The Meaning of Luke 9:36 Explained

Luke 9:36

KJV: And when the voice was past, Jesus was found alone. And they kept it close, and told no man in those days any of those things which they had seen.

YLT: and when the voice was past, Jesus was found alone; and they were silent, and declared to no one in those days anything of what they have seen.

Darby: And as the voice was heard Jesus was found alone: and they kept silence, and told no one in those days any of the things they had seen.

ASV: And when the voice came, Jesus was found alone. And they held their peace, and told no man in those days any of the things which they had seen.

What does Luke 9:36 Mean?

Verse Meaning

The scene ends with Jesus alone the center of the disciples" attention. The disciples told no one what they had seen because Jesus told them to keep it quiet ( Matthew 17:9; Mark 9:9). Luke simply recorded the fact and omitted the discussion about Elijah that followed ( Matthew 17:10-13; Mark 9:10-13) thus highlighting Jesus" authority.
The major emphasis in Luke"s account of the Transfiguration is that the glorious Son of God must suffer.

Context Summary

Luke 9:28-36 - A Glimpse Of Glory
From some aspects this was the highest point in our Savior's earthly career. He was the second Adam and had not sinned. There was no reason, therefore, that He should die. He might in a moment have been changed; that which was mortal might have been swallowed up of life. The door through which Moses and Elijah had come stood open, and by it our Lord might have returned. But He could never, under those circumstances, have been the Savior of mankind. He knew this, so He turned His back on the joy set before Him and set His face toward Calvary.
Moses came as representing the Law; and Elijah, the Prophets. Each of these great departments of divine revelation had anticipated His coming, Luke 24:27; Luke 24:44. As stars fade in the sunrise, so their mission was now merged in Him. They spoke of His decease, literally, His exodus, and it was from this that Peter caught the term which he applied to his own death, 2 Peter 1:15. The Apostles never forgot this manifestation of the glory of the Lord, 1 John 1:1-4; 2 Peter 1:17. When you hear that Christ is the Beloved of God, remember Ephesians 1:6. [source]

Chapter Summary: Luke 9

1  Jesus sends his apostles to work miracles, and to preach
7  Herod desires to see Jesus
10  The apostles return
12  Jesus feeds five thousand;
18  inquires what opinion the world had of him; foretells his passion;
23  proposes to all the pattern of his patience
28  The transfiguration
37  He heals the lunatic;
43  again forewarns his disciples of his passion;
46  commends humility;
51  bids them to show mildness toward all, without desire of revenge
57  Many would follow him, but upon conditions

Greek Commentary for Luke 9:36

When the voice came [εν τοι γενεσται την πωνην]
Another example of Luke‘s idiom, this time with the second aorist middle infinitive. Literally, “on the coming as to the voice” (accusative of general reference). It does not mean that it was “after” the voice was past that Jesus was found alone, but simultaneously with it (ingressive aorist tense). [source]
Alone [μονος]
Same adjective in Mark 9:8; Matthew 17:8 translated “only.” Should be rendered “alone” there also.They held their peace (εσιγησαν — esigēsan). Ingressive aorist active of common verb σιγαω — sigaō became silent. In Mark 9:9; Matthew 17:9, Jesus commanded them not to tell till His Resurrection from the dead. Luke notes that they in awe obeyed that command and it turns out that they finally forgot the lesson of this night‘s great experience. By and by they will be able to tell them, but not “in those days.”Which they had seen Attraction of the relative α — ha into the case of the unexpressed antecedent τουτων — toutōn Perfect active indicative εωρακαν — heōrakan with Koiné (papyri) form for the ancient εωρακασιν — heōrakāsin changed by analogy to the first aorist ending in -αν — an instead of -ασιν — asin f0). [source]
They held their peace [εσιγησαν]
Ingressive aorist active of common verb σιγαω — sigaō became silent. In Mark 9:9; Matthew 17:9, Jesus commanded them not to tell till His Resurrection from the dead. Luke notes that they in awe obeyed that command and it turns out that they finally forgot the lesson of this night‘s great experience. By and by they will be able to tell them, but not “in those days.” [source]
Which they had seen [ων εωρακαν]
Attraction of the relative α — ha into the case of the unexpressed antecedent τουτων — toutōn Perfect active indicative εωρακαν — heōrakan with Koiné (papyri) form for the ancient εωρακασιν — heōrakāsin changed by analogy to the first aorist ending in -αν — an instead of -ασιν — asin f0). [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Luke 9:36

Mark 9:9 Should have risen [anastēi)]
Second aorist active subjunctive. More exactly, “should rise” (punctiliar aorist and futuristic, not with any idea of perfect tense). Luke 9:36 merely says that they told no man any of these things. It was a high and holy secret experience that the chosen three had had for their future good and for the good of all. [source]
Colossians 2:1 For them at Laodicea [των εν Λαοδικιαι]
Supply υπερ — huper as with υπερ υμων — huper humōn Paul‘s concern extended beyond Colossae to Laodicea (Colossians 4:16) and to Hierapolis (Colossians 4:13), the three great cities in the Lycus Valley where Gnosticism was beginning to do harm. Laodicea is the church described as lukewarm in Revelation 3:14. For as many as have not seen my face The phrase undoubtedly includes Hierapolis (Colossians 4:13), and a few late MSS. actually insert it here. Lightfoot suggests that Hierapolis had not yet been harmed by the Gnostics as much as Colossae and Laodicea. Perhaps so, but the language includes all in that whole region who have not seen Paul‘s face in the flesh (that is, in person, and not in picture). How precious a real picture of Paul would be to us today. The antecedent to οσοι — hosoi is not expressed and it would be τουτων — toutōn after υπερ — huper The form εορακαν — heorakan (perfect active indicative of οραω — horaō instead of the usual εωρακασιν — heōrakasin has two peculiarities ο — o in Paul‘s Epistles (1 Corinthians 9:1) instead of ω — ō (see note on John 1:18 for εωρακεν — heōraken) and αν — ̇an by analogy in place of ασιν — ̇asin which short form is common in the papyri. See note on Luke 9:36 εωρακαν — heōrakan f0). [source]
Colossians 2:1 For as many as have not seen my face [οσοι ουχ εορακαν το προσωπον μου]
The phrase undoubtedly includes Hierapolis (Colossians 4:13), and a few late MSS. actually insert it here. Lightfoot suggests that Hierapolis had not yet been harmed by the Gnostics as much as Colossae and Laodicea. Perhaps so, but the language includes all in that whole region who have not seen Paul‘s face in the flesh (that is, in person, and not in picture). How precious a real picture of Paul would be to us today. The antecedent to οσοι — hosoi is not expressed and it would be τουτων — toutōn after υπερ — huper The form εορακαν — heorakan (perfect active indicative of οραω — horaō instead of the usual εωρακασιν — heōrakasin has two peculiarities ο — o in Paul‘s Epistles (1 Corinthians 9:1) instead of ω — ō (see note on John 1:18 for εωρακεν — heōraken) and αν — ̇an by analogy in place of ασιν — ̇asin which short form is common in the papyri. See note on Luke 9:36 εωρακαν — heōrakan f0). [source]

What do the individual words in Luke 9:36 mean?

And as - occurred the voice was found Jesus alone they were silent to no one they told in those the days anything of what they had seen
καὶ ἐν τῷ γενέσθαι τὴν φωνὴν εὑρέθη Ἰησοῦς μόνος αὐτοὶ ἐσίγησαν οὐδενὶ ἀπήγγειλαν ἐν ἐκείναις ταῖς ἡμέραις οὐδὲν ὧν ἑώρακαν

τῷ  - 
Parse: Article, Dative Neuter Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
γενέσθαι  occurred 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Infinitive Middle
Root: γίνομαι  
Sense: to become, i.
φωνὴν  voice 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: φωνή  
Sense: a sound, a tone.
εὑρέθη  was  found 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Passive, 3rd Person Singular
Root: εὑρίσκω  
Sense: to come upon, hit upon, to meet with.
Ἰησοῦς  Jesus 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: Ἰησοῦς  
Sense: Joshua was the famous captain of the Israelites, Moses’ successor.
μόνος  alone 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: μόνος  
Sense: alone (without a companion), forsaken, destitute of help, alone, only, merely.
ἐσίγησαν  were  silent 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 3rd Person Plural
Root: σιγάω  
Sense: to keep silence, hold one’s peace.
οὐδενὶ  to  no  one 
Parse: Adjective, Dative Masculine Singular
Root: οὐδείς 
Sense: no one, nothing.
ἀπήγγειλαν  they  told 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 3rd Person Plural
Root: ἀγγέλλω 
Sense: to bring tidings (from a person or a thing), bring word, report.
ἐκείναις  those 
Parse: Demonstrative Pronoun, Dative Feminine Plural
Root: ἐκεῖνος  
Sense: he, she it, etc.
ἡμέραις  days 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Plural
Root: ἡμέρα  
Sense: the day, used of the natural day, or the interval between sunrise and sunset, as distinguished from and contrasted with the night.
οὐδὲν  anything 
Parse: Adjective, Accusative Neuter Singular
Root: οὐδείς 
Sense: no one, nothing.
ὧν  of  what 
Parse: Personal / Relative Pronoun, Genitive Neuter Plural
Root: ὅς 
Sense: who, which, what, that.
ἑώρακαν  they  had  seen 
Parse: Verb, Perfect Indicative Active, 3rd Person Plural
Root: εἶδον 
Sense: to see with the eyes.

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