The Meaning of 2 Timothy 2:11 Explained

2 Timothy 2:11

KJV: It is a faithful saying: For if we be dead with him, we shall also live with him:

YLT: Stedfast is the word: For if we died together -- we also shall live together;

Darby: The word is faithful; for if we have died together with him, we shall also live together;

ASV: Faithful is the saying: For if we died with him, we shall also live with him:

What does 2 Timothy 2:11 Mean?

Context Summary

2 Timothy 2:10-18 - "approved Unto God"
The elect, 2 Timothy 2:10-13 : The Apostle sketches the experiences of the elect soul. It must endure, suffer, and die with Christ, that out of its surrender may come the truest, richest life, John 12:25. There is no path to lasting success save that of the cross and grave of Christ. It has been allotted to the redeemed in the divine program; each must tread it separately and with resolute purpose. But there is no doubt as to the sequel of a true life. The world of men may count it a failure, but God pledges Himself that as the pendulum swings here in the dark, it shall swing equally in yonder world of light. Three things are impossible with God-to die, to lie, and to fail the soul that trusts Him. Even when we cannot muster faith enough, His word of promise cannot be frustrated in the case of those whose faith is weak and trembling as the smoking flax.
The workman, 2 Timothy 2:14-18 : The one anxiety with us all should be to stand approved before God. As the r.v. margin suggests, we must hold a straight course in the word of truth. Our testimony should resemble an undeviating furrow. Let us construct in our life something which will be a permanent addition to the well-being of the world, so that at the last the Master may say that He is satisfied. [source]

Chapter Summary: 2 Timothy 2

1  Timothy is exhorted again to constancy and perseverance
17  Of Hymenaeus and Philetus
19  The foundation of the Lord is sure
22  He is taught whereof to beware, and what to follow after

Greek Commentary for 2 Timothy 2:11

Faithful is the saying [πιστος ο λογος]
The saying which follows here though it can refer to the preceding as in 1 Timothy 4:9. See note on 1 Timothy 1:15. It is possible that from here to the end of 2 Timothy 2:13 we have the fragment of an early hymn. There are four conditions in these verses (2 Timothy 2:11), all of the first class, assumed to be true. Parallels to the ideas here expressed are found in 2 Thessalonians 1:5; 1 Corinthians 4:8; 2 Corinthians 7:3; Romans 6:3-8; Colossians 3:1-4. Note the compounds with συν — sun For υπομενομεν — hupomenomen (we endure) see note on 1 Corinthians 13:7 and for απιστουμεν — apistoumen (we are faithless) see note on Romans 3:3. The verb αρνεομαι — arneomai to deny Here in 2 Timothy 2:13 it has the notion of proving false to oneself, a thing that Christ “cannot” (ου δυναται — ou dunatai) do. [source]
It is a faithful saying []
Better, faithful is the saying. See on 1 Timothy 1:15. It refers to what precedes - the eternal glory of those who are raised with Christ (2 Timothy 2:8) which stimulates to endurance of sufferings for the gospel. [source]
For [γὰρ]
Faithful is the saying that the elect shall obtain salvation with eternal glory, for if we be dead, etc. The following words to the end of 2 Timothy 2:12may be a fragment of a hymn or confession, founded on Romans 6:8; Romans 8:17. [source]
If we be dead with him [εἰ συναπεθάνομεν]
A.V. misses the force of the aorist. Better, if we died, etc. Comp. Romans 6:8; Colossians 2:20. For the verb, comp. Mark 14:31; 2 Corinthians 7:3. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for 2 Timothy 2:11

John 17:24 I will [τελω]
Perfect identity of his will with that of the Father in “this moment of spiritual exaltation” (Bernard), though in Gethsemane Jesus distinguishes between his human will and that of the Father (Mark 14:36). Where I am That is heaven, to be with Jesus (John 12:26; John 13:36; John 14:3; Romans 8:17; 2 Timothy 2:11.). That they may behold Another purpose clause with ινα — hina and the present active subjunctive of τεωρεω — theōreō “that they may keep on beholding,” the endless joy of seeing Jesus “as he is” (1 John 3:2) in heaven. Before the foundation of the world This same phrase in Ephesians 1:4; 1 Peter 1:20 and six other times we have καταβολη κοσμου — katabolē kosmou (Matthew 25:34; Luke 11:50; Hebrews 4:3; Hebrews 9:26; Revelation 13:8; Revelation 17:8). Here we find the same pre-incarnate consciousness of Christ seen in John 17:5. [source]
Colossians 3:16 Psalms []
See the parallel passage, Ephesians 5:19. A psalm was originally a song accompanied by a stringed instrument. See on 1 Corinthians 14:15. The idea of accompaniment passed away in usage, and the psalm, in New-Testament phraseology, is an Old-Testament psalm, or a composition having that character. A hymn is a song of praise, and a song ( ᾠδή ode) is the general term for a song of any kind. Hymns would probably be distinctively Christian. It is supposed by some that Paul embodies fragments of hymns in his epistles, as 1 Corinthians 13:1-13; Ephesians 5:14; 1 Timothy 3:16; 2 Timothy 2:11-14. James 1:17, and Revelation 1:5, Revelation 1:6; Revelation 15:3, are also supposed to be of this character. In both instances of his use of ᾠδή songPaul adds the term spiritual. The term may, as Trench suggests, denote sacred poems which are neither psalms nor hymns, as Herbert's “Temple,” or Keble's “Christian Year.” This is the more likely, as the use of these different compositions is not restricted to singing nor to public worship. They are to be used in mutual christian teaching and admonition. [source]
1 Timothy 1:15 This is a faithful saying [πιστὸς ὁ λόγος]
Better, faithful is the saying. A favorite phrase in these Epistles. oP. See 1 Timothy 3:1; 1 Timothy 4:9; 2 Timothy 2:11; Titus 3:8. [source]
1 Timothy 1:15 Faithful is the saying [πιστος ο λογος]
Five times in the Pastorals (1 Timothy 1:15; 1 Timothy 3:1; 1 Timothy 4:9; Titus 3:8; 2 Timothy 2:11). It will pay to note carefully πιστισ πιστευω πιστος — pistisπιστος — pisteuōλογος — pistos Same use of οτι — pistos (trustworthy) applied to αποδοχης — logos in Titus 1:9; Revelation 21:5; Revelation 22:6. Here and probably in 2 Timothy 2:11 a definite saying seems to be referred to, possibly a quotation (αχιος — hoti) of a current saying quite like the Johannine type of teaching. This very phrase (Christ coming into the world) occurs in John 9:37; John 11:27; John 16:28; John 18:37. Paul, of course, had no access to the Johannine writings, but such “sayings” were current among the disciples. There is no formal quotation, but “the whole phrase implies a knowledge of Synoptic and Johannine language” (Lock) as in Luke 5:32; John 12:47. [source]
2 Timothy 2:11 Faithful is the saying [πιστος ο λογος]
The saying which follows here though it can refer to the preceding as in 1 Timothy 4:9. See note on 1 Timothy 1:15. It is possible that from here to the end of 2 Timothy 2:13 we have the fragment of an early hymn. There are four conditions in these verses (2 Timothy 2:11), all of the first class, assumed to be true. Parallels to the ideas here expressed are found in 2 Thessalonians 1:5; 1 Corinthians 4:8; 2 Corinthians 7:3; Romans 6:3-8; Colossians 3:1-4. Note the compounds with συν — sun For υπομενομεν — hupomenomen (we endure) see note on 1 Corinthians 13:7 and for απιστουμεν — apistoumen (we are faithless) see note on Romans 3:3. The verb αρνεομαι — arneomai to deny Here in 2 Timothy 2:13 it has the notion of proving false to oneself, a thing that Christ “cannot” (ου δυναται — ou dunatai) do. [source]
Revelation 1:5 The faithful witness [ὁ μάρτυς ὁ πιστὸς]
For the phraseology see on 1 John 4:9. For witness, see on John 1:7; see on 1 Peter 5:1. As applied to the Messiah, see Psalm 89:37; Isaiah 55:4. The construction again departs from the grammatical rule. The words witness, first-born, ruler, are in the nominative case, instead of being in the genitive, in apposition with Jesus Christ. This construction, though irregular, nevertheless gives dignity and emphasis to these titles of the Lord. See on Revelation 1:4. The word πιστὸς , faithful is used (1), of one who shows Himself faithful in the discharge of a duty or the administration of a trust (Matthew 24:45; Luke 12:42). Hence, trustworthy (1 Corinthians 7:25; 2 Timothy 2:2). Of things that can be relied upon (1 Timothy 3:1; 2 Timothy 2:11). (2), Confiding; trusting; a believer (Galatians 3:9; Acts 16:1; 2 Corinthians 6:15; 1 Timothy 5:16). See on 1 John 1:9. The word is combined with ἀληθινός , true, genuine in Revelation 3:14; Revelation 19:11; Revelation 21:5; Revelation 22:6. Richard of St. Victor (cited by Trench) says: “A faithful witness, because He gave faithful testimony concerning all things which were to be testified to by Him in the world. A faithful witness, because whatever He heard from the Father, He faithfully made known to His disciples. A faithful witness, because He taught the way of God in truth, neither did He care for any one nor regard the person of men. A faithful witness, because He announced condemnation to the reprobate and salvation to the elect. A faithful witness, because He confirmed by miracles the truth which He taught in words. A faithful witness, because He denied not, even in death, the Father's testimony to Himself. A faithful witness, because He will give testimony in the day of judgment concerning the works of the good and of the evil.” [source]
Revelation 3:21 To sit [κατισαι]
First aorist active infinitive of κατιζω — kathizō This promise grows out of the prophecy that the saints will share in the Messiah‘s rule, made to the twelve (Matthew 19:28; Luke 22:29.), repeated by Paul (1 Corinthians 6:2.), enlarged in Revelation 22:1-5 (to last forever, 2 Timothy 2:11.). James and John took this hope and promise literally (Mark 10:40) not metaphorically.As I also overcame (ως καγω ενικησα — hōs kagō enikēsa). First aorist active indicative of νικαω — nikaō looking back on the victory as over in the past. In John 16:33 before the Cross Jesus says Εγω νενικηκα τον κοσμον — Egō nenikēka ton kosmon (perfect active), emphasizing the abiding effect of the victory.Sat down “I took my seat” (Hebrews 1:3) where Christ is now (Revelation 22:3; Colossians 3:1). Cf. 1 John 5:4; Revelation 2:27. Each of these seven messages begins alike and ends alike. Each is the message of the Christ and of the Holy Spirit to the angel of the church. Each has a special message suited to the actual condition of each church. In each case the individual who overcomes has a promise of blessing. Christ the Shepherd knows his sheep and lays bare the particular peril in each case. [source]

What do the individual words in 2 Timothy 2:11 mean?

Trustworthy [is] the saying If for we have died together [with Him] also we will live together [with Him]
Πιστὸς λόγος Εἰ γὰρ συναπεθάνομεν καὶ συζήσομεν

Πιστὸς  Trustworthy  [is] 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: πιστός  
Sense: trusty, faithful.
λόγος  saying 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: λόγος  
Sense: of speech.
συναπεθάνομεν  we  have  died  together  [with  Him] 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 1st Person Plural
Root: συναποθνῄσκω  
Sense: to die together.
καὶ  also 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: καί  
Sense: and, also, even, indeed, but.
συζήσομεν  we  will  live  together  [with  Him] 
Parse: Verb, Future Indicative Active, 1st Person Plural
Root: συζάω  
Sense: to live together with one.