The Meaning of Luke 24:35 Explained

Luke 24:35

KJV: And they told what things were done in the way, and how he was known of them in breaking of bread.

YLT: and they were telling the things in the way, and how he was made known to them in the breaking of the bread,

Darby: And they related what had happened on the way, and how he was made known to them in the breaking of bread.

ASV: And they rehearsed the things that happened in the way, and how he was known of them in the breaking of the bread.

What does Luke 24:35 Mean?

Verse Meaning

These two witnesses then proceeded to tell others about their experiences with Jesus and who He is. They serve as models of what disciples of the risen Christ should do. The manner in which they came to recognize Him clearly impressed them. Perhaps Luke mentioned again that the disciples recognized Jesus in the breaking of the bread since for Christians that happens whenever we observe the Lord"s Supper, though in a different sense.

Context Summary

Luke 24:28-35 - "abide With Us"
Our Lord must be invited and constrained. He will not impose Himself on an unwilling host; but how glad He is to enter where a welcome awaits! He turns ordinary meals into sacraments; common rooms into royal chambers: and the homeliest things into symbols of the eternal. He sat with them, then vanished; but He was no less truly with them when He ceased to be seen-and all to teach them that when He had passed permanently from their sight He would be nearer than ever.
When you have had a great vision of the Lord, be sure to tell it. Do not wait in the interior of your own chamber, hugging the joy and comfort of His presence. Hasten back to your fellow-believers. They also have much to tell. This appearance to Simon Peter is referred to by Paul in 1 Corinthians 15:5. When men really love the Savior, they will love the ordinances of the Church, the fellowship of the brethren, and especially the holy supper, where He makes Himself known. [source]

Chapter Summary: Luke 24

1  Jesus' resurrection is declared by two angels to the women who come to the tomb
9  They report it to others
13  Jesus himself appears to the two disciples that went to Emmaus;
36  afterwards he appears to the apostles, and reproves their unbelief;
47  gives them a charge;
49  promises the Holy Spirit;
50  and so ascends into heaven

Greek Commentary for Luke 24:35

Rehearsed [εχηγουντο]
Imperfect middle indicative of εχηγεομαι — exēgeomai verb to lead out, to rehearse. Our word exegesis comes from this verb. Their story was now confirmatory, not revolutionary. The women were right then after all. [source]
Of them [αυτοις]
To them, dative case. They did not recognize Jesus in his exegesis, but did in the breaking of bread. One is reminded of that saying in the Logia of Jesus: “Raise the stone and there thou shalt find me, cleave the wood and there am I.” [source]
Logia of Jesus []
: “Raise the stone and there thou shalt find me, cleave the wood and there am I.” [source]
They told [ἐξηγοῦντο]
Rev., rehearsed is better, because the verb means to tell at length or relate in full. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Luke 24:35

John 1:18 Hath declared [ἐξηγήσατο]
Or, rendering the aorist strictly, He declared. From ἐκ , forth, and ἡγέομαι , to lead the way. Originally, to lead or govern. Hence, like the Latin praeire verbis, to go before with words, to prescribe or dictate a form of words. To draw out in narrative, to recount or rehearse (see Acts 15:14, and on Luke 24:35). To relate in full; to interpret, or translate. Therefore ἐξήγησις , exegesis, is interpretation or explanation. The word ἐξηγητής was used by the Greeks of an expounder of oracles, dreams, omens, or sacred rites. Thus Croesus, finding the suburbs of Sardis alive with serpents, sent to the soothsayers ( ἐξηγητὰς ) of Telmessus (Herodotus, i. 78). The word thus comes to mean a spiritual director. Plato calls Apollo the tutelary director ( πατρῷος ἐξηγητής ) of religion (“Republic,” 427), and says, “Let the priests be interpreters for life” (“Laws,” 759). In the Septuagint the word is used of the magicians of Pharaoh's court (Genesis 41:8, Genesis 41:24), and the kindred verb of teaching or interpreting concerning leprosy (Leviticus 14:57). John's meaning is that the Word revealed or manifested and interpreted the Father to men. The word occurs only here in John's writings. Wyc. renders, He hath told out. These words conclude the Prologue. The Historical Narrative now begins, and falls into two general divisions:-DIVIDER-
I. The Self-Revelation of Christ to the World (1:19-12:50)-DIVIDER-
II. The Self-Revelation of Christ to the Disciples (13:1-21:23)sa120 [source]

John 1:18 No man hath seen God at any time [τεον ουδεις εωρακεν πωποτε]
“God no one has ever seen.” Perfect active indicative of οραω — horaō Seen with the human physical eye, John means. God is invisible (Exodus 33:20; Deuteronomy 4:12). Paul calls God αορατος — aoratos (Colossians 1:15; 1 Timothy 1:17). John repeats the idea in John 5:37; John 6:46. And yet in John 14:7 Jesus claims that the one who sees him has seen the Father as here. The only begotten Son This is the reading of the Textus Receptus and is intelligible after ως μονογενους παρα πατρος — hōs monogenous para patros in John 1:14. But the best old Greek manuscripts (Aleph B C L) read μονογενης τεος — monogenēs theos (God only begotten) which is undoubtedly the true text. Probably some scribe changed it to ο μονογενης υιος — ho monogenēs huios to obviate the blunt statement of the deity of Christ and to make it like John 3:16. But there is an inner harmony in the reading of the old uncials. The Logos is plainly called τεος — theos in John 1:1. The Incarnation is stated in John 1:14, where he is also termed μονογενης — monogenēs He was that before the Incarnation. So he is “God only begotten,” “the Eternal Generation of the Son” of Origen‘s phrase. Which is in the bosom of the Father The eternal relation of the Son with the Father like προς τον τεον — pros ton theon in John 1:1. In John 3:13 there is some evidence for ο ων εν τωι ουρανωι — ho ōn en tōi ouranōi used by Christ of himself while still on earth. The mystic sense here is that the Son is qualified to reveal the Father as Logos (both the Father in Idea and Expression) by reason of the continual fellowship with the Father. He Emphatic pronoun referring to the Son. Hath declared him First aorist (effective) middle indicative of εχηγεομαι — exēgeomai old verb to lead out, to draw out in narrative, to recount. Here only in John, though once in Luke‘s Gospel (Luke 24:35) and four times in Acts (Acts 10:8; Acts 15:12, Acts 15:14; Acts 21:19). This word fitly closes the Prologue in which the Logos is pictured in marvellous fashion as the Word of God in human flesh, the Son of God with the Glory of God in him, showing men who God is and what he is. [source]
Acts 15:12 Declaring [ἐξηγουμένων]
Better, as Rev., rehearsing. See on Luke 24:35. What miracles, etcLit., how many ( ὅσα )i1. [source]
Acts 10:8 Declared [ἐξηγησάμενος]
Better, as Rev., rehearsed. See on Luke 24:35. [source]
Acts 10:8 Rehearsed [exēgēsamenos)]
See note on Luke 24:35. All the details about the vision. The soldier was “devout” like Cornelius and would protect the two household servants (oiketōn). [source]
Acts 15:12 Hearkened [ηκουον]
Imperfect active of ακουω — akouō descriptive of the rapt attention, were listening. Unto Barnabas and Paul (αρναβα και Παυλου — Barnaba kai Paulou). Note placing Barnabas before Paul as in Acts 15:25, possibly because in Jerusalem Barnabas was still better known than Paul. Rehearsing Present middle participle of εχηγεομαι — exēgeomai old verb, to go through or lead out a narrative of events as in Luke 24:35; Acts 10:8 which see. Three times (Acts 14:27; Acts 15:4, Acts 15:12) Paul is described as telling the facts about their mission work, facts more eloquent than argument (Page). One of the crying needs in the churches is fuller knowledge of the facts of mission work and progress with enough detail to give life and interest. The signs and wonders which God had wrought among the Gentiles set the seal of approval on the work done through This same verb (εχηγησατο — exēgēsato) is used by James in Acts 15:14 referring to Peter‘s speech. [source]
Acts 15:12 Rehearsing [εχηγουμενων]
Present middle participle of εχηγεομαι — exēgeomai old verb, to go through or lead out a narrative of events as in Luke 24:35; Acts 10:8 which see. Three times (Acts 14:27; Acts 15:4, Acts 15:12) Paul is described as telling the facts about their mission work, facts more eloquent than argument (Page). One of the crying needs in the churches is fuller knowledge of the facts of mission work and progress with enough detail to give life and interest. The signs and wonders which God had wrought among the Gentiles set the seal of approval on the work done through This same verb (εχηγησατο — exēgēsato) is used by James in Acts 15:14 referring to Peter‘s speech. [source]
Acts 2:42 Fellowship [κοινωνιαι]
Old word from κοινωνος — Koinōnos (partner, sharer in common interest) and this from κοινος — Koinos what is common to all. This partnership involves participation in, as the blood of Christ (Philemon 2:1) or co-operation in the work of the gospel (Philemon 1:5) or contribution for those in need (2 Corinthians 8:4; 2 Corinthians 9:13). Hence there is wide diversity of opinion concerning the precise meaning of κοινωνια — Koinōnia in this verse. It may refer to the distribution of funds in Acts 2:44 or to the oneness of spirit in the community of believers or to the Lord‘s Supper (as in 1 Corinthians 10:16) in the sense of communion or to the fellowship in the common meals or αγαπαε — agapae (love-feasts). The breaking of bread (τηι κλασει του αρτου — tēi klasei tou artou). The word κλασις — klasis is an old word, but used only by Luke in the N.T. (Luke 24:35; Acts 2:42), though the verb κλαω — klaō occurs in other parts of the N.T. as in Acts 2:46. The problem here is whether Luke refers to the ordinary meal as in Luke 24:35 or to the Lord‘s Supper. The same verb κλαω — klaō is used of breaking bread at the ordinary meal (Luke 24:30) or the Lord‘s Supper (Luke 22:19). It is generally supposed that the early disciples attached so much significance to the breaking of bread at the ordinary meals, more than our saying grace, that they followed the meal with the Lord‘s Supper at first, a combination called αγαπαι — agapai or love-feasts. “There can be no doubt that the Eucharist at this period was preceded uniformly by a common repast, as was the case when the ordinance was instituted” (Hackett). This led to some abuses as in 1 Corinthians 11:20. Hence it is possible that what is referred to here is the Lord‘s Supper following the ordinary meal. “To simply explain τηι κλασει του αρτου — tēi klasei tou artou as=‹The Holy Communion‘ is to pervert the plain meaning of words, and to mar the picture of family life, which the text places before us as the ideal of the early believers” (Page). But in Acts 20:7 they seem to have come together especially for the observance of the Lord‘s Supper. Perhaps there is no way to settle the point conclusively here. The prayers Services where they prayed as in Acts 1:14, in the temple (Acts 3:1), in their homes (Acts 4:23). [source]
Acts 2:42 The breaking of bread [τηι κλασει του αρτου]
The word κλασις — klasis is an old word, but used only by Luke in the N.T. (Luke 24:35; Acts 2:42), though the verb κλαω — klaō occurs in other parts of the N.T. as in Acts 2:46. The problem here is whether Luke refers to the ordinary meal as in Luke 24:35 or to the Lord‘s Supper. The same verb κλαω — klaō is used of breaking bread at the ordinary meal (Luke 24:30) or the Lord‘s Supper (Luke 22:19). It is generally supposed that the early disciples attached so much significance to the breaking of bread at the ordinary meals, more than our saying grace, that they followed the meal with the Lord‘s Supper at first, a combination called αγαπαι — agapai or love-feasts. “There can be no doubt that the Eucharist at this period was preceded uniformly by a common repast, as was the case when the ordinance was instituted” (Hackett). This led to some abuses as in 1 Corinthians 11:20. Hence it is possible that what is referred to here is the Lord‘s Supper following the ordinary meal. “To simply explain τηι κλασει του αρτου — tēi klasei tou artou as=‹The Holy Communion‘ is to pervert the plain meaning of words, and to mar the picture of family life, which the text places before us as the ideal of the early believers” (Page). But in Acts 20:7 they seem to have come together especially for the observance of the Lord‘s Supper. Perhaps there is no way to settle the point conclusively here. [source]

What do the individual words in Luke 24:35 mean?

And they began relating the things on the road how He was known to them in breaking of the bread
Καὶ αὐτοὶ ἐξηγοῦντο τὰ ἐν τῇ ὁδῷ ὡς ἐγνώσθη αὐτοῖς ἐν κλάσει τοῦ ἄρτου

ἐξηγοῦντο  began  relating 
Parse: Verb, Imperfect Indicative Middle or Passive, 3rd Person Plural
Root: ἐξηγέομαι  
Sense: to lead out, be leader, go before.
τὰ  the  things 
Parse: Article, Accusative Neuter Plural
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
ὁδῷ  road 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: ὁδός 
Sense: properly.
ὡς  how 
Parse: Adverb
Root: ὡς 
Sense: as, like, even as, etc.
ἐγνώσθη  He  was  known 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Passive, 3rd Person Singular
Root: γινώσκω  
Sense: to learn to know, come to know, get a knowledge of perceive, feel.
αὐτοῖς  to  them 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Dative Masculine 3rd Person Plural
Root: αὐτός  
Sense: himself, herself, themselves, itself.
κλάσει  breaking 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: κλάσις  
Sense: a breaking.
τοῦ  of  the 
Parse: Article, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
ἄρτου  bread 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: ἄρτος  
Sense: food composed of flour mixed with water and baked.

What are the major concepts related to Luke 24:35?

Loading Information...