The Meaning of John 2:9 Explained

John 2:9

KJV: When the ruler of the feast had tasted the water that was made wine, and knew not whence it was: (but the servants which drew the water knew;) the governor of the feast called the bridegroom,

YLT: And as the director of the apartment tasted the water become wine, and knew not whence it is, (but the ministrants knew, who have drawn the water,) the director of the feast doth call the bridegroom,

Darby: But when the feast-master had tasted the water which had been made wine (and knew not whence it was, but the servants knew who drew the water), the feast-master calls the bridegroom,

ASV: And when the ruler of the feast tasted the water now become wine, and knew not whence it was (but the servants that had drawn the water knew), the ruler of the feast calleth the bridegroom,

What does John 2:9 Mean?

Context Summary

John 2:1-11 - Jesus Blesses Social Joys
The keyword here is signs, John 2:11, r.v. translated in the Authorized Version as miracles. They are windows into the eternal purpose. The Lord loved to join in simple human joys. "He came eating and drinking." He honored marriage by His first miracle. The wine had to fail, as the earthly and human always must, in order to make room for the eternal and divine. Like Mary, we are impetuous, and would hasten the divine actions: but God is ever deliberate and waits for the exact hour before He interposes. It is hardly likely that our Lord made one hundred and thirty gallons of wine; but that as the servants drew and bore to the table, the wondrous change was wrought. Our Lord did in a moment what He is ever doing, transforming dews and rain into the nutritive and gladdening juices of nature.
Here was indeed a sign that the Master desired to sweeten and enhance human happiness, and that His influence could transform what was ordinary and common into the joyous and sacramental. It was His glory to show that religion is consistent with ordinary life, and to teach that God increases our joys from less to more, and still more. "The best is yet to be." [source]

Chapter Summary: John 2

1  Jesus turns water into wine;
12  departs into Capernaum,
13  and to Jerusalem,
14  where he purges the temple of buyers and sellers
18  He foretells his death and resurrection
23  Many believe because of his miracles, but he will not trust himself with them

Greek Commentary for John 2:9

Tasted [εγευσατο]
First aorist middle indicative of γευομαι — geuomai As it was his function to do. The water now become wine Accusative case, though the genitive also occurs with γευομαι — geuomai Perfect passive participle of γινομαι — ginomai and οινον — oinon predicative accusative. The tablemaster knew nothing of the miracle, “whence it was” The servants knew the source of the water, but not the power that made the wine. Calleth the bridegroom As apparently responsible for the supply of the wine (thou hast kept τετηρηκας — tetērēkas). See Matthew 9:15 for νυμπιος — numphios When men have drunk freely Indefinite temporal clause with οταν — hotan and first aorist passive subjunctive of μετυσκω — methuskō The verb does not mean that these guests are now drunk, but that this is a common custom to put “the worse” But this fact does not mean that today Jesus would approve the modern liquor trade with its damnable influences. The law of love expounded by Paul in 1Cor 8-10 and in Rom 14, 15 teaches modern Christians to be willing gladly to give up what they see causes so many to stumble into sin. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for John 2:9

John 2:8 Ruler of the feast [ἀρχιτρικλίνῳ]
From ἄρχω , to be chief, and τρίκλινον , Latin, triclinium, a banqueting-hall with three couches (see on Mark 6:39). Some explain the word as meaning the superintendent of the banqueting-chamber, a servant whose duty it was to arrange the table-furniture and the courses, and to taste the food beforehand. Others as meaning one of the guests selected to preside at the banquet according to the Greek and Roman usage. This latter view seems to be supported by a passage in Ecclesiasticus (35:1,2): “If thou be made the master of a feast, lift not thyself up, but be among them as one of the rest; take diligent care for them, and so sit down. And when thou hast done all thy office, take thy place, that thou mayst be merry with them, and receive a crown for thy well ordering of the feast.” According to the Greek and Roman custom, the ruler of the feast was chosen by throwing the dice. Thus Horace, in his ode to his friend Sestius, says, moralizing on the brevity of life: “Soon the home of Pluto will be thine, nor wilt thou cast lots with the dice for the presidency over the wine.” He prescribed the proportions of wine and water, and could also impose fines for failures to guess riddles, etc. As the success of the feast depended largely upon him, his selection was a matter of some delicacy. Plato says, “Must we not appoint a sober man and a wise to be our master of the revels? For if the ruler of drinkers be himself young and drunken, and not over-wise, only by some special good fortune will he be saved from doing some great evil” (“Laws,” 640). The word occurs only here and John 2:9. Wyc. simply transcribes: architriclyn f0. [source]
John 12:45 Abide in darkness []
The phrase occurs only here. Compare 1 John 2:9, 1 John 2:11; also John 8:12; John 12:35. [source]
John 1:39 He dwelt [μένει]
The present tense. Literally, they saw where he dwelleth. For a similar construction see John 2:9; John 4:1; Acts 10:18, etc. [source]
John 2:8 Draw out now [Αντλησατε νυν]
First aorist active imperative of αντλεω — antleō from ο αντλος — ho antlos bilge water, or the hold where the bilge water settles (so in Homer). The verb occurs in John 4:7, John 4:15, for drawing water from the well, and Westcott so interprets it here, but needlessly so, since the servants seem bidden to draw from the large water-jars now full of water. Apparently the water was still water when it came out of the jars (John 2:9), but was changed to wine before reaching the guests. The water in the jars remained water. Unto the ruler of the feast Dative case. The τρικλινος — triklinos was a room And they bare it Second aorist active indicative of περω — pherō Apparently not knowing at first that they bore wine. [source]
John 3:19 And this is the judgment [αυτη δε εστιν η κρισις]
A thoroughly Johannine phrase for sequence of thought (John 15:12; John 17:3; 1 John 1:5; 1 John 5:11, 1 John 5:14; 3 John 1:6). It is more precisely the process of judging The light is come Second perfect active indicative of το σκοτος — erchomai a permanent result as already explained in the Prologue concerning the Incarnation (John 1:4, John 1:5, John 1:9, John 1:11). Jesus is the Light of the world. Loved darkness Job (Job 24:13) spoke of men rebelling against the light. Here πονηρα — to skotos common word for moral and spiritual darkness (1 Thessalonians 5:5), though Πονηρος — hē skotia in John 1:5. “Darkness” is common in John as a metaphor for the state of sinners (John 8:12; John 12:35, John 12:46; 1 John 1:6; 1 John 2:8, 1 John 2:9, 1 John 2:11). Jesus himself is the only moral and spiritual light of the world (John 8:12) as he dared claim to his enemies. The pathos of it all is that men fall in love with the darkness of sin and rebel against the light like denizens of the underworld, “for their works were evil In the end the god of this world blinds men‘s eyes so that they do not see the light (2 Corinthians 4:4). The fish in the Mammoth Cave have no longer eyes, but only sockets where eyes used to be. The evil one has a powerful grip on the world (1 John 5:19). [source]
John 7:10 Were gone up [ανεβησαν]
Second aorist active indicative of αναβαινω — anabainō not past perfect though the action is antecedent in fact to the following τοτε ανεβη — tote anebē The Greek does not always draw the precise distinction between the merely punctiliar (aorist) antecedent action and the past perfect (John 2:9; John 4:45). He also As well as the brothers. Not publicly Against their advice in John 7:4, using πανερωσον — phanerōson (the very same word stem). But as it were in secret “Not with the usual caravan of pilgrims” (Bernard). Just the opposite of their advice in John 7:4 with the same phrase εν πανερωι — en phanerōi Plainly Jesus purposely went contrary to the insincere counsel of his brothers as to the manner of his Messianic manifestation. This secrecy concerned solely the journey to Jerusalem, not his public teaching there after his arrival (John 7:26, John 7:28; John 18:20). [source]
Acts 10:10 Would have eaten [ἤθελε γεύσασθαι]
Rev., correctly, desired to eat. Γευέσθαι is rendered both to eat and to taste, more frequently the latter. See Matthew 27:34; John 2:9; 1 Peter 2:3; and compare Acts 20:11. [source]
Romans 10:1 Brethren []
See on 1 John 2:9. An expression of affectionate interest and indicating emotion. [source]
Galatians 5:22 Love [ἀγάπη]
Comp. love of the Spirit, Romans 15:30. In Class. φιλεῖν is the most general designation of love, denoting an inner inclination to persons or things, and standing opposed to μισεῖν or ἐχθαίρειν tohate. It occasionally acquires from the context a sensual flavor, as Hom. Od. xviii. 325; Hdt. iv. 176, thus running into the sense of ἐρᾶν which denotes sensual love. It is love to persons and things growing out of intercourse and amenities or attractive qualities. Στέργειν (not in N.T., lxx, Sirach 27:17) expresses a deep, quiet, appropriating, natural love, as distinguished from that which is called out by circumstances. Unlike φιλεῖν , it has a distinct moral significance, and is not applied to base inclinations opposed to a genuine manly nature. It is the word for love to parents, wife, children, king or country, as one's own. Aristotle (Nic. ix. 7,3) speaks of poets as loving ( στέργοντες ) their own poems as their children. See also Eurip. Med. 87. Ἁγαπᾶν is to love out of an intelligent estimate of the object of love. It answers to Lat. diligere, or Germ. schatzen to prize. It is not passionate and sensual as ἐρᾶν . It is not, like φιλεῖν , attachment to a person independently of his quality and created by close intercourse. It is less sentiment than consideration. While φιλεῖν contemplates the person, ἀγαπᾶν contemplates the attributes and character, and gives an account of its inclination. Ἁγαπᾶν is really the weaker expression for love, as that term is conventionally used. It is judicial rather than affectionate. Even in classical usage, however, the distinction between ἀγαπᾶν and φιλεῖν is often very subtle, and well-nigh impossible to express. In N.T. ἐπιθυμαῖν todesire or lust is used instead of ἐρᾶν . In lxx ἀγαπᾶν is far more common than φιλεῖν . Φιλεῖν occurs only 16 times in the sense of love, and 16 times in the sense of kiss; while ἀγαπᾶν is found nearly 300 times. It is used with a wide range, of the love of parent for child, of man for God, of God for man, of love to one's neighbor and to the stranger, of husband for wife, of love for God's house, and for mercy and truth; but also of the love of Samson for Delilah, of Hosea for his adulterous wife, of Amnon's love for Tamar, of Solomon's love for strange women, of loving a woman for her beauty. Also of loving vanity, unrighteousness, devouring words, cursing, death, silver. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The noun ἀγάπη , oClass., was apparently created by the lxx, although it is found there only 19 times. It first comes into habitual use in Christian writings. In N.T. it is, practically, the only noun for love, although compound nouns expressing peculiar phases of love, as brotherly love, love of money, love of children, etc., are formed with φίλος , as φιλαδελφία, φιλαργυρία, φιλανθρωπία . Both verbs, φιλεῖν and ἀγαπᾶν occur, but ἀγαπᾶν more frequently. The attempt to carry out consistently the classical distinction between these two must be abandoned. Both are used of the love of parents and children, of the love of God for Christ, of Christ for men, of God for men, of men for Christ and of men for men. The love of man for God and of husband for wife, only ἀγαπᾶν . The distinction is rather between ἀγαπᾶν and ἐπιθυμεῖν than between ἀγαπᾶν and φιλεῖν . Love, in this passage, is that fruit of the Spirit which dominates all the others. See Galatians 5:13, Galatians 5:14. Comp. 1 Corinthians 13:1-13; 1 John 2:5, 1 John 2:9-11; 1 John 3:11, 1 John 3:14-16; 1 John 4:7-11, 1 John 4:16-21; 1 John 5:1-3. [source]

1 John 3:14 We love the brethren [ἀγαπῶμεν του,ς ἀδελφούς]
The only occurrence of the phrase. Elsewhere, love one another, or love his brother. See on 1 John 2:9. [source]
1 John 2:8 The darkness [ἡ σκοτία]
See on John 1:5. God is light; and whatever is not in fellowship with God is therefore darkness. In all cases where the word is not used of physical darkness, it means moral insensibility to the divine light; moral blindness or obtuseness. Compare John 8:12; John 12:35, John 12:46; 1 John 2:9, 1 John 2:11. [source]
1 John 2:10 Abideth [μένει]
See on 1 John 2:6. Compare 1 John 2:9, is in. [source]
1 John 2:11 Blinded [ετυπλωσεν]
First aorist active indicative of τυπλοω — tuphloō the very verb and form used in 2 Corinthians 4:4 of the god of this age to keep men from beholding the illumination of the gospel of the glory of Christ who is the image of God. The first part of the verse repeats 1 John 2:9, but adds this vivid touch of the blinding power of darkness. In the Mammoth Cave of Kentucky the fish in Echo River have eye-sockets, but no eyes. [source]
1 John 2:29 Is begotten [γεγεννηται]
Perfect passive indicative of γενναω — gennaō stands begotten, the second birth (regeneration) of John 3:3-8.Of him (εχ αυτου — ex autou). Plainly “of God” in 1 John 2:9 and so apparently here in spite of δικαιος — dikaios referring to Christ. Doing righteousness is proof of the new birth. [source]
1 John 2:29 Of him [εχ αυτου]
Plainly “of God” in 1 John 2:9 and so apparently here in spite of δικαιος — dikaios referring to Christ. Doing righteousness is proof of the new birth. [source]
1 John 3:10 Doeth not righteousness [ο μη ποιων δικαιοσυνην]
Habit (linear present participle) again of not doing righteousness, as in 1 John 3:7 of doing it. Cf. ποιει — poiei and μη ποιων — mē poiōn (doing and not doing) in Matthew 7:24, Matthew 7:26.Neither (και — kai). Literally, “and,” but with the ellipsis of ουκ εστιν εκ του τεου — ouk estin ek tou theou (is not of God). The addition here of this one item about not loving (μη αγαπων — mē agapōn) one‘s brother is like Paul‘s summary in Romans 13:9, a striking illustration of the general principle just laid down and in accord with 1 John 2:9-11. [source]
1 John 3:10 Neither [και]
Literally, “and,” but with the ellipsis of ουκ εστιν εκ του τεου — ouk estin ek tou theou (is not of God). The addition here of this one item about not loving (μη αγαπων — mē agapōn) one‘s brother is like Paul‘s summary in Romans 13:9, a striking illustration of the general principle just laid down and in accord with 1 John 2:9-11. [source]
1 John 3:14 We have passed [μεταβεβηκαμεν]
Perfect active indicative of μεταβαινω — metabainō old compound to pass over from one place to another (John 7:3), to migrate, out of death into life. We have already done it while here on earth.Because (οτι — hoti). Proof of this transition, not the ground of it.We love the brethren Just this phrase (plural) here alone, but see 1 John 2:9 for the singular.He that loveth not (ο μη αγαπων — ho mē agapōn). “The not loving man,” general picture and picture of spiritual death. [source]
1 John 3:14 We love the brethren [αγαπωμεν τους αδελπους]
Just this phrase (plural) here alone, but see 1 John 2:9 for the singular.He that loveth not (ο μη αγαπων — ho mē agapōn). “The not loving man,” general picture and picture of spiritual death. [source]
1 John 4:7 Of God [εκ του τεου]
Even human love comes from God, “a reflection of something in the Divine nature itself” (Brooke). John repeats the old commandment of 1 John 2:7. Persistence in loving (present tense αγαπωμεν — agapōmen indicative and αγαπων — agapōn participle) is proof that one “has been begotten of God” (εκ του τεου γεγεννηται — ek tou theou gegennētai as in 1 John 2:29) and is acquainted with God. Otherwise mere claim to loving God accompanied by hating one‘s brother is a lie (1 John 2:9-11). [source]
1 John 4:20 I love God [Αγαπω τον τεον]
Quoting an imaginary disputant as in 1 John 2:4.And hateth (και μισει — kai misei). Continuation of the same condition with εαν — ean and the present active subjunctive, “and keep on hating.” See 1 John 2:9; 1 John 3:15 for use of μισεω — miseō (hate) with αδελπος — adelphos (brother). A liar (πσευστης — pseustēs). Blunt and to the point as in 1 John 1:10; 1 John 2:4.That loveth not “The one who does not keep on loving” (present active negative articular participle).Hath seen (εωρακεν — heōraken). Perfect active indicative of οραω — horaō the form in John 1:18 used of seeing God.Cannot love “Is not able to go on loving,” with which compare 1 John 2:9, ου δυναται αμαρτανειν — ou dunatai hamartanein (is not able to go on sinning). The best MSS. do not have πως — pōs (how) here. [source]
1 John 4:20 And hateth [και μισει]
Continuation of the same condition with εαν — ean and the present active subjunctive, “and keep on hating.” See 1 John 2:9; 1 John 3:15 for use of μισεω — miseō (hate) with αδελπος — adelphos (brother). A liar Blunt and to the point as in 1 John 1:10; 1 John 2:4. [source]
1 John 4:20 That loveth not [ο μη αγαπων]
“The one who does not keep on loving” (present active negative articular participle).Hath seen (εωρακεν — heōraken). Perfect active indicative of οραω — horaō the form in John 1:18 used of seeing God.Cannot love “Is not able to go on loving,” with which compare 1 John 2:9, ου δυναται αμαρτανειν — ou dunatai hamartanein (is not able to go on sinning). The best MSS. do not have πως — pōs (how) here. [source]
1 John 4:20 Cannot love [ου δυναται αγαπαιν]
“Is not able to go on loving,” with which compare 1 John 2:9, ου δυναται αμαρτανειν — ou dunatai hamartanein (is not able to go on sinning). The best MSS. do not have πως — pōs (how) here. [source]
3 John 1:3 Brethren came [ἐρχομένων ἀδελφῶν]
Lit., coming. The present participle denotes coming from time to time, and not coming on a single occasion, which would require the aorist. On brethren, see on 1 John 2:9. [source]
Revelation 2:2 And they are not [και ευρες]
A parenthesis in Johannine style (John 2:9; John 3:9; 1 John 3:1) for ευρισκω — kai ouk ontas to correspond to επειρασας — legontas didst find Second aorist active indicative of πσευδης — heuriskō Dropping back to the regular structure parallel with epeirasas Predicate accusative plural of pseudēs self-deceived deceivers as in Revelation 21:8. [source]
Revelation 2:2 Works [εργα]
The whole life and conduct as in John 6:29.And thy toil and patience (και τον κοπον και την υπομονην σου — kai ton kopon kai tēn hupomonēn sou). “Both thy toil and patience,” in explanation of εργα — erga and see 1 Thessalonians 1:3, where all three words (εργον κοποσ υπομονη — ergonεργα — koposκοποι — hupomonē) occur together as here. See Revelation 14:13 for sharp distinction between υπομονη — erga (activities) and κοπος — kopoi (toils, with weariness). Endurance (και οτι — hupomonē) in hard toil (κοπος — kopos).And that Further explanation of δυνασαι — kopos (hard toil).Not able (βαστασαι — ou dunēi). This Koiné form for the Attic βασταζω — dunasai (second person singular indicative middle) occurs also in Mark 9:22; Luke 16:2.Bear First aorist active infinitive of πειραζω — bastazō for which verb see John 10:31; John 12:6; Galatians 6:2. These evil men were indeed a heavy burden.And didst try (δυνηι εχεις — kai epeirasas). First aorist active indicative of τους λεγοντας εαυτους αποστολους — peirazō to test, a reference to a recent crisis when these Nicolaitans (Revelation 2:6) were condemned. The present tenses (και ουκ εισιν — dunēiκαι ουκ οντας — echeis) indicate the continuance of this attitude. Cf. 1 John 4:1.Which call themselves apostles Perhaps itinerant missionaries of these Nicolaitans who posed as equal to or even superior to the original apostles, like the Judaizers so described by Paul (2 Corinthians 11:5, 2 Corinthians 11:13; 2 Corinthians 12:11). Paul had foretold such false teachers (Gnostics), grievous wolves, in Acts 20:29; in sheep‘s clothing, Jesus had said (Matthew 7:15).And they are not (και ευρες — kai ouk eisin). A parenthesis in Johannine style (John 2:9; John 3:9; 1 John 3:1) for ευρισκω — kai ouk ontas to correspond to επειρασας — legontas didst find (πσευδεις — kai heures). Second aorist active indicative of πσευδης — heuriskō Dropping back to the regular structure parallel with epeirasas (pseudeis). Predicate accusative plural of pseudēs self-deceived deceivers as in Revelation 21:8. [source]
Revelation 2:2 And that [ου δυνηι]
Further explanation of δυνασαι — kopos (hard toil).Not able (βαστασαι — ou dunēi). This Koiné form for the Attic βασταζω — dunasai (second person singular indicative middle) occurs also in Mark 9:22; Luke 16:2.Bear First aorist active infinitive of πειραζω — bastazō for which verb see John 10:31; John 12:6; Galatians 6:2. These evil men were indeed a heavy burden.And didst try (δυνηι εχεις — kai epeirasas). First aorist active indicative of τους λεγοντας εαυτους αποστολους — peirazō to test, a reference to a recent crisis when these Nicolaitans (Revelation 2:6) were condemned. The present tenses (και ουκ εισιν — dunēiκαι ουκ οντας — echeis) indicate the continuance of this attitude. Cf. 1 John 4:1.Which call themselves apostles Perhaps itinerant missionaries of these Nicolaitans who posed as equal to or even superior to the original apostles, like the Judaizers so described by Paul (2 Corinthians 11:5, 2 Corinthians 11:13; 2 Corinthians 12:11). Paul had foretold such false teachers (Gnostics), grievous wolves, in Acts 20:29; in sheep‘s clothing, Jesus had said (Matthew 7:15).And they are not (και ευρες — kai ouk eisin). A parenthesis in Johannine style (John 2:9; John 3:9; 1 John 3:1) for ευρισκω — kai ouk ontas to correspond to επειρασας — legontas didst find (πσευδεις — kai heures). Second aorist active indicative of πσευδης — heuriskō Dropping back to the regular structure parallel with epeirasas (pseudeis). Predicate accusative plural of pseudēs self-deceived deceivers as in Revelation 21:8. [source]
Revelation 2:2 Bear [και επειρασας]
First aorist active infinitive of πειραζω — bastazō for which verb see John 10:31; John 12:6; Galatians 6:2. These evil men were indeed a heavy burden.And didst try (δυνηι εχεις — kai epeirasas). First aorist active indicative of τους λεγοντας εαυτους αποστολους — peirazō to test, a reference to a recent crisis when these Nicolaitans (Revelation 2:6) were condemned. The present tenses (και ουκ εισιν — dunēiκαι ουκ οντας — echeis) indicate the continuance of this attitude. Cf. 1 John 4:1.Which call themselves apostles Perhaps itinerant missionaries of these Nicolaitans who posed as equal to or even superior to the original apostles, like the Judaizers so described by Paul (2 Corinthians 11:5, 2 Corinthians 11:13; 2 Corinthians 12:11). Paul had foretold such false teachers (Gnostics), grievous wolves, in Acts 20:29; in sheep‘s clothing, Jesus had said (Matthew 7:15).And they are not (και ευρες — kai ouk eisin). A parenthesis in Johannine style (John 2:9; John 3:9; 1 John 3:1) for ευρισκω — kai ouk ontas to correspond to επειρασας — legontas didst find (πσευδεις — kai heures). Second aorist active indicative of πσευδης — heuriskō Dropping back to the regular structure parallel with epeirasas (pseudeis). Predicate accusative plural of pseudēs self-deceived deceivers as in Revelation 21:8. [source]
Revelation 2:2 Which call themselves apostles [λεγοντας]
Perhaps itinerant missionaries of these Nicolaitans who posed as equal to or even superior to the original apostles, like the Judaizers so described by Paul (2 Corinthians 11:5, 2 Corinthians 11:13; 2 Corinthians 12:11). Paul had foretold such false teachers (Gnostics), grievous wolves, in Acts 20:29; in sheep‘s clothing, Jesus had said (Matthew 7:15).And they are not (και ευρες — kai ouk eisin). A parenthesis in Johannine style (John 2:9; John 3:9; 1 John 3:1) for ευρισκω — kai ouk ontas to correspond to επειρασας — legontas didst find (πσευδεις — kai heures). Second aorist active indicative of πσευδης — heuriskō Dropping back to the regular structure parallel with epeirasas (pseudeis). Predicate accusative plural of pseudēs self-deceived deceivers as in Revelation 21:8. [source]

What do the individual words in John 2:9 mean?

When then had tasted the master of the feast the water wine having become and not he knew from where it is the however servants knew - having drawn calls the bridegroom
ὡς δὲ ἐγεύσατο ἀρχιτρίκλινος τὸ ὕδωρ οἶνον γεγενημένον καὶ οὐκ ᾔδει πόθεν ἐστίν οἱ δὲ διάκονοι ᾔδεισαν οἱ ἠντληκότες φωνεῖ τὸν νυμφίον

ἐγεύσατο  had  tasted 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Middle, 3rd Person Singular
Root: γεύομαι  
Sense: to taste, to try the flavour of.
ἀρχιτρίκλινος  master  of  the  feast 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: ἀρχιτρίκλινος  
Sense: the superintendent of the dining room, a table master.
ὕδωρ  water 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Neuter Singular
Root: ὕδωρ  
Sense: water.
οἶνον  wine 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: οἶνος  
Sense: wine.
γεγενημένον  having  become 
Parse: Verb, Perfect Participle Middle or Passive, Accusative Neuter Singular
Root: γίνομαι  
Sense: to become, i.
ᾔδει  he  knew 
Parse: Verb, Pluperfect Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: οἶδα  
Sense: to see.
πόθεν  from  where 
Parse: Adverb
Root: πόθεν  
Sense: of place: from where, from what condition.
ἐστίν  it  is 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: εἰμί  
Sense: to be, to exist, to happen, to be present.
δὲ  however 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: δέ  
Sense: but, moreover, and, etc.
διάκονοι  servants 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root: διάκονος  
Sense: one who executes the commands of another, esp. of a master, a servant, attendant, minister.
ᾔδεισαν  knew 
Parse: Verb, Pluperfect Indicative Active, 3rd Person Plural
Root: οἶδα  
Sense: to see.
οἱ  - 
Parse: Article, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
ἠντληκότες  having  drawn 
Parse: Verb, Perfect Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root: ἀντλέω  
Sense: to draw out of a ship’s bilge-water, to bale or pump out.
φωνεῖ  calls 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: φωνέω 
Sense: to sound, emit a sound, to speak.
νυμφίον  bridegroom 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: νυμφίος  
Sense: a bridegroom.

What are the major concepts related to John 2:9?

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