The Meaning of Acts 3:8 Explained

Acts 3:8

KJV: And he leaping up stood, and walked, and entered with them into the temple, walking, and leaping, and praising God.

YLT: and springing up, he stood, and was walking, and did enter with them into the temple, walking and springing, and praising God;

Darby: And leaping up he stood and walked, and entered with them into the temple, walking, and leaping, and praising God.

ASV: And leaping up, he stood, and began to walk; and he entered with them into the temple, walking, and leaping, and praising God.

What does Acts 3:8 Mean?

Context Summary

Acts 3:1-10 - Uplifting Power
Peter and John differed greatly, in age, in gift, and in point of view. They had been rivals; now they walked together. It was at three in the afternoon that this incident took place. As they climbed the Temple steps, they must have spoken of the many times that the Master had walked at their side. But they realized, too, that He was still as near as ever; and so they became the means of linking this withered man to His glorious health-giving power. It was because Jesus went with them that the healed man was able to become the fourth of the group.
The gate was beautiful, but it could not heal. More is needed than beauty or art. We may have neither the silver of profound intellect, nor the golden speech of Chrysostom, but we must see that we have something to give to a paralyzed and perishing world. Let us so move among men as to lead them to expect that we have something to give, and then give them Jesus. The lame man needed strength, and this is the divine gift of the gospel. "It is the power of God unto salvation." The Savior makes us able to walk and leap in God's ways. [source]

Chapter Summary: Acts 3

1  Peter preaching to the people that came to see a lame man restored to his feet,
12  professes the cure to have been wrought by God, and his son Jesus;
13  withal reprehending them for crucifying Jesus;
17  which because they did it through ignorance,
18  and that thereby were fulfilled God's determinate counsel, and the Scriptures,
19  he exhorts them by repentance and faith to seek remission of their sins through Jesus

Greek Commentary for Acts 3:8

Leaping up [εχαλλομενος]
Present middle participle, leaping out repeatedly after Peter pulled him up. Only here in the N.T. [source]
He stood [εστη]
Second aorist active. Walked (περιεπατει — periepatei). Went on walking, imperfect active. He came into the temple repeating these new exercises (walking, leaping, praising God). [source]
Walked [περιεπατει]
Went on walking, imperfect active. He came into the temple repeating these new exercises (walking, leaping, praising God). [source]
Leaping up [ἐξαλλόμενος]
Strictly, leaping forth. Only here in New Testament. Used in medical language of the sudden starting of a bone from the socket, of starting from sleep, or of the sudden bound of the pulse. [source]
Walked [περιεπάτει]
The imperfect. Correctly, as Rev., began to walk; or, perhaps, continued walking about, testing his newly acquired power. The medical notes of the case are, that the disease was congenital, had lasted over forty years (Acts 4:22), and the progressive steps of the recovery - leaped up, stood, walked. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
[source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Acts 3:8

John 4:14 That I shall give him [ου εγω δωσω αυτωι]
Relative ου — hou attracted to the case (genitive) of the antecedent Future active indicative of διδωμι — didōmi Shall never thirst The double negative ου μη — ou mē is used with either the future indicative as here or the aorist subjunctive, the strongest possible negative. See both constructions “Spring (or fountain) of water leaping (bubbling up) unto life eternal.” Present middle participle of αλλομαι — hallomai old verb, in N.T. only here and Acts 3:8; Acts 14:10. The woman‘s curiosity is keenly excited about this new kind of water. [source]
Acts 27:9 And the voyage was now dangerous [και οντος ηδη επισπαλους]
Genitive absolute, “and the voyage being already Because the Fast was now already gone by (δια το και την νηστειαν ηδη παρεληλυτεναι — dia to kai tēn nēsteian ēdē parelēluthenai). Accusative (after δια — dia) of the articular infinitive perfect active of παρερχομαι — parerchomai to pass by, with the accusative of general reference (νηστειαν — nēsteian the great day of atonement of the Jews, Leviticus 16:29.) occurring about the end of September. The ancients considered navigation on the Mediterranean unsafe from early October till the middle of March. In a.d. 59 the Fast occurred on Oct. 5. There is nothing strange in Luke using this Jewish note of time as in Acts 20:6 though a Gentile Christian. Paul did it also (1 Corinthians 16:8). It is no proof that Luke was a Jewish proselyte. We do not know precisely when the party left Caesarea (possibly in August), but in ample time to arrive in Rome before October if conditions had been more favourable. But the contrary winds had made the voyage very slow and difficult all the way (Acts 27:7) besides the long delay here in this harbour of Fair Havens. Paul admonished them Imperfect active of παραινεω — paraineō old word to exhort from παρα — para and αινεω — aineō to praise (Acts 3:8), only here and Acts 27:22 in N.T. It is remarkable that a prisoner like Paul should venture to give advice at all and to keep on doing it (imperfect tense inchoative, began to admonish and kept on at it). Paul had clearly won the respect of the centurion and officers and also felt it to be his duty to give this unasked for warning. I perceive (τεωρω — theōrō). Old word from τεωρος — theōros a spectator. See note on Luke 10:18. Paul does not here claim prophecy, but he had plenty of experience with three shipwrecks already (2 Corinthians 11:25) to justify his apprehension. Will be Infinitive in indirect assertion followed by future infinitive after μελλειν — mellein in spite of οτι — hoti which would naturally call for present indicative μελλει — mellei an anacoluthon due to the long sentence (Robertson, Grammar, p. 478). With injury (μετα υβρεως — meta hubreōs). An old word from υπερ — huper (above, upper, like our “uppishness”) and so pride, insult, personal injury, the legal word for personal assault (Page). Josephus (Ant. III. 6, 4) uses it of the injury of the elements. Loss Old word, opposite of κερδος — kerdos gain or profit (Philemon 3:7.). Nowhere else in N.T. Lading (πορτιου — phortiou). Diminutive of πορτος — phortos (from περω — pherō to bear) only in form. Common word, but in N.T. only here in literal sense, as metaphor in Matthew 11:30; Matthew 23:4; Luke 11:46; Galatians 6:5. But also of our lives Common use of πσυχη — psuchē for life, originally “breath of life” (Acts 20:10), and also “soul” (Acts 14:2). Fortunately no lives were lost, though all else was. But this outcome was due to the special mercy of God for the sake of Paul (Acts 27:24), not to the wisdom of the officers in rejecting Paul‘s advice. Paul begins now to occupy the leading role in this marvellous voyage. [source]
Acts 27:9 Paul admonished them [παρηινηι ο Παυλος]
Imperfect active of παραινεω — paraineō old word to exhort from παρα — para and αινεω — aineō to praise (Acts 3:8), only here and Acts 27:22 in N.T. It is remarkable that a prisoner like Paul should venture to give advice at all and to keep on doing it (imperfect tense inchoative, began to admonish and kept on at it). Paul had clearly won the respect of the centurion and officers and also felt it to be his duty to give this unasked for warning. I perceive (τεωρω — theōrō). Old word from τεωρος — theōros a spectator. See note on Luke 10:18. Paul does not here claim prophecy, but he had plenty of experience with three shipwrecks already (2 Corinthians 11:25) to justify his apprehension. Will be Infinitive in indirect assertion followed by future infinitive after μελλειν — mellein in spite of οτι — hoti which would naturally call for present indicative μελλει — mellei an anacoluthon due to the long sentence (Robertson, Grammar, p. 478). With injury (μετα υβρεως — meta hubreōs). An old word from υπερ — huper (above, upper, like our “uppishness”) and so pride, insult, personal injury, the legal word for personal assault (Page). Josephus (Ant. III. 6, 4) uses it of the injury of the elements. Loss Old word, opposite of κερδος — kerdos gain or profit (Philemon 3:7.). Nowhere else in N.T. Lading (πορτιου — phortiou). Diminutive of πορτος — phortos (from περω — pherō to bear) only in form. Common word, but in N.T. only here in literal sense, as metaphor in Matthew 11:30; Matthew 23:4; Luke 11:46; Galatians 6:5. But also of our lives Common use of πσυχη — psuchē for life, originally “breath of life” (Acts 20:10), and also “soul” (Acts 14:2). Fortunately no lives were lost, though all else was. But this outcome was due to the special mercy of God for the sake of Paul (Acts 27:24), not to the wisdom of the officers in rejecting Paul‘s advice. Paul begins now to occupy the leading role in this marvellous voyage. [source]

What do the individual words in Acts 3:8 mean?

And leaping up he stood began walking he entered with them into the temple walking leaping praising - God
καὶ ἐξαλλόμενος ἔστη περιεπάτει εἰσῆλθεν σὺν αὐτοῖς εἰς τὸ ἱερὸν περιπατῶν ἁλλόμενος αἰνῶν τὸν Θεόν

ἐξαλλόμενος  leaping  up 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Middle or Passive, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: ἐξάλλομαι  
Sense: to leap up.
ἔστη  he  stood 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἵστημι  
Sense: to cause or make to stand, to place, put, set.
περιεπάτει  began  walking 
Parse: Verb, Imperfect Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: περιπατέω  
Sense: to walk.
εἰσῆλθεν  he  entered 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: εἰσέρχομαι  
Sense: to go out or come in: to enter.
εἰς  into 
Parse: Preposition
Root: εἰς  
Sense: into, unto, to, towards, for, among.
ἱερὸν  temple 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Neuter Singular
Root: ἱερόν  
Sense: a sacred place, temple.
περιπατῶν  walking 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: περιπατέω  
Sense: to walk.
ἁλλόμενος  leaping 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Middle or Passive, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: ἅλλομαι 
Sense: to leap.
αἰνῶν  praising 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: αἰνέω  
Sense: to praise, extol, to sing praises in honour to God.
τὸν  - 
Parse: Article, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
Θεόν  God 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: θεός  
Sense: a god or goddess, a general name of deities or divinities.