The Meaning of Matthew 11:29 Explained

Matthew 11:29

KJV: Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls.

YLT: take up my yoke upon you, and learn from me, because I am meek and humble in heart, and ye shall find rest to your souls,

Darby: Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me; for I am meek and lowly in heart; and ye shall find rest to your souls;

ASV: Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls.

What does Matthew 11:29 Mean?

Context Summary

Matthew 11:20-30 - Woe Or Welcome
The voice of upbraiding, Matthew 11:20-24. The Judge weeps as he pronounces the doom of those who reject Him. They would have crowned Him king, but refused to repent. See John 6:15. These cities did not crucify Him, but they had been deaf to His warnings and indifferent to His mighty works. Even where there is no direct opposition, indifference will be sufficient to seal our doom.
The voice of thanksgiving, Matthew 11:25-27. He "answered" the voice of God within His breast. Babes are those who mistrust the reasonings of their intellect, but trust the instincts and intuitions of their hearts. The child-heart looks open-eyed into all the mysteries of God. Learn to say Yea to all God's dealings. The Spirit reveals the Son, and the Son the Father. Our Lord must be divine, if only God can know him.
The voice of pleading mercy, Matthew 11:28-30. Labor is for active manhood; heavy-laden for suffering, patient womanhood. The invitation is to commit and submit; to come and to bow under the yoke of the Father's will. Submission and obedience are the secrets of the blessed life. [source]

Chapter Summary: Matthew 11

1  John sends his disciples to Jesus
7  Jesus' testimony concerning John
16  The perverse judgment of the people concerning the Son
20  Jesus upbraids Korazin, Bethsaida, and Capernaum;
25  and praising his Father's wisdom in revealing the Gospel to the simple,
28  he calls to him those who are weary and burdened

Greek Commentary for Matthew 11:29

Take my yoke upon you and learn of me [αρατε τον ζυγον μου επυμας και ματετε απεμου]
The rabbis used yoke for school as many pupils find it now a yoke. The English word “school” is Greek for leisure But Jesus offers refreshment (αναπαυσιν — anapausin) in his school and promises to make the burden light, for he is a meek and humble teacher. Humility was not a virtue among the ancients. It was ranked with servility. Jesus has made a virtue of this vice. He has glorified this attitude so that Paul urges it (Philemon 2:3), “in lowliness of mind each counting other better than himself.” In portions of Europe today people place yokes on the shoulders to make the burden easier to carry. Jesus promises that we shall find the yoke kindly and the burden lightened by his help. “Easy” is a poor translation of χρηστος — chrēstos Moffatt puts it “kindly.” That is the meaning in the Septuagint for persons. We have no adjective that quite carries the notion of kind and good. The yoke of Christ is useful, good, and kindly. Cf. Song of Solomon 1:10. [source]
Yoke [ζυγόν]
“These words, as recorded by St. Matthew, the Evangelist of the Jews, must have sunk the deeper into the hearts of Christ's Jewish hearers, that they came in their own old, familiar form of speech, yet with such contrast of spirit. One of the most common figurative expressions of the time was that of the yoke for submission to an occupation or obligation. Very instructive for the understanding of the figure is this paraphrase of Deuteronomy 6:4-9; Deuteronomy 11:13-21; Numbers 15:37-41. The section Deuteronomy 6:4-9 was said to precede Deuteronomy 11:13-21, so that we might take upon ourselves the yoke of the kingdom of heaven, and only after that the yoke of the commandments. The Saviour's words must have had a special significance to those who remembered this lesson; and they would now understand how, by coming to the Saviour, they would first take on them the yoke of the kingdom of heaven, and then that of the commandments, finding this yoke easy and the burden light” (Edersheim, “Life and Times of Jesus,” and “Jewish Social Life”)Meek ( πραΰ́ς )See on Matthew 5:5. [source]
Lowly [ταπεινός]
The word has a history. In the classics it is used commonly in a bad and degrading sense, of meanness of condition, lowness of rank, and cringing abjectness and baseness of character. Still, even in classical Greek, this is not its universal usage. It is occasionally employed in a way which foreshadows its higher sense. Plato, for instance, says, “To that law (of God) he would be happy who holds fast, and follows it in all humility and order; but he who is lifted up with pride, or money, or honor, or beauty, who has a soul hot with folly, and youth, and insolence, and thinks that he has no need of a guide or ruler, but is able himself to be the guide of others, he, I say,is left deserted of God” (“Laws,” 716). And Aristotle says: “He who is worthy of small things, and deems himself so, is wise” (“Nich. Ethics, ” iv., 3). At best, however, the classical conception is only modesty, absence of assumption. It is an element of wisdom and in no way opposed to self-righteousness (see Aristotle above). The word for the Christian virtue of humility ( ταπεινοφροσύνη )was not used before the Christian era, and is distinctly an outgrowth of the Gospel. This virtue is based upon a correct estimate of our actual littleness, and is linked with a sense of sinfulness. True greatness is holiness. We are little because sinful. Compare Luke 18:14. It is asked how, in this view of the case, the word can be applied to himself by the sinless Lord? “The answer is,” says Archbishop Trench, “that for the sinner humility involves the confession of sin, inasmuch as it involves the confession of his true condition; while yet for the unfallen creature the grace itself as truly exists, involving for such the acknowledgment, not of sinfulness, which would be untrue, but of creatureliness, of absolute dependence, of having nothing, but receiving all things of God. And thus the grace of humility belongs to the highest angel before the throne, being as he is a creature, yea, even to the Lord of Glory himself. In his human nature he must be the pattern of all humility, of all creaturely dependence; and it is only as a man that Christ thus claims to be lowly; his human life was a constant living on the fulness of his Father's love; he evermore, as man, took the place which beseemed the creature in the presence of its Creator” (“Synonyms,” p. 145). The Christian virtue regards man not only with reference to God, but to his fellow-man. In lowliness of mind each counting other better than himself (Philemon 2:3, Rev.). But this is contrary to the Greek conception of justice or righteousness, which was simply “his own to each one.” It is noteworthy that neither the Septuagint, the Apocrypha, nor the New Testament recognize the ignoble classical sense of the word. [source]
Ye shall find [εὑρήσετε]
Compare I will give you and ye shall find. The rest of Christ is twofold- given and found. It is given in pardon and reconciliation. It is found under the yoke and the burden; in the development of Christian experience, as more and more the “strain passes over” from self to Christ. “No other teacher, since the world began, has ever associated learn with rest. 'Learn of me,'says the philosopher, 'and you shall find restlessness.' 'Learn of me,' says Christ, 'and you shall find rest'” (Drummond, “Natural Law in the Spiritual World”)i1. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Matthew 11:29

Matthew 5:5 The meek [οἱ πραεῖς]
Another word which, though never used in a bad sense, Christianity has lifted to a higher plane, and made the symbol of a higher good. Its primary meaning is mild, gentle. It was applied to inanimate things, as light, wind, sound, sickness. It was used of a horse; gentle. As a human attribute, Aristotle defines it as the mean between stubborn anger and that negativeness of character which is inescapable of even righteous indignation: according to which it is tantamount to equanimity. Plato opposes it to fierceness or cruelty, and uses it of humanity to the condemned; but also of the conciliatory demeanor of a demagogue seeking popularity and power. Pindar applies it to a king, mild or kind to the citizens, and Herodotus uses it as opposed to anger. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
These pre-Christian meanings of the word exhibit two general characteristics. 1. They express outward conduct merely. 2. They contemplate relations to men only. The Christian word, on the contrary, describes an inward quality, and that as related primarily to God. The equanimity, mildness, kindness, represented by the classical word, are founded in self-control or in natural disposition. The Christian meekness is based on humility, which is not a natural quality but an outgrowth of a renewed nature. To the pagan the word often implied condescension, to the Christian it implies submission. The Christian quality, in its manifestation, reveals all that was best in the heathen virtue - mildness, gentleness, equanimity - but these manifestations toward men are emphasized as outgrowths of a spiritual relation to God. The mildness or kindness of Plato or Pindar imply no sense of inferiority in those who exhibit them; sometimes the contrary. Plato's demagogue is kindly from self-interest and as a means to tyranny. Pindar's king is condescendingly kind. The meekness of the Christian springs from a sense of the inferiority of the creature to the Creator, and especially of the sinful creature to the holy God. While, therefore, the pagan quality is redolent of self-assertion, the Christian quality carries the flavor of self-abasement. As toward God, therefore, meekness accepts his dealings without murmur or resistance as absolutely good and wise. As toward man, it accepts opposition, insult, and provocation, as God's permitted ministers of a chastening demanded by the infirmity and corruption of sin; while, under this sense of his own sinfulness, the meek bears patiently “the contradiction of sinners against himself,” forgiving and restoring the erring in a spirit of meekness, considering himself, lest he also be tempted (see Galatians 6:1-5). The ideas of forgiveness and restoration nowhere attach to the classical word. They belong exclusively to Christian meekness, which thus shows itself allied to love. As ascribed by our Lord-DIVIDER-
to himself, see Matthew 11:29. Wyc. renders “Blessed be mild men.”-DIVIDER-
[source]

Matthew 5:5 The meek [οι πραεις]
Wycliff has it “Blessed be mild men.” The ancients used the word for outward conduct and towards men. They did not rank it as a virtue anyhow. It was a mild equanimity that was sometimes negative and sometimes positively kind. But Jesus lifted the word to a nobility never attained before. In fact, the Beatitudes assume a new heart, for the natural man does not find in happiness the qualities mentioned here by Christ. The English word “meek” has largely lost the fine blend of spiritual poise and strength meant by the Master. He calls himself “meek and lowly in heart” (Matthew 11:29) and Moses is also called meek. It is the gentleness of strength, not mere effeminacy. By “the earth” (την γην — tēn gēn) Jesus seems to mean the Land of Promise (Psalm 37:11) though Bruce thinks that it is the whole earth. Can it be the solid earth as opposed to the sea or the air? [source]
Luke 14:11 Humbled []
See Matthew 11:29. [source]
Acts 8:33 Humiliation []
See on Matthew 11:29. [source]
Acts 19:9 Disobedient [επειτουν]
Imperfect again, showing the growing disbelief and disobedience Late verb from κακολογος — kakologos (speaker of evil) for the old κακως λεγω — kakōs legō Already in Mark 7:10; Mark 9:39; Matthew 15:4. Now these Jews are aggressive opponents of Paul and seek to injure his influence with the crowd. Note “the Way” as in Acts 9:2 for Christianity. He departed from them Second aorist active participle of απιστημι — aphistēmi made an “apostasy” (standing off, cleavage) as he did at Corinth (Acts 18:7, μεταβας — metabas making a change). Separated the disciples (απωρισεν τους ματητας — aphōrisen tous mathētas). First aorist active indicative of αποριζω — aphorizō old verb to mark limits (horizon) as already in Acts 13:2. Paul himself was a spiritual Pharisee “separated” to Christ (Romans 1:1). The Jews regarded this withdrawal as apostasy, like separating the sheep from the goats (Matthew 25:32). Paul now made a separate church as he had done at Thessalonica and Corinth. In the school of Tyrannus Σχολη — Scholē (our school) is an old word from σχειν — schein (εχω — echō) to hold on, leisure and then in later Greek (Plutarch, etc.) a place where there is leisure as here. Only this example in the N.T. This is the Greek notion of “school,” the Jewish being that of “yoke” as in Matthew 11:29. The name Tyrannus (our tyrant) is a common one. It is an inscription in the Columbarium of the Empress Livia as that of a physician in the court. Furneaux suggests the possibility that a relative of this physician was lecturing on medicine in Ephesus and so as a friend of Luke, the physician, would be glad to help Paul about a place to preach. It was probably a public building or lecture hall with this name whether hired by Paul or loaned to him. The pagan sophists often spoke in such halls. The Codex Bezae adds “from the fifth hour to the tenth” as the time allotted Paul for his work in this hall, which is quite possible, from just before midday till the close of the afternoon (from before the noon meal till two hours before sunset) each day. Here Paul had great freedom and a great hearing. As the church grows there will be other places of meeting as the church in the house of Aquila and Priscilla (1 Corinthians 16:19). [source]
Acts 19:9 He departed from them [αποστας απ αυτων]
Second aorist active participle of απιστημι — aphistēmi made an “apostasy” (standing off, cleavage) as he did at Corinth (Acts 18:7, μεταβας — metabas making a change). Separated the disciples (απωρισεν τους ματητας — aphōrisen tous mathētas). First aorist active indicative of αποριζω — aphorizō old verb to mark limits (horizon) as already in Acts 13:2. Paul himself was a spiritual Pharisee “separated” to Christ (Romans 1:1). The Jews regarded this withdrawal as apostasy, like separating the sheep from the goats (Matthew 25:32). Paul now made a separate church as he had done at Thessalonica and Corinth. In the school of Tyrannus Σχολη — Scholē (our school) is an old word from σχειν — schein (εχω — echō) to hold on, leisure and then in later Greek (Plutarch, etc.) a place where there is leisure as here. Only this example in the N.T. This is the Greek notion of “school,” the Jewish being that of “yoke” as in Matthew 11:29. The name Tyrannus (our tyrant) is a common one. It is an inscription in the Columbarium of the Empress Livia as that of a physician in the court. Furneaux suggests the possibility that a relative of this physician was lecturing on medicine in Ephesus and so as a friend of Luke, the physician, would be glad to help Paul about a place to preach. It was probably a public building or lecture hall with this name whether hired by Paul or loaned to him. The pagan sophists often spoke in such halls. The Codex Bezae adds “from the fifth hour to the tenth” as the time allotted Paul for his work in this hall, which is quite possible, from just before midday till the close of the afternoon (from before the noon meal till two hours before sunset) each day. Here Paul had great freedom and a great hearing. As the church grows there will be other places of meeting as the church in the house of Aquila and Priscilla (1 Corinthians 16:19). [source]
Acts 19:9 In the school of Tyrannus [εν τηι σχοληι Τυραννου]
Σχολη — Scholē (our school) is an old word from σχειν — schein (εχω — echō) to hold on, leisure and then in later Greek (Plutarch, etc.) a place where there is leisure as here. Only this example in the N.T. This is the Greek notion of “school,” the Jewish being that of “yoke” as in Matthew 11:29. The name Tyrannus (our tyrant) is a common one. It is an inscription in the Columbarium of the Empress Livia as that of a physician in the court. Furneaux suggests the possibility that a relative of this physician was lecturing on medicine in Ephesus and so as a friend of Luke, the physician, would be glad to help Paul about a place to preach. It was probably a public building or lecture hall with this name whether hired by Paul or loaned to him. The pagan sophists often spoke in such halls. The Codex Bezae adds “from the fifth hour to the tenth” as the time allotted Paul for his work in this hall, which is quite possible, from just before midday till the close of the afternoon (from before the noon meal till two hours before sunset) each day. Here Paul had great freedom and a great hearing. As the church grows there will be other places of meeting as the church in the house of Aquila and Priscilla (1 Corinthians 16:19). [source]
Romans 11:3 Life [ψυχήν]
From ψύχω tobreathe or blow. In classical usage it signifies life in the distinctness of individual existence, especially of man, occasionally of brutes. Hence, generally, the life of the individual. In the further development of the idea it becomes, instead of the body, the seat of the will, dispositions, desires, passions; and, combined with the σῶμα bodydenotes the constituent parts of humanity. Hence the morally endowed individuality of man which continues after death. Scripture. In the Old Testament, answering to nephesh primarily life, breath; therefore life in its distinct individuality; life as such, distinguished from other men and from inanimate nature. Not the principle of life, but that which bears in itself and manifests the life-principle. Hence spirit (ruach πνεῦμα ) in the Old Testament never signifies the individual. Soul ( ψυχή ), of itself, does not constitute personality, but only when it is the soul of a human being. Human personality is derived from spirit ( πνεῦμα ), and finds expression in soul or life ( ψυχή ). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The New-Testament usage follows the Old, in denoting all individuals from the point of view of individual life. Thus the phrase πᾶσα ψυχή everysoul, i.e., every person (Romans 2:9; Romans 13:1), marking them off from inanimate nature. So Romans 11:3; Romans 16:4; 2 Corinthians 1:23; 2 Corinthians 12:15; Philemon 2:30; 1 Thessalonians 2:8, illustrate an Old-Testament usage whereby the soul is the seat of personality, and is employed instead of the personal pronoun, with a collateral notion of value as individual personality. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
These and other passages are opposed to the view which limits the term to a mere animal life-principle. See Ephesians 6:6; Colossians 3:23; the compounds σύμψυχοι withone soul; ἰσοψύχον like-minded(Philemon 1:27; Philemon 2:20), where personal interest and accord of feeling are indicated, and not lower elements of personality. See, especially 1 Thessalonians 5:23. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
As to the distinction between ψυχή souland πνεῦμα spiritit is to be said:-DIVIDER-
1. That there are cases where the meanings approach very closely, if they are not practically synonymous; especially where the individual life is referred to. See Luke 1:47; John 11:33, and John 12:27; Matthew 11:29, and 1 Corinthians 16:18. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
2. That the distinction is to be rejected which rests on the restriction of ψυχή to the principle of animal life. This cannot be maintained in the face of 1 Corinthians 15:45; 1 Corinthians 2:14, in which latter the kindred adjective ψυχικός naturalhas reference to the faculty of discerning spiritual truth. In both cases the antithesis is πνεῦμα spiritin the ethical sense, requiring an enlargement of the conception of ψυχικός naturalbeyond that of σαρκικός fleshlyThat ψυχή soulmust not be distinguished from πνεῦμα ; spirit as being alone subject to the dominion of sin, since the πνεῦμα is described as being subject to such dominion. See 2 Corinthians 7:1. So 1 Thessalonians 5:23; 1 Corinthians 7:34, imply that the spirit needs sanctification. Compare Ephesians 4:23. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
4. Ψυχή soulis never used of God like πνεῦμα spiritIt is used of Christ, but always with reference to His humanity. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Whatever distinction there is, therefore, is not between a higher and a lower element in man. It is rather between two sides of the one immaterial nature which stands in contrast with the body. Spirit expresses the conception of that nature more generally, being used both of the earthly and of the non-earthly spirit, while soul designates it on the side of the creature. In this view ψυχή soulis akin to σάρξ , flesh, “not as respects the notion conveyed by them, but as respects their value as they both stand at the same stage of creatureliness in contradistinction to God.” Hence the distinction follows that of the Old Testament between soul and spirit as viewed from two different points: the soul regarded as an individual possession, distinguishing the holder from other men and from inanimate nature; the spirit regarded as coming directly from God and returning to Him. “The former indicates the life-principle simply as subsistent, the latter marks its relation to God.” Spirit and not soul is the point of contact with the regenerating forces of the Holy Spirit; the point from which the whole personality is moved round so as to face God. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Ψυχή soulis thus:-DIVIDER-
1. The individual life, the seat of the personality. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
2. The subject of the life, the person in which it dwells. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
3. The mind as the sentient principle, the seat of sensation and desire. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
[source]

2 Corinthians 7:6 Those that are cast down [τοὺς ταπεινοὺς]
Rev., the lowly. See on Matthew 11:29. Here the A.V. is more nearly true to the idea, which is that of depression through circumstances, rather than of lowliness of character. The neater rendering would be the downcast. [source]
2 Corinthians 7:6 The lowly [τους ταπεινους]
See note on Matthew 11:29. Literally, low on the ground in old sense (Ezekiel 17:24). Low in condition as here; James 1:9. In 2 Corinthians 10:1 regarded as abject. In this sense in papyri. “Humility as a sovereign grace is the creation of Christianity” (Gladstone, Life, iii, p. 466). By the coming (en tēi parousiāi). Same use of parousia as in 1 Corinthians 16:7 which see. See also 2 Corinthians 7:7; 2 Corinthians 10:10. [source]
2 Corinthians 10:1 By the meekness and gentleness of Christ [δια τες πραυτητος και επιεικιας του Χριστου]
This appeal shows (Plummer) that Paul had spoken to the Corinthians about the character of Christ. Jesus claimed meekness for himself (Matthew 11:29) and felicitated the meek (Matthew 5:5) and he exemplified it abundantly (Luke 23:34). See note on Matthew 5:5 and 1 Corinthians 4:21 for this great word that has worn thin with us. Plutarch combines πραυτης — prautēs with επιεικια — epieikia as Paul does here. Matthew Arnold suggested “sweet reasonableness” for επιεικεια — epieikeia in Plato, Aristotle, Plutarch. It is in the N.T. only here and Acts 24:4 In Greek Ethics the equitable man was called επιεικης — epieikēs a man who does not press for the last farthing of his rights (Bernard). Lowly among you (ταπεινος εν υμιν — tapeinos en humin). The bad use of ταπεινος — tapeinos the old use, but here alone in N.T. in that meaning. Socrates and Aristotle used it for littleness of soul. Probably Paul here is quoting one of the sneers of his traducers in Corinth about his humble conduct while with them (1 Corinthians 2:2, 1 Corinthians 2:3; 2 Corinthians 7:6) and his boldness (απων ταρρω — apōn tharrō) when away (1 Corinthians 7:16). “It was easy to satirize and misrepresent a depression of spirits, a humility of demeanour, which were either the direct results of some bodily affliction, or which the consciousness of this affliction had rendered habitual” (Farrar). The words stung Paul to the quick. [source]
Galatians 5:1 Yoke [ζυγῷ]
Metaphorical, of a burden or bondage. Comp. Matthew 11:29, Matthew 11:30; Acts 15:10; 1 Timothy 6:1. Similarly lxx, Genesis 27:40; Leviticus 26:13; 2 Chronicles 10:4, 2 Chronicles 10:9, 2 Chronicles 10:10, 2 Chronicles 10:11, 2 Chronicles 10:14. So always in N.T. except Revelation 6:5, where it means a pair of scales. See note, and comp. Leviticus 19:35, Leviticus 19:36; Proverbs 11:1; Proverbs 16:11; Hosea 12:7. [source]
Ephesians 4:2 Lowiness - meekness []
See on Matthew 11:29; see on Matthew 5:5. [source]
Philippians 2:3 Lowliness of mind [ταπεινοφροσύνῃ]
See on Matthew 11:29. [source]
Philippians 2:3 In lowliness of mind [ταπεινος]
Late and rare word. Not in O.T. or early Greek writers. In Josephus and Epictetus in bad sense (pusillanimity). For ostentatious humility in Corinthians Phlippians 2:18, Phlippians 2:23. One of the words, like ταπεινοπρων — tapeinos (Matthew 11:29) and υπερεχοντας εαυτων — tapeinophrōn (1 Peter 3:8, here alone in N.T.) that Christianity has ennobled and dignified (Acts 20:19). Better than himself (υπερεχω — huperechontas heautōn). Present active participle of huperechō in intransitive sense to excel or surpass with the ablative, “excelling themselves.” See Romans 12:10. [source]
Colossians 2:18 In a voluntary humility [θέλων ἐν ταπεινοφροσύνῃ]
Render delighting in humility. This rendering is well supported by Septuagint usage. See 1 Samuel 18:22; 2 Samuel 15:26; 1 Kings 10:9; 2 Chronicles 9:8. It falls in, in the regular participial series, with the other declarations as to the vain conceit of the teachers; signifying not their purpose or their wish to deprive the Christians of their reward, but their vain enthusiasm for their false doctrine, and their conceited self-complacency which prompted them to sit as judges. The worship of angels involved a show of humility, an affectation of superior reverence for God, as shown in the reluctance to attempt to approach God otherwise than indirectly: in its assumption that humanity, debased by the contact with matter, must reach after God through successive grades of intermediate beings. For humility, see on Matthew 11:29. [source]
1 Timothy 6:1 As many servants as are under the yoke [ὅσοι εἰσὶν ὑπὸ ζυγὸν δοῦλοι]
Incorrect. Rather, as many as are under the yoke as bondservants. As bondservants is added in explanation of under the yoke, which implies a hard and disagreeable condition. Yoke is used only here of the state of slavery. In Galatians 5:1; Acts 15:10, of the Mosaic law. See on Matthew 11:29. [source]
1 Timothy 6:1 Under the yoke [υπο ζυγον]
As slaves Perhaps under heathen masters (1 Peter 2:18). For the slave problem, see also Philemon 1:1; Colossians 3:22; Ephesians 6:5; Titus 2:9. See note on Matthew 11:29 for Christ‘s “yoke” (ζυγον — zugon from ζευγνυμι — zeugnumi to join). [source]
James 1:9 The brother of low degree [ὁ ἀδελφὸς ὁ ταπεινὸς]
Lit., the brother, the lowly one. Not in the higher Christian sense of ταπεινὸς (see on Matthew 11:29), but, rather, poor and afflicted, as contrasted with rich. [source]
James 1:9 Of low degree [ο ταπεινος]
“The lowly” brother, in outward condition (Luke 1:52), humble and poor as in Psalm 9:12; Proverbs 30:14, not the spiritually humble as in Matthew 11:29; James 4:6. In the lxx ταπεινος — tapeinos was used for either the poor in goods or the poor in spirit. Christianity has glorified this word in both senses. Already the rich and the poor in the churches had their occasion for jealousies.Glory in his high estate (καυχαστω εν τωι υπσει αυτου — kauchasthō en tōi hupsei autou). Paradox, but true. In his low estate he is “in his height” (υπσος — hupsos old word, in N.T., also in Luke 1:78; Ephesians 3:1; etc.). [source]
James 3:13 By his good life [εκ της καλης αναστροπης]
For this literary Koiné word from αναστρεπομαι — anastrephomai (walk, conduct) see Galatians 1:13. Actions speak louder than words even in the case of the professional wise man. Cf. 1 Peter 1:15.In meekness of wisdom (εν πραυτητι σοπιας — en prautēti sophias). As in James 1:21 of the listener, so here of the teacher. Cf. Matthew 5:5; Matthew 11:29 and Zechariah 9:9 of King Messiah quoted in Matthew 21:5. Startling combination. [source]
James 3:13 In meekness of wisdom [εν πραυτητι σοπιας]
As in James 1:21 of the listener, so here of the teacher. Cf. Matthew 5:5; Matthew 11:29 and Zechariah 9:9 of King Messiah quoted in Matthew 21:5. Startling combination. [source]
James 3:13 Wise and understanding [σοπος και επιστημων]
Σοπος — Sophos is used for the practical teacher (James 3:1), επιστημων — epistēmōn (old word from επισταμαι — epistamai here only in N.T.) for an expert, a skilled and scientific person with a tone of superiority. In Deuteronomy 1:13, Deuteronomy 1:15; Deuteronomy 4:6, the two terms are practically synonyms.Let him shew (δειχατω — deixatō). First aorist active imperative of δεικνυμι — deiknumi old verb to show. As about faith in James 2:18. Emphatic position of this verb.By his good life For this literary Koiné word from αναστρεπομαι — anastrephomai (walk, conduct) see Galatians 1:13. Actions speak louder than words even in the case of the professional wise man. Cf. 1 Peter 1:15.In meekness of wisdom (εν πραυτητι σοπιας — en prautēti sophias). As in James 1:21 of the listener, so here of the teacher. Cf. Matthew 5:5; Matthew 11:29 and Zechariah 9:9 of King Messiah quoted in Matthew 21:5. Startling combination. [source]
1 Peter 5:5 To the humble []
See on Matthew 11:29. [source]
1 Peter 3:8 Courteous []
The A. V. has here followed the reading of the Tex. Rec., φιλόφρονες . But the best texts read ταπεινόφρονες , humble-minded. So Rev. This occurs nowhere else in the New Testament, though the kindred noun ταπεινοφροσύνη , humility, is found often. See on ταπεινός , lowly, notes on Matthew 11:29. [source]
1 Peter 3:4 In the incorruptible apparel of a meek and quiet spirit [εν τωι απταρτωι του ησυχιου και πραεως πνευματος]
No word in the Greek for “apparel” For απταρτος — aphthartos see note on 1 Peter 1:4 and note on 1 Peter 1:23. For πραυς — praus see Matthew 5:5; Matthew 11:29. Πνευμα — Pneuma (spirit) is here disposition or temper (Bigg), unlike any other use in the N.T. In 1 Peter 3:18, 1 Peter 3:19; 1 Peter 4:6 it means the whole inner man as opposed to σαρχ — sarx or σωμα — sōma very much as πσυχη — psuchē is used as opposed to σωμα — sōma Spirit just mentioned.Of great price (πολυτελες — poluteles). Old word (from πολυ — polu and τελος — telos cost), in N.T. only here, Mark 14:3; 1 Timothy 2:9. [source]
3 John 1:2 Soul [ψυχή]
See on Mark 12:30; see on Luke 1:46. The soul ( ψυχή ) is the principle of individuality, the seat of personal impressions. It has a side in contact with both the material and the spiritual element of humanity, and is thus the mediating organ between body and spirit. Its meaning, therefore, constantly rises above life or the living individual, and takes color from its relation to either the emotional or the spiritual side of life, from the fact of its being the seat of the feelings, desires, affections, aversions, and the bearer and manifester of the divine life-principle ( πνεῦμα ). Consequently ψυχή is often used in our sense of heart (Luke 1:46; Luke 2:35; John 10:24; Acts 14:2); and the meanings of ψυχή souland πνεῦμα spiritoccasionally approach each other very closely. Compare John 12:27, and John 11:33; Matthew 11:29, and 1 Corinthians 16:18. Also both words in Luke 1:47. In this passage ψυχή soulexpresses the soul regarded as moral being designed for everlasting life. See Hebrews 6:19; Hebrews 10:39; Hebrews 13:17; 1 Peter 2:11; 1 Peter 4:19. John commonly uses the word to denote the principle of the natural life. See John 10:11, John 10:15; John 13:37; John 15:13; 1 John 3:16; Revelation 8:9; Revelation 12:11; Revelation 16:3. [source]
Revelation 6:5 Pair of balances [ζυγὸν]
Rev., a balance. Properly, anything which joins two bodies; hence a yoke (Matthew 11:29; Acts 15:10). The cross-beam of the loom, to which the warp was fixed; the thwarts joining the opposite sides of a ship; the beam of the balance, and hence the balance itself. The judgment of this seal is scarcity, of which the balance is a symbol, representing the time when food is doled out by weight. See Leviticus 26:26; Ezekiel 4:16. [source]
Revelation 6:5 Had [εχων]
Literally, a yoke (old word from ζευγνυμι — zeugnumi to join), of slavery (Acts 15:10; Galatians 5:1), of teaching (Matthew 11:29), of weight or measure like a pair of scales evenly balancing as here (Ezekiel 5:1; Ezekiel 45:10). The rider of this black horse, like the spectral figure of hunger, carries in his hand a pair of scales. This is also one of the fruits of war. [source]
Revelation 6:5 A balance [ζυγον]
Literally, a yoke (old word from ζευγνυμι — zeugnumi to join), of slavery (Acts 15:10; Galatians 5:1), of teaching (Matthew 11:29), of weight or measure like a pair of scales evenly balancing as here (Ezekiel 5:1; Ezekiel 45:10). The rider of this black horse, like the spectral figure of hunger, carries in his hand a pair of scales. This is also one of the fruits of war. [source]
Revelation 4:8 Having [εχων]
Masculine participle again as in Revelation 4:7, though ζωον — zōon neuter.Six wings (ανα πτερυγας εχ — ana pterugas hex). Distributive use of ανα — ana “six wings apiece” as in Luke 10:1 (ανα δυο — ana duo by twos). Like Isaiah 6:2, not like Ezekiel 1:6, where only four wings are given apiece.Are full of Plural verb, though ζωα — zōa neuter, to individualize each one.Round about and within (κυκλοτεν και εσωτεν — kuklothen kai esōthen). Perhaps before and behind (Revelation 4:6) and under the wings, “pointing to the secret energies of nature” (Swete).Rest See also Revelation 14:11. Old word (from αναπαυω — anapauō to relax), as in Matthew 11:29. God and Christ cease not their activity (John 5:17). “This ceaseless activity of nature under the hand of God is a ceaseless tribute of praise” (Swete).Day and night (ημερας και νυκτος — hēmeras kai nuktos). Genitive of time, by day and by night.Holy, holy, holy “The task of the Cherubim together with the Seraphim and Ophannim is to sing the praises of God” (Charles) in the Κυριος ο τεος — trisagion (triple repetition of εστιν — hagios).Is the Lord God (ο παντοκρατωρ — Kurios ho theos). See Isaiah 6:3. The copula ο ην και ο ων και ο ερχομενος — estin (is) is not expressed, but is implied.The Almighty See note on Revelation 1:8.Which was and which is and which is to come (ho ēn kai ho ōn kai ho erchomenos). Just as in Revelation 1:4, Revelation 1:8, but with the order changed. [source]
Revelation 4:8 Are full of [γεμουσιν]
Plural verb, though ζωα — zōa neuter, to individualize each one.Round about and within (κυκλοτεν και εσωτεν — kuklothen kai esōthen). Perhaps before and behind (Revelation 4:6) and under the wings, “pointing to the secret energies of nature” (Swete).Rest See also Revelation 14:11. Old word (from αναπαυω — anapauō to relax), as in Matthew 11:29. God and Christ cease not their activity (John 5:17). “This ceaseless activity of nature under the hand of God is a ceaseless tribute of praise” (Swete).Day and night (ημερας και νυκτος — hēmeras kai nuktos). Genitive of time, by day and by night.Holy, holy, holy “The task of the Cherubim together with the Seraphim and Ophannim is to sing the praises of God” (Charles) in the Κυριος ο τεος — trisagion (triple repetition of εστιν — hagios).Is the Lord God (ο παντοκρατωρ — Kurios ho theos). See Isaiah 6:3. The copula ο ην και ο ων και ο ερχομενος — estin (is) is not expressed, but is implied.The Almighty See note on Revelation 1:8.Which was and which is and which is to come (ho ēn kai ho ōn kai ho erchomenos). Just as in Revelation 1:4, Revelation 1:8, but with the order changed. [source]
Revelation 4:8 Rest [αναπαυσιν]
See also Revelation 14:11. Old word (from αναπαυω — anapauō to relax), as in Matthew 11:29. God and Christ cease not their activity (John 5:17). “This ceaseless activity of nature under the hand of God is a ceaseless tribute of praise” (Swete).Day and night (ημερας και νυκτος — hēmeras kai nuktos). Genitive of time, by day and by night.Holy, holy, holy “The task of the Cherubim together with the Seraphim and Ophannim is to sing the praises of God” (Charles) in the Κυριος ο τεος — trisagion (triple repetition of εστιν — hagios).Is the Lord God (ο παντοκρατωρ — Kurios ho theos). See Isaiah 6:3. The copula ο ην και ο ων και ο ερχομενος — estin (is) is not expressed, but is implied.The Almighty See note on Revelation 1:8.Which was and which is and which is to come (ho ēn kai ho ōn kai ho erchomenos). Just as in Revelation 1:4, Revelation 1:8, but with the order changed. [source]

What do the individual words in Matthew 11:29 mean?

Take the yoke of Me upon you and learn from Me for gentle I am humble [in] the heart you will find rest [for] the souls of you
ἄρατε τὸν ζυγόν μου ἐφ’ ὑμᾶς καὶ μάθετε ἀπ’ ἐμοῦ ὅτι πραΰς εἰμι ταπεινὸς τῇ καρδίᾳ εὑρήσετε ἀνάπαυσιν ταῖς ψυχαῖς ὑμῶν

ἄρατε  Take 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Imperative Active, 2nd Person Plural
Root: αἴρω  
Sense: to raise up, elevate, lift up.
ζυγόν  yoke 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: ζυγός  
Sense: a yoke.
μου  of  Me 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive 1st Person Singular
Root: ἐγώ  
Sense: I, me, my.
ἐφ’  upon 
Parse: Preposition
Root: ἐπί  
Sense: upon, on, at, by, before.
μάθετε  learn 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Imperative Active, 2nd Person Plural
Root: μανθάνω  
Sense: to learn, be appraised.
ἐμοῦ  Me 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive 1st Person Singular
Root: ἐγώ  
Sense: I, me, my.
πραΰς  gentle 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: πραΰς  
Sense: mildness of disposition, gentleness of spirit, meekness.
εἰμι  I  am 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 1st Person Singular
Root: εἰμί  
Sense: to be, to exist, to happen, to be present.
ταπεινὸς  humble 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: ταπεινός  
Sense: not rising far from the ground.
τῇ  [in]  the 
Parse: Article, Dative Feminine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
καρδίᾳ  heart 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: καρδία  
Sense: the heart.
εὑρήσετε  you  will  find 
Parse: Verb, Future Indicative Active, 2nd Person Plural
Root: εὑρίσκω  
Sense: to come upon, hit upon, to meet with.
ἀνάπαυσιν  rest 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: ἀνάπαυσις  
Sense: intermission, cessation of any motion, business or labour.
ταῖς  [for]  the 
Parse: Article, Dative Feminine Plural
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
ψυχαῖς  souls 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Plural
Root: ψυχή  
Sense: breath.
ὑμῶν  of  you 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive 2nd Person Plural
Root: σύ  
Sense: you.