The Meaning of Mark 8:32 Explained

Mark 8:32

KJV: And he spake that saying openly. And Peter took him, and began to rebuke him.

YLT: and openly he was speaking the word. And Peter having taken him aside, began to rebuke him,

Darby: And he spoke the thing openly. And Peter, taking him to him, began to rebuke him.

ASV: And he spake the saying openly. And Peter took him, and began to rebuke him.

What does Mark 8:32 Mean?

Verse Meaning

Until now, Jesus had only hinted at His sufferings (cf. Mark 2:20; Mark 4:33-34; Mark 7:14-15; Mark 7:17-23). The disciples were unprepared for this clear revelation that Messiah would suffer, die, and rise again. Peter understood it but refused to accept it. He could not reconcile this view of Messiah with the popular one. The word Mark chose to describe Peter"s rebuke is a strong one (Gr. epitimao). It is the same one he used to describe Jesus silencing demons (cf. Mark 1:25; Mark 3:12). Peter reacted with "an air of conscious superiority." [1]

Context Summary

Mark 8:22-38 - The Cost Of Following Jesus
Our attention has been drawn to the Master's sighs; here, however, was another characteristic act. He spat on the eyes of the blind man, perhaps to excite his expectation and faith. Repulsive as ophthalmia is in the East, it did not repel Him nor staunch the flow of His pity.
We do not at once see everything clearly, but step by step we come unto perfect vision. Here we see through a glass darkly, there face to face. There was a great price to be paid; it was only through suffering and death that Jesus could do His greatest work, in redeeming and cleansing the children of men. He might have been the miracle-worker apart from Calvary; but to be the Savior, He must not spare Himself but be willing to pour out His soul even unto death. It was hard for the Apostles to learn this lesson; they wanted the Master to spare Himself. Peter, especially, sought to dissuade Him; but the Lord knew better the desperate need of men and how it must be met. There are three conditions to be fulfilled by those who have resolved to follow the Lamb whithersoever he goeth. 1. We must deny self; 2. Each must take up his cross; 3. We must think more of others than of ourselves. If these are realized, the soul is following Christ and making progress, even though it deems itself stagnant or drifting back. [source]

Chapter Summary: Mark 8

1  Jesus feeds the people miraculously;
10  refuses to give a sign to the Pharisees;
14  admonishes his disciples to beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and Herod;
22  gives a blind man his sight;
27  acknowledges that he is the Jesus who should suffer and rise again;
34  and exhorts to patience in persecution for the profession of the gospel

Greek Commentary for Mark 8:32

Spake the saying openly [παρρησιαι τον λογον ελαλει]
He held back nothing, told it all (παν — pān all, ρησια — rēsia from ειπον — eipon say), without reserve, to all of them. Imperfect tense ελαλει — elalei shows that Jesus did it repeatedly. Mark alone gives this item. Mark does not give the great eulogy of Peter in Matthew 16:17, Matthew 16:19 after his confession (Mark 8:29; Matthew 16:16; Luke 9:20), but he does tell the stinging rebuke given Peter by Jesus on this occasion. See discussion on Matthew 16:21, Matthew 16:26. [source]
He spake the saying openly []
Mark only. Not as a secret or mystery, as in his words about being lifted up, or building the temple in three days. Not ambiguously, but explicitly. Wyc., plainly. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Mark 8:32

Matthew 16:22 Peter took him [προσλαβομενος αυτον ο Πετρος]
Middle voice, “taking to himself,” aside and apart, “as if by a right of his own. He acted with greater familiarity after the token of acknowledgment had been given. Jesus, however, reduces him to his level” (Bengel). “Peter here appears in a new character; a minute ago speaking under inspiration from heaven, now under inspiration from the opposite quarter” (Bruce). Syriac Sinaitic for Mark 8:32 has it “as though pitying him.” But this exclamation and remonstrance of Peter was soon interrupted by Jesus. [source]
Mark 9:6 For he wist not what to answer [ou gar ēidei ti apokrithēi)]
Deliberative subjunctive retained in indirect question. But why did Peter say anything? Luke says that he spoke, “not knowing what he said,” as an excuse for the inappropriateness of his remarks. Perhaps Peter felt embarrassed at having been asleep (Luke 9:32) and the feast of tabernacles or booths (skēnai) was near. See note on Matthew 17:4. Peter and the others apparently had not heard the talk of Moses and Elijah with Jesus about his decease (exodon exodus, departure) and little knew the special comfort that Jesus had found in this understanding of the great approaching tragedy concerning which Peter had shown absolute stupidity (Mark 8:32.) so recently. See note on Matthew 17:5 about the overshadowing and the voice. [source]
Luke 9:31 Who appeared in glory [οι οπτεντες εν δοχηι]
First aorist passive participle of οραω — horaō This item peculiar to Luke. Compare Luke 9:26.Spake of his decease (ελεγον την εχοδον — elegon tēn exodon). Imperfect active, were talking about his εχοδυς — exodus (departure from earth to heaven) very much like our English word “decease” (Latin decessus, a going away). The glorious light graphically revealed Moses and Elijah talking with Jesus about the very subject concerning which Peter had dared to rebuke Jesus for mentioning (Mark 8:32; Matthew 16:22). This very word εχοδυς — exodus (way out) in the sense of death occurs in 2 Peter 1:15 and is followed by a brief description of the Transfiguration glory. Other words for death (τανατος — thanatos) in the N.T. are εκβασις — ekbasis going out as departure (Hebrews 13:7), απιχις — aphixis departing (Acts 20:29), αναλυσις — analusis loosening anchor (2 Timothy 4:6) and αναλυσαι — analusai (Philemon 1:23).To accomplish To fulfil. Moses had led the Exodus from Egypt. Jesus will accomplish the exodus of God‘s people into the Promised Land on high. See notes on Mark and note on Matthew for discussion of significance of the appearance of Moses and Elijah as representatives of law and prophecy and with a peculiar death. The purpose of the Transfiguration was to strengthen the heart of Jesus as he was praying long about his approaching death and to give these chosen three disciples a glimpse of his glory for the hour of darkness coming. No one on earth understood the heart of Jesus and so Moses and Elijah came. The poor disciples utterly failed to grasp the significance of it all. [source]
Luke 9:31 Spake of his decease [ελεγον την εχοδον]
Imperfect active, were talking about his εχοδυς — exodus (departure from earth to heaven) very much like our English word “decease” (Latin decessus, a going away). The glorious light graphically revealed Moses and Elijah talking with Jesus about the very subject concerning which Peter had dared to rebuke Jesus for mentioning (Mark 8:32; Matthew 16:22). This very word εχοδυς — exodus (way out) in the sense of death occurs in 2 Peter 1:15 and is followed by a brief description of the Transfiguration glory. Other words for death (τανατος — thanatos) in the N.T. are εκβασις — ekbasis going out as departure (Hebrews 13:7), απιχις — aphixis departing (Acts 20:29), αναλυσις — analusis loosening anchor (2 Timothy 4:6) and αναλυσαι — analusai (Philemon 1:23). [source]
1 Thessalonians 2:2 We waxed bold [ἐπαρρησιασάμεθα]
Only once elsewhere in Paul, Ephesians 6:20. Frequent in Acts. Always in N.T. in connection with speaking. Derived from πᾶν everyand ῥῆσις speakingHence παρρησία boldnessbold speaking out of every word. The noun is very often used adverbially, as παρρησίᾳ boldlyor openly, Mark 8:32; see also John 18:20. In Acts always μετὰ παρρησίας withboldness, comp. Hebrews 4:16. Ἑν παρρησίᾳ inboldness, John 7:4; John 16:29; Ephesians 6:19; Philemon 1:20. Both the verb and the noun are found in lxx. See Leviticus 26:13; Proverbs 10:10; Wisd. 5:1; Sirach 6:11. [source]

What do the individual words in Mark 8:32 mean?

And openly the word He was speaking having taken Him - Peter to him he began to rebuke Him
καὶ παρρησίᾳ τὸν λόγον ἐλάλει προσλαβόμενος Πέτρος αὐτὸν ἤρξατο ἐπιτιμᾶν αὐτῷ

παρρησίᾳ  openly 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: παρρησία  
Sense: freedom in speaking, unreservedness in speech.
λόγον  word 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: λόγος  
Sense: of speech.
ἐλάλει  He  was  speaking 
Parse: Verb, Imperfect Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἀπολαλέω 
Sense: to utter a voice or emit a sound.
προσλαβόμενος  having  taken  Him 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Participle Middle, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: προσαναλαμβάνω 
Sense: to take to, take in addition, to take to one’s self.
  - 
Parse: Article, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
Πέτρος  Peter 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: Πέτρος  
Sense: one of the twelve disciples of Jesus.
αὐτὸν  to  him 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Accusative Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Root: αὐτός  
Sense: himself, herself, themselves, itself.
ἤρξατο  he  began 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Middle, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἄρχω  
Sense: to be the first to do (anything), to begin.
ἐπιτιμᾶν  to  rebuke 
Parse: Verb, Present Infinitive Active
Root: ἐπιτιμάω  
Sense: to show honour to, to honour.