The Meaning of 1 John 3:2 Explained

1 John 3:2

KJV: Beloved, now are we the sons of God, and it doth not yet appear what we shall be: but we know that, when he shall appear, we shall be like him; for we shall see him as he is.

YLT: beloved, now, children of God are we, and it was not yet manifested what we shall be, and we have known that if he may be manifested, like him we shall be, because we shall see him as he is;

Darby: Beloved, now are we children of God, and what we shall be has not yet been manifested; we know that if it is manifested we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is.

ASV: Beloved, now are we children of God, and it is not yet made manifest what we shall be. We know that, if he shall be manifested, we shall be like him; for we shall see him even as he is.

What does 1 John 3:2 Mean?

Verse Meaning

Even though we are presently God"s children we do not yet fully reflect His image as we shall. However when (not "if," another third class condition) Jesus Christ appears and we see Him, we shall experience full transformation (i.e, glorification). Evidently seeing Jesus Christ will fully transform us physically and spiritually (cf. 1 Corinthians 13:12).
"A child of God is here and now, indeed, like a diamond that is crystal white within but is still uncut and shows no brilliant flashes from reflected facets." [1]
"He will not be anything essentially different hereafter, but he will be what he is now essentially more completely, though in ways wholly beyond our powers of imagination." [2]
John"s references to the appearing in 1 John 2:28 and 1 John 3:2 frame his references to the new birth in 1 John 2:29 and 1 John 3:1. Every true Christian will participate in this appearing.

Context Summary

1 John 3:1-12 - The Marks Of God's Children
This chapter opens with one of the astounding announcements of Scripture. Why God should have made us His children is incomprehensible, except to show forth the riches of His grace. See Ephesians 2:7. That such we are is certain, but how marvelous! Yet even greater wonders await us, for we are to be like Jesus our Lord. He is the type to which we are being conformed, and on the other side we shall awake in His likeness.
He is pure; such is the verdict of one who lived in the closest possible association with Him. We cannot think of Christ, or of the future to be spent with Him, without desiring purity above all. Ask Him to become in thee the fountain of purity! If He is thy constant study, the quality of His character will become thine. Presumptuous sin is impossible under such conditions. He will destroy the works of the devil in the individual and in the universe. That we are God's own children is proved by our integrity and love. They are the hallmark of God's ownership. [source]

Chapter Summary: 1 John 3

1  He declares the singular love of God toward us, in making us his sons;
3  who therefore ought obediently to keep his commandments;
11  as also to love one another as brothers

Greek Commentary for 1 John 3:2

Now [νυν]
Without waiting for the παρουσια — parousia or second coming. We have a present dignity and duty, though there is greater glory to come. [source]
It is not yet made manifest [ουπω επανερωτη]
First aorist passive indicative of πανεροω — phaneroō For the aorist indicative with ουπω — oupō with a future outlook Brooke notes Mark 11:2; 1 Corinthians 8:2; Hebrews 12:4; Revelation 17:10, Revelation 17:12.What we shall be (τι εσομετα — ti esometha). Not τινες — tines (who), but τι — ti (what) neuter singular predicate nominative. “This what suggests something unspeakable, contained in the likeness of God” (Bengel).If he shall be manifested As in 1 John 2:28, which see. The subject may be Christ as in 1 John 3:9, or the future manifestation just mentioned. Either makes sense, probably “it” here better than “he.”Like him (ομοιοι αυτωι — homoioi autōi). Αυτωι — Autōi is associative instrumental case after ομοιοι — homoioi This is our destiny and glory (Romans 8:29), to be like Jesus who is like God (2 Corinthians 4:6).We shall see him even as he is Future middle indicative of οραω — horaō The transforming power of this vision of Christ (1 Corinthians 13:12) is the consummation of the glorious process begun at the new birth (2 Corinthians 3:18). [source]
What we shall be [τι εσομετα]
Not τινες — tines (who), but τι — ti (what) neuter singular predicate nominative. “This what suggests something unspeakable, contained in the likeness of God” (Bengel). [source]
If he shall be manifested [εαν πανερωτηι]
As in 1 John 2:28, which see. The subject may be Christ as in 1 John 3:9, or the future manifestation just mentioned. Either makes sense, probably “it” here better than “he.”Like him (ομοιοι αυτωι — homoioi autōi). Αυτωι — Autōi is associative instrumental case after ομοιοι — homoioi This is our destiny and glory (Romans 8:29), to be like Jesus who is like God (2 Corinthians 4:6).We shall see him even as he is Future middle indicative of οραω — horaō The transforming power of this vision of Christ (1 Corinthians 13:12) is the consummation of the glorious process begun at the new birth (2 Corinthians 3:18). [source]
Like him [ομοιοι αυτωι]
Αυτωι — Autōi is associative instrumental case after ομοιοι — homoioi This is our destiny and glory (Romans 8:29), to be like Jesus who is like God (2 Corinthians 4:6). [source]
We shall see him even as he is [οπσομετα αυτον κατως εστιν]
Future middle indicative of οραω — horaō The transforming power of this vision of Christ (1 Corinthians 13:12) is the consummation of the glorious process begun at the new birth (2 Corinthians 3:18). [source]
Beloved []
See 1 John 2:7. [source]
As He is [καθώς ἐστιν]
Strictly, just as. Rev., even as.“As long as the festivityOf Paradise shall be, so long our love Shall radiate round about us such a vesture. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Its brightness is proportioned to the ardor,-DIVIDER-
The ardor to the vision; and the vision-DIVIDER-
Equals what grace it has above its worth.Dante, “Paradiso,” iv., 37-42. [source]

Now are we and, etc. []
The two thoughts of the present and the future condition of God's children are placed side by side with the simple copula, and, as parts of one thought. Christian condition, now and eternally, centers in the fact of being children of God. In that fact lies the germ of all the possibilities of eternal life. [source]
It doth not yet appear [οὔπω ἐφανερώθη]
Rev., more correctly, it is not yet made manifest. See on John 21:1. The force of the aorist tense is, was never manifested on any occasion. [source]
What we shall be [τί ἐσόμεθα]
“This what suggests something unspeakable, contained in the likeness of God” (Bengel). [source]
But we know []
Omit but. [source]
When He shall appear [ἐὰν φανερωθῇ]
Rev., correctly, if He (or it ) shall be manifested. We may render either “if it shall be manifested,” that is what we shall be; or, “if He,” etc. The preceding ἐφανερώθη itis (not yet) made manifest, must, I think, decide us in favor of the rendering it. We are now children of God. It has not been revealed what we shall be, and therefore we do not know. In the absence of such revelation, we know (through our consciousness of childship, through His promise that we shall behold His glory), that if what we shall be were manifested, the essential fact of the glorified condition thus revealed will be likeness to the Lord. This fact we know now as a promise, as a general truth of our future state. The condition of realizing the fact is the manifestation of that glorified state, the revealing of the τί ἐσόμεθα whatwe shall be; for that manifestation will bring with it the open vision of the Lord. When the what we shall be shall be manifest, it will bring us face to face with Him, and we shall be like Him because we shall see Him as He is. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for 1 John 3:2

Matthew 17:2 He was transfigured [μετεμορφώθη]
μετά , denoting change or transfer, and μορφή , form. This latter word denotes the form regarded as the distinctive nature and character of the object, and is distinguished from σχῆμα , the changeable, outward fashion: in a man, for instance, his gestures, clothes, words, acts. The μορφή partakes of the essence of a thing; the σχῆμα is an accident which may change, leaving the form unaffected. Compare Mark 16:12; Christ “appeared in another form ” ( μορφή )and 1 Corinthians 7:31: “the fashion ( σχῆμα ) of the world passeth away.” The distinction passes into the verbs compounded with these two nouns. Thus, Romans 12:2, “Be not conformed to this world,” is μὴ συσχηματίζεσθε ;i.e., be not fashioned according to the fleetingfashion of this world. So Rev.,fashioned. See, also, 2 Corinthians 11:13, 2 Corinthians 11:14, 2 Corinthians 11:15, where the changes described are changes in outward semblance. False apostles appeared in the outward fashion of apostles of Christ; Satan takes on the outward appearance of an angel. All these changes are in the accidents of the life, and do not touch its inner, essential quality. On the other hand, a change in the inner life is described as a change of μορθή , never of σχῆμα . Hence, Romans 12:2, “Be ye transformed ( μεταμορφοῦσθε )the change taking place by the renewing of the mind. Compare Romans 8:29; 2 Corinthians 3:18; Philemon 3:21; and see, further, on Philemon 2:6, Philemon 2:7. Why, then, it may be asked, is a compound of μορφή employed in this description of the transfigured Saviour, since the change described is a change in his outward appearance? It may be answered, because a compound of σχῆμα , expressing merely a change in the aspect of Christ's person and garments, would not express the deeper truth of the case, which is, that the visible change gets its real character and meaning from that which is essential in our Lord - his divine nature. A fore-shadowing or prophecy of his true form - his distinctive character - comes out in his transfiguration. He passes over into a form identified, so far as revealed, with the divine quality of his being, and prophetic of his revelation “as he is” (1 John 3:2), in the glory which he had with the Father before the world was (John 17:5). In truth, there is a deep and pregnant hint in the use of this word, which easily escapes observation, and which defies accurate definition. The profound and overwhelming impression upon the three disciples was due to something besides the shining of Christ's face and garments, and the presence of Moses and Elijah; and was deeper and subtler than the effect of all these combined. There was a fact and a power in that vision which mere radiance and the appearance of the dead patriarchs could not wholly convey: a revelation of Deity breaking out in that glorified face and form, which appealed to something deeper than sense, and confirmed the words from heaven: This is my beloved Son. The same truth is illustrated in the use of μορφή in Mark 16:12, where it is said that Jesus appeared in a different form ( ἐν ἑτέρᾳ μορφῇ ) after his resurrection. The accidents of figure, face, pierced hands and feet, were the same; but an indefinable change had passed upon him, the characteristic of which was that it prefigured his passing into the condition peculiar and appropriate to his essential spiritual and divine being. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
[source]

John 6:46 Hath seen []
As contrasted with hearing and learning (John 6:45). The Father is not seen immediately, but through the Son. Compare John 1:18; John 14:9; 1 John 3:2, Matthew 11:27. [source]
John 21:1 Shewed [ἐφανέρωσεν]
This rendering might easily convey merely the sense of appearing; but its meaning is much deeper. Occurring frequently in the New Testament, it is used most frequently of God and Christ, or of men in their relation to these. Thus, of Christ in person while upon earth (Mark 16:12, Mark 16:14; John 1:31; John 2:11; 1 Peter 1:20; 1 John 1:2). Of the works of Christ (John 2:11; John 9:3; 1 John 3:5). Of Christ in redemption (1 John 3:5). Of Christ in His second coming (1 John 2:28). Of Christ in glory (1 John 3:2; Colossians 3:4). It is used of God. Of His revelation to men of the knowledge of Himself (Romans 1:19). Of His manifestation in Christ (1 Timothy 3:16). Of His righteousness (Romans 3:21). Of His love (1 John 4:9). It is used of men. As epistles manifesting the character and spirit of Christ (2 Corinthians 3:3; 2 Corinthians 5:11). In the judgment (2 Corinthians 5:10). In all these cases the appearing is not merely an appeal to sense, but is addressed to spiritual perception, and contemplates a moral and spiritual effect. It is the setting forth of the law or will or character of God; of the person or work of Christ; of the character or deeds of men, with a view to the disclosure of their quality and to the producing of a moral impression. Rev., manifested. [source]
John 16:30 By this [ἐν τούτῳ]
Literally, in this. Compare 1 John 2:3, 1 John 2:5; 1 John 3:16, 1 John 3:19, 1 John 3:24; 1 John 4:9, 1 John 4:10, 1 John 4:13, 1 John 4:17; 1 John 5:2. [source]
John 13:34 Commandment [ἐντολὴν]
The word for a single commandment or injunction, but used also for the whole body of the moral precepts of Christianity. See 1 Timothy 6:14; 2 Peter 2:21; 2 Peter 3:2. See also on James 2:8. This new commandment embodies the essential principle of the whole law. Compare also 1 John 3:23. Some interpreters instead of taking that ye love one another, etc., as the definition of the commandment, explain the commandment as referring to the ordinance of the Holy Communion, and render, “a new commandment (to observe this ordinance) I give unto you, in order that ye love one another.” It is, however, more than improbable, and contrary to usage, that the Holy Supper should be spoken of as ἐντολὴ acommandment. [source]
John 17:3 Might know [γινώσκωσι]
Might recognize or perceive. This is striking, that eternal life consists in knowledge, or rather the pursuit of knowledge, since the present tense marks a continuance, a progressive perception of God in Christ. That they might learn to know. Compare John 17:23; John 10:38; 1 John 5:20; 1 John 4:7, 1 John 4:8.“I say, the acknowledgment of God in ChristAccepted by thy reason, solves for thee All questions in the earth and out of it,-DIVIDER-
And has so far advanced thee to be wise. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Wouldst thou improve this to reprove the proved?-DIVIDER-
In life's mere minute, with power to use that proof,-DIVIDER-
Leave knowledge and revert to how it sprung?-DIVIDER-
Thou hast it; use it, and forthwith, or die. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
For this I say is death, and the sole death,-DIVIDER-
When a man's loss comes to him from his gain,-DIVIDER-
Darkness from light, from knowledge ignorance,-DIVIDER-
And lack of love from love made manifest.”Robert Browning, “A Death in the Desert.” The relation of perception of God to character is stated in 1 John 3:2, on which see note. [source]

John 16:23 Ye shall ask [ἐρωτήσετε]
Or, as Rev., in margin, ask - question. To question is the primary meaning of the verb, from which it runs into the more general sense of request, beseech. So Mark 7:26; Luke 4:38; John 17:15, etc. Here the meaning is, ye shall ask me no question (compare John 16:19, where the same verb is used). Compare Matthew 16:13; Matthew 21:24; John 1:19. Ask, absolutely, Luke 22:68. Note, moreover, the selection of the word here as marking the asking on familiar terms. See on John 11:22. Another verb for ask occurs in the following sentence: “If ye shall ask ( αἰτήστητε ) anything,” etc. Here the sense is, if ye shall make any request. Compare Matthew 5:42; Matthew 7:7, Matthew 7:9, Matthew 7:10, etc. Note, also, that this word for asking the Father marks the asking of an inferior from a superior, and is the word which Christ never uses of His own requests to the Father. Compare 1 John 3:22. [source]
John 1:12 Sons [τέκνα]
Rev., more correctly, children. Son is υἱός . Τέκνον , child ( τίκτω , to bring forth ), denotes a relation based on community of nature, while υἱός , Son, may indicate only adoption and heirship. See Galatians 4:7. Except in Revelation 21:7, which is a quotation, John never uses υἱός to describe the relation of Christians to God, since he regards their position not as a result of adoption, but of a new life. Paul, on the other hand, regards the relation from the legal standpoint, as adoption, imparting a new dignity and relation (Romans 8:15; Galatians 4:5, Galatians 4:6). See also James 1:18; 1 Peter 1:3, 1 Peter 1:23, where the point of view is John's rather than Paul's. Τέκνον , indicating the relationship of man to God, occurs in John 1:12; John 11:52; 1 John 3:1, 1 John 3:2, 1 John 3:10; 1 John 5:2, and always in the plural. [source]
John 20:30 Many other signs [πολλα αλλα σημεια]
Not only those described in the Synoptic Gospels or referred to in general statements, but many alluded to in John‘s Gospel (John 2:23; John 4:45; John 12:37). Are not written Periphrastic perfect passive indicative of γραπω — graphō do not stand written, are not described “in this book.” John has made a selection of the vast number wrought by Jesus “in the presence of the disciples” (ενωπιον των ματητων — enōpion tōn mathētōn), common idiom in Luke, not in Mark and Matthew, and by John elsewhere only in 1 John 3:22. John‘s book is written with a purpose which he states. [source]
John 6:56 Abideth in me and I in him [εν εμοι μενει καγω εν αυτωι]
Added to the phrase in John 6:54 in the place of εχει ζωην αιωνιον — echei zōēn aiōnion (has eternal life). The verb μενω — menō (to abide) expresses continual mystical fellowship between Christ and the believer as in John 15:4-7; 1 John 2:6, 1 John 2:27, 1 John 2:28; 1 John 3:6, 1 John 3:24; 1 John 4:12, 1 John 4:16. There is, of course, no reference to the Lord‘s Supper (Eucharist), but simply to mystical fellowship with Christ. [source]
John 8:29 Is with me [μετ εμου εστιν]
The Incarnation brought separation from the Father in one sense, but in essence there is complete harmony and fellowship as he had already said (John 8:16) and will expand in John 17:21-26. He hath not left me alone First aorist active indicative of απιημι — aphiēmi “He did not leave me alone.” However much the crowds and the disciples misunderstood or left Jesus, the Father always comforted and understood him (Mark 6:46; Matthew 14:23; John 6:15). That are pleasing to him This old verbal adjective, from αρεσκω — areskō to please, in N.T. only here, Acts 6:4; Acts 12:3; 1 John 3:22. The joy of Jesus was in doing the will of the Father who sent him (John 4:34). [source]
John 17:24 I will [τελω]
Perfect identity of his will with that of the Father in “this moment of spiritual exaltation” (Bernard), though in Gethsemane Jesus distinguishes between his human will and that of the Father (Mark 14:36). Where I am That is heaven, to be with Jesus (John 12:26; John 13:36; John 14:3; Romans 8:17; 2 Timothy 2:11.). That they may behold Another purpose clause with ινα — hina and the present active subjunctive of τεωρεω — theōreō “that they may keep on beholding,” the endless joy of seeing Jesus “as he is” (1 John 3:2) in heaven. Before the foundation of the world This same phrase in Ephesians 1:4; 1 Peter 1:20 and six other times we have καταβολη κοσμου — katabolē kosmou (Matthew 25:34; Luke 11:50; Hebrews 4:3; Hebrews 9:26; Revelation 13:8; Revelation 17:8). Here we find the same pre-incarnate consciousness of Christ seen in John 17:5. [source]
John 21:1 Manifested himself [επανεροσεν εαυτον]
First aorist active indicative of πανεροω — phaneroō with the reflexive pronoun (cf. John 7:4; John 13:4). For the passive see John 1:31; John 21:14. Jesus was only seen during the forty days now and then (Acts 1:3), ten instances being recorded. The word πανεροω — phaneroō is often used of Christ on earth (John 1:31; John 2:11; 1 Peter 1:20; 1 John 1:2), of his works (John 3:5), of the second coming (1 John 2:28), of Christ in glory (Colossians 3:4; 1 John 3:2). At By or upon. Of Tiberias As in John 6:1 instead of the usual “Sea of Galilee.” Tiberias, the capital city of Galilee, gave this epithet to the Sea of Galilee. This is not the appearance in Galilee prearranged by Jesus (Mark 16:7; Matthew 28:7, Matthew 28:16). [source]
Romans 8:19 Waiteth for [απεκδεχεται]
See note on 1 Corinthians 1:7; Galatians 5:5 for this rare word (possibly formed by Paul, Milligan). “To wait it out” (Thayer). The revealing of the sons of God (την αποκαλυπσιν των υιων του τεου — tēn apokalupsin tōn huiōn tou theou). Cf. 1 John 3:2; 2 Thessalonians 2:8; Colossians 3:4. This mystical sympathy of physical nature with the work of grace is beyond the comprehension of most of us. But who can disprove it? [source]
Romans 8:19 The revealing of the sons of God [την αποκαλυπσιν των υιων του τεου]
Cf. 1 John 3:2; 2 Thessalonians 2:8; Colossians 3:4. This mystical sympathy of physical nature with the work of grace is beyond the comprehension of most of us. But who can disprove it? [source]
2 Corinthians 3:18 The same image [τὴν αὐτὴν εἰκόνα]
See on Revelation 13:14. Compare especially 1 John 3:2; also Romans 8:29; John 17:24; Colossians 3:4; Romans 8:17; 1 Corinthians 15:48-53. [source]
2 Corinthians 3:18 With unveiled face [ανακεκαλυμμενωι προσωπωι]
Instrumental case of manner. Unlike and like Moses. Reflecting as in a mirror (κατοπτριζομενοι — katoptrizomenoi). Present middle participle of κατοπτριζω — katoptrizō late verb from κατοπτρον — katoptron mirror (κατα οπτρον — kataεγκατοπτρισασται εις το υδωρ — optron a thing to see with). In Philo (Legis Alleg. iii. 33) the word means beholding as in a mirror and that idea suits also the figure in 1 Corinthians 13:12. There is an inscription of third century b.c. with μεταμορπουμετα — egkatoptrisasthai eis to hudōr to look at one‘s reflection in the water. Plutarch uses the active for mirroring or reflecting and Chrysostom takes it so here. Either makes good sense. The point that Paul is making is that we shall not lose the glory as Moses did. But that is true if we keep on beholding or keep on reflecting (present tense). Only here in N.T. Are transformed Present passive (are being transformed) of metamorphoō late verb and in papyri. See note on Matthew 17:2; Mark 9:2 where it is translated “transfigured.” It is the word used for heathen mythological metamorphoses. Into the same image (tēn autēn eikona). Accusative retained with passive verb την αυτην εικονα — metamorphoumetha Into the likeness of God in Christ (1 Corinthians 15:48-53; Romans 8:17, Romans 8:29; Colossians 3:4; 1 John 3:2). As from the Lord the Spirit More likely, “as from the Spirit of the Lord.” [source]
2 Corinthians 3:18 Are transformed [μεταμορποω]
Present passive (are being transformed) of metamorphoō late verb and in papyri. See note on Matthew 17:2; Mark 9:2 where it is translated “transfigured.” It is the word used for heathen mythological metamorphoses. Into the same image (tēn autēn eikona). Accusative retained with passive verb την αυτην εικονα — metamorphoumetha Into the likeness of God in Christ (1 Corinthians 15:48-53; Romans 8:17, Romans 8:29; Colossians 3:4; 1 John 3:2). As from the Lord the Spirit More likely, “as from the Spirit of the Lord.” [source]
2 Corinthians 3:18 Into the same image [tēn autēn eikona)]
Accusative retained with passive verb την αυτην εικονα — metamorphoumetha Into the likeness of God in Christ (1 Corinthians 15:48-53; Romans 8:17, Romans 8:29; Colossians 3:4; 1 John 3:2). [source]
Galatians 1:12 Of man [παρὰ ἀνθρώπου]
Better, from man. Παρὰ fromemphasizes the idea of transmission, and marks the connection between giver and receiver. Comp. 1 Thessalonians 2:13; 1 Thessalonians 4:1; 2 Timothy 3:14; Acts 10:22. In the Gospels and Acts παραλαμβάνειν usually means to take, in the sense of causing to accompany, as Matthew 4:5; Matthew 17:1; Mark 4:36, etc. Scarcely ever in the sense of receive: see Mark 7:4. In Paul only in the sense of receive, and only with παρὰ , with the single exception of 1 Corinthians 11:23( ἀπὸ ). The simple λαμβάνω usually with παρὰ , but with ἀπὸ , 1 John 2:27; 1 John 3:22. [source]
Galatians 2:11 Because he stood condemned [οτι κατεγνωσμενος ην]
Periphrastic past perfect passive of καταγινοσκω — kataginoskō old verb to know against, to find fault with. In N.T. only here and 1 John 3:20. [source]
Colossians 3:4 Shall appear [φανερωθῇ]
Rev., correctly, shall be manifested. Compare 1 John 3:2, note. See on Romans 3:21. [source]
Colossians 3:4 When Christ shall be manifested [οταν ο Χριστος πανερωτηι]
Indefinite temporal clause with οταν — hotan and the first aorist passive subjunctive of πανεροω — phaneroō “whenever Christ is manifested,” a reference to the second coming of Christ as looked for and longed for, but wholly uncertain as to time. See this same verb used of the second coming in 1 John 3:2. [source]
Colossians 3:10 The new man [τον νεον]
“The new (young as opposed to old παλαιον — palaion) man” (though αντρωπον — anthrōpon is not here expressed, but understood from the preceding phrase). In Ephesians 4:24 Paul has ενδυσασται τον καινον — endusasthai ton kainon (fresh as opposed to worn out) αντρωπον — anthrōpon Which is being renewed (τον ανακαινουμενον — ton anakainoumenon). Present passive articular participle of ανακαινοω — anakainoō Paul apparently coined this word on the analogy of ανανεομαι — ananeomai Ανακαινιζω — Anakainizō already existed (Hebrews 6:6). Paul also uses ανακαινωσις — anakainōsis (Romans 12:2; Titus 3:5) found nowhere before him. By this word Paul adds the meaning of καινος — kainos to that of νεος — neos just before. It is a continual refreshment (καινος — kainos) of the new (νεος — neos young) man in Christ Jesus. Unto knowledge “Unto full (additional) knowledge,” one of the keywords in this Epistle. After the image (κατ εικονα — kat' eikona). An allusion to Genesis 1:26, Genesis 1:28. The restoration of the image of God in us is gradual and progressive (2 Corinthians 3:18), but will be complete in the final result (Romans 8:29; 1 John 3:2). [source]
Colossians 3:10 Unto knowledge [εις επιγνωσιν]
“Unto full (additional) knowledge,” one of the keywords in this Epistle. After the image (κατ εικονα — kat' eikona). An allusion to Genesis 1:26, Genesis 1:28. The restoration of the image of God in us is gradual and progressive (2 Corinthians 3:18), but will be complete in the final result (Romans 8:29; 1 John 3:2). [source]
Colossians 3:10 After the image [κατ εικονα]
An allusion to Genesis 1:26, Genesis 1:28. The restoration of the image of God in us is gradual and progressive (2 Corinthians 3:18), but will be complete in the final result (Romans 8:29; 1 John 3:2). [source]
1 Timothy 6:14 Commandment [ἐντολὴν]
Usually of a single commandment or injunction, but sometimes for the whole body of the moral precepts of Christianity, as 2 Peter 2:21; 2 Peter 3:2. The reference may be explained by ἡ παραγγελία thecommandment, 1 Timothy 1:5, meaning the gospel as the divine standard of conduct and faith. Comp. 2 Timothy 1:14. The phrase τηρεῖν τὴν ἐντολὴν tokeep the commandment is Johannine. See John 14:15, John 14:21; John 15:10; 1 John 2:3, 1 John 2:4; 1 John 3:22, 1 John 3:24; 1 John 5:3. [source]
1 Timothy 5:4 Before [ἐνώπιον]
Frequent in N.T., especially Luke and Revelation. It occurs 31 times in the phrases ἐνώπιον τοῦ Θεοῦ inthe sight of God, and ἐνώπιον κυρίου inthe sight of the Lord. olxx. Comp. ἔμπροσθεν τοῦ Θεοῦ before God. Acts 10:4; 1 Thessalonians 1:3; 1 Thessalonians 2:19; 1 Thessalonians 3:9, 1 Thessalonians 3:13. Not in Pastorals, and by Paul only 1Thessalonians the difference is trifling. Comp. 1 John 3:19and 1 John 3:22. [source]
1 Timothy 3:16 Was manifest [ἐφανερώθη]
More correctly, was manifested. The verb is used John 1:2; Hebrews 9:26; 1 Peter 1:20; 1 John 3:5, 1 John 3:8, of the historical manifestation of Christ; and of the future coming of Christ in Colossians 3:4; 1 Peter 5:4; 1 John 3:2. [source]
Titus 3:7 According to the hope of eternal life [κατ ' ἐλπίδα ζωῆς αἰωνίου]
Const. of eternal life with heirs, and rend. heirs of eternal life according to hope. Comp. Romans 4:18; Romans 5:2; Romans 8:24; Galatians 5:5; Colossians 1:5, Colossians 1:27; Titus 1:2; 1 Peter 1:3; 1 John 3:2, 1 John 3:3. [source]
Hebrews 10:19 To enter into the holiest [εἰς τὴν εἴσοδον τῶν ἁγίων]
Lit. for the entering of the holiest. The phrase παρρησία εἰς boldnessunto, N.T.o Παρρησία with περὶ concerning John 16:25; with πρὸς with reference to, 2 Corinthians 7:4; 1 John 3:21; 1 John 5:14. Ἔισοδος in N.T. habitually of the act of entering. [source]
Hebrews 2:17 Wherefore [οτεν]
Old relative adverb It behoved him Imperfect active of οπειλω — opheilō old verb to owe, money (Matthew 18:28), service and love (Romans 13:8), duty or obligation as here and often in N.T. (Luke 17:10). Jesus is here the subject and the reference is to the incarnation. Having undertaken the work of redemption (John 3:16), voluntarily (John 10:17), Jesus was under obligation to be properly equipped for that priestly service and sacrifice. In all things Except yielding to sin (Hebrews 4:15) and yet he knew what temptation was, difficult as it may be for us to comprehend that in the Son of God who is also the Son of man (Mark 1:13). Jesus fought through to victory over Satan. To be made like unto his brethren First aorist passive infinitive of ομοιοω — homoioō old and common verb from ομοιος — homoios (like), as in Matthew 6:8, with the associative instrumental case as here. Christ, our Elder Brother, resembles us in reality (Philemon 2:7 “in the likeness of men”) as we shall resemble him in the end (Romans 8:29 “first-born among many brethren”; 1 John 3:2 “like him”), where the same root is used as here That he might be (ινα — hina genētai). Purpose clause with γινομαι — hina and the second aorist middle subjunctive of ελεημων και πιστος αρχιερευς — ginomai to become, “that he might become.” That was only possible by being like his brethren in actual human nature. Merciful and faithful high priest (αρχιερευς — eleēmōn kai pistos archiereus). The sudden use of ελεημων — archiereus here for Jesus has been anticipated by Hebrews 1:3; Hebrews 2:9 and see Hebrews 3:1. Jesus as the priest-victim is the chief topic of the Epistle. These two adjectives (πιστος — eleēmōn and τα προς τον τεον — pistos) touch the chief points in the function of the high priest (Hebrews 5:1-10), sympathy and fidelity to God. The Sadducean high priests (Annas and Caiaphas) were political and ecclesiastical tools and puppets out of sympathy with the people and chosen by Rome. In things pertaining to God (τα προς τον τεον — ta pros ton theon). The adverbial accusative of the article is a common idiom. See the very idiom προς — ta pros ton theon in Exodus 18:19; Romans 15:17. This use of εις το ιλασκεσται — pros we had already in Hebrews 1:7. On the day of atonement the high priest entered the holy of holies and officiated in behalf of the people. To make propitiation for (εις το — eis to hilaskesthai). Purpose clause with ιλασκομαι — eis to and the infinitive (common Greek idiom), here present indirect middle of ιλαος — hilaskomai to render propitious to oneself (from ιλεως — hilaos Attic ιλαστητι — hileōs gracious). This idea occurs in the lxx (Psalm 65:3), but only here in N.T., though in Luke 18:13 the passive form (ιλασμος — hilasthēti) occurs as in 2 Kings 5:18. In 1 John 2:2 we have hilasmos used of Christ (cf. Hebrews 7:25). The inscriptions illustrate the meaning in Hebrews 2:17 as well as the lxx. [source]
Hebrews 2:17 It behoved him [ωπειλεν]
Imperfect active of οπειλω — opheilō old verb to owe, money (Matthew 18:28), service and love (Romans 13:8), duty or obligation as here and often in N.T. (Luke 17:10). Jesus is here the subject and the reference is to the incarnation. Having undertaken the work of redemption (John 3:16), voluntarily (John 10:17), Jesus was under obligation to be properly equipped for that priestly service and sacrifice. In all things Except yielding to sin (Hebrews 4:15) and yet he knew what temptation was, difficult as it may be for us to comprehend that in the Son of God who is also the Son of man (Mark 1:13). Jesus fought through to victory over Satan. To be made like unto his brethren First aorist passive infinitive of ομοιοω — homoioō old and common verb from ομοιος — homoios (like), as in Matthew 6:8, with the associative instrumental case as here. Christ, our Elder Brother, resembles us in reality (Philemon 2:7 “in the likeness of men”) as we shall resemble him in the end (Romans 8:29 “first-born among many brethren”; 1 John 3:2 “like him”), where the same root is used as here That he might be (ινα — hina genētai). Purpose clause with γινομαι — hina and the second aorist middle subjunctive of ελεημων και πιστος αρχιερευς — ginomai to become, “that he might become.” That was only possible by being like his brethren in actual human nature. Merciful and faithful high priest (αρχιερευς — eleēmōn kai pistos archiereus). The sudden use of ελεημων — archiereus here for Jesus has been anticipated by Hebrews 1:3; Hebrews 2:9 and see Hebrews 3:1. Jesus as the priest-victim is the chief topic of the Epistle. These two adjectives (πιστος — eleēmōn and τα προς τον τεον — pistos) touch the chief points in the function of the high priest (Hebrews 5:1-10), sympathy and fidelity to God. The Sadducean high priests (Annas and Caiaphas) were political and ecclesiastical tools and puppets out of sympathy with the people and chosen by Rome. In things pertaining to God (τα προς τον τεον — ta pros ton theon). The adverbial accusative of the article is a common idiom. See the very idiom προς — ta pros ton theon in Exodus 18:19; Romans 15:17. This use of εις το ιλασκεσται — pros we had already in Hebrews 1:7. On the day of atonement the high priest entered the holy of holies and officiated in behalf of the people. To make propitiation for (εις το — eis to hilaskesthai). Purpose clause with ιλασκομαι — eis to and the infinitive (common Greek idiom), here present indirect middle of ιλαος — hilaskomai to render propitious to oneself (from ιλεως — hilaos Attic ιλαστητι — hileōs gracious). This idea occurs in the lxx (Psalm 65:3), but only here in N.T., though in Luke 18:13 the passive form (ιλασμος — hilasthēti) occurs as in 2 Kings 5:18. In 1 John 2:2 we have hilasmos used of Christ (cf. Hebrews 7:25). The inscriptions illustrate the meaning in Hebrews 2:17 as well as the lxx. [source]
Hebrews 2:17 In all things [κατα παντα]
Except yielding to sin (Hebrews 4:15) and yet he knew what temptation was, difficult as it may be for us to comprehend that in the Son of God who is also the Son of man (Mark 1:13). Jesus fought through to victory over Satan. To be made like unto his brethren First aorist passive infinitive of ομοιοω — homoioō old and common verb from ομοιος — homoios (like), as in Matthew 6:8, with the associative instrumental case as here. Christ, our Elder Brother, resembles us in reality (Philemon 2:7 “in the likeness of men”) as we shall resemble him in the end (Romans 8:29 “first-born among many brethren”; 1 John 3:2 “like him”), where the same root is used as here That he might be (ινα — hina genētai). Purpose clause with γινομαι — hina and the second aorist middle subjunctive of ελεημων και πιστος αρχιερευς — ginomai to become, “that he might become.” That was only possible by being like his brethren in actual human nature. Merciful and faithful high priest (αρχιερευς — eleēmōn kai pistos archiereus). The sudden use of ελεημων — archiereus here for Jesus has been anticipated by Hebrews 1:3; Hebrews 2:9 and see Hebrews 3:1. Jesus as the priest-victim is the chief topic of the Epistle. These two adjectives (πιστος — eleēmōn and τα προς τον τεον — pistos) touch the chief points in the function of the high priest (Hebrews 5:1-10), sympathy and fidelity to God. The Sadducean high priests (Annas and Caiaphas) were political and ecclesiastical tools and puppets out of sympathy with the people and chosen by Rome. In things pertaining to God (τα προς τον τεον — ta pros ton theon). The adverbial accusative of the article is a common idiom. See the very idiom προς — ta pros ton theon in Exodus 18:19; Romans 15:17. This use of εις το ιλασκεσται — pros we had already in Hebrews 1:7. On the day of atonement the high priest entered the holy of holies and officiated in behalf of the people. To make propitiation for (εις το — eis to hilaskesthai). Purpose clause with ιλασκομαι — eis to and the infinitive (common Greek idiom), here present indirect middle of ιλαος — hilaskomai to render propitious to oneself (from ιλεως — hilaos Attic ιλαστητι — hileōs gracious). This idea occurs in the lxx (Psalm 65:3), but only here in N.T., though in Luke 18:13 the passive form (ιλασμος — hilasthēti) occurs as in 2 Kings 5:18. In 1 John 2:2 we have hilasmos used of Christ (cf. Hebrews 7:25). The inscriptions illustrate the meaning in Hebrews 2:17 as well as the lxx. [source]
Hebrews 2:17 To be made like unto his brethren [τοις αδελποις ομοιωτηναι]
First aorist passive infinitive of ομοιοω — homoioō old and common verb from ομοιος — homoios (like), as in Matthew 6:8, with the associative instrumental case as here. Christ, our Elder Brother, resembles us in reality (Philemon 2:7 “in the likeness of men”) as we shall resemble him in the end (Romans 8:29 “first-born among many brethren”; 1 John 3:2 “like him”), where the same root is used as here That he might be (ινα — hina genētai). Purpose clause with γινομαι — hina and the second aorist middle subjunctive of ελεημων και πιστος αρχιερευς — ginomai to become, “that he might become.” That was only possible by being like his brethren in actual human nature. Merciful and faithful high priest (αρχιερευς — eleēmōn kai pistos archiereus). The sudden use of ελεημων — archiereus here for Jesus has been anticipated by Hebrews 1:3; Hebrews 2:9 and see Hebrews 3:1. Jesus as the priest-victim is the chief topic of the Epistle. These two adjectives (πιστος — eleēmōn and τα προς τον τεον — pistos) touch the chief points in the function of the high priest (Hebrews 5:1-10), sympathy and fidelity to God. The Sadducean high priests (Annas and Caiaphas) were political and ecclesiastical tools and puppets out of sympathy with the people and chosen by Rome. In things pertaining to God (τα προς τον τεον — ta pros ton theon). The adverbial accusative of the article is a common idiom. See the very idiom προς — ta pros ton theon in Exodus 18:19; Romans 15:17. This use of εις το ιλασκεσται — pros we had already in Hebrews 1:7. On the day of atonement the high priest entered the holy of holies and officiated in behalf of the people. To make propitiation for (εις το — eis to hilaskesthai). Purpose clause with ιλασκομαι — eis to and the infinitive (common Greek idiom), here present indirect middle of ιλαος — hilaskomai to render propitious to oneself (from ιλεως — hilaos Attic ιλαστητι — hileōs gracious). This idea occurs in the lxx (Psalm 65:3), but only here in N.T., though in Luke 18:13 the passive form (ιλασμος — hilasthēti) occurs as in 2 Kings 5:18. In 1 John 2:2 we have hilasmos used of Christ (cf. Hebrews 7:25). The inscriptions illustrate the meaning in Hebrews 2:17 as well as the lxx. [source]
1 John 5:18 We know [οἴδαμεν]
John uses this appeal to knowledge in two forms: we know (1 John 3:2, 1 John 3:14; 1 John 5:18, 1 John 5:19, 1 John 5:20); ye know (1 John 2:20; 1 John 3:5, 1 John 3:15). [source]
1 John 4:4 Greater []
Compare 1 John 3:20. [source]
1 John 5:11 Hath given [ἔδωκεν]
The aorist tense, gave. So Rev. The reference is to the historic fact of the gift. So 1 John 3:23: “We should love one another as He gave ( ἔδωκεν ) us commandment.” 1 John 3:24: “We know that He abideth in us by the Spirit which He gave ( ἔδωκεν ) us.” On the other hand, 1 John 3:1: “Behold what manner of love the Father hath bestowed ( δέδωκεν ) upon us.” The gift of love abides in the fact that we are now children of God (1 John 3:2). [source]
1 John 4:17 He is []
The present tense is very significant. Compare 1 John 3:7, “is righteous even as He is righteous.” The essence of out being as He is lies in perfected love; and Christ is eternally love. “He that abideth in love abideth in God and God in him.” Compare 1 John 3:2. [source]
1 John 4:1 Beloved []
Again the recognition of danger from false spirits prompts this affectionate address. Compare 1 John 3:21. [source]
1 John 3:3 Every man that hath [πᾶς ὁ ἔχων]
A characteristic form of expression with John, containing “a reference to some who had questioned the application of a general principle in particular cases.” Here to some persons who had denied the practical obligation to moral purity involved in their hope. See 1 John 3:4, 1 John 3:6, 1 John 3:9, 1 John 3:10, 1 John 3:15, 1 John 3:23, 1 John 3:24; 1 John 4:7; 1 John 5:1, 1 John 5:4, 1 John 5:18; 2 John 1:9. [source]
1 John 2:6 He abideth in Him [ἐν αὐτῷ μένειν]
To abide in God is a more common expression with John than to be in God, and marks an advance in thought. The phrase is a favorite one with John. See John 15:4sqq.; John 6:56; 1 John 2:24, 1 John 2:27, 1 John 2:28; 1 John 3:6, 1 John 3:24; 1 John 4:12sq.; 1 John 4:15sq. Bengel notes the gradation in the three phrases “to know Him, to be in Him, to abide in Him; knowledge, fellowship, constancy.” [source]
1 John 3:20 Condemn [καταγινώσκῃ]
The word occurs only three times in the New Testament; here, 1 John 3:21, and Galatians 2:11. It signifies (1.) To note accurately, usually in a bad sense. Hence to detect (Proverbs 28:11); compare Aristophanes: “Having observed ( καταγνοὺς ) the foibles of the old man” (“Knights,” 46). To form an unfavorable prejudice against. So Herodotus. Datis says to the Delians, “Why are ye fled, O holy men, having judged me ( καταγνόντες κατ ' ἐμεῦ ) in so unfriendly a way?” (vi., 97). (2.) To note judicially: to accuse: to accuse one's self. So Thucydides: “No one, when venturing on a perilous enterprise, ever yet passed a sentence of failure on himself ” ( καταγνοὺς ἑαυτοῦ μὴ περιέσεσθαι ; iii., 45). To give sentence, or condemn. To condemn to death. “Those who had fled they condemned to death” ( θάνατον καταγνόντες ; Thucydides, vi., 60). To decide a suit against one. So Aristophanes: “You judges have no maintenance if you will not decide against ( καταγνώσεσθε ) this suit” (“Knights,” 1360). In Galatians 2:11, it is said of Peter that, because of his concessions to the Jewish ritualists, κατεγνωσμένος ἦν hestood condemned or self-condemned (not as A.V., he was to be blamed ). His conduct was its own condemnation. This is the sense in this passage, the internal judgment of conscience. [source]
1 John 2:3 We know [γινώσκομεν]
Or, perceive. By experience, from day to day; distinguished from οἴδαμεν weknow, expressing absolute, immediate knowledge of a fact once for all. Compare 1 John 3:2. [source]
1 John 2:3 Hereby [ἐν τούτῳ]
Lit., in this. Characteristic of John. See John 8:35; John 15:8; John 16:30; 1 John 2:5; 1 John 3:24; 1 John 4:13; 1 John 5:2; 1 John 3:16; 1 John 3:19; 1 John 4:2. The expression points to what follows, “if we keep His commandments,” yet with a covert reference to that idea as generally implied in the previous words concerning fellowship with God and walking in the light. [source]
1 John 2:28 We may have confidence [σχῶμεν παῤῥησίαν]
Rev., boldness. For the phrase have boldness, see 1 John 3:21; 1 John 4:17; 1 John 5:14; Hebrews 3:6; Hebrews 10:19; Philemon 1:8. For the word παῤῥησία boldnesssee on John 7:13; see on Acts 2:29. It is opposed, as here, to αἰσχύνομαι tobe ashamed, in Proverbs 13:5, where the Septuagint reads “a wicked man is ashamed ( αἰσχύνεται ) and shall not have boldness ( παῤῥησίαν ). Also in Philemon 1:20. Compare 2 Corinthians 3:12. The idea of free, open speech lies at the bottom of the word: coming before God's bar with nothing to conceal. The thought is embodied in the general confession of the Book of Common Prayer: “That we should not dissemble nor cloke them before the face of Almighty God our Heavenly Father, but confess them.” So John Wesley's Hymn:“Jesus, Thy blood and righteousnessMy beauty are, my glorious dress: 'Midst flaming worlds, in these arrayed,-DIVIDER-
With joy shall I lift up my head.Bold shall I stand in Thy great day,For who aught to my charge shall lay? Fully absolved through these I am, - From sin and fear, from guilt and shame.” [source]

1 John 1:7 One with another [μετ ' ἀλλήλων]
Not, we with God and God with us, but with our brethren. Fellowship with God exhibits and proves itself by fellowship with Christians. See 1 John 4:7, 1 John 4:12; 1 John 3:11, 1 John 3:23. [source]
1 John 1:5 We have heard of Him [ἀκηκόαμεν ἀπ ' αὐτοῦ]
A form of expression not found elsewhere in John, who commonly uses παρ ' αὐτοῦ . See on John 6:46. The phrase here points to the ultimate and not necessarily the immediate source of the message. Not only John, but others in earlier times had heard this message. Compare 1 Peter 1:10, 1 Peter 1:11. Ἁπό points to the source παρά to the giver. Thus, John 5:41, “ I receive not honor from ( παρά ) men.” They are not the bestowers of honor upon me.” John 5:44, “How can ye believe which receive honor from ( παρά ) one another;” the honor which men have to give, “and seek not the honor that cometh from ( παρά ) God;” the honor which God alone bestows. On the other hand, 1 John 3:22, “Whatsoever we ask we receive from ( ἀπό ) Him,” the ultimate source of our gifts. So Matthew 17:25: “Of ( ἀπό ) whom do the kings of the earth take custom - of ( ἀπό ) their own children or of ( ἀπό ) strangers?” What is the legitimate and ultimate source of revenue in states? [source]
1 John 2:3 Hereby [εν τουτωι]
See this phrase also in 1 John 2:5; 1 John 3:16, 1 John 3:19, 1 John 3:24; 1 John 4:2, 1 John 4:13; 1 John 5:2. That is explained by the εαν — ean clause, “if we keep his commandments” (εαν τηρωμεν — ean tērōmen condition of the third class, εαν — ean with present active subjunctive, “if we keep on keeping”), the clause itself in apposition with τουτωι — toutōi (locative case). [source]
1 John 2:7 Beloved [αγαπητοι]
First instance of this favourite form of address in these Epistles (1 John 3:2, 1 John 3:21; 1 John 4:1, 1 John 4:7; 3 John 1:1, 3 John 1:2, 3 John 1:5, 3 John 1:11). [source]
1 John 2:12 I write [γραπω]
Present active indicative, repeated three times, referring to this Epistle. For “the name” see 1 John 3:23; 3 John 1:7. They were loyal to the name of Christ (Matthew 10:22). [source]
1 John 3:20 Whereinsoever our heart condemn us [οτι εαν καταγινωσκηι ημων η καρδια]
A construction like οτι αν — hoti an whatever, in John 2:5; John 14:13. Καταγινωσκω — Kataginōskō occurs only three times in the N.T., here, 1 John 3:21; Galatians 2:11. It means to know something against one, to condemn. [source]
1 John 3:22 Whatsoever we ask [ο εαν αιτωμεν]
Indefinite relative clause with modal αν — an and the present active subjunctive, like οτι εαν καταγινωσκηι — hoti ean kataginōskēi in 1 John 3:20. In form no limitations are placed here save that of complete fellowship with God, which means complete surrender of our will to that of God our Father. See the clear teaching of Jesus on this subject in Mark 11:24; Luke 11:9; John 14:12.; John 16:23 and his example (Mark 14:36; Matthew 26:39; Luke 22:42). The answer may not always be in the form that we expect, but it will be better. [source]
1 John 4:4 Because [οτι]
The reason for the victory lies in God, who abides in them (1 John 3:20, 1 John 3:24; John 14:20; John 15:4.). God is greater than Satan, “he that is in the world” (ο εν τωι κοσμωι — ho en tōi kosmōi), the prince of this world (John 12:31; John 14:30), the god of this age (2 Corinthians 4:4), powerful as he seems. [source]
1 John 1:7 Of Jesus Christ His Son []
Omit Christ. The human name, Jesus, shows that His blood is available for man. The divine name, His Son, shows that it is efficacious. I shall be rendering a service to students of John's Epistles by giving, in a condensed form, Canon Westcott's note, classifying the several names of our Lord and their uses in the Epistles. The name in John, as in the Bible elsewhere, has two distinct, but closely connected meanings. -DIVIDER-
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1. The Revelation of the Divine Being by a special title. -DIVIDER-
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2. The whole sum of the manifold revelations gathered up so as to form one supreme revelation. -DIVIDER-
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The latter sense is illustrated in 3 John 1:7, where “the name” absolutely includes the essential elements of the Christian creed, the complete revelation of Christ's work in relation to God and man. Compare John 20:31; Acts 5:41. -DIVIDER-
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In 1 John 2:12, the term is more limited, referring to Christ as He lived on earth and gave Himself for “the brethren.” In 1 John 3:23; 1 John 5:13, the exact sense is defined by what follows. -DIVIDER-
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Actual Names Used. -DIVIDER-
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(I.) His Son Jesus Christ. 1 John 1:3; 1 John 3:23; 1 John 5:20. The divine antecedent is differently described in each case, and the difference colors the phrase. In 1 John 1:2-3, the Father (compare 1John href="/desk/?q=1jo+3:23&sr=1">1 John 3:23, God. In 1 John 5:20, He that is true. Thus the sonship of Christ is regarded in relation to God as Father, as God, and as satisfying the divine ideal which man is able to form. The whole phrase, His Son Jesus Christ, includes the two elements of the confessions which John makes prominent. -DIVIDER-
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1. Jesus is the Son of God (John 4:15; John 5:5). -DIVIDER-
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2. Jesus is the Christ (John 2:22; John 5:1). -DIVIDER-
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The constituents of the compressed phrase are all used separately by John. -DIVIDER-
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(1.) Jesus. 1 John 2:22; 1 John 5:1; 1 John 4:3(where the correct reading omits Christ). The thought is that of the Lord in His perfect historic humanity. -DIVIDER-
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(2.) Christ. 2 John 1:9. Pointing to the preparation made under the old covenant. -DIVIDER-
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(3). Jesus Christ. 1 John 2:1; 1 John 5:6; 2 John 1:7. Combining the ideas of true humanity and messianic position. -DIVIDER-
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In 1 John 4:15, the reading is doubtful: Jesus or Jesus Christ. -DIVIDER-
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On 1 John 4:2, see note. -DIVIDER-
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(4.) The Son. 1 John 2:22, 1 John 2:23, 1 John 2:24; 1 John 4:14; 1 John 5:12. The absolute relation of Sonship to Fatherhood. -DIVIDER-
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(5.) The Son of God. 1 John 3:8; 1 John 5:10, 1 John 5:12, 1 John 5:13, 1 John 5:20. Compare His Son (1 John 4:10; 1 John 5:9), where the immediate antecedent is ὁ Θεός Godand 1 John 5:18, He that was begotten of God. Combination of the ideas of Christ's divine dignity and divine sonship. -DIVIDER-
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(6.) Jesus His (God's) Son. 1 John 1:7. Two truths. The blood of Christ is available and efficacious. -DIVIDER-
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(7). His (God's) Son, His only Son. 1 John 4:9. The uniqueness of the gift is the manifestation of love. -DIVIDER-
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The Son in various forms is eminently characteristic of the First and Second Epistles, in which it occurs more times than in all Paul's Epistles. -DIVIDER-
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Κύριος Lordis not found in the Epistles (omit from 2 John 1:3), but occurs in the Gospel, and often in Revelation. -DIVIDER-
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The expression, the blood of Jesus His Son, is chosen with a profound insight. Though Ignatius uses the phrase blood of God yet the word blood is inappropriate to the Son conceived in His divine nature. The word Jesus brings out His human nature, in which He assumed a real body of flesh and blood, which blood was shed for us.Cleanseth ( καθαρίζει )See on Mark 7:19. Not only forgives but removes. Compare Titus 2:14; Hebrews 9:13sq.; Hebrews 9:22sq.; Ephesians 5:26sq.; Matthew 5:8; 1 John 3:3. Compare also 1 John 1:9, where, forgive ( ἀφῇ ) and cleanse ( καθαρίσῃ ) occur, with an obvious difference of meaning. Note the present tense cleanseth. The cleansing is present and continuous. Alexander (Bishop of Derry) cites a striking passage from Victor Hugo (“Le Parricide”). The usurper Canute, who has had a share in his father's death, expiring after a virtuous and glorious reign, walks towards the light of heaven. But first he cuts with his sword a shroud of snow from the top of Mt. Savo. As he advances towards heaven, a cloud forms, and drop by drop his shroud is soaked with a rain of blood.All sin ( πάσης ἁμαρτίας )The principle of sin in all its forms and manifestations; not the separate manifestations. Compare all joy (James 1:2); all patience (2 Corinthians 7:12); all wisdom (Ephesians 1:8); all diligence (2 Peter 1:5). [source]

1 John 3:5 Was manifested [επανερωτη]
Same form as in 1 John 3:2, but here of the Incarnation as in John 21:1, not of the second coming (1 John 2:28).To take away sins (ινα τας αμαρτιας αρηι — hina tas hamartias arēi). Purpose clause with ινα — hina and first aorist active subjunctive of αιρω — airō as in John 1:29. In Isaiah 53:11 we have αναπερω — anapherō for bearing sins, but αιρω — airō properly means to lift up and carry away (John 2:16). So in Hebrews 10:4 we find απαιρεω — aphaireō and Hebrews 10:11 περιαιρεω — periaireō to take away sins completely (the complete expiation wrought by Christ on Calvary). The plural αμαρτιας — hamartias here, as in Colossians 1:14, not singular (collective sense) αμαρτιαν — hamartian as in John 1:29.And in him is no sin “And sin (the sinful principle) in him is not.” As Jesus had claimed about himself (John 7:18; John 8:46) and as is repeatedly stated in the N.T. (2 Corinthians 5:21; Hebrews 4:15; Hebrews 7:26; Hebrews 9:13). [source]
1 John 4:15 Whosoever shall confess [ος εαν ομολογησηι]
Indefinite relative clause with modal εαν — ean (= an) and the first aorist active subjunctive, “whoever confesses.” See 1 John 2:23; 1 John 4:2. for ομολογεω — homologeō Object clause (indirect assertion) after ομολογεω — homologeō This confession of the deity of Jesus Christ implies surrender and obedience also, not mere lip service (cf. 1 Corinthians 12:3; Romans 10:6-12). This confession is proof (if genuine) of the fellowship with God (1 John 1:3.; 1 John 3:24). [source]
1 John 5:9 Greater [μειζων]
Comparative of μεγας — megas because God is always true.For (οτι — hoti). So it applies to this case.That Thus taken in the declarative sense (the fact that) as in John 3:19, though it can be causal (because) or indefinite relative with μεμαρτυρηκεν — memarturēken (what he hath testified, perfect active indicative of μαρτυρεω — martureō as in John 1:32; John 4:44, etc.), a harsh construction here because of μαρτυρια — marturia though some MSS. do read εν — hen to agree with it (cf. 1 John 5:10). See οτι εαν — hoti ean in 1 John 3:20 for that idiom. Westcott notes the Trinity in 1 John 5:6-9: the Son comes, the Spirit witnesses, the Father has witnessed. [source]
1 John 5:9 That [οτι]
Thus taken in the declarative sense (the fact that) as in John 3:19, though it can be causal (because) or indefinite relative with μεμαρτυρηκεν — memarturēken (what he hath testified, perfect active indicative of μαρτυρεω — martureō as in John 1:32; John 4:44, etc.), a harsh construction here because of μαρτυρια — marturia though some MSS. do read εν — hen to agree with it (cf. 1 John 5:10). See οτι εαν — hoti ean in 1 John 3:20 for that idiom. Westcott notes the Trinity in 1 John 5:6-9: the Son comes, the Spirit witnesses, the Father has witnessed. [source]
1 John 5:11 That God gave [οτι εδωκεν ο τεος]
Declarative οτι — hoti in apposition with μαρτυρια — marturia as in 1 John 5:14; John 3:19. Note aorist active indicative εδωκεν — edōken (from διδωμι — didōmi) as in 1 John 3:23., the great historic fact of the Incarnation (John 3:16), but the perfect δεδωκεν — dedōken in 1 John 3:1 to emphasize the abiding presence of God‘s love. [source]
1 John 5:13 That ye may know [ινα ειδητε]
Purpose clause with ινα — hina and the second perfect active subjunctive of οιδα — oida to know with settled intuitive knowledge. He wishes them to have eternal life in Christ (John 20:31) and to know that they have it, but not with flippant superficiality (1 John 2:3.).Unto you that believe on (τοις πιστευουσιν εις — tois pisteuousin eis). Dative of the articular present active participle of πιστευω — pisteuō and εις — eis as in 1 John 5:10. For this use of ονομα — onoma (name) with πιστευω — pisteuō see 1 John 3:23; John 2:23. [source]
1 John 5:13 Unto you that believe on [τοις πιστευουσιν εις]
Dative of the articular present active participle of πιστευω — pisteuō and εις — eis as in 1 John 5:10. For this use of ονομα — onoma (name) with πιστευω — pisteuō see 1 John 3:23; John 2:23. [source]
1 John 5:18 We know [οιδαμεν]
As in 1 John 3:2, 1 John 3:14; 1 John 5:15, 1 John 5:19, 1 John 5:20. He has “ye know” in 1 John 2:20; 1 John 3:5, 1 John 3:15. [source]
2 John 1:4 Greatly [λιαν]
Only here and 3 John 1:3 in John‘s writings.I have found (ευρηκα — heurēka). Perfect active indicative of ευρισκω — heuriskō as in John 1:41, our “eureka,” here with its usual force, a continued discovery. “He sits down at once and writes to Kyria. How glad she would be that her lads, far away in the great city, were true to their early faith” (David Smith).Certain of thy children No τινας — tinas as one would expect before εκ — ek a not infrequent idiom in the N.T. (John 16:17).Walking (περιπατουντας — peripatountas). Present active accusative supplementary participle agreeing with τινας — tinas understood. Probably members of the church off here in Ephesus.In truth As in 2 John 1:1; 3 John 1:4.We received (ελαβομεν — elabomen). Second aorist active (possibly, though not certainly, literary plural) of λαμβανω — lambanō This very idiom (εντολην λαμβανω — entolēn lambanō) in John 10:18; Acts 17:15; Colossians 4:10. Perhaps the reference here is to 1 John 2:7.; 1 John 3:23. [source]
2 John 1:4 Certain of thy children [εκ των τεκνων]
No τινας — tinas as one would expect before εκ — ek a not infrequent idiom in the N.T. (John 16:17).Walking (περιπατουντας — peripatountas). Present active accusative supplementary participle agreeing with τινας — tinas understood. Probably members of the church off here in Ephesus.In truth As in 2 John 1:1; 3 John 1:4.We received (ελαβομεν — elabomen). Second aorist active (possibly, though not certainly, literary plural) of λαμβανω — lambanō This very idiom (εντολην λαμβανω — entolēn lambanō) in John 10:18; Acts 17:15; Colossians 4:10. Perhaps the reference here is to 1 John 2:7.; 1 John 3:23. [source]
2 John 1:4 In truth [εν αλητειαι]
As in 2 John 1:1; 3 John 1:4.We received (ελαβομεν — elabomen). Second aorist active (possibly, though not certainly, literary plural) of λαμβανω — lambanō This very idiom (εντολην λαμβανω — entolēn lambanō) in John 10:18; Acts 17:15; Colossians 4:10. Perhaps the reference here is to 1 John 2:7.; 1 John 3:23. [source]
2 John 1:4 We received [ελαβομεν]
Second aorist active (possibly, though not certainly, literary plural) of λαμβανω — lambanō This very idiom (εντολην λαμβανω — entolēn lambanō) in John 10:18; Acts 17:15; Colossians 4:10. Perhaps the reference here is to 1 John 2:7.; 1 John 3:23. [source]
2 John 1:5 Lady [κυρια]
Vocative case and in the same sense as in 2 John 1:1.As though I wrote (ως γραπων — hōs graphōn). Common idiom ως — hōs with the participle (present active) for the alleged reason.New As in 1 John 2:7., which see.We had (ειχαμεν — eichamen). Imperfect active (late α — ̇a form like ειχαν — eichan in Mark 8:7) of εχω — echō and note ειχετε — eichete with απ αρχης — ap' archēs in 1 John 2:7. Not literary plural, John identifying all Christians with himself in this blessing.That we love one another Either a final clause after ερωτω — erōtō as in John 17:15 or an object clause in apposition with εντολην — entolēn like 1 John 2:27; 1 John 3:23 and like 2 John 1:6. [source]
2 John 1:5 New [καινην]
As in 1 John 2:7., which see.We had (ειχαμεν — eichamen). Imperfect active (late α — ̇a form like ειχαν — eichan in Mark 8:7) of εχω — echō and note ειχετε — eichete with απ αρχης — ap' archēs in 1 John 2:7. Not literary plural, John identifying all Christians with himself in this blessing.That we love one another Either a final clause after ερωτω — erōtō as in John 17:15 or an object clause in apposition with εντολην — entolēn like 1 John 2:27; 1 John 3:23 and like 2 John 1:6. [source]
2 John 1:5 That we love one another [ινα αγαπωμεν αλληλους]
Either a final clause after ερωτω — erōtō as in John 17:15 or an object clause in apposition with εντολην — entolēn like 1 John 2:27; 1 John 3:23 and like 2 John 1:6. [source]
2 John 1:6 That we should walk [ινα περιπατωμεν]
Object clause in nominative case in apposition with αγαπη — agapē with ινα — hina and the present active subjunctive of περιπατεω — peripateō “that we keep on walking.”The commandment (η εντολη — hē entolē). The one just mentioned with the same construction with ινα — hina as in 1 John 3:23. John changes from the first person plural to the second (ηκουσατε — ēkousate as in 1 John 2:7, περιπατητε — peripatēte) as in 1 John 2:5, 1 John 2:7.In it Either to αλητειαι — alētheiāi (truth) of 2 John 1:4, αγαπη — agapē of this verse, or εντολη — entolē of this verse. Either makes good sense, probably “in love.” With περιπατεω — peripateō (walk) we have often εν — en (1 John 1:7; 1 John 2:11, etc.) or κατα — kata (according to) as in Mark 7:5; 1 Corinthians 3:3; 2 Corinthians 10:2, etc. [source]
2 John 1:6 The commandment [η εντολη]
The one just mentioned with the same construction with ινα — hina as in 1 John 3:23. John changes from the first person plural to the second (ηκουσατε — ēkousate as in 1 John 2:7, περιπατητε — peripatēte) as in 1 John 2:5, 1 John 2:7. [source]
3 John 1:2 Beloved []
Compare the plural, 1 John 3:2, 1 John 3:21; 1 John 4:1, 1 John 4:7, 1 John 4:11. [source]
Revelation 22:4 See His face []
Compare 1 John 3:2; Matthew 5:8; Exodus 33:20; Psalm 17:15. [source]
Revelation 2:17 Of the hidden manna [τοῦ μάννα τοῦ κεκρυμμένου]
The allusion may be partly to the pot of manna which was laid up in the ark in the sanctuary. See Exodus 16:32-34; compare Hebrews 9:4. That the imagery of the ark was familiar to John appears from Revelation 11:19. This allusion however is indirect, for the manna laid up in the ark was not for food, but was a memorial of food once enjoyed. Two ideas seem to be combined in the figure: 1. Christ as the bread from heaven, the nourishment of the life of believers, the true manna, of which those who eat shall never die (John 6:31-43, John 6:48-51); hidden, in that He is withdrawn from sight, and the Christian's life is hid with Him in God (Colossians 3:3). 2. The satisfaction of the believer's desire when Christ shall be revealed. The hidden manna shall not remain for ever hidden. We shall see Christ as He is, and be like Him (1 John 3:2). Christ gives the manna in giving Himself “The seeing of Christ as He is, and, through this beatific vision, being made like to Him, is identical with the eating of the hidden manna, which shall, as it were, be then brought forth from the sanctuary, the holy of holies of God's immediate presence where it was withdrawn from sight so long, that all may partake of it; the glory of Christ, now shrouded and concealed, being then revealed to His people” (Trench). -DIVIDER-
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This is one of numerous illustrations of the dependence of Revelation upon Old Testament history and prophecy. “To such an extent is this the case,” says Professor Milligan, “that it may be doubted whether it contains a single figure not drawn from the Old Testament, or a single complete sentence not more or less built up of materials brought from the same source.” See, for instance, Balaam (Revelation 2:14); Jezebel (Revelation 2:20); Michael (Revelation 12:7, compare Daniel 10:13; Daniel 12:1); Abaddon (Revelation 9:11); Jerusalem, Mt. Zion, Babylon, the Euphrates, Sodom, Egypt (Revelation 21:2; Revelation 14:1; Revelation 16:19; Revelation 9:14; Revelation 11:8); Gog and Magog (Revelation 20:8, compare Revelation href="/desk/?q=re+2:7&sr=1">Revelation 2:7, Revelation 2:17, Revelation 2:27, Revelation 2:28). Heaven is described under the figure of the tabernacle in the wilderness (Revelation 11:1, Revelation 11:19; Revelation 6:9; Revelation 8:3; Revelation 11:19; Revelation 4:6). The song of the redeemed is the song of Moses (Revelation 15:3). The plagues of Egypt appear in the blood, fire, thunder, darkness and locusts (Revelation 8:1-13). “The great earthquake of chapter 6 is taken from Haggai; the sun becoming black as sackcloth of hair and the moon becoming blood (Revelation 8:1-13) from Joel: the stars of heaven falling, the fig-tree casting her untimely figs, the heavens departing as a scroll (Revelation 8:1-13) from Isaiah: the scorpions of chapter 9 from Ezekiel: the gathering of the vine of the earth (chapter 14) from Joel, and the treading of the wine-press in the same chapter from Isaiah.” So too the details of a single vision are gathered out of different prophets or different parts of the same prophet. For instance, the vision of the glorified Redeemer (Revelation 1:12-20). The golden candlesticks are from Exodus and Zechariah; the garment down to the foot from Exodus and Daniel; the golden girdle and the hairs like wool from Isaiah and Daniel; the feet like burnished brass, and the voice like the sound of many waters, from Ezekiel; the two-edged sword from Isaiah and Psalms; the countenance like the sun from Exodus; the falling of the seer as dead from Exodus, Isaiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel; the laying of Jesus' right hand on the seer from Daniel. -DIVIDER-
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“Not indeed that the writer binds himself to the Old Testament in a slavish spirit. He rather uses it with great freedom and independence, extending, intensifying, or transfiguring its descriptions at his pleasure. Yet the main source of his emblems cannot be mistaken. The sacred books of his people had been more than familiar to him. They had penetrated his whole being. They had lived within him as a germinating seed, capable of shooting up not only in the old forms, but in new forms of life and beauty. In the whole extent of sacred and religious literature there is to be found nowhere else such a perfect fusion of the revelation given to Israel with the mind of one who would either express Israel's ideas, or give utterance, by means of the symbols supplied by Israel's history, to the present and most elevated thoughts of the Christian faith “(this note is condensed from Professor Milligan's “Baird Lectures on the Revelation of St. John”).A white stone ( ψῆφον λευκὴν )See on counteth, Luke 14:28; and see on white, Luke 9:29. The foundation of the figure is not to be sought in Gentile but in Jewish customs. “White is everywhere the color and livery of heaven” (Trench). See Revelation 1:14; Revelation 3:5; Revelation 7:9; Revelation 14:14; Revelation 19:8, Revelation 19:11, Revelation 19:14; Revelation 20:11. It is the bright, glistering white. Compare Matthew 28:3; Luke 24:4; John 20:12; Revelation 20:11; Daniel 7:9. It is impossible to fix the meaning of the symbol with any certainty. The following are some of the principal views: The Urim and Thummim concealed within the High-Priest's breastplate of judgment. This is advocated by Trench, who supposes that the Urim was a peculiarly rare stone, possibly the diamond, and engraven with the ineffable name of God. The new name he regards as the new name of God or of Christ (Revelation 3:12); some revelation of the glory of God which can be communicated to His people only in the higher state of being, and which they only can understand who have actually received. -DIVIDER-
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Professor Milligan supposes an allusion to the plate of gold worn on the High-Priest's forehead, and inscribed with the words “Holiness to the Lord,” but, somewhat strangely, runs the figure into the stone or pebble used in voting, and regards the white stone as carrying the idea of the believer's acquittal at the hands of God. -DIVIDER-
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Dean Plumptre sees in the stone the signet by which, in virtue of its form or of the characters inscribed on it, he who possessed it could claim from the friend who gave it, at any distance of time, a frank and hearty welcome; and adds to this an allusion to the custom of presenting such a token, with the guest's name upon it, of admission to the feast given to those who were invited to partake within the temple precincts - a feast which consisted wholly or in part of sacrificial meats. -DIVIDER-
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Others, regarding the connection of the stone with the manna, refer to the use of the lot cast among the priests in order to determine which one should offer the sacrifice. -DIVIDER-
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Others, to the writing of a candidate's name at an election by ballot upon a stone or bean. -DIVIDER-
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In short, the commentators are utterly divided, and the true interpretation remains a matter of conjecture.A new nameSome explain the new name of God or of Christ (compare Revelation 3:12); others, of the recipient's own name. “A new name however, a revelation of his everlasting title as a son of God to glory in Christ, but consisting of and revealed in those personal marks and signs of God's peculiar adoption of himself, which he and none other is acquainted with” (Alford). Bengel says: “Wouldst thou know what kind of a new name thou wilt obtain? Overcome. Before that thou wilt ask in vain, and after that thou wilt soon read it inscribed on the white stone.” [source]

Revelation 22:4 They shall see his face [οπσονται το προσωπον αυτου]
Future active of οραω — horaō This vision of God was withheld from Moses (Exodus 33:20, Exodus 33:23), but promised by Jesus to the pure in heart (Matthew 5:8) and mentioned in Hebrews 12:14 as possible only to the holy, and promised in Psalm 17:15. Even here on earth we can see God in the face of Christ (2 Corinthians 4:6), but now in the New Jerusalem we can see Christ face to face (1 Corinthians 13:12), even as he is after we are made really like him (2 Corinthians 3:18; Romans 8:29; 1 John 3:2). It is anthropomorphic language, to be sure, but it touches the essential reality of religion. “The supreme felicity is reached, immediate presence with God and the Lamb” (Beckwith). [source]

What do the individual words in 1 John 3:2 mean?

Beloved now children of God are we and not yet has been revealed what we will be We know that when He appears like Him for we will see Him as He is
Ἀγαπητοί νῦν τέκνα Θεοῦ ἐσμεν καὶ οὔπω ἐφανερώθη τί ἐσόμεθα οἴδαμεν ὅτι ἐὰν φανερωθῇ ὅμοιοι αὐτῷ ὅτι ὀψόμεθα αὐτὸν καθώς ἐστιν

Ἀγαπητοί  Beloved 
Parse: Adjective, Vocative Masculine Plural
Root: ἀγαπητός  
Sense: beloved, esteemed, dear, favourite, worthy of love.
νῦν  now 
Parse: Adverb
Root: νῦν  
Sense: at this time, the present, now.
τέκνα  children 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Neuter Plural
Root: τέκνον  
Sense: offspring, children.
Θεοῦ  of  God 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: θεός  
Sense: a god or goddess, a general name of deities or divinities.
ἐσμεν  are  we 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 1st Person Plural
Root: εἰμί  
Sense: to be, to exist, to happen, to be present.
οὔπω  not  yet 
Parse: Adverb
Root: οὔπω  
Sense: not yet.
ἐφανερώθη  has  been  revealed 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Passive, 3rd Person Singular
Root: φανερόω  
Sense: to make manifest or visible or known what has been hidden or unknown, to manifest, whether by words, or deeds, or in any other way.
ἐσόμεθα  we  will  be 
Parse: Verb, Future Indicative Middle, 1st Person Plural
Root: εἰμί  
Sense: to be, to exist, to happen, to be present.
οἴδαμεν  We  know 
Parse: Verb, Perfect Indicative Active, 1st Person Plural
Root: οἶδα  
Sense: to see.
ὅτι  that 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: ὅτι  
Sense: that, because, since.
φανερωθῇ  He  appears 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Subjunctive Passive, 3rd Person Singular
Root: φανερόω  
Sense: to make manifest or visible or known what has been hidden or unknown, to manifest, whether by words, or deeds, or in any other way.
ὅμοιοι  like 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root: ὅμοιος  
Sense: like, similar, resembling.
ὀψόμεθα  we  will  see 
Parse: Verb, Future Indicative Middle, 1st Person Plural
Root: εἶδον 
Sense: to see with the eyes.
ἐστιν  He  is 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: εἰμί  
Sense: to be, to exist, to happen, to be present.