The Meaning of Luke 24:30 Explained

Luke 24:30

KJV: And it came to pass, as he sat at meat with them, he took bread, and blessed it, and brake, and gave to them.

YLT: And it came to pass, in his reclining (at meat) with them, having taken the bread, he blessed, and having broken, he was giving to them,

Darby: And it came to pass as he was at table with them, having taken the bread, he blessed, and having broken it, gave it to them.

ASV: And it came to pass, when he had sat down with them to meat, he took the bread and blessed; and breaking it he gave to them.

What does Luke 24:30 Mean?

Context Summary

Luke 24:28-35 - "abide With Us"
Our Lord must be invited and constrained. He will not impose Himself on an unwilling host; but how glad He is to enter where a welcome awaits! He turns ordinary meals into sacraments; common rooms into royal chambers: and the homeliest things into symbols of the eternal. He sat with them, then vanished; but He was no less truly with them when He ceased to be seen-and all to teach them that when He had passed permanently from their sight He would be nearer than ever.
When you have had a great vision of the Lord, be sure to tell it. Do not wait in the interior of your own chamber, hugging the joy and comfort of His presence. Hasten back to your fellow-believers. They also have much to tell. This appearance to Simon Peter is referred to by Paul in 1 Corinthians 15:5. When men really love the Savior, they will love the ordinances of the Church, the fellowship of the brethren, and especially the holy supper, where He makes Himself known. [source]

Chapter Summary: Luke 24

1  Jesus' resurrection is declared by two angels to the women who come to the tomb
9  They report it to others
13  Jesus himself appears to the two disciples that went to Emmaus;
36  afterwards he appears to the apostles, and reproves their unbelief;
47  gives them a charge;
49  promises the Holy Spirit;
50  and so ascends into heaven

Greek Commentary for Luke 24:30

When he had sat down [εν τωι κατακλιτηναι αυτον]
Luke‘s common idiom as in Luke 24:4, Luke 24:15. Note first aorist passive infinitive (on the reclining as to him). [source]
Gave [επεδιδου]
Imperfect, inchoative idea, began to give to them, in contrast with the preceding aorist (punctiliar) participles. [source]
And gave [ἐπεδίδου]
A very beautiful use of the imperfect, indicating that while he was in the act of distributing they recognized him. He blessed, and having broken, was giving it to them, when, in an instant, their eyes were opened (aorist tense). [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Luke 24:30

Luke 14:8 Sit not down [μη κατακλιτηις]
First aorist (ingressive) passive subjunctive of κατακλινω — kataklinō to recline. Old verb, but peculiar to Luke in the N.T. (Luke 7:36; Luke 9:14; Luke 14:8; Luke 24:30). [source]
Acts 2:42 Fellowship [κοινωνιαι]
Old word from κοινωνος — Koinōnos (partner, sharer in common interest) and this from κοινος — Koinos what is common to all. This partnership involves participation in, as the blood of Christ (Philemon 2:1) or co-operation in the work of the gospel (Philemon 1:5) or contribution for those in need (2 Corinthians 8:4; 2 Corinthians 9:13). Hence there is wide diversity of opinion concerning the precise meaning of κοινωνια — Koinōnia in this verse. It may refer to the distribution of funds in Acts 2:44 or to the oneness of spirit in the community of believers or to the Lord‘s Supper (as in 1 Corinthians 10:16) in the sense of communion or to the fellowship in the common meals or αγαπαε — agapae (love-feasts). The breaking of bread (τηι κλασει του αρτου — tēi klasei tou artou). The word κλασις — klasis is an old word, but used only by Luke in the N.T. (Luke 24:35; Acts 2:42), though the verb κλαω — klaō occurs in other parts of the N.T. as in Acts 2:46. The problem here is whether Luke refers to the ordinary meal as in Luke 24:35 or to the Lord‘s Supper. The same verb κλαω — klaō is used of breaking bread at the ordinary meal (Luke 24:30) or the Lord‘s Supper (Luke 22:19). It is generally supposed that the early disciples attached so much significance to the breaking of bread at the ordinary meals, more than our saying grace, that they followed the meal with the Lord‘s Supper at first, a combination called αγαπαι — agapai or love-feasts. “There can be no doubt that the Eucharist at this period was preceded uniformly by a common repast, as was the case when the ordinance was instituted” (Hackett). This led to some abuses as in 1 Corinthians 11:20. Hence it is possible that what is referred to here is the Lord‘s Supper following the ordinary meal. “To simply explain τηι κλασει του αρτου — tēi klasei tou artou as=‹The Holy Communion‘ is to pervert the plain meaning of words, and to mar the picture of family life, which the text places before us as the ideal of the early believers” (Page). But in Acts 20:7 they seem to have come together especially for the observance of the Lord‘s Supper. Perhaps there is no way to settle the point conclusively here. The prayers Services where they prayed as in Acts 1:14, in the temple (Acts 3:1), in their homes (Acts 4:23). [source]
Acts 2:42 The breaking of bread [τηι κλασει του αρτου]
The word κλασις — klasis is an old word, but used only by Luke in the N.T. (Luke 24:35; Acts 2:42), though the verb κλαω — klaō occurs in other parts of the N.T. as in Acts 2:46. The problem here is whether Luke refers to the ordinary meal as in Luke 24:35 or to the Lord‘s Supper. The same verb κλαω — klaō is used of breaking bread at the ordinary meal (Luke 24:30) or the Lord‘s Supper (Luke 22:19). It is generally supposed that the early disciples attached so much significance to the breaking of bread at the ordinary meals, more than our saying grace, that they followed the meal with the Lord‘s Supper at first, a combination called αγαπαι — agapai or love-feasts. “There can be no doubt that the Eucharist at this period was preceded uniformly by a common repast, as was the case when the ordinance was instituted” (Hackett). This led to some abuses as in 1 Corinthians 11:20. Hence it is possible that what is referred to here is the Lord‘s Supper following the ordinary meal. “To simply explain τηι κλασει του αρτου — tēi klasei tou artou as=‹The Holy Communion‘ is to pervert the plain meaning of words, and to mar the picture of family life, which the text places before us as the ideal of the early believers” (Page). But in Acts 20:7 they seem to have come together especially for the observance of the Lord‘s Supper. Perhaps there is no way to settle the point conclusively here. [source]
Acts 27:35 Gave thanks to God [ευχαριστησεν τωι τεωι]
First aorist active indicative of ευχαριστεω — eucharisteō from which our word “Eucharist” comes. It was saying grace like the head of a Hebrew family and the example of Paul would encourage the others to eat. Probably Paul, Luke, and Aristarchus had memories of the Lord‘s supper (Acts 2:42) while to others it was only an ordinary meal (Luke 24:30). [source]

What do the individual words in Luke 24:30 mean?

And it came to pass in the reclining of Him with them having taken the bread He blessed [it] having broken [it] He began giving [it] to them
καὶ ἐγένετο ἐν τῷ κατακλιθῆναι αὐτὸν μετ’ αὐτῶν λαβὼν τὸν ἄρτον εὐλόγησεν κλάσας ἐπεδίδου αὐτοῖς

ἐγένετο  it  came  to  pass 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Middle, 3rd Person Singular
Root: γίνομαι  
Sense: to become, i.
κατακλιθῆναι  reclining 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Infinitive Passive
Root: κατακλίνω  
Sense: in the NT in reference to eating, to make to recline.
αὐτὸν  of  Him 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Accusative Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Root: αὐτός  
Sense: himself, herself, themselves, itself.
λαβὼν  having  taken 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: λαμβάνω  
Sense: to take.
ἄρτον  bread 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: ἄρτος  
Sense: food composed of flour mixed with water and baked.
εὐλόγησεν  He  blessed  [it] 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: εὐλογέω 
Sense: to praise, celebrate with praises.
κλάσας  having  broken  [it] 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: κλάω  
Sense: to break.
ἐπεδίδου  He  began  giving  [it] 
Parse: Verb, Imperfect Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἐπιδίδωμι 
Sense: to hand, give by hand.
αὐτοῖς  to  them 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Dative Masculine 3rd Person Plural
Root: αὐτός  
Sense: himself, herself, themselves, itself.