The Meaning of 2 Peter 1:3 Explained

2 Peter 1:3

KJV: According as his divine power hath given unto us all things that pertain unto life and godliness, through the knowledge of him that hath called us to glory and virtue:

YLT: As all things to us His divine power (the things pertaining unto life and piety) hath given, through the acknowledgement of him who did call us through glory and worthiness,

Darby: As his divine power has given to us all things which relate to life and godliness, through the knowledge of him that has called us by glory and virtue,

ASV: seeing that his divine power hath granted unto us all things that pertain unto life and godliness, through the knowledge of him that called us by his own glory and virtue;

What does 2 Peter 1:3 Mean?

Verse Meaning

Grace and peace are possible since God has given us (all Christians) everything we need to live godly lives.
""Power" is one of the key-words of the epistle." [1]
It is possible that Peter meant the apostles specifically when he wrote "us" in 2 Peter 1:3-4. [2] The apostles are evidently in view in 2 Peter 1:1 ("ours"), and they may contrast with the readers ("you") in 2 Peter 1:2; 2 Peter 1:5. If this is what Peter meant, he was probably continuing to stress his apostolic authority, specifically in the teaching that follows. This would have been important since the false teachers were claiming that their teaching was authoritative (ch2). However the opening sections of most other epistles that contain reminders of God"s blessings (e.g, Ephesians 1:3-14; 1 Peter 1:3-9), as 2 Peter 1:3-4 does, seem to refer to all believers as "us." Moreover the "our" in 2 Peter 1:2 seems to be inclusive of all believers rather than a specific reference to the apostles. Nevertheless the prologue to1John ( 2 Peter 1:1-4) apparently does refer to the apostles as "us." I have not found any commentators who believed that Peter was referring to the apostles alone in 2 Peter 1:3-4.
"Life and godliness" is probably a hendiadys meaning "a godly life." A hendiadys is a figure of speech in which the writer joins two substantives with "and" rather than using an adjective and a substantive. These resources are available to us through full knowledge (cf. 2 Peter 1:2) of Jesus Christ, namely, through relationship with Him (cf. Philippians 4:13; Colossians 2:9-10; 2 Timothy 1:7). Lenski rightly, I believe, called epignosis ("full knowledge"), "... the key word of this epistle." [3]
"Just as a normal baby is born with all the "equipment" he needs for life and only needs to grow, so the Christian has all that is needed and only needs to grow." [4]
Is what God has given us in His Spirit and His word sufficient for a godly life, or do we also need the insights of other branches of knowledge (e.g, psychology)? Clearly our basic resources as Christians do no equip us for every task in life (e.g, auto maintenance, gardening, orthopedic surgery, etc.). This was not Peter"s claim. But how do the resources that he identified and modern psychology interface? Can psychology provide tools for growth in godliness, or is the Bible sufficient in itself for this? It seems to me that Peter"s point was that God"s Spirit and His word provide everything that is essential to godly living, not that these are the only resources that we have or should use. Peter"s point was that there is nothing that all believers need to become more godly that He has not already made available to us (cf. 2 Timothy 3:16-17). Some people, for various reasons, need more specialized help in dealing with the obstacles to godly living that they face, which psychology may provide. Nevertheless, no one can get along without God"s Spirit and His word to make progress in godliness.
Jesus Christ called Peter"s readers to Himself in the sense that His excellent glory, another hendiadys, attracted them to Him. "Excellent" (Gr. areten) really means moral excellence or virtue (cf. 2 Peter 1:5). Both Christ"s glory and His moral virtue appealed to the Gentiles as well as the Jews.

Context Summary

2 Peter 1:1-11 - The Rule Of Christian Growth
The keynote of this paragraph is these things, 2 Peter 1:8-10. Precious faith, 2 Peter 1:1, answers to precious promises, 2 Peter 1:4. Notice that God has given us every provision for a godly life, through the knowledge of Jesus, but that we must avail ourselves of it. The promises are great and precious, but we must appropriate and absorb them, if we are through them to partake of the divine nature. Our redemption has been secured by our Savior, but we must constantly advance and add to the golden links already securely stapled in faith.
In 2 Peter 1:5-7, a choir with linked hands passes before us, each member of which leads another; or we may use another similitude, and say that each grace, here mentioned, is contained in the next, as a series of Chinese boxes. To be deficient in these things is to be barren and unfruitful, 2 Peter 1:8, and to be shortsighted, 2 Peter 1:9. We may well desire the abundant entrance, 2 Peter 1:11, not like waterlogged vessels, but with every sail unfurled-hot landing on the celestial shore unexpected and unwanted, but welcomed by those we have helped. [source]

Chapter Summary: 2 Peter 1

1  Peter confirms the hope of the increase of God's grace,
5  exhorts them, by faith, and good works, to make their calling sure;
12  whereof he is careful to remind them, knowing that his death is at hand;
16  and assures them of the authenticity of the Gospel, by the eyewitness of the apostles and the prophets

Greek Commentary for 2 Peter 1:3

Seeing that his divine power hath granted unto us [ως ημιν της τειας δυναμεως αυτου δεδωρημενης]
Genitive absolute with the causal particle ως — hōs and the perfect middle participle of δωρεω — dōreō old verb, to bestow Τειος — Theios (from τεος — theos) is an old adjective in N.T. here and 2 Peter 1:4 only, except Acts 17:29, where Paul uses το τειον — to theion for deity, thus adapting his language to his audience as the papyri and inscriptions show. The use of τειος — theios with an imperial connotation is very common in the papyri and the inscriptions. Deissmann (Bible Studies, pp. 360-368) has shown the singular linguistic likeness between 2 Peter 1:3-11 and a remarkable inscription of the inhabitants of Stratonicea in Caria to Zeus Panhemerios and Hecate dated a.d. 22 (in full in C I H ii No. 2715 a b). One of the likenesses is the use of της τειας δυναμεως — tēs theias dunameōs Peter may have read this inscription (cf. Paul in Athens) or he may have used “the familiar forms and formulae of religious emotion” (Deissmann), “the official liturgical language of Asia Minor.” Peter is fond of δυναμις — dunamis in this Epistle, and the δυναμις — dunamis of Christ “is the sword which St. Peter holds over the head of the False Teachers” (Bigg). [source]
All things that pertain unto life and godliness [παντα τα προς ζωην και ευσεβειαν]
“All the things for life and godliness.” The new life in Christ who is the mystery of godliness (1 Timothy 3:16). Ευσεβεια — Eusebeia with its cognates Genitive of the articular first aorist active participle of ιδιαι δοχηι και αρετηι — kaleō Christ called Peter and all other Christians.By his own glory and virtue So B K L, but Aleph A C P read αρετη — idiāi doxēi kai aretēi (either instrumental case “by” or dative “to”). Peter is fond of idios (own, 1 Peter 3:1, 1 Peter 3:5; 2 Peter 2:16, 2 Peter 2:22, etc.). “Glory” here is the manifestation of the Divine Character in Christ. For aretē see note on 1 Peter 2:9, note on Philemon 4:8, and note on 2 Peter 1:5. [source]
Of him that called us [δια δοχης και αρετης]
Genitive of the articular first aorist active participle of ιδιαι δοχηι και αρετηι — kaleō Christ called Peter and all other Christians. [source]
By his own glory and virtue [ιδιος]
So B K L, but Aleph A C P read αρετη — idiāi doxēi kai aretēi (either instrumental case “by” or dative “to”). Peter is fond of idios (own, 1 Peter 3:1, 1 Peter 3:5; 2 Peter 2:16, 2 Peter 2:22, etc.). “Glory” here is the manifestation of the Divine Character in Christ. For aretē see note on 1 Peter 2:9, note on Philemon 4:8, and note on 2 Peter 1:5. [source]
Hath granted [δεδωρημένης]
This is the only word which Peter and Mark alone have in common in the New Testament; a somewhat singular fact in view of their intimate relations, and of the impress of Peter upon Mark's gospel: yet it tells very strongly against the theory of a forgery of this epistle. The word is stronger than the simple δίδωμι , to give, meaning to grant or bestow as a gift. Compare Mark 15:45. [source]
Virtue []
See on 1 Peter 2:9. Used by Peter only, with the exception on Philemon 4:8. The original classical sense of the word had no special moral import, but denoted excellence of any kind - bravery, rank, nobility; also, excellence of land, animals, things, classes of persons. Paul seems to avoid the term, using it only once. On glory and virtue Bengel says, “the-DIVIDER-
former indicates his natural, the latter his moral, attributes.”-DIVIDER-
[source]

Godliness [εὐσέβειαν]
Used only by Peter (Acts 3:12), and in the Pastoral Epistles. It is from εὐ , well, and σέβομαι , to worship, so that the radical idea is worship rightly directed. Worship, however, is to be understood in its etymological sense, worth-ship, or reverence paid to worth, whether in God or man. So Wycliffe's rendering of Matthew 6:2, “that they be worshipped of men;” and “worship thy father and thy mother,” Matthew 19:19. In classical Greek the word is not confined to religion, but means also piety in the fulfilment of human relations, like the Latinpietas. Even in classical Greek, however, it is a standing word for piety in the religious sense, showing itself in right reverence; and is opposed to δυσσέβεια , ungodliness, and ἀνοσιότης , profaness. “The recognition of dependence upon the gods, the confession of human dependence, the tribute of homage which man renders in the certainty that he needs their favor - all this is εὐσέβεια , manifest in conduct and conversation, in sacrifice and prayer” (Nägelsbach, cited by Cremer). This definition may be almost literally transferred to the Christian word. It embraces the confession of the one living and true God, and life corresponding to this knowledge. See on 2 Peter 1:2. [source]
Called [καλέσαντος]
Also used of the divine invitation, 1 Peter 2:9, 1 Peter 2:21; 1 Peter 3:9; 1 Peter 5:10. [source]
To glory and virtue [ἰδίᾳ δόξῃ καὶ ἀρετῇ]
Lit., and properly, by his own glory and virtue, though some read διὰ δόξης καὶ ἀρετῆς , through glory and virtue. Rev. adopts the former. The meaning is much the same in either case. [source]
His own [ἰδίᾳ]
Of frequent occurrence in Peter, and not necessarily with an emphatic force, since the adjective is sometimes used merely as a possessive pronoun, and mostly so in Peter (1 Peter 3:1, 1 Peter 3:5; 2 Peter 2:16, 2 Peter 2:22, etc.). [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for 2 Peter 1:3

John 9:31 A worshipper of God [θεοσεβὴς]
Only here in the New Testament. The kindred word, θεοσέβεια , godliness, occurs only at 1 Timothy 2:10. Compounded with Θεός , God, and σέβομαι , to worship, the same verb which appears in εὐσεβής , devout (Acts 10:2, Acts 10:7; Acts 22:12), and εὐσέβεια , godliness (Acts 3:12; 1 Timothy 2:2, etc.). See on 2 Peter 1:3. These two latter words, while they may mean reverence toward God, may also mean the due fulfillment of human relations; while θεοσεβὴς , worshipper of God, is limited to piety towards God. [source]
Acts 10:2 Devout [εὐσεβὴς]
See on godliness, 2 Peter 1:3. [source]
Romans 3:23 The glory of God [τῆς δόξης τοῦ Θεοῦ]
Interpretations vary greatly. The glory of personal righteousness; that righteousness which God judges to be glory; the image of God in man; the glorying or boasting of righteousness before God; the approbation of God; the state of future glory. The dominant meanings of δόξα in classical Greek are notion, opinion, conjecture, repute. See on Revelation 1:6. In biblical usage: 1. Recognition, honor, Philemon 1:11; 1 Peter 1:7. It is joined with τιμή honor 1 Timothy 1:17; Hebrews 2:7, Hebrews 2:9; 2 Peter 1:17. Opposed to ἀτιμὶα dishonor 1 Corinthians 11:14, 1 Corinthians 11:15; 1 Corinthians 15:43; 2 Corinthians 6:8. With ζητέω toseek, 1 Thessalonians 2:6; John 5:44; John 7:18. With λαμβάνω toreceive, John 5:41, John 5:44. With δίδωμι togive, Luke 17:18; John 9:24. In the ascriptive phrase glory be to, Luke 2:14, and ascriptions in the Epistles. Compare Luke 14:10. 2. The glorious appearance which attracts the eye, Matthew 4:8; Luke 4:6; Luke 12:27. Hence parallel with εἰκών image μορφή form ὁμοίωμα likeness εἶδος appearancefigure, Romans 1:23; Psalm 17:15; Numbers 12:8. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The glory of God is used of the aggregate of the divine attributes and coincides with His self-revelation, Exodus 33:22; compare πρόσωπον face Exodus 33:23. Hence the idea is prominent in the redemptive revelation (Isaiah 60:3; Romans 6:4; Romans 5:2). It expresses the form in which God reveals Himself in the economy of salvation (Romans 9:23; 1 Timothy 1:11; Ephesians 1:12). It is the means by which the redemptive work is carried on; for instance, in calling, 2 Peter 1:3; in raising up Christ and believers with Him to newness of life, Romans 6:4; in imparting strength to believers, Ephesians 3:16; Colossians 1:11; as the goal of Christian hope, Romans 5:2; Romans 8:18, Romans 8:21; Titus 2:13. It appears prominently in the work of Christ - the outraying of the Father's glory (Hebrews 1:3), especially in John. See John 1:14; John 2:11, etc. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The sense of the phrase here is: they are coming short of the honor or approbation which God bestows. The point under discussion is the want of righteousness. Unbelievers, or mere legalists, do not approve themselves before God by the righteousness which is of the law. They come short of the approbation which is extended only to those who are justified by faith. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
[source]

Romans 1:18 Ungodliness and unrighteousness [ἀσέβειαν καὶ ἀδικίαν]
Irreligiousness and immorality. See on godliness, 2 Peter 1:3; also 2 Peter 2:13. [source]
Galatians 1:6 Him that called [τοῦ καλέσαντος]
God. Not neuter and referring to the gospel. Calling, in the writings of the apostles, is habitually represented as God's work. See Romans 8:30; Romans 9:11; 1 Corinthians 1:9; Galatians 1:15; 1 Thessalonians 2:12; 1 Peter 1:15; 1 Peter 2:9; 2 Peter 1:3. [source]
Philippians 4:8 Virtue [ἀρετὴ]
With this exception the word occurs only in Peter's epistles; 1 Peter 2:9(note); 2 Peter 1:3, 2 Peter 1:5(note). [source]
Philippians 4:8 Virtue [αρετη]
Old word, possibly from αρεσκω — areskō to please, used very often in a variety of senses by the ancients for any mental excellence or moral quality or physical power. Its very vagueness perhaps explains its rarity in the N.T., only four times (Phlippians 4:8; 1 Peter 2:9; 2 Peter 1:3, 2 Peter 1:5). It is common in the papyri, but probably Paul is using it in the sense found in the lxx (Isa 42:12; 43:21) of God‘s splendour and might (Deissmann, Bible Studies, p. 95) in connection with “praise” Present middle imperative for habit of thought. We are responsible for our thoughts and can hold them to high and holy ideals. [source]
Philippians 4:8 Whatsoever [οσα]
Thus he introduces six adjectives picturing Christian ideals, old-fashioned and familiar words not necessarily from any philosophic list of moral excellencies Stoic or otherwise. Without these no ideals can exist. They are pertinent now when so much filth is flaunted before the world in books, magazines and moving-pictures under the name of realism (the slime of the gutter and the cess-pool). Honourable (σεμνα — semna). Old word from σεβω — sebō to worship, revere. So revered, venerated (1 Timothy 3:8). Pure Old word for all sorts of purity. There are clean things, thoughts, words, deeds. Lovely (προσπιλη — prosphilē). Old word, here only in N.T., from προς — pros and πιλεω — phileō pleasing, winsome. Of good report Paul changes the construction from οσα — hosa (whatsoever) to a condition of the first class, as in Phlippians 2:1, with two substantives. Virtue Old word, possibly from αρεσκω — areskō to please, used very often in a variety of senses by the ancients for any mental excellence or moral quality or physical power. Its very vagueness perhaps explains its rarity in the N.T., only four times (Phlippians 4:8; 1 Peter 2:9; 2 Peter 1:3, 2 Peter 1:5). It is common in the papyri, but probably Paul is using it in the sense found in the lxx (Isa 42:12; 43:21) of God‘s splendour and might (Deissmann, Bible Studies, p. 95) in connection with “praise” Present middle imperative for habit of thought. We are responsible for our thoughts and can hold them to high and holy ideals. [source]
Philippians 4:8 Pure [αγνα]
Old word for all sorts of purity. There are clean things, thoughts, words, deeds. Lovely (προσπιλη — prosphilē). Old word, here only in N.T., from προς — pros and πιλεω — phileō pleasing, winsome. Of good report Paul changes the construction from οσα — hosa (whatsoever) to a condition of the first class, as in Phlippians 2:1, with two substantives. Virtue Old word, possibly from αρεσκω — areskō to please, used very often in a variety of senses by the ancients for any mental excellence or moral quality or physical power. Its very vagueness perhaps explains its rarity in the N.T., only four times (Phlippians 4:8; 1 Peter 2:9; 2 Peter 1:3, 2 Peter 1:5). It is common in the papyri, but probably Paul is using it in the sense found in the lxx (Isa 42:12; 43:21) of God‘s splendour and might (Deissmann, Bible Studies, p. 95) in connection with “praise” Present middle imperative for habit of thought. We are responsible for our thoughts and can hold them to high and holy ideals. [source]
Philippians 4:8 Of good report [ευπημα]
Paul changes the construction from οσα — hosa (whatsoever) to a condition of the first class, as in Phlippians 2:1, with two substantives. Virtue Old word, possibly from αρεσκω — areskō to please, used very often in a variety of senses by the ancients for any mental excellence or moral quality or physical power. Its very vagueness perhaps explains its rarity in the N.T., only four times (Phlippians 4:8; 1 Peter 2:9; 2 Peter 1:3, 2 Peter 1:5). It is common in the papyri, but probably Paul is using it in the sense found in the lxx (Isa 42:12; 43:21) of God‘s splendour and might (Deissmann, Bible Studies, p. 95) in connection with “praise” Present middle imperative for habit of thought. We are responsible for our thoughts and can hold them to high and holy ideals. [source]
1 Thessalonians 2:12 Worthy of God [ἀξίως θεοῦ]
Better worthily. For ἀξίως comp. lxx, Wisd. 7:15; 16:1; Luke href="/desk/?q=lu+6:20&sr=1">Luke 6:20. Δόξα gloryis not used in N.T. in its primary, classical sense of opinion or notion. It signifies reputation, John 12:43; Romans 2:7, Romans 2:10: brightness or splendor, Acts 22:11; Romans 9:4; 1 Corinthians 15:40. Glory of God expresses the sum total of the divine perfections. The idea is prominent in redemptive revelation: see Isaiah 60:1; Romans 5:2; Romans 6:4. It expresses the form in which God reveals himself in the economy of salvation: see Romans 9:23; Ephesians 1:12; 1 Timothy 1:11. It is the means by which the redemptive work is carried on: see 2 Peter 1:3; Romans 6:4; Ephesians 3:16; Colossians 1:11. It is the goal of Christian hope: see Romans 5:2; Romans 8:18, Romans 8:21; Titus 2:13. [source]
1 Timothy 1:9 Ungodly - sinners [ἀσεβέσι - ἁμαρτωλοῖς]
The same collocation in 1 Peter 4:18; Judges 1:15. See on godliness, 2 Peter 1:3. [source]
1 Peter 2:9 The excellencies [τα μεγαλεια του τεου]
From Isaiah 43:21. Old word for any preeminence (moral, intellectual, military), often for “virtue,” but not in that sense in the O.T. or the N.T. The word has the sense of moral worth in 2 Peter 1:3, 2 Peter 1:5; Philemon 4:8; and the Apocrypha. In Isaiah (here quoted) it means praise and glory to God. So also Isaiah 42:12. See Acts 2:11 σκοτους — ta megaleia tou theou (the mighty works of God). [source]
1 Peter 2:9 An elect race [γενος εκλεκτον]
From Isaiah 43:20. The blood relation of the spiritual Israel (not the Jewish race) through the new birth (1 Peter 1:23).A royal priesthood (βασιλειον ιερατευμα — basileion hierateuma). From Exodus 19:6 (cf. Revelation 1:6; Revelation 5:10). The official in Christian churches is πρεσβυτεροσεπισχοπος — presbuteros =ιερευς — episcopos not ιερεις — hiereus We are all ετνος αγιον — hiereis (priests). Cf. 1 Peter 2:5.A holy nation Also from Exodus 19:6, but here applied, not to the national Israel, but to the spiritual Israel of believers (both Jews and Gentiles).A people for God‘s own possession (λαος περιουσιος — laos eis peripoiēsin). The idea here occurs in Exodus 19:5; Deuteronomy 7:6; Deuteronomy 14:2; Deuteronomy 26:18, where we have εις περιποιησιν — laos periousios as in Titus 2:14 (alone in the N.T.), and in Malachi 3:17 we find Περιουσιος λαος — eis peripoiēsin (for a possession). περιποιησις — Periousios laos is a people over and above the others and περιεποιησατο — peripoiēsis is a possession in a special sense (Ephesians 1:14). See Paul‘s use of οπως εχαγγειλητε — periepoiēsato in Acts 20:28. The old rendering, “a peculiar people,” had this idea of possession, for “peculiar” is from pecus (Latin for flock).That ye may shew forth Purpose clause with ινα — hopōs rather than εχαγγελλω — hina with the first aorist active subjunctive of τας αρετας — exaggellō old verb, to tell out, here alone in N.T.The excellencies (τα μεγαλεια του τεου — tas aretas). From Isaiah 43:21. Old word for any preeminence (moral, intellectual, military), often for “virtue,” but not in that sense in the O.T. or the N.T. The word has the sense of moral worth in 2 Peter 1:3, 2 Peter 1:5; Philemon 4:8; and the Apocrypha. In Isaiah (here quoted) it means praise and glory to God. So also Isaiah 42:12. See Acts 2:11 σκοτους — ta megaleia tou theou (the mighty works of God).Darkness Heathenism.His marvellous light (ταυμαστον — to thaumaston autou phōs). Christianity. For ταυμαζω — thaumaston (from thaumazō) see Matthew 21:42. For the change from heathenism to Christianity see Colossians 1:12; Ephesians 5:8-14. [source]
1 Peter 2:9 A holy nation [λαος εις περιποιησιν]
Also from Exodus 19:6, but here applied, not to the national Israel, but to the spiritual Israel of believers (both Jews and Gentiles).A people for God‘s own possession (λαος περιουσιος — laos eis peripoiēsin). The idea here occurs in Exodus 19:5; Deuteronomy 7:6; Deuteronomy 14:2; Deuteronomy 26:18, where we have εις περιποιησιν — laos periousios as in Titus 2:14 (alone in the N.T.), and in Malachi 3:17 we find Περιουσιος λαος — eis peripoiēsin (for a possession). περιποιησις — Periousios laos is a people over and above the others and περιεποιησατο — peripoiēsis is a possession in a special sense (Ephesians 1:14). See Paul‘s use of οπως εχαγγειλητε — periepoiēsato in Acts 20:28. The old rendering, “a peculiar people,” had this idea of possession, for “peculiar” is from pecus (Latin for flock).That ye may shew forth Purpose clause with ινα — hopōs rather than εχαγγελλω — hina with the first aorist active subjunctive of τας αρετας — exaggellō old verb, to tell out, here alone in N.T.The excellencies (τα μεγαλεια του τεου — tas aretas). From Isaiah 43:21. Old word for any preeminence (moral, intellectual, military), often for “virtue,” but not in that sense in the O.T. or the N.T. The word has the sense of moral worth in 2 Peter 1:3, 2 Peter 1:5; Philemon 4:8; and the Apocrypha. In Isaiah (here quoted) it means praise and glory to God. So also Isaiah 42:12. See Acts 2:11 σκοτους — ta megaleia tou theou (the mighty works of God).Darkness Heathenism.His marvellous light (ταυμαστον — to thaumaston autou phōs). Christianity. For ταυμαζω — thaumaston (from thaumazō) see Matthew 21:42. For the change from heathenism to Christianity see Colossians 1:12; Ephesians 5:8-14. [source]
1 Peter 2:9 That ye may shew forth [οπως]
Purpose clause with ινα — hopōs rather than εχαγγελλω — hina with the first aorist active subjunctive of τας αρετας — exaggellō old verb, to tell out, here alone in N.T.The excellencies (τα μεγαλεια του τεου — tas aretas). From Isaiah 43:21. Old word for any preeminence (moral, intellectual, military), often for “virtue,” but not in that sense in the O.T. or the N.T. The word has the sense of moral worth in 2 Peter 1:3, 2 Peter 1:5; Philemon 4:8; and the Apocrypha. In Isaiah (here quoted) it means praise and glory to God. So also Isaiah 42:12. See Acts 2:11 σκοτους — ta megaleia tou theou (the mighty works of God).Darkness Heathenism.His marvellous light (ταυμαστον — to thaumaston autou phōs). Christianity. For ταυμαζω — thaumaston (from thaumazō) see Matthew 21:42. For the change from heathenism to Christianity see Colossians 1:12; Ephesians 5:8-14. [source]
2 Peter 3:11 Godliness [εὐσεβείαις]
See on 2 Peter 1:3. Both words are plural; holy livings and godlinesses. [source]
2 Peter 1:6 Godliness []
See on 2 Peter 1:3. The quality is never ascribed to God. [source]
2 Peter 1:5 Virtue []
See on 2 Peter 1:3, and 1 Peter 2:9. Not in the sense of moral excellence, but of the energy which Christians are to exhibit, as God exerts his energy upon them. As God calls us by his own virtue (2 Peter 1:3), so Christians are to exhibit virtue or energy in the exercise of their faith, translating it into vigorous action. [source]
2 Peter 1:4 Are given [δεδώρηται]
Middle voice; not passive, as A. V. Hence Rev., correctly, he hath granted. See on 2 Peter 1:3. [source]
2 Peter 1:4 Whereby [δἰ ὧν]
Lit., through which; viz., his glory and virtue. Note the three occurrences of διά , through, in 2 Peter 1:3, 2 Peter 1:4. [source]
2 Peter 1:20 Private [ἰδίας]
See on 2 Peter 1:3. His own. Rev., special, in margin. [source]
2 Peter 1:5 All diligence [σπευδω]
Old word from πασαν σπουδην — speudō to hasten (Luke 19:5.). This phrase (ποιουμενος — pāsan spoudēn) occurs in Judges 1:3 with ισπερεσται — poioumenos and on the inscription in Stratonicea (2 Peter 1:3) with εν τηι πιστει υμων — ispheresthai (certainly a curious coincidence, to say the least, though common in the Koiné). [source]
2 Peter 1:5 Virtue [γνωσιν]
Moral power, moral energy, vigor of soul (Bengel). See 2 Peter 1:3.Knowledge (gnōsin). Insight, understanding (1 Corinthians 16:18; John 15:15). [source]
2 Peter 1:6 Patience [την υπομονην]
For which see James 1:3.Godliness (την ευσεβειαν — tēn eusebeian). For which see 2 Peter 1:3. [source]
2 Peter 1:6 Godliness [την ευσεβειαν]
For which see 2 Peter 1:3. [source]
2 Peter 1:2 In the knowledge [εν επιγνωσει]
Full (additional, επι — epi) knowledge as in 2 Peter 1:8 (only γνωσις — gnōsis in 2 Peter 1:5, 2 Peter 1:6; 2 Peter 3:18), but επιγνωσιν — epignōsin again in 2 Peter 1:3, 2 Peter 1:8; 2 Peter 2:20. As in Colossians, so here full knowledge is urged against the claims of the Gnostic heretics to special γνωσις — gnōsis God and of Jesus our Lord At first sight the idiom here seems to require one person as in 2 Peter 1:1, though there is a second article (του — tou) before κυριου — kuriou and Ιησου — Iēsou is a proper name. But the text here is very uncertain. Bengel, Spitta, Zahn, Nestle accept the short reading of P and some Vulgate MSS. and some minuscles with only του κυριου ημων — tou kuriou hēmōn (our Lord) from which the three other readings may have come. Elsewhere in 2 Peter γνωσις — gnōsis and επιγνωσις — epignōsis are used of Christ alone. The text of 2 Peter is not in a good state of preservation. [source]
2 Peter 1:3 Seeing that his divine power hath granted unto us [ως ημιν της τειας δυναμεως αυτου δεδωρημενης]
Genitive absolute with the causal particle ως — hōs and the perfect middle participle of δωρεω — dōreō old verb, to bestow Τειος — Theios (from τεος — theos) is an old adjective in N.T. here and 2 Peter 1:4 only, except Acts 17:29, where Paul uses το τειον — to theion for deity, thus adapting his language to his audience as the papyri and inscriptions show. The use of τειος — theios with an imperial connotation is very common in the papyri and the inscriptions. Deissmann (Bible Studies, pp. 360-368) has shown the singular linguistic likeness between 2 Peter 1:3-11 and a remarkable inscription of the inhabitants of Stratonicea in Caria to Zeus Panhemerios and Hecate dated a.d. 22 (in full in C I H ii No. 2715 a b). One of the likenesses is the use of της τειας δυναμεως — tēs theias dunameōs Peter may have read this inscription (cf. Paul in Athens) or he may have used “the familiar forms and formulae of religious emotion” (Deissmann), “the official liturgical language of Asia Minor.” Peter is fond of δυναμις — dunamis in this Epistle, and the δυναμις — dunamis of Christ “is the sword which St. Peter holds over the head of the False Teachers” (Bigg). [source]
2 Peter 1:4 He hath granted [δεδωρηται]
Perfect middle indicative of δωρεω — dōreō for which see 2 Peter 1:3.His precious and exceeding great promises (τα τιμια και μεγιστα επαγγελματα — ta timia kai megista epaggelmata). Επαγγελμα — Epaggelma is an old word (from επαγγελλω — epaggellō) in place of the common επαγγελια — epaggelia in N.T. only here and 2 Peter 3:13. Τιμιος — Timios (precious, from τιμη — timē value), three times by Peter (1 Peter 1:7 of faith; 1 Peter 1:19 of the blood of Christ; 2 Peter 1:4 of Christ‘s promises). Μεγιστα — Megista is the elative superlative used along with a positive adjective (τιμια — timia).That ye may become Purpose clause with ινα — hina and second aorist middle subjunctive of γινομαι — ginomai these The promises.Partakers (κοινωνοι — koinōnoi). Partners, sharers in, for which word see 1 Peter 5:1.Of the divine nature This phrase, like το τειον — to theion in Acts 17:29, “belongs rather to Hellenism than to the Bible” (Bigg). It is a Stoic phrase, but not with the Stoic meaning. Peter is referring to the new birth as 1 Peter 1:23 The same phrase occurs in an inscription possibly under the influence of Mithraism (Moulton and Milligan‘s Vocabulary).Having escaped (αποπυγοντες — apophugontes). Second aorist active participle of αποπευγω — apopheugō old compound verb, in N.T. only here and 2 Peter 2:18-20, with the ablative here (πτορας — phthorās old word from πτειρω — phtheirō moral decay as in 2 Peter 2:12) and the accusative there.By lust Caused by, consisting in, lust. “Man becomes either regenerate or degenerate” (Strachan). [source]
2 Peter 1:5 Adding on your part [παρεισπερω]
First aorist active participle of εισπερω — pareispherō old double compound, to bring in Old word from πασαν σπουδην — speudō to hasten (Luke 19:5.). This phrase (ποιουμενος — pāsan spoudēn) occurs in Judges 1:3 with ισπερεσται — poioumenos and on the inscription in Stratonicea (2 Peter 1:3) with εν τηι πιστει υμων — ispheresthai (certainly a curious coincidence, to say the least, though common in the Koiné).In your faith Faith or αγαπη — pistis (strong conviction as in Hebrews 11:1, Hebrews 11:3, the root of the Christian life Ephesians 2:8) is the foundation which goes through various steps up to love See similar lists in James 1:3; 1 Thessalonians 1:3; 2 Thessalonians 1:3.; Galatians 5:22.; Romans 5:3.; Romans 8:29. Hermas (Vis. iii. 8. 1-7) has a list called “daughters” of one another. Note the use of επιχορηγησατε — en (in, on) with each step.Supply (επιχορηγεω — epichorēgēsate). First aorist active imperative of επι — epichorēgeō late and rare double compound verb (χορηγεω — epi and χορηγος — chorēgeō 1 Peter 4:11 from χορος — chorēgos chorus-leader, ηγεομαι — choros and αρετην — hēgeomai to lead), to fit out the chorus with additional (complete) supplies. Both compound and simplex (more common) occur in the papyri. In 2 Peter 1:11 and already in 2 Corinthians 9:10; Galatians 3:5; Colossians 2:19.Virtue Moral power, moral energy, vigor of soul (Bengel). See 2 Peter 1:3.Knowledge (gnōsin). Insight, understanding (1 Corinthians 16:18; John 15:15). [source]
2 Peter 1:5 In your faith [πιστις]
Faith or αγαπη — pistis (strong conviction as in Hebrews 11:1, Hebrews 11:3, the root of the Christian life Ephesians 2:8) is the foundation which goes through various steps up to love See similar lists in James 1:3; 1 Thessalonians 1:3; 2 Thessalonians 1:3.; Galatians 5:22.; Romans 5:3.; Romans 8:29. Hermas (Vis. iii. 8. 1-7) has a list called “daughters” of one another. Note the use of επιχορηγησατε — en (in, on) with each step.Supply (επιχορηγεω — epichorēgēsate). First aorist active imperative of επι — epichorēgeō late and rare double compound verb (χορηγεω — epi and χορηγος — chorēgeō 1 Peter 4:11 from χορος — chorēgos chorus-leader, ηγεομαι — choros and αρετην — hēgeomai to lead), to fit out the chorus with additional (complete) supplies. Both compound and simplex (more common) occur in the papyri. In 2 Peter 1:11 and already in 2 Corinthians 9:10; Galatians 3:5; Colossians 2:19.Virtue Moral power, moral energy, vigor of soul (Bengel). See 2 Peter 1:3.Knowledge (gnōsin). Insight, understanding (1 Corinthians 16:18; John 15:15). [source]

What do the individual words in 2 Peter 1:3 mean?

Accordingly - all things to us the divine power of Him - toward life and godliness has given through knowledge of the [One] having called us [by His] own glory excellence
Ὡς 〈τὰ〉 πάντα ἡμῖν τῆς θείας δυνάμεως αὐτοῦ τὰ πρὸς ζωὴν καὶ εὐσέβειαν δεδωρημένης διὰ ἐπιγνώσεως τοῦ καλέσαντος ἡμᾶς ἰδίᾳ δόξῃ ἀρετῇ

Ὡς  Accordingly 
Parse: Adverb
Root: ὡς 
Sense: as, like, even as, etc.
〈τὰ〉  - 
Parse: Article, Nominative Neuter Plural
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
πάντα  all  things 
Parse: Adjective, Accusative Neuter Plural
Root: πᾶς  
Sense: individually.
ἡμῖν  to  us 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Dative 1st Person Plural
Root: ἐγώ  
Sense: I, me, my.
θείας  divine 
Parse: Adjective, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root: θεῖος  
Sense: a general name of deities or divinities as used by the Greeks.
δυνάμεως  power 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root: δύναμις  
Sense: strength power, ability.
αὐτοῦ  of  Him 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Root: αὐτός  
Sense: himself, herself, themselves, itself.
τὰ  - 
Parse: Article, Accusative Neuter Plural
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
πρὸς  toward 
Parse: Preposition
Root: πρός  
Sense: to the advantage of.
ζωὴν  life 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: ζωή  
Sense: life.
εὐσέβειαν  godliness 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: εὐσέβεια  
Sense: reverence, respect.
δεδωρημένης  has  given 
Parse: Verb, Perfect Participle Middle or Passive, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root: δωρέομαι  
Sense: to present, bestow.
διὰ  through 
Parse: Preposition
Root: διά  
Sense: through.
ἐπιγνώσεως  knowledge 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root: ἐπίγνωσις  
Sense: precise and correct knowledge.
τοῦ  of  the  [One] 
Parse: Article, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
καλέσαντος  having  called 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Participle Active, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: καλέω  
Sense: to call.
ἡμᾶς  us 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Accusative 1st Person Plural
Root: ἐγώ  
Sense: I, me, my.
ἰδίᾳ  [by  His]  own 
Parse: Adjective, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: ἴδιος  
Sense: pertaining to one’s self, one’s own, belonging to one’s self.
δόξῃ  glory 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: δόξα  
Sense: opinion, judgment, view.
ἀρετῇ  excellence 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: ἀρετή  
Sense: a virtuous course of thought, feeling and action.