The Meaning of Acts 19:19 Explained

Acts 19:19

KJV: Many of them also which used curious arts brought their books together, and burned them before all men: and they counted the price of them, and found it fifty thousand pieces of silver.

YLT: and many of those who had practised the curious arts, having brought the books together, were burning them before all; and they reckoned together the prices of them, and found it five myriads of silverlings;

Darby: And many of those that practised curious arts brought their books of charms and burnt them before all. And they reckoned up the prices of them, and found it fifty thousand pieces of silver.

ASV: And not a few of them that practised magical arts brought their books together and burned them in the sight of all; and they counted the price of them, and found it fifty thousand pieces of silver.

What does Acts 19:19 Mean?

Context Summary

Acts 19:13-29 - The Power Of Jesus' Name
Where God's spirit is mightily at work, Satan is not far away. Here the enemy's emissaries were mean enough to use the name of Jesus to get themselves a few more shekels. But the name is useless apart from the living power of the Spirit. It is terrible when the very demons flout those who profess religion. Who are ye? meant, "You do not count." The demons knew Christ as the Holy One of God and Paul as His representative, but these exorcist Jews were hollow as sounding brass. Cast into the balances, they were altogether lighter than vanity, Psalms 62:9.
The outcome of all this was a mighty revival. The name of the Lord Jesus was magnified, and a searching work of grace led to the confession of sin and the cleansing of heart and life in many who had followed vain superstitions.
So deep was the work of God in that great city of Ephesus that the trade in charms and amulets, sold in the neighborhood of the temple, began to fall off. The crowd of worshippers in Diana's temple was also perceptibly less. People who came in from the seaboard would find their way to the Apostle, who preached the gospel with a power that could not be withstood. Regenerated souls therefore, in turn, carried the gospel throughout the whole region. [source]

Chapter Summary: Acts 19

1  The Holy Spirit is given by Paul's hands
8  The Jews blaspheme his doctrine, which is confirmed by miracles
13  The Jewish exorcists,
16  are beaten by a man who had an evil spirit
19  Conjuring books are burnt
21  Demetrius, for love of gain, raises an uproar against Paul;
35  which is appeased by the town clerk

Greek Commentary for Acts 19:19

Not a few of them that practised curious arts [ικανοι των τα περιεργα πραχαντων]
Considerable number of the performers or exorcists themselves who knew that they were humbugs were led to renounce their evil practices. The word περιεργα — perierga (curious) is an old word (περι εργα — periκατεκαιον ενωπιον παντων — erga) originally a piddler about trifles, a busybody (1 Timothy 5:13), then impertinent and magical things as here. Only two examples in the N.T. It is a technical term for magic as the papyri and inscriptions show. Deissmann (Bible Studies, p. 323) thinks that these books here burned were just like the Magic Papyri now recovered from Egypt. [source]
Burned them in the sight of all [κατακαιω]
Imperfect active of κατα — katakaiō It probably took a good while to do it, burned them completely (up, we say; down, the Greeks say, perfective use of Επεσια Γραμματα — kata). These Magical Papyri or slips of parchment with symbols or magical sentences written on them called συνενεγκαντες — Ephesia Grammata (Ephesian Letters). These Ephesian Letters were worn as amulets or charms. They brought them together (συνπερω — sunenegkantes). Second aorist active participle of συνεπσηπισαν — sunpherō What a glorious conflagration it would be if in every city all the salacious, blasphemous, degrading books, pamphlets, magazines, and papers could be piled together and burned. They counted First aorist active indicative of Συνκαταπσηπιζω — sunpsēphizō to reckon together. In lxx (Jeremiah 29:49). Only here in N.T. αργυριου μυριαδας πεντε — Sunkatapsēphizō in Acts 1:26. Fifty thousand pieces of silver (μυριαδας — arguriou muriadas pente). Five ten thousand (muriadas) pieces of silver. Ephesus was largely Greek and probably the silver pieces were Greek drachmae or the Latin denarius, probably about ten thousand dollars or two thousand English pounds. [source]
They brought them together [συνπερω]
Second aorist active participle of συνεπσηπισαν — sunpherō What a glorious conflagration it would be if in every city all the salacious, blasphemous, degrading books, pamphlets, magazines, and papers could be piled together and burned. [source]
They counted [συνπσηπιζω]
First aorist active indicative of Συνκαταπσηπιζω — sunpsēphizō to reckon together. In lxx (Jeremiah 29:49). Only here in N.T. αργυριου μυριαδας πεντε — Sunkatapsēphizō in Acts 1:26. Fifty thousand pieces of silver (μυριαδας — arguriou muriadas pente). Five ten thousand (muriadas) pieces of silver. Ephesus was largely Greek and probably the silver pieces were Greek drachmae or the Latin denarius, probably about ten thousand dollars or two thousand English pounds. [source]
Fifty thousand pieces of silver [μυριαδας]
Five ten thousand (muriadas) pieces of silver. Ephesus was largely Greek and probably the silver pieces were Greek drachmae or the Latin denarius, probably about ten thousand dollars or two thousand English pounds. [source]
Curious arts [τὰ περίεργα]
The word means, literally, overwrought, elaborate, and hence recondite or curious, as magical practices. Only here and 1 Timothy 5:13, in its original sense of those who busy themselves excessively ( περί ): busybodies. The article indicates the practices referred to in the context. [source]
Books []
Containing magical formulas. Heathen writers often allude to the Ephesian letters. These were symbols, or magical sentences written on slips of parchment, and carried about as amulets. Sometimes they were engraved on seals. [source]
Burned [κατέκαιον]
Burned them up ( κατά ). The imperfect is graphic, describing them as throwing book after book on the pile. [source]
Counted [συνεψήφισαν]
Only here in New Testament. See on Luke 14:28. The preposition σύν , together, in the compound verb, indicates the reckoning up of the sum-total. [source]
Fifty thousand pieces of silver []
If reckoned in Jewish money, about thirty-five thousand dollars; if in Greek drachmaeas is more probable, about nine thousand three hundred dollars. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Acts 19:19

Luke 12:1 Many thousands [μυριαδων]
Genitive absolute with επισυναχτεισων — episunachtheisōn (first aorist passive participle feminine plural because of μυριαδων — muriadōn), a double compound late verb, επισυναγω — episunagō to gather together unto. The word “myriads” is probably hyperbolical as in Acts 21:20, but in the sense of ten thousand, as in Acts 19:19, it means a very large crowd apparently drawn together by the violent attacks of the rabbis against Jesus.Insomuch that they trode one upon another (ωστε καταπατειν αλληλους — hōste katapatein allēlous). The imagination must complete the picture of this jam.Unto his disciples first of all This long discourse in Luke 12 is really a series of separate talks to various groups in the vast crowds around Jesus. This particular talk goes through Luke 12:12.Beware of (προσεχετε εαυτοις απο — prosechete heautois apo). Put your mind (νουν — noun understood) for yourselves (dative) and avoid (απο — apo with the ablative).The leaven of the Pharisees which is hypocrisy In Mark 8:15 Jesus had coupled the lesson of the Pharisees with that of Herod, in Matthew 16:6 with that of the Sadducees also. He had long ago called the Pharisees hypocrites (Matthew 6:2, Matthew 6:5, Matthew 6:16). The occasion was ripe here for this crisp saying. In Matthew 13:33 leaven does not have an evil sense as here. See note on Matthew 23:13 for hypocrites. Hypocrisy was the leading Pharisaic vice (Bruce) and was a mark of sanctity to hide an evil heart. [source]
Acts 1:26 He was numbered [συνκατεπσηπιστη]
To the Jews the lot did not suggest gambling, but “the O.T. method of learning the will of Jehovah” (Furneaux). The two nominations made a decision necessary and they appealed to God in this way. This double compound συνκαταπσηπιζω — sunkatapsēphizō occurs here alone in the N.T. and elsewhere only in Plutarch (Them. 21) in the middle voice for condemning with others. Συνπσηπιζω — Sunpsēphizō occurs in the middle voice in Acts 19:19 for counting up money and also in Aristophanes. Πσηπιζω — Psēphizō with δαπανην — dapanēn occurs in Luke 14:28 for counting the cost and in Revelation 13:18 for “counting” the number of the beast. The ancients used pebbles (πσηποι — psēphoi) in voting, black for condemning, white (Revelation 2:17) in acquitting. Here it is used in much the same sense as καταριτμεω — katarithmeō in Acts 1:17. [source]
Acts 21:20 How many thousands [ποσαι μυριαδες]
Old word for ten thousand (Acts 19:19) and then an indefinite number like our “myriads” (this very word) as Luke 12:1; Acts 21:20; Judges 1:14; Revelation 5:11; Revelation 9:16. But it is a surprising statement even with allowable hyperbole, but one may recall Acts 4:4 (number of the men--not women--about five thousand); Acts 5:14 (multitudes both of men and women); Acts 6:7. There were undoubtedly a great many thousands of believers in Jerusalem and all Jewish Christians, some, alas, Judaizers (Acts 11:2; Acts 15:1, Acts 15:5). This list may include the Christians from neighbouring towns in Palestine and even some from foreign countries here at the Feast of Pentecost, for it is probable that Paul arrived in time for it as he had hoped. But we do not have to count the hostile Jews from Asia (Acts 21:27) who were clearly not Christians at all. All zealous for the law (παντες ζηλωται του νομου — pantes zēlōtai tou nomou). Zealots (substantive) rather than zealous (adjective) with objective genitive (του νομου — tou nomou). The word zealot is from ζηλοω — zēloō to burn with zeal, to boil. The Greek used ζηλωτης — zēlōtēs for an imitator or admirer. There was a party of Zealots (developed from the Pharisees), a group of what would be called “hot-heads,” who brought on the war with Rome. One of this party, Simon Zelotes (Acts 1:13), was in the number of the twelve apostles. It is important to understand the issues in Jerusalem. It was settled at the Jerusalem Conference (Acts 15; Galatians 2) that the Mosaic ceremonial law was not to be imposed upon Gentile Christians. Paul won freedom for them, but it was not said that it was wrong for Jewish Christians to go on observing it if they wished. We have seen Paul observing the passover in Philippi (Acts 20:6) and planning to reach Jerusalem for Pentecost (Acts 20:16). The Judaizers rankled under Paul‘s victory and power in spreading the gospel among the Gentiles and gave him great trouble in Galatia and Corinth. They were busy against him in Jerusalem also and it was to undo the harm done by them in Jerusalem that Paul gathered the great collection from the Gentile Christians and brought it with him and the delegates from the churches. Clearly then Paul had real ground for his apprehension of trouble in Jerusalem while still in Corinth (Romans 15:25) when he asked for the prayers of the Roman Christians (Romans 15:30-32). The repeated warnings along the way were amply justified. [source]
Acts 26:10 Having received authority from the chief priests [την παρα των αρχιερεων εχουσιαν λαβων]
“The authority,” he says. Paul was the official persecutor of the saints under the direction of the Sanhedrin. He mentions “chief priests” (Sadducees), though a Pharisee himself. Both parties were co-operating against the saints. And when they were put to death (αναιρουμενων τε αυτων — anairoumenōn te autōn). Genitive absolute with present passive participle of αναιρεω — anaireō I gave my vote against them “I cast down my pebble” (a black one). The ancient Greeks used white pebbles for acquittal (Revelation 2:17), black ones for condemnation as here (the only two uses of the word in the N.T.). Paul‘s phrase (not found elsewhere) is more vivid than the usual καταπσηπιζω — katapsēphizō for voting. They literally cast the pebbles into the urn. Cf. συμπσηπιζω — sumpsēphizō in Acts 19:19, συγκαταπσεπιζο — sugkatapsephizo in Acts 1:26. If Paul‘s language is taken literally here, he was a member of the Sanhedrin and so married when he led the persecution. That is quite possible, though he was not married when he wrote 1 Corinthians 7:7., but a widower. It is possible to take the language figuratively for approval, but not so natural. [source]
Acts 26:10 I gave my vote against them [κατηνεγκα πσηπον]
“I cast down my pebble” (a black one). The ancient Greeks used white pebbles for acquittal (Revelation 2:17), black ones for condemnation as here (the only two uses of the word in the N.T.). Paul‘s phrase (not found elsewhere) is more vivid than the usual καταπσηπιζω — katapsēphizō for voting. They literally cast the pebbles into the urn. Cf. συμπσηπιζω — sumpsēphizō in Acts 19:19, συγκαταπσεπιζο — sugkatapsephizo in Acts 1:26. If Paul‘s language is taken literally here, he was a member of the Sanhedrin and so married when he led the persecution. That is quite possible, though he was not married when he wrote 1 Corinthians 7:7., but a widower. It is possible to take the language figuratively for approval, but not so natural. [source]
Galatians 5:20 Witchcraft [φαρμακία]
Or sorcery. Elsewhere only Revelation 18:23. From φάρμακον adrug. In lxx, see Exodus 7:11; Wisd. 12:4; Isaiah 47:9. Comp. Acts 19:19, περίεργα curiousarts, note. [source]
Galatians 5:19 Manifest [πανερα]
Opposed to “hidden” Ancient writers were fond of lists of vices and virtues. Cf. Stalker‘s sermons on The Seven Cardinal Virtues and The Seven Deadly Sins. There are more than seven in this deadly list in Galatians 5:19-21. He makes the two lists in explanation of the conflict in Galatians 5:17 to emphasize the command in Galatians 5:13. There are four groups in Paul‘s list of manifest vices:(1)Sensual sins like fornication (πορνεια — porneia prostitution, harlotry), uncleanness (ακαταρσια — akatharsia moral impurity), lasciviousness (ασελγεια — aselgeia wantonness), sexual vice of all kinds prevailed in heathenism.(2)Idolatry (ειδωλατρεια — eidōlatreia worship of idols) and witchcraft (παρμακεια — pharmakeia from παρμακον — pharmakon a drug, the ministering of drugs), but the sorcerers monopolized the word for a while in their magical arts and used it in connection with idolatry. In N.T. only here and Revelation 18:23. See note on Acts 19:19 περιεργα — perierga curious arts. [source]
2 Thessalonians 3:11 Working not at all - busybodies [μηδὲν ἐργαζομένους - περιεργαζομένους]
One of Paul's frequent wordplays. See on reprobate mind, Romans 1:28. Not busy, but busybodies. Περιεργάζεσθαι (N.T.ois to bustle about a thing: here, to be officious in others' affairs. See on τὰ περίεργα curiousarts, Acts 19:19, and see on 1 Timothy 5:13. [source]
1 Timothy 5:13 Busybodies [περίεργοι]
In this sense only here. Comp. τὰ περίεργα curiousarts, Acts 19:19. The participle περιεργαζομένοι busybodies 2 Thessalonians 3:11. See note. Rend. the whole passage: “And withal, being also idle, they learn, gadding about from house to house; and not only (are they) idle, but tattlers also, and busybodies, speaking things which they ought not.” [source]
1 Timothy 5:13 They learn to be idle [αργαι μαντανουσιν]
There is no ειναι — einai (to be) in the Greek. This very idiom without ειναι — einai after μαντανω — manthanō occurs in Plato and Dio Chrysostom, though unusual. Αργαι — Argai (idle) is old adjective See note on Matthew 20:3 and note on Titus 1:12. Going about (περιερχομεναι — perierchomenai). Present middle participle of περιερχομαι — perierchomai old compound verb. See note on Acts 19:13 of strollers. From house to house Literally “the houses,” “wandering around the houses.” Vivid picture of idle tattlers and gossipers. But tattlers also (αλλα και πλυαροι — alla kai phluaroi). Old word from πλυω — phluō (to boil up, to throw up bubbles, like blowing soap bubbles). Only here in N.T. Πλυαρεω — Phluareō in 3 John 1:10 only in N.T. And busybodies Old word (from περι εργον — periπεριεργαζομαι — ergon), busy about trifles to the neglect of important matters. In N.T. only here and Acts 19:19. See note on 2 Thessalonians 3:11 for τα μη δεοντα — periergazomai Things which they ought not (α μη δει — ta mē deonta). “The not necessary things,” and, as a result, often harmful. See note on Titus 1:11 ha mē dei (which things are not necessary). [source]
1 Timothy 5:13 From house to house [τας οικιας]
Literally “the houses,” “wandering around the houses.” Vivid picture of idle tattlers and gossipers. But tattlers also (αλλα και πλυαροι — alla kai phluaroi). Old word from πλυω — phluō (to boil up, to throw up bubbles, like blowing soap bubbles). Only here in N.T. Πλυαρεω — Phluareō in 3 John 1:10 only in N.T. And busybodies Old word (from περι εργον — periπεριεργαζομαι — ergon), busy about trifles to the neglect of important matters. In N.T. only here and Acts 19:19. See note on 2 Thessalonians 3:11 for τα μη δεοντα — periergazomai Things which they ought not (α μη δει — ta mē deonta). “The not necessary things,” and, as a result, often harmful. See note on Titus 1:11 ha mē dei (which things are not necessary). [source]
1 Timothy 5:13 And busybodies [και περιεργοι]
Old word (from περι εργον — periπεριεργαζομαι — ergon), busy about trifles to the neglect of important matters. In N.T. only here and Acts 19:19. See note on 2 Thessalonians 3:11 for τα μη δεοντα — periergazomai Things which they ought not (α μη δει — ta mē deonta). “The not necessary things,” and, as a result, often harmful. See note on Titus 1:11 ha mē dei (which things are not necessary). [source]
2 Timothy 3:15 The sacred writings [ιερα γραμματα]
“Sacred writings” or “Holy Scriptures.” Here alone in N.T., though in Josephus (Proem to Ant. 3; Apion 1, etc.) and in Philo. The adjective ιερος — hieros occurs in 1 Corinthians 9:13 of the temple worship, and γραμμα — gramma in contrast to πνευμα — pneuma in 2 Corinthians 3:6.; Romans 2:29 and in John 5:47 of Moses‘ writings, in Acts 28:21 of an epistle, in Galatians 6:11 of letters (characters). In Ephesus there were Επεσια γραμματα — Ephesia grammata that were βεβηλα — bebēla (Acts 19:19), not ιερα — hiera [source]
2 Timothy 3:15 Thou has known [οιδας]
Present active indicative, progressive perfect reaching from a babe till now. Would that Christian parents took like pains today. The sacred writings (ιερα γραμματα — hiera grammata). “Sacred writings” or “Holy Scriptures.” Here alone in N.T., though in Josephus (Proem to Ant. 3; Apion 1, etc.) and in Philo. The adjective ιερος — hieros occurs in 1 Corinthians 9:13 of the temple worship, and γραμμα — gramma in contrast to πνευμα — pneuma in 2 Corinthians 3:6.; Romans 2:29 and in John 5:47 of Moses‘ writings, in Acts 28:21 of an epistle, in Galatians 6:11 of letters (characters). In Ephesus there were Επεσια γραμματα — Ephesia grammata that were βεβηλα — bebēla (Acts 19:19), not ιερα — hiera To make thee wise First aorist active infinitive of σοπιζω — sophizō old verb (from σοπος — sophos), in N.T. only here, and 2 Peter 1:16. Which is in (της εν — tēs en). Common idiom with the article, “the in.” The use of the Scriptures was not magic, but of value when used “through faith that is in Christ Jesus.” [source]
Hebrews 12:22 To an innumerable company of angels [μυριάσιν ἀγγέλων]
On this whole passage (Hebrews 12:22-24) it is to be observed that it is arranged in a series of clauses connected by καὶ . Accordingly μυριάσιν tomyriads or tens of thousands stands by itself, and πανηγύρει festalassembly goes with ἀγγέλων angels Μυριάς (see Luke 12:1; Acts 19:19; Revelation 5:11; quite often in lxx) is strictly the number ten thousand. In the plural, an innumerable multitude. So A.V. here. Rend. “to an innumerable multitude,” placing a comma after μυριάσιν , and connecting of angels with the next clause. This use of μυριάσιν without a qualifying genitive is justified by numerous examples. See Genesis 24:60; Deuteronomy 32:30; Deuteronomy 33:2; 1 Samuel 18:7, 1 Samuel 18:8; Psalm 90:7; Song of Solomon 5:10; Daniel 7:10; Daniel 11:12; 2 Maccabees 8:20; Judges href="/desk/?q=jud+1:14&sr=1">Judges 1:14. Χιλιάδες thousandsis used in the same way. See Daniel href="/desk/?q=da+7:10&sr=1">Daniel 7:10. [source]
Jude 1:14 Enoch the seventh from Adam [εβδομος απο Αδαμ ενωχ]
The genealogical order occurs in Gen 5:4-20, with Enoch as seventh. He is so termed in Enoch 60:8; 93:3.Prophesied (επροπητευσεν — eprophēteusen). First aorist active indicative of προπητευω — prophēteuō If the word is given its ordinary meaning as in 1 Peter 1:10, then Jude terms the Book of Enoch an inspired book. The words quoted are “a combination of passages from Enoch” (Bigg), chiefly from Enoch 1:9.With ten thousand of his holy ones “With (εν — en of accompaniment, Luke 14:31) his holy ten thousands” (μυριας — murias regular word, feminine gender, for ten thousand, Acts 19:19, there an unlimited number like our myriads, Luke 12:1). [source]
Jude 1:14 With ten thousand of his holy ones [εν αγιαις μυριασιν αυτου]
“With (εν — en of accompaniment, Luke 14:31) his holy ten thousands” (μυριας — murias regular word, feminine gender, for ten thousand, Acts 19:19, there an unlimited number like our myriads, Luke 12:1). [source]
Revelation 5:11 Ten thousand times ten thousand [μυρίαδες μυρίαδων]
Lit., ten thousands of ten thousands. Compare Psalm 68:17; Daniel 8:10. Μυριάς , whence the English myriad, means the number ten thousand. So, literally, Acts 19:19, ἀργυρίου μυριάδας πέντε fifty-thousandpieces of silver; lit., five ten-thousands. In the plural used for an unlimited number. See Luke 12:1; Acts 21:20; Hebrews 12:22; Judges 1:14. [source]
Revelation 2:1 In Ephesus [εν Επεσωι]
Near the sea on the river Cayster, the foremost city of Asia Minor, the temple-keeper of Artemis and her wonderful temple (Acts 19:35), the home of the magic arts (Ephesian letters, Acts 19:19) and of the mystery-cults, place of Paul‘s three years‘ stay (Acts 19:1-10; 20:17-38), where Aquila and Priscilla and Apollos laboured (Acts 18:24-28), where Timothy wrought (1 Tim. and 2 Tim.), where the Apostle John preached in his old age. Surely it was a place of great privilege, of great preaching. It was about sixty miles from Patmos and the messenger would reach Ephesus first. It is a free city, a seat of proconsular government (Acts 19:38), the end of the great road from the Euphrates. The port was a place of shifting sands, due to the silting up of the mouth of the Cayster. Ramsay (Letters to the Seven Churches, p. 210) calls it “the City of Change.” [source]

What do the individual words in Acts 19:19 mean?

Many now of those the magic arts having practiced having brought the books burned [them] before all And they counted up prices of them found [it] of silverlings myriads five
ἱκανοὶ δὲ τῶν τὰ περίεργα πραξάντων συνενέγκαντες τὰς βίβλους κατέκαιον ἐνώπιον πάντων καὶ συνεψήφισαν τιμὰς αὐτῶν εὗρον ἀργυρίου μυριάδας πέντε

ἱκανοὶ  Many 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root: ἱκανός  
Sense: sufficient.
δὲ  now 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: δέ  
Sense: but, moreover, and, etc.
τῶν  of  those 
Parse: Article, Genitive Masculine Plural
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
περίεργα  magic  arts 
Parse: Adjective, Accusative Neuter Plural
Root: περίεργος  
Sense: busy about trifles and neglectful of important matters.
πραξάντων  having  practiced 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Participle Active, Genitive Masculine Plural
Root: ἀναπράσσω 
Sense: to exercise, practise, to be busy with, carry on.
συνενέγκαντες  having  brought 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root: συμφέρω 
Sense: to bear or bring together.
βίβλους  books 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Plural
Root: βίβλος  
Sense: a written book, a roll, a scroll.
κατέκαιον  burned  [them] 
Parse: Verb, Imperfect Indicative Active, 3rd Person Plural
Root: κατακαίω  
Sense: to burn up, consume by fire.
ἐνώπιον  before 
Parse: Preposition
Root: ἐνώπιον  
Sense: in the presence of, before.
συνεψήφισαν  they  counted  up 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 3rd Person Plural
Root: συμψηφίζω  
Sense: to compute, count up.
τιμὰς  prices 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Plural
Root: τιμή  
Sense: a valuing by which the price is fixed.
αὐτῶν  of  them 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive Feminine 3rd Person Plural
Root: αὐτός  
Sense: himself, herself, themselves, itself.
εὗρον  found  [it] 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 3rd Person Plural
Root: εὑρίσκω  
Sense: to come upon, hit upon, to meet with.
ἀργυρίου  of  silverlings 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Neuter Singular
Root: ἀργύριον  
Sense: silver.
μυριάδας  myriads 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Plural
Root: μυριάς  
Sense: ten thousand.
πέντε  five 
Parse: Adjective, Accusative Feminine Plural
Root: πέντε  
Sense: five.