The Meaning of Mark 10:32 Explained

Mark 10:32

KJV: And they were in the way going up to Jerusalem; and Jesus went before them: and they were amazed; and as they followed, they were afraid. And he took again the twelve, and began to tell them what things should happen unto him,

YLT: And they were in the way going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was going before them, and they were amazed, and following they were afraid. And having again taken the twelve, he began to tell them the things about to happen to him,

Darby: And they were in the way going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was going on before them; and they were amazed, and were afraid as they followed. And taking the twelve again to him, he began to tell them what was going to happen to him:

ASV: And they were on the way, going up to Jerusalem; and Jesus was going before them: and they were amazed; and they that followed were afraid. And he took again the twelve, and began to tell them the things that were to happen unto him,

What does Mark 10:32 Mean?

Verse Meaning

Jesus and His disciples were traveling to Jerusalem from somewhere in Perea or Judea. They had not yet passed through Jericho ( Mark 10:46-52). Jesus" position in front of them, in typical rabbinic fashion, suggests His determination to go to Jerusalem in spite of His coming death there (cf. Mark 14:28; Mark 16:7). His attitude probably accounted for the disciples" amazement. Other disciples following farther behind were afraid because of what Jesus had said lay ahead there. Jesus turned to give the Twelve further information about His coming passion.

Context Summary

Mark 10:23-52 - True Riches And Real Greatness
Wealth brings many temptations. It is not said that rich men cannot get through the gate, but they will have to stoop very low and be stripped of the love of wealth, though not necessarily of wealth itself. In Christ's kingdom to give all is to get all. The surrendered life needs no pity, for what it loses on the material side is more than compensated by its enormous spiritual gains, Mark 10:30-31. Perhaps the request of the two brethren was dictated rather by the desire to be near the Master than by ambition; but in any case there is only one price to be paid. We must know the fellowship of His sufferings, if we are to share His glory, 2 Timothy 2:11, etc. It is easy to say, "We are able;" but had they not experienced the day of Pentecost, these two aspirants had certainly failed, Philippians 4:13. If you are not called to suffer with Him, then serve. Service like Christ's will bring you near His throne, as will also a share in His suffering. With us as with Bartimaeus, obstacles and difficulties should not daunt, but rather incite to more eager prayers. Christ is ever saying to men-Courage! Only faith could make a blind man cast away his garment, but he knew that he would be able to find it again with the sight that Jesus would certainly bestow. [source]

Chapter Summary: Mark 10

1  Jesus disputes with the Pharisees concerning divorce;
13  blesses the children that are brought unto him;
17  resolves a rich man how he may inherit everlasting life;
23  tells his disciples of the danger of riches;
28  promises rewards to those who forsake all for the gospel;
32  foretells his death and resurrection;
35  bids the two ambitious suitors to think rather of suffering with him;
46  and restores to Bartimaeus his sight

Greek Commentary for Mark 10:32

And they were amazed [και εταμβουντο]
Imperfect tense describing the feelings of the disciples as Jesus was walking on in front of them Cf. Luke 9:5. They began to fear coming disaster as they neared Jerusalem. They read correctly the face of Jesus. [source]
And he took again the twelve [και παραλαβων τους δωδεκα]
Matthew has “apart” from the crowds and that is what Mark also means. Note παραλαβων — paralabōn taking to his side.And began to tell them the things that were to happen to him (ηρχατο αυτοις λεγειν τα μελλοντα αυτωι συμβαινειν — ērxato autois legein ta mellonta autōi sumbainein). He had done it before three times already (Mark 8:31; Mark 9:13; Mark 9:31). So Jesus tries once more. They had failed utterly heretofore. How is it now? Luke adds (Luke 18:34): “They understood none of these things.” But Mark and Matthew show how the minds of two of the disciples were wholly occupied with plans of their own selfish ambition while Jesus was giving details of his approaching death and resurrection. [source]
And began to tell them the things that were to happen to him [ηρχατο αυτοις λεγειν τα μελλοντα αυτωι συμβαινειν]
He had done it before three times already (Mark 8:31; Mark 9:13; Mark 9:31). So Jesus tries once more. They had failed utterly heretofore. How is it now? Luke adds (Luke 18:34): “They understood none of these things.” But Mark and Matthew show how the minds of two of the disciples were wholly occupied with plans of their own selfish ambition while Jesus was giving details of his approaching death and resurrection. [source]
Were amazed []
The sudden awe which fell on the disciples is noted by Mark only. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Mark 10:32

Matthew 20:17 Apart [κατ ιδιαν]
This is the prediction in Matthew of the cross (Matthew 16:21; Matthew 17:22; Matthew 20:17). “Aside by themselves” (Moffatt). The verb is παρελαβεν — parelaben Jesus is having his inward struggle (Mark 10:32) and makes one more effort to get the Twelve to understand him. [source]
Mark 14:33 Greatly amazed and sore troubled [εκταμβεισται και αδημονειν]
Matthew 26:37 has “sorrowful and sore troubled.” See note on Matt. about αδημονειν — adēmonein Mark alone uses εχταμβεισται — exthambeisthai (here and in Mark 9:15). There is a papyrus example given by Moulton and Milligan‘s Vocabulary. The verb ταμβεω — thambeō occurs in Mark 10:32 for the amazement of the disciples at the look of Jesus as he went toward Jerusalem. Now Jesus himself feels amazement as he directly faces the struggle in the Garden of Gethsemane. He wins the victory over himself in Gethsemane and then he can endure the loss, despising the shame. For the moment he is rather amazed and homesick for heaven. “Long as He had foreseen the Passion, when it came clearly into view its terror exceeded His anticipations” (Swete). “He learned from what he suffered,” (Hebrews 5:8) and this new experience enriched the human soul of Jesus. [source]
Luke 12:50 I have a baptism [βαπτισμα δε εχω]
Once again Jesus will call his baptism the baptism of blood and will challenge James and John to it (Mark 10:32.; Matthew 20:22.). So here. “Having used the metaphor of fire, Christ now uses the metaphor of water. The one sets forth the result of his coming as it affects the world, the other as it affects himself. The world is lit up with flames and Christ is bathed in blood” (Plummer). [source]
Luke 18:31 Took unto him [παραλαβων]
Second aorist active participle of παραλαμβανω — paralambanō Taking along with himself. So Mark 10:32. Matthew 20:17 adds κατ ιδιαν — kat' idian (apart). Jesus is making a special point of explaining his death to the Twelve. [source]
Luke 9:51 That he should be received up [της αναλημπσεως αυτου]
Literally, “of his taking up.” It is an old word (from Hippocrates on), but here alone in the N.T. It is derived from αναλαμβανω — analambanō (the verb used of the Ascension, Acts 1:2, Acts 1:11, Acts 1:22; 1 Timothy 3:16) and refers here to the Ascension of Jesus after His Resurrection. Not only in John‘s Gospel (John 17:5) does Jesus reveal a yearning for a return to the Father, but it is in the mind of Christ here as evidently at the Transfiguration (Luke 9:31) and later in Luke 12:49.He steadfastly set his face (αυτος το προσωπον εστηρισεν — autos to prosōpon estērisen). Note emphatic αυτος — autos he himself, with fixedness of purpose in the face of difficulty and danger. This look on Christ‘s face as he went to his doom is noted later in Mark 10:32. It is a Hebraistic idiom (nine times in Ezekiel), this use of face here, but the verb (effective aorist active) is an old one from στηριζω — stērizō (from στηριγχ — stērigx a support), to set fast, to fix.To go to Jerusalem Genitive infinitive of purpose. Luke three times mentions Christ making his way to Jerusalem (Luke 9:51; Luke 13:22; Luke 17:11) and John mentions three journeys to Jerusalem during the later ministry (John 7:10; John 11:17; John 12:1). It is natural to take these journeys to be the same in each of these Gospels. Luke does not make definite location of each incident and John merely supplements here and there. But in a broad general way they seem to correspond. [source]
Luke 9:51 He steadfastly set his face [αυτος το προσωπον εστηρισεν]
Note emphatic αυτος — autos he himself, with fixedness of purpose in the face of difficulty and danger. This look on Christ‘s face as he went to his doom is noted later in Mark 10:32. It is a Hebraistic idiom (nine times in Ezekiel), this use of face here, but the verb (effective aorist active) is an old one from στηριζω — stērizō (from στηριγχ — stērigx a support), to set fast, to fix. [source]
Galatians 1:17 Went I up [ἀνῆλθον]
Comp. Galatians 1:18. Only in this chapter, and John 6:3. More commonly ἀναβαίνειν , often of the journey to Jerusalem, probably in the conventional sense in which Englishmen speak of going up to London, no matter from what point. See Matthew 20:17; Mark 10:32; John 2:13; Acts 11:2. In Acts 18:22the verb is used absolutely of going to Jerusalem. The reading ἀπῆλθον Iwent away had strong support, and is adopted by Weiss. In that case the meaning would be went away to Jerusalem from where I then was. [source]
1 Peter 4:12 Concerning the fiery trial among you [τει εν υμιν πυρωσει]
Instrumental case, “by the among you burning,” metaphorical sense of old word (since Aristotle), from πυροω — puroō to burn See 1 Peter 1:7 for the metaphor. See Revelation 18:9, Revelation 18:18 only other N.T. examples. It occurs in Proverbs 27:21 for the smelting of gold and silver and so in Psalm 56:10 (lxx 65:10): “Thou didst smelt us as silver is smelted” Present middle participle of γινομαι — ginomai (already coming) with dative case υμιν — humin prove you (προς πειρασμον — pros peirasmon). “For testing.”As though a strange thing happened unto you Genitive absolute with ως — hōs giving the alleged reason, and υμιν — humin dative case with συμβαινοντος — sumbainontos (present active participle of συμβαινω — sumbainō to go together, to happen (Mark 10:32), agreeing with χενου — xenou (strange, Hebrews 13:9). [source]
1 Peter 4:12 As though a strange thing happened unto you [ως χενου υμιν συμβαινοντος]
Genitive absolute with ως — hōs giving the alleged reason, and υμιν — humin dative case with συμβαινοντος — sumbainontos (present active participle of συμβαινω — sumbainō to go together, to happen (Mark 10:32), agreeing with χενου — xenou (strange, Hebrews 13:9). [source]

What do the individual words in Mark 10:32 mean?

They were then on the way going up to Jerusalem and was going on before them - Jesus they were astonished those following were afraid having taken to [Him] again the Twelve He began them to tell the things being about to Him to happen
Ἦσαν δὲ ἐν τῇ ὁδῷ ἀναβαίνοντες εἰς Ἱεροσόλυμα καὶ ἦν προάγων αὐτοὺς Ἰησοῦς ἐθαμβοῦντο οἱ ἀκολουθοῦντες ἐφοβοῦντο παραλαβὼν πάλιν τοὺς δώδεκα ἤρξατο αὐτοῖς λέγειν τὰ μέλλοντα αὐτῷ συμβαίνειν

Ἦσαν  They  were 
Parse: Verb, Imperfect Indicative Active, 3rd Person Plural
Root: εἰμί  
Sense: to be, to exist, to happen, to be present.
ὁδῷ  way 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: ὁδός 
Sense: properly.
ἀναβαίνοντες  going  up 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root: ἀναβαίνω  
Sense: ascend.
Ἱεροσόλυμα  Jerusalem 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Neuter Plural
Root: Ἱεροσόλυμα  
Sense: denotes either the city itself or the inhabitants.
προάγων  going  on  before 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: προάγω  
Sense: to lead forward, lead forth.
  - 
Parse: Article, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
Ἰησοῦς  Jesus 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: Ἰησοῦς  
Sense: Joshua was the famous captain of the Israelites, Moses’ successor.
ἐθαμβοῦντο  they  were  astonished 
Parse: Verb, Imperfect Indicative Middle or Passive, 3rd Person Plural
Root: θαμβέω  
Sense: to be astonished.
οἱ  those 
Parse: Article, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
ἀκολουθοῦντες  following 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root: ἀκολουθέω  
Sense: to follow one who precedes, join him as his attendant, accompany him.
ἐφοβοῦντο  were  afraid 
Parse: Verb, Imperfect Indicative Middle or Passive, 3rd Person Plural
Root: φοβέομαι 
Sense: to put to flight by terrifying (to scare away).
παραλαβὼν  having  taken  to  [Him] 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: παραλαμβάνω  
Sense: to take to, to take with one’s self, to join to one’s self.
πάλιν  again 
Parse: Adverb
Root: πάλιν  
Sense: anew, again.
δώδεκα  Twelve 
Parse: Adjective, Accusative Masculine Plural
Root: δώδεκα  
Sense: twelve.
ἤρξατο  He  began 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Middle, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἄρχω  
Sense: to be the first to do (anything), to begin.
λέγειν  to  tell 
Parse: Verb, Present Infinitive Active
Root: λέγω 
Sense: to say, to speak.
τὰ  the  things 
Parse: Article, Accusative Neuter Plural
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
μέλλοντα  being  about 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Active, Accusative Neuter Plural
Root: μέλλω  
Sense: to be about.
αὐτῷ  to  Him 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Dative Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Root: αὐτός  
Sense: himself, herself, themselves, itself.
συμβαίνειν  to  happen 
Parse: Verb, Present Infinitive Active
Root: συμβαίνω  
Sense: to walk with the feet near together.