The vine the genuine.” Assuming that the Lord‘s Supper had just been instituted by Jesus the metaphor of the vine is naturally suggested by “the fruit of the vine” (Mark 14:25; Matthew 26:29). Αμπελος — Ampelos in the papyri (Moulton and Milligan‘s Vocabulary) is sometimes used in the sense of ο γεωργος — ampelōn (vineyard), but not so here. Jesus uses various metaphors to illustrate himself and his work (the light, John 8:12; the door, John 10:7; the shepherd, John 10:11; the vine, John 15:1). The vine was common in Palestine. See Psalm 80:8. “On the Maccabean coinage Israel was represented by a vine” (Dods). Jesus is the genuine Messianic vine. The husbandman (τεου γεωργιον — ho geōrgos) as in Mark 12:1; James 5:7; 2 Timothy 2:6. cf. 1 Corinthians 3:9, theou geōrgion (God‘s field). [source]
John 19:30 Had received [ελαβεν]
Second aorist active indicative of λαμβανω — lambanō Jesus took the vinegar (a stimulant), though he had refused the drugged vinegar. It is finished Same for as in John 19:28. A cry of victory in the hour of defeat like νενικηκα — nenikēka in John 16:33. Jesus knew the relation of his death to redemption for us (Mark 10:45; Matthew 20:28; Matthew 26:28). Bowed his head First aorist active participle of κλινω — klinō This vivid detail only in John. Gave up his spirit With the quotation of Psalm 31:5 according to Luke 23:46, “Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit” (the last of the seven sayings of Jesus on the Cross that are preserved for us). Jesus died with the words of this Psalm upon his lips. The apostle John had come back to the Cross. [source]
John 6:35 I am the bread of life [Εγω ειμι ο αρτος της ζωης]
This sublime sentence was startling in the extreme to the crowd. Philo does compare the manna to the τειος λογος — theios logos in an allegorical sense, but this language is far removed from Philo‘s vagueness. In the Synoptics (Mark 14:22; Matthew 26:26; Luke 22:19) Jesus uses bread He is the bread of life in two senses: it has life in itself, the living bread (John 6:51), and it gives life to others like the water of life, the tree of life. John often has Jesus saying “I am” As also in John 6:41, John 6:48, John 6:51; John 8:12; John 10:7, John 10:9, John 10:11, John 10:14; John 11:25; John 14:6; John 15:1, John 15:5. He that cometh to me The first act of the soul in approaching Jesus. See also John 6:37. Shall not hunger Strong double negative ου με — ou me with first aorist (ingressive) active subjunctive, “shall not become hungry.” He that believeth on me The continuous relation of trust after coming like πιστευητε — pisteuēte (present tense) in John 6:29. See both verbs used together also in John 7:37. Shall never thirst So the old MSS. the future active indicative instead of the aorist subjunctive as above, an even stronger form of negation with πωποτε — pōpote (John 1:18) added. [source]
Acts 3:25 Covenant [διαθήκης]
See on Matthew 26:28. [source]
Acts 1:1 Began [ἤρξατο]
This is interpreted in two ways. Either, (1), as a simple historical statement equivalent to “all that Jesus did and taught.” In favor of this is the fact that the synoptists often record that which is done or said according to its moment of commencement, thus giving vividness to the account. See Matthew 11:20; Matthew 26:22, Matthew 26:37; Mark 6:7; Mark 14:19; Luke 7:38, etc. According to this explanation the word serves “to recall to the recollection from the Gospel all the several incidents and events, up to the ascension, in which Jesus had appeared as doer and teacher” (Meyer). Or, (2), as indicating that the Gospel contains the beginning, and the Acts of the Apostles the continuation, of the doings and teachings of Jesus. “The earthly life of Jesus, concluded with the ascension, has its fruit and continued efficacy; and his heavenly life, commencing with the ascension, has its manifestation and proof in the acts and experiences of the apostles and first churches. The history of the Church was under the immediate control of the exalted Redeemer, and may justly be considered as the continuation in heaven of the work which he had begun on earth” (Baumgarten and Gloag). While the truth and importance of this statement are admitted, it is objected that such an intention on Luke's part would have been more clearly intimated, and not left to be inferred from a single doubtful phrase. As regards Luke's intention, I think the first explanation is more likely to be correct. The second, however, states a truth, the value and importance of which cannot be overestimated, and which should be kept in mind constantly in the study of the book of Acts. This is well put by Bernard (“Progress of Doctrine in the New TestamentLect. IV.): “Thus the history which follows is linked to, or (may I not rather say) welded with the past; and the founding of the Church in the earth is presented as one continuous work, begun by the Lord in person, and perfected by the same Lord through the ministry of men … . 'The former treatise' delivered to us, not all that Jesus did and taught, but 'all that Jesus began to do and teach until the day when he was taken up.' The following writings appear intended to give us, and do, in fact, profess to give us, that which Jesus continued to do and teach after the day in which he was taken up.” [source]
Acts 3:25 The covenant which God made [της διατηκης ης ο τεος διετετο]
Literally, “the covenant which God covenanted.” Διατηκη — Diathēkē and διετετο — dietheto (second aorist middle indicative of διατημι — diathēmi) are the same root. See note on Matthew 26:28. The covenant (agreement between two, diatithēmi) was with Abraham (Genesis 12:1-3) and repeated at various times (Genesis 18:18; Genesis 22:18; Genesis 26:4, etc.). In Hebrews 9:15-18 the word is used both for covenant and will. The genitive relative δια τιτημι — hēs attracted to case of the antecedent. [source]
Romans 1:24 Gave them up [παρέδωκεν]
Handed them over to the power of sin. See on Matthew 4:12; see on Matthew 11:27; see on Matthew 26:2; see on Mark 4:29; see on Luke 1:2; see on 1 Peter 2:23. [source]
Romans 9:4 The covenants [αἱ διαθῆκαι]
See on Matthew 26:28. Those concluded with the patriarchs since Abraham. See Galatians 3:16, Galatians 3:17; Ephesians 2:12. The plural never occurs in the Old Testament. See on Hebrews 9:16. [source]
1 Corinthians 5:7 New [νέον]
See on Matthew 26:29. [source]
1 Corinthians 11:25 The new covenant [η καινη διατηκη]
For διατηκη — diathēkē see note on Matthew 26:28. For καινος — kainos see Luke 5:38 and note on Luke 22:20. The position of εστιν — estin before εν τωι αιματι — en tōi haimati (in my blood) makes it a secondary or additional predicate and not to be taken just with διατηκη — diathēkē (covenant or will). As oft as ye drink it (οσακις αν πινητε — hosakis an pinēte). Usual construction for general temporal clause of repetition (αν — an and the present subjunctive with οσακις — hosakis). So in 1 Corinthians 11:26. [source]
1 Corinthians 11:26 Till he come [αχρι ου ελτηι]
Common idiom (with or without αν — an) with the aorist subjunctive for future time (Robertson, Grammar, p. 975). In Luke 22:18 we have εως ου ελτηι — heōs hou elthēi The Lord‘s Supper is the great preacher (καταγγελλετε — kataggellete) of the death of Christ till his second coming (Matthew 26:29). [source]
1 Corinthians 11:25 Testament [διαθήκη]
Rev., correctly, covenant. See on Matthew 26:28. The Hebrew word is derived from a verb meaning to cut. Hence the connection of dividing the victims with the ratification of a covenant. See Genesis 15:9-18. A similar usage appears in the Homeric phrase ὅρκια πιστὰ ταμεῖν , lit., to cut trustworthy oaths, whence the word oaths is used for the victims sacrificed in ratification of a covenant or treaty. See Homer, “Iliad,” ii., 124; 3. 73,93. So the Latin foedus ferire “to kill a league,” whence our phrase to strike a compact. In the Septuagint proper, where it occurs nearly three hundred times, διαθήκη , in all but four passages, is the translation of the Hebrew word for covenant (berith ). In those four it is used to render brotherhood and words of the covenant. In Philo it has the same sense as in the Septuagint, and covenant is its invariable sense in the New Testament. [source]
2 Corinthians 3:6 Of the new testament [καινῆς διαθήκης]
See on Matthew 26:28, Matthew 26:29. There is no article. Render, as Rev., of a new covenant, in contrast with the Mosaic. See on Hebrews 9:15. Of course the term is never applied in the gospels or epistles to the collection of New-Testament writings. [source]
2 Corinthians 3:6 As ministers of a new covenant [διακονους καινης διατηκης]
Predicate accusative with ικανωσεν — hikanōsen For διατηκη — diathēkē see note on Matthew 26:28 and for διακονος — diakonos see note on Matthew 20:26 and for καινης — kainēs (fresh and effective) see Luke 5:38. Only God can make us that. [source]
Galatians 6:15 A new creature [καινὴ κτίσις]
Comp. 2 Corinthians 5:17. For καινὴ newsee on Matthew 26:29. For κτίσις see on Romans 8:19; see on 2 Corinthians 5:17. Here of the thing created, not of the act of creating. The phrase was common in Jewish writers for one brought to the knowledge of the true God. Comp. Ephesians 2:10, Ephesians 2:15. [source]
Galatians 4:24 For these are []
Hagar and Sarah are, allegorically. Signify. Comp. Matthew 13:20, Matthew 13:38; Matthew 26:26, Matthew 26:28; 1 Corinthians 10:4, 1 Corinthians 10:16. [source]
Galatians 3:8 Would justify [δικαιοῖ]
Better justifieth. The present tense. The time foreseen was the Christian present. Comp. 1 Corinthians 3:13; Matthew 26:2. [source]
Galatians 3:15 Covenant [διαθήκην]
Not testament. See on Matthew 26:28, and see on Hebrews 9:16. [source]
Galatians 4:22 By the handmaid [εκ της παιδισκης]
From Genesis 16:1. Feminine diminutive of παις — pais boy or slave. Common word for damsel which came to be used for female slave or maidservant (Luke 12:45) or doorkeeper like Matthew 26:29. So in the papyri. [source]
Galatians 3:15 Though it be but a man‘s covenant, yet when it hath been confirmed [ομως αντρωπου κεκυρωμενην διατηκην]
Literally, “Yet a man‘s covenant ratified.” On Διατηκη — Diathēkē as both covenant and will see note on Matthew 26:28; note on 1 Corinthians 11:25; note on 2 Corinthians 3:6; notes on Hebrews 9:16. On κυροω — kuroō to ratify, to make valid, see note on 2 Corinthians 2:8. Perfect passive participle here, state of completion, authoritative confirmation. Maketh it void (ατετει — athetei). See note on Galatians 2:21 for this verb. Both parties can by agreement cancel a contract, but not otherwise. Addeth thereto Present middle indicative of the double compound verb επιδιατασσομαι — epidiatassomai a word found nowhere else as yet. But inscriptions use διατασσομαι διαταχισ διαταγη διαταγμα — diatassomaiεπι — diataxisδιαταχεις — diatagēdiatagma with the specialized meaning to “determine by testamentary disposition” (Deissmann, Light from the Ancient East, p. 90). It was unlawful to add (epi) fresh clauses or specifications (diataxeis). [source]
Ephesians 4:24 New man [καινὸν]
See on Matthew 26:29. [source]
Ephesians 4:19 Have given themselves over [παρέδωκαν]
See on Matthew 4:12; see on Matthew 11:27; see on Matthew 26:2; see on Mark 4:29; see on Luke 1:2; see on 1 Peter 2:23. The verb is frequently used of Christ giving Himself for the world. Romans 4:25; Galatians 2:20; Ephesians 5:5, Ephesians 5:25. It indicates a complete surrender. Meyer says, “with frightful emphasis.” Where men persistently give themselves up to evil, God gives them up to its power. See Romans 1:24. [source]
Ephesians 2:15 Of the twain one new man [τοὺς δύο εἰς ἕνα καινὸν ἄνθρωπον]
The Greek is livelier: make the two into one new man. Καινὸν newemphasizes the new quality; not newness in point of time. See on Matthew 26:29. [source]
Philippians 2:26 Was full of heaviness [ἦν ἀδημονῶν]
Rev., was sore troubled. Used of Christ in Gethsemane, Matthew 26:27. [source]
Colossians 3:10 New [νέον]
See on Matthew 26:29. Compare Ephesians 5:24. [source]
2 Timothy 4:18 Heavenly kingdom [τὴν βασιλείαν τὴν ἐπουράνιον]
The phrase N.T.o Ἑπουράνιος heavenlyonly here in Pastorals. Mostly in Paul and Hebrews. Heavenly kingdom, here the future, glorified life, as 1 Corinthians 6:9, 1 Corinthians 6:10; 1 Corinthians 15:50; Luke 13:29. In the same sense, kingdom of Christ and of God, Ephesians 5:5; kingdom of their Father, Matthew 13:43; my Father's kingdom, Matthew 26:29; kingdom prepared for you, Matthew 25:34; eternal kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, 2 Peter 1:11. [source]
2 Timothy 1:12 That day [ἐκείνην τὴν ἡμέραν]
The day of Christ's second appearing. See on 1 Thessalonians 5:2. In this sense the phrase occurs in the N.T. Epistles only 2 Timothy 1:18; 2 Timothy 4:8; 2 Thessalonians 1:10; but often in the Gospels, as Matthew 7:22; Matthew 26:29; Mark 13:32, etc. The day of the Lord's appearing is designated by Paul as ἡ ἡμέρα , absolutely, the day, Romans 13:12; 1 Corinthians 3:13; 1 Thessalonians 5:4: ἡμέρα τοῦ κυρίου theday of the Lord, 1 Corinthians 1:8; 2 Corinthians 1:14; 1 Thessalonians 5:2; 2 Thessalonians 2:2: the day of Jesus Christ or Christ, Philemon 1:6, Philemon 1:10; Philemon 2:16day when God shall judge, Romans 2:16: the day of wrath and revelation of the righteous judgment of God, Romans 2:5: the day of redemption, Ephesians 4:30. [source]
Hebrews 8:8 A new covenant [διαθήκην καινήν]
Always καινὴ in the phrase new covenant, except Hebrews 12:24, where we have νέα . For the distinction see note there, and see on Matthew 26:29. [source]
Hebrews 13:20 That great shepherd of the sheep [τὸν ποιμένα τῶν προβάτων τὸν μέγαν]
The Greek order is, “the shepherd of the sheep the great (shepherd).” Comp. John 10:2, John 10:11, John 10:14; 1 Peter 2:25, and see Isaiah 63:11. Of God, Zechariah href="/desk/?q=zec+9:11&sr=1">Zechariah 9:11. The phrase eternal covenant N.T.oCommon in lxx; see Genesis 9:16; Genesis 17:19; Leviticus 24:8; 2 Samuel 23:5; Jeremiah 32:40; Ezekiel 16:60. Const. with the great shepherd of the sheep. It may be granted that the raising of Christ from the dead, viewed as the consummation of the plan of salvation, was in the sphere of the blood of the covenant; nevertheless, the covenant is nowhere in the N.T. associated with the resurrection, but frequently with death, especially in this epistle. See Matthew 26:28; Luke 22:20; Hebrews 9:15, Hebrews 9:16, Hebrews 9:17, Hebrews 9:20. The connection of the blood of the covenant with Christ's pastoral office gives a thoroughly scriptural sense, and one which exactly fits into the context. Christ becomes the great shepherd solely through the blood of the covenant. Comp. Acts 20:28. Through this is brought about the new relation of the church with God described in Hebrews 8:10ff. This tallies perfectly with the conception of “the God of peace”; and the great Shepherd will assert the power of the eternal covenant of reconciliation and peace by perfecting his flock in every good work to do his will, working in them that which is well pleasing in his sight. With this agree Jeremiah 50:5, Jeremiah 50:19; Ezekiel 34:25, and the entire chapter, see especially Ezekiel 34:12-15, Ezekiel 34:23, Ezekiel 34:31. In these verses the Shepherd of the Covenant appears as guiding, tending his flock, and leading them into fair and safe pastures. Comp. Isaiah 63:11-14, and Revelation 7:17, see note on ποιμανεῖ shallshepherd. Ἑν αἵματι “in the blood,” is in virtue of, or in the power of the blood. [source]
Hebrews 12:24 The mediator of the new covenant [διαθήκης νέας μεσίτῃ]
See Hebrews 7:22; Hebrews 8:6, Hebrews 8:8, Hebrews 8:9, Hebrews 8:10; Hebrews 9:15. For covenant, see on Hebrews 9:6ff. For the new covenant, rend. a new covenant. Νέα newonly here applied to the covenant in N.T. The word elsewhere is καινή . For the distinction, see on Matthew 26:29. It is better not to press the distinction, since νεός , in certain cases, clearly has the sense of quality rather than of time, as 1 Corinthians 5:7; Colossians 3:10, and probably here, where to confine the sense to recent would seem to limit it unduly. In the light of all that the writer has said respecting the better quality of the Christian covenant, superseding the old, outworn, insufficient covenant, he may naturally be supposed to have had in mind something besides its mere recentness. Moreover, all through the contrast from Hebrews 12:18, the thought of earlier and later is not once touched, but only that of inferior and better; repellency and invitation; terrors and delights; fear and confidence. Note that the privilege of approaching the Mediator in person is emphasized. [source]
Hebrews 5:3 For himself [περι εαυτου]
Note περι — peri three times here (περι του λαου περι εαυτου περι αμαρτιων — peri tou laou class="normal greek">υπερ αντρωπων υπερ αμαρτιων — peri heautou class="normal greek">περι — peri hamartiōn), but in Hebrews 5:1 υπερ — huper anthrōpōn class="translit"> huper hamartiōn In the Koiné this interchange of peri (around) and huper (over) is common (Matthew 26:28). [source]
Hebrews 13:20 The God of peace [ο τεος της ειρηνης]
God is the author and giver of peace, a Pauline phrase (6 times) as in 1 Thessalonians 5:23. Who brought again from the dead Second aorist active articular participle of αναγω — anagō (cf. Romans 10:7), the only direct mention of the resurrection of Jesus in the Epistle, though implied often (Hebrews 1:3, etc.). That great shepherd of the sheep This phrase occurs in Isaiah 63:11 except τον μεγαν — ton megan which the author adds as in Hebrews 4:14; Hebrews 10:21. So here, “the shepherd of the sheep the great one.” With the blood of the eternal covenant This language is from Zechariah 9:11. The language reminds us of Christ‘s own words in Mark 14:24 (Matthew 26:28; Luke 22:20; 1 Corinthians 11:25) about “my blood of the covenant.” [source]
Hebrews 8:6 But now [νυν δε]
Logical use of νυν — nun as the case now stands, with Jesus as high priest in heaven. Hath he obtained Perfect active indicative of τυγχανω — tugchanō with the genitive, a rare and late form for τετευχεν — teteuchen (also τετευχηκεν — teteuchēken), old verb to hit the mark, to attain. A ministry the more excellent “A more excellent ministry.” For the comparative of διαπορος — diaphoros see Hebrews 1:4. This remark applies to all the five points of superiority over the Levitical priesthood. By how much Instrumental case of the relative οσος — hosos between two comparative adjectives as in Hebrews 1:4. The mediator Late word from μεσος — mesos (amid) and so a middle man (arbitrator). Already in Galatians 3:19. and see 1 Timothy 2:5. See Hebrews 9:15; Hebrews 12:24 for further use with διατηκη — diathēkē Of a better covenant Called “new” For νενομοτετηται — diathēkē see Matthew 26:28; Luke 1:72; Galatians 3:17, etc. This idea he will discuss in Hebrews 8:7-13. Hath been enacted (νομοτετεω — nenomothetētai). Perfect passive indicative of επι κρειττοσιν επαγγελιαις — nomotheteō as in Hebrews 7:11 which see. Upon better promises (επι — epi kreittosin epaggeliais). Upon the basis of (κρεισσων — epi). But how “better” if the earlier were also from God? This idea, alluded to in Hebrews 6:12-17, Will be developed in 10:19-12:3 with great passion and power. Thus it is seen that “better” (kreissōn) is the keynote of the Epistle. At every point Christianity is better than Judaism. [source]
Hebrews 9:22 I may almost say [σχεδον]
Old adverb, only three times in the N.T., here, Acts 13:44; Acts 19:26. Here it qualifies the entire clause, not just παντα — panta With blood In blood. There were exceptions (Exodus 19:10; Exodus 32:30.; Leviticus 5:11.; Leviticus 15:5; Numbers 16:46.; Numbers 31:23., etc.). Apart from shedding of blood A double compound first found here (coined by the writer) and later in ecclesiastical writers “Pouring out of blood.” The author seems to have in mind Christ‘s words in Matthew 26:28: “This is my blood of the covenant which is shed for many for the forgiveness of sins.” The blood is the vital principle and is efficacious as an atonement. The blood of Christ sets aside all other plans for pardon. [source]
Hebrews 8:6 Hath he obtained [τετυχεν]
Perfect active indicative of τυγχανω — tugchanō with the genitive, a rare and late form for τετευχεν — teteuchen (also τετευχηκεν — teteuchēken), old verb to hit the mark, to attain. A ministry the more excellent “A more excellent ministry.” For the comparative of διαπορος — diaphoros see Hebrews 1:4. This remark applies to all the five points of superiority over the Levitical priesthood. By how much Instrumental case of the relative οσος — hosos between two comparative adjectives as in Hebrews 1:4. The mediator Late word from μεσος — mesos (amid) and so a middle man (arbitrator). Already in Galatians 3:19. and see 1 Timothy 2:5. See Hebrews 9:15; Hebrews 12:24 for further use with διατηκη — diathēkē Of a better covenant Called “new” For νενομοτετηται — diathēkē see Matthew 26:28; Luke 1:72; Galatians 3:17, etc. This idea he will discuss in Hebrews 8:7-13. Hath been enacted (νομοτετεω — nenomothetētai). Perfect passive indicative of επι κρειττοσιν επαγγελιαις — nomotheteō as in Hebrews 7:11 which see. Upon better promises (επι — epi kreittosin epaggeliais). Upon the basis of (κρεισσων — epi). But how “better” if the earlier were also from God? This idea, alluded to in Hebrews 6:12-17, Will be developed in 10:19-12:3 with great passion and power. Thus it is seen that “better” (kreissōn) is the keynote of the Epistle. At every point Christianity is better than Judaism. [source]
Hebrews 8:6 A ministry the more excellent [διαπορωτερας λειτουργιας]
“A more excellent ministry.” For the comparative of διαπορος — diaphoros see Hebrews 1:4. This remark applies to all the five points of superiority over the Levitical priesthood. By how much Instrumental case of the relative οσος — hosos between two comparative adjectives as in Hebrews 1:4. The mediator Late word from μεσος — mesos (amid) and so a middle man (arbitrator). Already in Galatians 3:19. and see 1 Timothy 2:5. See Hebrews 9:15; Hebrews 12:24 for further use with διατηκη — diathēkē Of a better covenant Called “new” For νενομοτετηται — diathēkē see Matthew 26:28; Luke 1:72; Galatians 3:17, etc. This idea he will discuss in Hebrews 8:7-13. Hath been enacted (νομοτετεω — nenomothetētai). Perfect passive indicative of επι κρειττοσιν επαγγελιαις — nomotheteō as in Hebrews 7:11 which see. Upon better promises (επι — epi kreittosin epaggeliais). Upon the basis of (κρεισσων — epi). But how “better” if the earlier were also from God? This idea, alluded to in Hebrews 6:12-17, Will be developed in 10:19-12:3 with great passion and power. Thus it is seen that “better” (kreissōn) is the keynote of the Epistle. At every point Christianity is better than Judaism. [source]
Hebrews 8:6 By how much [οσωι]
Instrumental case of the relative οσος — hosos between two comparative adjectives as in Hebrews 1:4. The mediator Late word from μεσος — mesos (amid) and so a middle man (arbitrator). Already in Galatians 3:19. and see 1 Timothy 2:5. See Hebrews 9:15; Hebrews 12:24 for further use with διατηκη — diathēkē Of a better covenant Called “new” For νενομοτετηται — diathēkē see Matthew 26:28; Luke 1:72; Galatians 3:17, etc. This idea he will discuss in Hebrews 8:7-13. Hath been enacted (νομοτετεω — nenomothetētai). Perfect passive indicative of επι κρειττοσιν επαγγελιαις — nomotheteō as in Hebrews 7:11 which see. Upon better promises (επι — epi kreittosin epaggeliais). Upon the basis of (κρεισσων — epi). But how “better” if the earlier were also from God? This idea, alluded to in Hebrews 6:12-17, Will be developed in 10:19-12:3 with great passion and power. Thus it is seen that “better” (kreissōn) is the keynote of the Epistle. At every point Christianity is better than Judaism. [source]
Hebrews 8:6 The mediator [μεσιτης]
Late word from μεσος — mesos (amid) and so a middle man (arbitrator). Already in Galatians 3:19. and see 1 Timothy 2:5. See Hebrews 9:15; Hebrews 12:24 for further use with διατηκη — diathēkē Of a better covenant Called “new” For νενομοτετηται — diathēkē see Matthew 26:28; Luke 1:72; Galatians 3:17, etc. This idea he will discuss in Hebrews 8:7-13. Hath been enacted (νομοτετεω — nenomothetētai). Perfect passive indicative of επι κρειττοσιν επαγγελιαις — nomotheteō as in Hebrews 7:11 which see. Upon better promises (επι — epi kreittosin epaggeliais). Upon the basis of (κρεισσων — epi). But how “better” if the earlier were also from God? This idea, alluded to in Hebrews 6:12-17, Will be developed in 10:19-12:3 with great passion and power. Thus it is seen that “better” (kreissōn) is the keynote of the Epistle. At every point Christianity is better than Judaism. [source]
Hebrews 8:6 Of a better covenant [κρειττονος διατηκης]
Called “new” For νενομοτετηται — diathēkē see Matthew 26:28; Luke 1:72; Galatians 3:17, etc. This idea he will discuss in Hebrews 8:7-13. Hath been enacted (νομοτετεω — nenomothetētai). Perfect passive indicative of επι κρειττοσιν επαγγελιαις — nomotheteō as in Hebrews 7:11 which see. Upon better promises (επι — epi kreittosin epaggeliais). Upon the basis of (κρεισσων — epi). But how “better” if the earlier were also from God? This idea, alluded to in Hebrews 6:12-17, Will be developed in 10:19-12:3 with great passion and power. Thus it is seen that “better” (kreissōn) is the keynote of the Epistle. At every point Christianity is better than Judaism. [source]
James 3:12 Fig-tree [συκη]
Old and common word (Matthew 21:19.).Figs (συκα — suka). Ripe fruit of η συκη — hē sukē (ελαιας — elaias). Elsewhere in the N.T. for olive-trees as Matthew 21:1.Vine Old word (Matthew 26:29).Salt water (αλυκον — halukon). Old adjective from αλς — hals (αλας — halas salt), here only in N.T. [source]
James 3:12 Vine [αμπελος]
Old word (Matthew 26:29).Salt water (αλυκον — halukon). Old adjective from αλς — hals (αλας — halas salt), here only in N.T. [source]
1 Peter 1:2 The foreknowledge [προγνωσιν]
Late substantive (Plutarch, Lucian, papyri) from προγινωσκω — proginōskō (1 Peter 1:20), to know beforehand, only twice in N.T. (here and Acts 2:23 in Peter‘s sermon). In this Epistle Peter often uses substantives rather than verbs (cf. Romans 8:29).Of God the Father (τεου πατρος — theou patros). Anarthous again and genitive case. See πατηρ — patēr applied to God also in 1 Peter 1:3, 1 Peter 1:17 as often by Paul (Romans 1:7, etc.). Peter here presents the Trinity (God the Father, the Spirit, Jesus Christ).In sanctification of the Spirit Clearly the Holy Spirit, though anarthrous like τεου πατρος — theou patros Late word from αγιαζω — hagiazō to render holy Obedience (from υπακουω — hupakouō to hear under, to hearken) to the Lord Jesus as in 1 Peter 1:22 “to the truth,” result of “the sanctification.”And sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ Late substantive from ραντιζω — rantizō to sprinkle (Hebrews 9:13), a word used in the lxx of the sacrifices (Num 19:9, 13, 20, etc.), but not in any non-biblical source so far as known, in N.T. only here and Hebrews 12:24 (of the sprinkling of blood). Reference to the death of Christ on the Cross and to the ratification of the New Covenant by the blood of Christ as given in Hebrews 9:19.; Hebrews 12:24 with allusion to Exodus 24:3-8. Paul does not mention this ritual use of the blood of Christ, but Jesus does (Matthew 26:28; Mark 14:24). Hence it is not surprising to find the use of it by Peter and the author of Hebrews. Hort suggests that Peter may also have an ulterior reference to the blood of the martyrs as in Revelation 7:14.; Revelation 12:11, but only as illustration of what Jesus did for us, not as having any value. The whole Epistle is a commentary upon προγνωσις τεου αγιασμος πνευματοσ αιμα Χριστου — prognōsis theouπλητυντειη — hagiasmos pneumatosπλητυνω — haima Christou (Bigg). Peter is not ashamed of the blood of Christ.Be multiplied (πλητυς — plēthuntheiē). First aorist passive optative (volitive) of χαρις και ειρηνη — plēthunō old verb (from ελεος — plēthus fulness), in a wish. So in 2 Peter 1:2; Judges 1:2, but nowhere else in N.T. salutations. Grace and peace (ελεος — charis kai eirēnē) occur together in 2 Peter 1:2, in 2 John 1:2 (with eleos), and in all Paul‘s Epistles (with eleos added in 1 Timothy and 2 Timothy). [source]
1 Peter 1:2 In sanctification of the Spirit [εν αγιασμωι πνευματος]
Clearly the Holy Spirit, though anarthrous like τεου πατρος — theou patros Late word from αγιαζω — hagiazō to render holy Obedience (from υπακουω — hupakouō to hear under, to hearken) to the Lord Jesus as in 1 Peter 1:22 “to the truth,” result of “the sanctification.”And sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ Late substantive from ραντιζω — rantizō to sprinkle (Hebrews 9:13), a word used in the lxx of the sacrifices (Num 19:9, 13, 20, etc.), but not in any non-biblical source so far as known, in N.T. only here and Hebrews 12:24 (of the sprinkling of blood). Reference to the death of Christ on the Cross and to the ratification of the New Covenant by the blood of Christ as given in Hebrews 9:19.; Hebrews 12:24 with allusion to Exodus 24:3-8. Paul does not mention this ritual use of the blood of Christ, but Jesus does (Matthew 26:28; Mark 14:24). Hence it is not surprising to find the use of it by Peter and the author of Hebrews. Hort suggests that Peter may also have an ulterior reference to the blood of the martyrs as in Revelation 7:14.; Revelation 12:11, but only as illustration of what Jesus did for us, not as having any value. The whole Epistle is a commentary upon προγνωσις τεου αγιασμος πνευματοσ αιμα Χριστου — prognōsis theouπλητυντειη — hagiasmos pneumatosπλητυνω — haima Christou (Bigg). Peter is not ashamed of the blood of Christ.Be multiplied (πλητυς — plēthuntheiē). First aorist passive optative (volitive) of χαρις και ειρηνη — plēthunō old verb (from ελεος — plēthus fulness), in a wish. So in 2 Peter 1:2; Judges 1:2, but nowhere else in N.T. salutations. Grace and peace (ελεος — charis kai eirēnē) occur together in 2 Peter 1:2, in 2 John 1:2 (with eleos), and in all Paul‘s Epistles (with eleos added in 1 Timothy and 2 Timothy). [source]
1 Peter 1:2 And sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ [ραντισμον αιματος Ιησου Χριστου]
Late substantive from ραντιζω — rantizō to sprinkle (Hebrews 9:13), a word used in the lxx of the sacrifices (Num 19:9, 13, 20, etc.), but not in any non-biblical source so far as known, in N.T. only here and Hebrews 12:24 (of the sprinkling of blood). Reference to the death of Christ on the Cross and to the ratification of the New Covenant by the blood of Christ as given in Hebrews 9:19.; Hebrews 12:24 with allusion to Exodus 24:3-8. Paul does not mention this ritual use of the blood of Christ, but Jesus does (Matthew 26:28; Mark 14:24). Hence it is not surprising to find the use of it by Peter and the author of Hebrews. Hort suggests that Peter may also have an ulterior reference to the blood of the martyrs as in Revelation 7:14.; Revelation 12:11, but only as illustration of what Jesus did for us, not as having any value. The whole Epistle is a commentary upon προγνωσις τεου αγιασμος πνευματοσ αιμα Χριστου — prognōsis theouπλητυντειη — hagiasmos pneumatosπλητυνω — haima Christou (Bigg). Peter is not ashamed of the blood of Christ.Be multiplied (πλητυς — plēthuntheiē). First aorist passive optative (volitive) of χαρις και ειρηνη — plēthunō old verb (from ελεος — plēthus fulness), in a wish. So in 2 Peter 1:2; Judges 1:2, but nowhere else in N.T. salutations. Grace and peace (ελεος — charis kai eirēnē) occur together in 2 Peter 1:2, in 2 John 1:2 (with eleos), and in all Paul‘s Epistles (with eleos added in 1 Timothy and 2 Timothy). [source]
2 Peter 3:13 New [καινοὺς]
See on Matthew 26:29. [source]
2 Peter 2:21 It were better [κρειττον ην]
Apodosis of a condition of second class without αν — an as is usual with clauses of possibility, propriety, obligation (Matthew 26:24; 1 Corinthians 5:10; Romans 7:7; Hebrews 9:26). [source]
2 Peter 3:13 Promise [επαγγελμα]
As in 2 Peter 1:4. The reference is to Isaiah 65:17.; Isaiah 66:22. See also Revelation 21:1. For καινος — kainos (new) see note on Matthew 26:29. For the expectant attitude in προσδοκωμεν — prosdokōmen (we look for) repeated from 2 Peter 3:12 and again in 2 Peter 3:14, see απεκδεχομετα — apekdechometha (we eagerly look for) in Philemon 3:20. [source]
1 John 2:7 No new commandment [οὐκ ἐντολὴν καινὴν]
The Rev., properly, places these words first in the sentence as emphatic, the point of the verse lying in the antithesis between the new and the old. On new, see on Matthew 26:29. [source]
2 John 1:5 New [καινὴν]
See on Matthew 26:29. [source]
Revelation 3:12 New Jerusalem []
See Ezekiel 48:35. The believer whose brow is adorned with this name has the freedom of the heavenly city. Even on earth his commonwealth is in heaven (Philemon 3:20). “Still, his citizenship was latent: he was one of God's hidden ones; but now he is openly avouched, and has a right to enter in by the gates to the city” (Trench). The city is called by John, the great and holy (Revelation 21:10); by Matthew, the holy city (Matthew 4:5); by Paul, Jerusalem which is above (Galatians 4:6); by the writer to the Hebrews, the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem (Hebrews 12:22). Plato calls his ideal city Callipolis, the fair city (“Republic,” vii., 527), and the name Ouranopolis, heavenly city, was applied to Rome and Byzantium. For new ( καινῆς ), see on Matthew 26:29. The new Jerusalem is not a city freshly built ( νέα ), but is new ( καινὴ ) in contrast with the old, outworn, sinful city. In the Gospel John habitually uses the Greek and civil form of the name, Ἰεροσόλυμα ; in Revelation, the Hebrew and more holy appellation, ἱερουσάλημ . [source]
Revelation 21:1 New [καινὸν]
See on Matthew 26:29. Compare Isaiah 65:17. [source]
Revelation 11:19 The ark of His covenant [ἡ κιβωτὸς τῆς διαθήκης αὐτοῦ]
Κιβωτὸς arkmeaning generally any wooden box or chest used of the ark in the tabernacle only here and Hebrews 9:4. Elsewhere of Noah's ark. See Matthew 24:38; Luke 17:27; Hebrews 11:7; 1 Peter 3:20. For covenant, see note on testament, Matthew 26:28. This is the last mention in scripture of the ark of the covenant. It was lost when the temple was destroyed by the Chaldeans (2 Kings 25:10), and was wanting in the second temple. Tacitus says that Pompey “by right of conquest entered the temple. Thenceforward it became generally known that the habitation was empty and the sanctuary unoccupied do representation of the deity being found within it” (“History,” v., 9). According to Jewish tradition Jeremiah had taken the ark and all that the Most Holy Place contained, and concealed them, before the destruction of the temple, in a cave at Mount Sinai, whence they are to be restored to the temple in the days of Messiah. [source]
Revelation 19:9 It is another beatitude [μακαριοι]
Articular perfect passive participle of καλεω — kaleō like Matthew 22:3; Luke 14:17. Cf. Revelation 17:14. This beatitude reminds us of that in Luke 14:15. (Cf. Matthew 8:11; Matthew 26:29.)These are true words of God Undoubtedly, but one should bear in mind that apocalyptic symbolism “has its own methods and laws of interpretation, and by these the student must be guided” (Swete). [source]
Revelation 19:9 They which are bidden [οι κεκλημενοι]
Articular perfect passive participle of καλεω — kaleō like Matthew 22:3; Luke 14:17. Cf. Revelation 17:14. This beatitude reminds us of that in Luke 14:15. (Cf. Matthew 8:11; Matthew 26:29.) [source]
Revelation 3:20 Will sup [δειπνησω]
Future active of δειπνεω — deipneō old verb, from δειπνον — deipnon (supper), as in Luke 17:8. Fellowship in the Messianic kingdom (Luke 22:30; Mark 14:25; Matthew 26:29). Purely metaphorical, as is plain from 1 Corinthians 6:13. [source]
Revelation 3:20 If any man hear - and open [εαν τις ακουσηι και ανοιχηι]
Condition of third class with εαν — ean and first aorist (ingressive) active subjunctive of ακουω — akouō and ανοιγω — anoigō See John 10:3; John 18:37. See the picture reversed (Swete) in Luke 13:25; Matthew 25:10.I will come in to him (εισελευσομαι — eiseleusomai). Future middle of εισερχομαι — eiserchomai See Mark 15:43; Acts 11:3 for εισερχομαι προς — eiserchomai pros to go into a man‘s house. Cf. John 14:23.Will sup Future active of δειπνεω — deipneō old verb, from δειπνον — deipnon (supper), as in Luke 17:8. Fellowship in the Messianic kingdom (Luke 22:30; Mark 14:25; Matthew 26:29). Purely metaphorical, as is plain from 1 Corinthians 6:13. [source]

What do the individual words in Matthew 26:2 mean?

You know that after two days the Passover takes place and the Son - of Man is delivered over - to be crucified
Οἴδατε ὅτι μετὰ δύο ἡμέρας τὸ πάσχα γίνεται καὶ Υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου παραδίδοται εἰς τὸ σταυρωθῆναι

Οἴδατε  You  know 
Parse: Verb, Perfect Indicative Active, 2nd Person Plural
Root: οἶδα  
Sense: to see.
ὅτι  that 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: ὅτι  
Sense: that, because, since.
μετὰ  after 
Parse: Preposition
Root: μετά  
Sense: with, after, behind.
δύο  two 
Parse: Adjective, Accusative Feminine Plural
Root: δύο 
Sense: the two, the twain.
ἡμέρας  days 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Plural
Root: ἡμέρα  
Sense: the day, used of the natural day, or the interval between sunrise and sunset, as distinguished from and contrasted with the night.
πάσχα  Passover 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Neuter Singular
Root: πάσχα  
Sense: the paschal sacrifice (which was accustomed to be offered for the people’s deliverance of old from Egypt).
γίνεται  takes  place 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Middle or Passive, 3rd Person Singular
Root: γίνομαι  
Sense: to become, i.
Υἱὸς  Son 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: υἱός  
Sense: a son.
τοῦ  - 
Parse: Article, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
ἀνθρώπου  of  Man 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: ἄνθρωπος  
Sense: a human being, whether male or female.
παραδίδοται  is  delivered 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Middle or Passive, 3rd Person Singular
Root: παραδίδωμι  
Sense: to give into the hands (of another).
εἰς  over 
Parse: Preposition
Root: εἰς  
Sense: into, unto, to, towards, for, among.
τὸ  - 
Parse: Article, Accusative Neuter Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
σταυρωθῆναι  to  be  crucified 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Infinitive Passive
Root: σταυρόω  
Sense: to stake, drive down stakes.