The Meaning of 1 Corinthians 14:1 Explained

1 Corinthians 14:1

KJV: Follow after charity, and desire spiritual gifts, but rather that ye may prophesy.

YLT: Pursue the love, and seek earnestly the spiritual things, and rather that ye may prophecy,

Darby: Follow after love, and be emulous of spiritual manifestations, but rather that ye may prophesy.

ASV: Follow after love; yet desire earnestly spiritual gifts , but rather that ye may prophesy.

What does 1 Corinthians 14:1 Mean?

Study Notes

rather
The subject is still the pneumatika. Chapter 12, described the gifts and the Body; Chapter 13. the love which alone gives ministry of gift any value; Chapter 14. regulates the ministry of gift in the primitive, apostolic assembly of saints.
(1) The important gift is that of prophecy ( 1 Corinthians 1:1 ). The N.T. prophet was not merely a preacher, but an inspired preacher, through whom, until the N.T. was written, new revelations suited to the new dispensation were given 1 Corinthians 14:29 ; 1 Corinthians 14:30 .
(2) Tongues and the sign gifts are to cease, and meantime must be used with restraint, and only if an interpreter be present 1 Corinthians 14:1-19 ; 1 Corinthians 14:27 ; 1 Corinthians 14:28 .
(3) In the primitive church there was liberty for the ministry of all the gifts which might be present, but for prophecy more especially 1 Corinthians 14:23-26 ; 1 Corinthians 14:31 ; 1 Corinthians 14:39 .
(4) In such meetings, when "the whole church" came together "in one place," women were required to keep silence 1 Corinthians 14:34 ; 1 Corinthians 14:35 ; 1 Corinthians 11:3-16 ; 1 Timothy 2:11-14 .
(5) These injunctions are declared to be "the commandments of the Lord" 1 Corinthians 14:36 ; 1 Corinthians 14:37 .

Verse Meaning

This verse sums up what Paul had just written about love, and it resumes the thought in 1 Corinthians 12:31 by restating that exhortation. In contrast to some of the milder advice he gave in this epistle, Paul urged his readers strongly to follow the way of love. This imperative advances the thought by urging the readers to seek the gift of prophesying in particular. This indicates that, while spiritual gifts are sovereignly bestowed, God does not necessarily grant them all at conversion. One may strongly desire a gift.
"At the end of chap12 , where he had been speaking specifically of the gifts themselves as gracious endowments, he told them, "eagerly desire the greater charismata." Now in a context where the emphasis will be on the activity of the Spirit in the community at worship, he says, "eagerly desire the things of the Spirit [1]."" [2]

Context Summary

1 Corinthians 14:1-12 - The Gift Of "prophesying"
The word prophesy is used here, as so largely in Scripture, not in the limited sense of foretelling the future, but of pouring forth heaven-given speech. There was a strong tendency at Corinth to magnify the use of tongues; that is, forms of utterance which the assembly could not understand. The Apostle rebukes this, and says that it is far better to be able to speak to the edification of the hearers. Indeed, he directs that speech in an unknown tongue should be withheld, unless someone were present who could explain and interpret it.
The gift of tongues was a special sign intended for the convincing of that age, but it was not a necessary accompaniment of the filling of the Holy Spirit, and is certainly of inferior value. A mere blare of a trumpet, without note or modulation, conveys no meaning to the waiting ranks of soldiers; and the mere sound of an unknown tongue startles without teaching. Do not be content merely to make a sound; say something. Seek to do actual service to others is one of the three directions suggested in 1 Corinthians 14:3. Edification is the building up of the soul in truth. Comfort is for the distressed and weary. Consolation is the heartening of the soul to fresh enterprise. [source]

Chapter Summary: 1 Corinthians 14

1  Prophecy is commended,
2  and preferred before speaking in tongues,
6  by a comparison drawn from musical instruments
12  Both must be referred to edification,
22  as to their true and proper end
26  The true use of each is taught,
27  and the abuse rebuked
34  Women in the churches

Greek Commentary for 1 Corinthians 14:1

Follow after love [διωκετε την αγαπην]
As if a veritable chase. Paul comes back to the idea in 1 Corinthians 12:31 (same use of ζηλουτε — zēloute) and proves the superiority of prophecy to the other spiritual gifts not counting faith, hope, love of 1 Corinthians 13:13. [source]
But rather that ye may prophesy [μαλλον δε ινα προπητευητε]
Distinct aim in view as in 1 Corinthians 14:5. Old verb from προπητης — prophētēs common in N.T. Present subjunctive, “that ye may keep on prophesying.” [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for 1 Corinthians 14:1

Matthew 13:14 Is fulfilled [αναπληρουται]
Aoristic present passive indicative. Here Jesus points out the fulfilment and not with Matthew‘s usual formula The verb αναπληροω — anaplēroō occurs nowhere else in the Gospels, but occurs in the Pauline Epistles. It means to fill up like a cup, to fill another‘s place (1 Corinthians 14:16), to fill up what is lacking (Philemon 2:30). Here it means that the prophecy of Isaiah is fully satisfied in the conduct of the Pharisees and Jesus himself points it out. Note two ways of reproducing the Hebrew idiom (infinitive absolute), one by ακοηι — akoēi the other by βλεποντες — blepontes Note also the strong negative ου μη — ou mē with aorist subjunctive. [source]
John 3:8 Sound [φωνὴν]
Rev., voice. Used both of articulate and inarticulate utterances, as of the words from heaven at Jesus' baptism and transfiguration (Matthew 3:17; 2 Peter 1:17, 2 Peter 1:18); of the trumpet (Matthew 24:31; 1 Corinthians 14:8), and of inanimate things in general (1 Corinthians 14:17). John the Baptist calls himself φωνή , a voice, and the word is used of the wind, as here, in Acts 2:6. Of thunder, often in the Revelation (Revelation 6:1; Revelation 14:2, etc.). [source]
John 1:1 The Word [ὁ λόγος]
Logos. This expression is the keynote and theme of the entire gospel. Λόγος is from the root λεγ , appearing in λέγω , the primitive meaning of which is to lay: then, to pick out, gather, pick up: hence to gather or put words together, and so, to speak. Hence λόγος is, first of all, a collecting or collection both of things in the mind, and of words by which they are expressed. It therefore signifies both the outward form by which the inward thought is expressed, and the inward thought itself, the Latin oratio and ratio: compare the Italian ragionare, “to think” and “to speak.” As signifying the outward form it is never used in the merely grammatical sense, as simply the name of a thing or act ( ἔπος, ὄνομα, ῥῆμα ), but means a word as the thing referred to: the material, not the formal part: a word as embodying a conception or idea. See, for instance, Matthew 22:46; 1 Corinthians 14:9, 1 Corinthians 14:19. Hence it signifies a saying, of God, or of man (Matthew 19:21, Matthew 19:22; Mark 5:35, Mark 5:36): a decree, a precept (Romans 9:28; Mark 7:13). The ten commandments are called in the Septuagint, οἱ δέκα λόγοι , “the ten words ” (Exodus 34:28), and hence the familiar term decalogue. It is further used of discourse: either of the act of speaking (Acts 14:12), of skill and practice in speaking (Acts 18:15; 2 Timothy 4:15), specifically the doctrine of salvation through Christ (Matthew 13:20-23; Philemon 1:14); of narrative, both the relation and the thing related (Acts 1:1; John 21:23; Mark 1:45); of matter under discussion, an affair, a case in law (Acts 15:6; Acts 19:38). -DIVIDER-
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As signifying the inward thought, it denotes the faculty of thinking and reasoning (Hebrews 4:12); regard or consideration (Acts 20:24); reckoning, account (Philemon 4:15, Philemon 4:17; Hebrews 4:13); cause or reason (Acts 10:29). -DIVIDER-
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John uses the word in a peculiar sense, here, and in John 1:14; and, in this sense, in these two passages only. The nearest approach to it is in Revelation 19:13, where the conqueror is called the Word of God; and it is recalled in the phrases Word of Life, and the Life was manifested (1 John 1:1, 1 John 1:2). Compare Hebrews 4:12. It was a familiar and current theological term when John wrote, and therefore he uses it without explanation. Old Testament Usage of the TermThe word here points directly to Psalm href="/desk/?q=ps+33:6&sr=1">Psalm 33:6). The idea of God, who is in his own nature hidden, revealing himself in creation, is the root of the Logos-idea, in contrast with all materialistic or pantheistic conceptions of creation. This idea develops itself in the Old Testament on three lines. (1) The Word, as embodying the divine will, is personified in Hebrew poetry. Consequently divine attributes are predicated of it as being the continuous revelation of God in law and prophecy (Psalm 3:4; Isaiah 40:8; Psalm 119:105). The Word is a healer in Psalm 107:20; a messenger in Psalm 147:15; the agent of the divine decrees in Isaiah 55:11. (2) The personified wisdom (Job 28:12sq.; Job 28). Even Death, which unlocks so many secrets, and the underworld, know it only as a rumor (Job href="/desk/?q=job+28:22&sr=1">Job 28:22). It is only God who knows its way and its place (Job 28:23). He made the world, made the winds and the waters, made a decree for the rain and a way for the lightning of the thunder (Job 28:25, Job 28:26). He who possessed wisdom in the beginning of his way, before His works of old, before the earth with its depths and springs and mountains, with whom was wisdom as one brought up with Him (Proverbs 8:26-31), declared it. “It became, as it were, objective, so that He beheld it” (Job 28:27) and embodied it in His creative work. This personification, therefore, is based on the thought that wisdom is not shut up at rest in God, but is active and manifest in the world. “She standeth in the top of high places, by the way in the places of the paths. She crieth at the gates, at the entry of the city, at the coming in at the doors” (Proverbs 8:2, Proverbs 8:3). She builds a palace and prepares a banquet, and issues a general invitation to the simple and to him that wanteth understanding (Proverbs 9:1-6). It is viewed as the one guide to salvation, comprehending all revelations of God, and as an attribute embracing and combining all His other attributes. -DIVIDER-
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(3) The Angel of Jehovah. The messenger of God who serves as His agent in the world of sense, and is sometimes distinguished from Jehovah and sometimes identical with him (Genesis 16:7-13; Genesis 32:24-28; Hosea 12:4, Hosea 12:5; Exodus 23:20, Exodus 23:21; Malachi 3:1). Apocryphal UsageIn the Apocryphal writings this mediative element is more distinctly apprehended, but with a tendency to pantheism. In the Wisdom of Solomon (at least 100 b.c.), where wisdom seems to be viewed as another name for the whole divine nature, while nowhere connected with the Messiah, it is described as a being of light, proceeding essentially from God; a true image of God, co-occupant of the divine throne; a real and independent principle, revealing God in the world and mediating between it and Him, after having created it as his organ - in association with a spirit which is called μονογενές , only begotten (7:22). “She is the breath of the power of God, and a pure influence flowing from the glory of the Almighty; therefore can no defiled thing fall into her. For she is the brightness of the everlasting light, the unspotted mirror of the power of God, and the image of his goodness” (see chapter 7, throughout). Again: “Wisdom reacheth from one end to another mightily, and sweetly doth she order all things. In that she is conversant with God, she magnifieth her nobility: yea, the Lord of all things Himself loved her. For she is privy to the mysteries of the knowledge of God, and a lover of His works. Moreover, by the means of her I shall obtain immortality, and leave behind me an everlasting memorial to them that come after me” (chapter 9). In 16:12, it is said, “Thy word, O Lord, healeth all things” (compare Psalm 107:20); and in 18:15,16, “Thine almighty word leaped from heaven out of thy royal throne, as a fierce man of war into the midst of a land of destruction, and brought thine unfeigned commandment as a sharp sword, and, standing up, filled all things with death; and it touched the heaven, but it stood upon the earth.” See also Wisdom of Sirach, chapters 1,24, and Genesis href="/desk/?q=ge+39:21&sr=1">Genesis 39:21, they paraphrase, “The Memra was with Joseph in prison.” In Psalm 110:1-7Jehovah addresses the first verse to the Memra. The Memra is the angel that destroyed the first-born of Egypt, and it was the Memra that led the Israelites in the cloudy pillar. Usage in the Judaeo-Alexandrine PhilosophyFrom the time of Ptolemy I: (323-285 b.c.), there were Jews in great numbers in Egypt. Philo (a.d. 50) estimates them at a million in his time. Alexandria was their headquarters. They had their own senate and magistrates, and possessed the same privileges as the Greeks. The Septuagint translation of the Hebrew Scriptures into Greek (b.c. 280-150) was the beginning of a literary movement among them, the key-note of which was the reconciliation of Western culture and Judaism, the establishment of a connection between the Old Testament faith and the Greek philosophy. Hence they interpreted the facts of sacred history allegorically, and made them symbols of certain speculative principles, alleging that the Greek philosophers had borrowed their wisdom from Moses. Aristobulus (about 150 b.c.) asserted the existence of a previous and much older translation of the law, and dedicated to Ptolemy VI an allegorical exposition of the Pentateuch, in which he tried to show that the doctrines of the Peripatetic or Aristotelian school were derived from the Old Testament. Most of the schools of Greek philosophy were represented among the Alexandrian Jews, but the favorite one was the Platonic. The effort at reconciliation culminated in Philo, a contemporary of Christ. Philo was intimately acquainted with the Platonic philosophy, and made it the fundamental feature of his own doctrines, while availing himself likewise of ideas belonging to the Peripatetic and Stoic schools. Unable to discern the difference in the points of view from which these different doctrines severally proceeded, he jumbled together not merely discordant doctrines of the Greek schools, but also those of the East, regarding the wisdom of the Greeks as having originated in the legislation and writings of Moses. He gathered together from East and West every element that could help to shape his conception of a vicegerent of God, “a mediator between the eternal and the ephemeral. His Logos reflects light from countless facets.” According to Philo, God is the absolute Being. He calls God “that which is:” “the One and the All.” God alone exists for himself, without multiplicity and without mixture. No name can properly be ascribed to Him: He simply is. Hence, in His nature, He is unknowable. -DIVIDER-
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Outside of God there exists eternal matter, without form and void, and essentially evil; but the perfect Being could not come into direct contact with the senseless and corruptible; so that the world could not have been created by His direct agency. Hence the doctrine of a mediating principle between God and matter - the divine Reason, the Logos in whom are comprised all the ideas of finite things, and who created the sensible world by causing these ideas to penetrate into matter. -DIVIDER-
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The absolute God is surrounded by his powers ( δυνάμεις ) as a king by his servants. These powers are, in Platonic language, ideas; in Jewish, angels; but all are essentially one, and their unity, as they exist in God, as they emanate from him, as they are disseminated in the world, is expressed by Logos Hence the Logos appears under a twofold aspect: (1) As the immanent reason of God, containing within itself the world-ideal, which, while not outwardly existing, is like the immanent reason in man. This is styled Λόγος ἐνδιάθετος , i.e., the Logos conceived and residing in the mind. This was the aspect emphasized by the Alexandrians, and which tended to the recognition of a twofold personality in the divine essence. (2) As the outspoken word, proceeding from God and manifest in the world. This, when it has issued from God in creating the world, is the Λόγος προφορικός , i.e., the Logos uttered, even as in man the spoken word is the manifestation of thought. This aspect prevailed in Palestine, where the Word appears like the angel of the Pentateuch, as the medium of the outward communication of God with men, and tends toward the recognition of a divine person subordinate to God. Under the former aspect, the Logos is, really, one with God's hidden being: the latter comprehends all the workings and revelations of God in the world; affords from itself the ideas and energies by which the world was framed and is upheld; and, filling all things with divine light and life, rules them in wisdom, love, and righteousness. It is the beginning of creation, not inaugurated, like God, nor made, like the world; but the eldest son of the eternal Father (the world being the younger); God's image; the mediator between God and the world; the highest angel; the second God. -DIVIDER-
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Philo's conception of the Logos, therefore, is: the sum-total and free exercise of the divine energies; so that God, so far as he reveals himself, is called Logos; while the Logos, so far as he reveals God, is called God. -DIVIDER-
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John's doctrine and terms are colored by these preceding influences. During his residence at Ephesus he must have become familiar with the forms and terms of the Alexandrian theology. Nor is it improbable that he used the term Logos with an intent to facilitate the passage from the current theories of his time to the pure gospel which he proclaimed. “To those Hellenists and Hellenistic Jews, on the one hand, who were vainly philosophizing on the relations of the finite and infinite; to those investigators of the letter of the Scriptures, on the other, who speculated about the theocratic revelations, John said, by giving this name Logos to Jesus: 'The unknown Mediator between God and the world, the knowledge of whom you are striving after, we have seen, heard, and touched. Your philosophical speculations and your scriptural subtleties will never raise you to Him. Believe as we do in Jesus, and you will possess in Him that divine Revealer who engages your thoughts'” (Godet). -DIVIDER-
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But John's doctrine is not Philo's, and does not depend upon it. The differences between the two are pronounced. Though both use the term Logos, they use it with utterly different meanings. In John it signifies word, as in Holy Scripture generally; in Philo, reason; and that so distinctly that when Philo wishes to give it the meaning of word, he adds to it by way of explanation, the term ῥῆμα , word. The nature of the being described by Logos is conceived by each in an entirely different spirit. John's Logos is a person, with a consciousness of personal distinction; Philo's is impersonal. His notion is indeterminate and fluctuating, shaped by the influence which happens to be operating at the time. Under the influence of Jewish documents he styles the Logos an “archangel;” under the influence of Plato, “the Idea of Ideas;” of the Stoics, “the impersonal Reason.” It is doubtful whether Philo ever meant to represent the Logos formally as a person. All the titles he gives it may be explained by supposing it to mean the ideal world on which the actual is modeled. -DIVIDER-
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In Philo, moreover, the function of the Logos is confined to the creation and preservation of the universe. He does not identify or connect him with the Messiah. His doctrine was, to a great degree, a philosophical substitute for Messianic hopes. He may have conceived of the Word as acting through the Messiah, but not as one with him. He is a universal principle. In John the Messiah is the Logos himself, uniting himself with humanity, and clothing himself with a body in order to save the world. -DIVIDER-
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The two notions differ as to origin. The impersonal God of Philo cannot pass to the finite creation without contamination of his divine essence. Hence an inferior agent must be interposed. John's God, on the other hand, is personal, and a loving personality. He is a Father (John 1:18); His essence is love (John 3:16; 1 John 4:8, 1 John 4:16). He is in direct relation with the world which He desires to save, and the Logos is He Himself, manifest in the flesh. According to Philo, the Logos is not coexistent with the eternal God. Eternal matter is before him in time. According to John, the Logos is essentially with the Father from all eternity (John 1:2), and it is He who creates all things, matter included (John 1:3). -DIVIDER-
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Philo misses the moral energy of the Hebrew religion as expressed in its emphasis upon the holiness of Jehovah, and therefore fails to perceive the necessity of a divine teacher and Savior. He forgets the wide distinction between God and the world, and declares that, were the universe to end, God would die of loneliness and inactivity. The Meaning of Logos in JohnAs Logos has the double meaning of thought and speech, so Christ is related to God as the word to the idea, the word being not merely a name for the idea, but the idea itself expressed. The thought is the inward word (Dr. Schaff compares the Hebrew expression “I speak in my heart” for “I think”). The Logos of John is the real, personal God (John 1:1), the Word, who was originally before the creation with God. and was God, one in essence and nature, yet personally distinct (John 1:1, John 1:18); the revealer and interpreter of the hidden being of God; the reflection and visible image of God, and the organ of all His manifestations to the world. Compare Hebrews 1:3. He made all things, proceeding personally from God for the accomplishment of the act of creation (Hebrews 1:3), and became man in the person of Jesus Christ, accomplishing the redemption of the world. Compare Philemon 2:6. -DIVIDER-
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The following is from William Austin, “Meditation for Christmas Day,” cited by Ford on John:-DIVIDER-
“The name Word is most excellently given to our Savior; for it expresses His nature in one, more than in any others. Therefore St. John, when he names the Person in the Trinity (1 John 5:7), chooses rather to call Him Word than Son; for word is a phrase more communicable than son. Son hath only reference to the Father that begot Him; but word may refer to him that conceives it; to him that speaks it; to that which is spoken by it; to the voice that it is clad in; and to the effects it raises in him that hears it. So Christ, as He is the Word, not only refers to His Father that begot Him, and from whom He comes forth, but to all the creatures that were made by Him; to the flesh that He took to clothe Him; and to the doctrine He brought and taught, and, which lives yet in the hearts of all them that obediently do hear it. He it is that is this Word; and any other, prophet or preacher, he is but a voice (Luke 3:4). Word is an inward conception of the mind; and voice is but a sign of intention. St. John was but a sign, a voice; not worthy to untie the shoe-latchet of this Word. Christ is the inner conception 'in the bosom of His Father;' and that is properly the Word. And yet the Word is the intention uttered forth, as well as conceived within; for Christ was no less the Word in the womb of the Virgin, or in the cradle of the manger, or on the altar of the cross, than he was in the beginning, 'in the bosom of his Father.' For as the intention departs not from the mind when the word is uttered, so Christ, proceeding from the Father by eternal generation, and after here by birth and incarnation, remains still in Him and with Him in essence; as the intention, which is conceived and born in the mind, remains still with it and in it, though the word be spoken. He is therefore rightly called the Word, both by His coming from, and yet remaining still in, the Father.”And the WordA repetition of the great subject, with solemn emphasis.Was with God ( ἦν πὸς τὸν Θεὸν )Anglo-Saxon vers., mid Gode. Wyc., at God. With ( πρός ) does not convey the full meaning, that there is no single English word which will give it better. The preposition πρός , which, with the accusative case, denotes motion towards, or direction, is also often used in the New Testament in the sense of with; and that not merely as being near or beside, but as a living union and communion; implying the active notion of intercourse. Thus: “Are not his sisters here with us ” ( πρὸς ἡμᾶς ), i.e., in social relations with us (Mark 6:3; Matthew 13:56). “How long shall I be with you ” ( πρὸς ὑμᾶς , Mark 9:16). “I sat daily with you ” (Matthew 26:55). “To be present with the Lord ” ( πρὸς τὸν Κύριον , 2 Corinthians 5:8). “Abide and winter with you ” (1 Corinthians 16:6). “The eternal life which was with the Father ” ( πρὸς τὸν πατέρα , 1 John 1:2). Thus John's statement is that the divine Word not only abode with the Father from all eternity, but was in the living, active relation of communion with Him.And the Word was God ( καὶ Θεὸς ἦν ὁ λόγος )In the Greek order, and God was the Word, which is followed by Anglo-Saxon, Wyc., and Tynd. But θεὸς , God, is the predicate and not the subject of the proposition. The subject must be the Word; for John is not trying to show who is God, but who is the Word. Notice that Θεὸς is without the article, which could not have been omitted if he had meant to designate the word as God; because, in that event, Θεὸς would have been ambiguous; perhaps a God. Moreover, if he had said God was the Word, he would have contradicted his previous statement by which he had distinguished (hypostatically) God from the word, and λόγος (Logos) would, further, have signified only an attribute of God. The predicate is emphatically placed in the proposition before the subject, because of the progress of the thought; this being the third and highest statement respecting the Word - the climax of the two preceding propositions. The word God, used attributively, maintains the personal distinction between God and the Word, but makes the unity of essence and nature to follow the distinction of person, and ascribes to the Word all the attributes of the divine essence. “There is something majestic in the way in which the description of the Logos, in the three brief but great propositions of John 1:1, is unfolded with increasing fullness” (Meyer). [source]

Acts 4:13 Ignorant [ἰδιῶται]
Originally, one in a private station, as opposed to one in office or in public affairs. Therefore one without professional knowledge, a layman; thence, generally, ignorant, ill-informed; sometimes plebeian, common. In the absence of certainty it is as well to retain the meaning given by the A. V., perhaps with a slight emphasis on the want of professional knowledge. Compare 1 Corinthians 14:16, 1 Corinthians 14:23, 1 Corinthians 14:24; 2 Corinthians 11:6. [source]
Acts 28:2 Barbarous people []
From the Roman point of view, regarding all as barbarians who spoke neither Greek nor Latin. Not necessarily uncivilized. It is equivalent to foreigners. Compare Romans 1:14; 1 Corinthians 14:11. The inhabitants of Malta were of Carthaginian descent. “Even in the present day the natives of Malta have a peculiar language, termed the Maltese, which has been proved to be essentially an Arabic dialect, with an admixture of Italian” (Gloag). [source]
Acts 2:4 With other tongues [ετεραις γλωσσαις]
Other than their native tongues. Each one began to speak in a language that he had not acquired and yet it was a real language and understood by those from various lands familiar with them. It was not jargon, but intelligible language. Jesus had said that the gospel was to go to all the nations and here the various tongues of earth were spoken. One might conclude that this was the way in which the message was to be carried to the nations, but future developments disprove it. This is a third miracle (the sound, the tongues like fire, the untaught languages). There is no blinking the fact that Luke so pictures them. One need not be surprised if this occasion marks the fulfilment of the Promise of the Father. But one is not to confound these miraculous signs with the Holy Spirit. They are merely proof that he has come to carry on the work of his dispensation. The gift of tongues came also on the house of Cornelius at Caesarea (Acts 10:44-47; Acts 11:15-17), the disciples of John at Ephesus (Acts 19:6), the disciples at Corinth (1 Corinthians 14:1-33). It is possible that the gift appeared also at Samaria (Acts 8:18). But it was not a general or a permanent gift. Paul explains in 1 Corinthians 14:22 that “tongues” were a sign to unbelievers and were not to be exercised unless one was present who understood them and could translate them. This restriction disposes at once of the modern so-called tongues which are nothing but jargon and hysteria. It so happened that here on this occasion at Pentecost there were Jews from all parts of the world, so that some one would understand one tongue and some another without an interpreter such as was needed at Corinth. The experience is identical in all four instances and they are not for edification or instruction, but for adoration and wonder and worship. [source]
Acts 2:6 When this sound was heard [γενομενης της πωνης ταυτης]
Genitive absolute with aorist middle participle. Note πωνη — phōnē this time, not ηχο — ēcho as in Acts 2:1. Πωνη — Phōnē originally meant sound as of the wind (John 3:8) or an instrument (1 Corinthians 14:7, 1 Corinthians 14:8, 1 Corinthians 14:10), then voice of men. The meaning seems to be that the excited “other tongues” of Acts 2:4 were so loud that the noise drew the crowd together. The house where the 120 were may have been (Hackett) on one of the avenues leading to the temple. [source]
Acts 21:22 What is it therefore? [Τι ουν εστιν]
See this form of question by Paul (1 Corinthians 14:15, 1 Corinthians 14:26). What is to be done about it? Clearly James and the elders do not believe these misrepresentations of Paul‘s teaching, but many do. [source]
Acts 21:9 Virgins which did prophesy [παρτενοι προπητευσαι]
Not necessarily an “order” of virgins, but Philip had the honour of having in his home four virgin daughters with the gift of prophecy which was not necessarily predicting events, though that was done as by Agabus here. It was more than ordinary preaching (cf. Acts 19:6) and was put by Paul above the other gifts like tongues (1 Corinthians 14:1-33). The prophecy of Joel (Joel 2:28.) about their sons and daughters prophesying is quoted by Peter and applied to the events on the day of Pentecost (Acts 2:17). Paul in 1 Corinthians 11:5 gives directions about praying and prophesying by the women (apparently in public worship) with the head uncovered and sharply requires the head covering, though not forbidding the praying and prophesying. With this must be compared his demand for silence by the women in 1 Corinthians 14:34-40; 1 Timothy 2:8-15 which it is not easy to reconcile. One wonders if there was not something known to Paul about special conditions in Corinth and Ephesus that he has not told. There was also Anna the prophetess in the temple (Luke 2:36) besides the inspired hymns of Elizabeth (Luke 1:42-45) and of Mary (Luke 1:46-55). At any rate there was no order of women prophets or official ministers. There were Old Testament prophetesses like Miriam, Deborah, Huldah. Today in our Sunday schools the women do most of the actual teaching. The whole problem is difficult and calls for restraint and reverence. One thing is certain and that is that Luke appreciated the services of women for Christ as is shown often in his writings (Luke 8:1-3, for instance) before this incident. [source]
Romans 8:4 The Spirit [πνεῦμα]
From πνέω tobreathe or blow. The primary conception is wind or breath. Breath being the sign and condition of life in man, it comes to signify life. In this sense, physiologically considered, it is frequent in the classics. In the psychological sense, never. In the Old Testament it is ordinarily the translation of ruach It is also used to translate chai life, Isaiah 38:12; nbreath, 1 Kings 17:17. In the New Testament it occurs in the sense of wind or breath, John 3:8; 2 Thessalonians 2:8; Hebrews 1:7. Closely related to the physiological sense are such passages as Luke 8:55; James 2:26; Revelation 13:15. Pauline Usage: 1. Breath, 2 Thessalonians 2:8. 2. The spirit or mind of man; the inward, self-conscious principle which feels and thinks and wills (1 Corinthians 2:11; 1 Corinthians 5:3; 1 Corinthians 7:34; Colossians 2:5). In this sense it is distinguished from σῶμα bodyor accompanied with a personal pronoun in the genitive, as my, our, his spirit (Romans 1:9; Romans 8:16; 1 Corinthians 5:4; 1 Corinthians 16:18, etc.). It is used as parallel with ψυχή souland καρδία heartSee 1 Corinthians 5:3; 1 Thessalonians 2:17; and compare John 13:21and John 12:27; Matthew 26:38and Luke 1:46, Luke 1:47. But while ψυχή soulis represented as the subject of life, πνεύμα spiritrepresents the principle of life, having independent activity in all circumstances of the perceptive and emotional life, and never as the subject. Generally, πνεύμα spiritmay be described as the principle, ψυχή soulas the subject, and καρδία heartas the organ of life. 3. The spiritual nature of Christ. Romans 1:4; 1 Corinthians 15:45; 1 Timothy 3:16. 4. The divine power or influence belonging to God, and communicated in Christ to men, in virtue of which they become πνευματικοί spiritual - recipientsand organs of the Spirit. This is Paul's most common use of the word. Romans 8:9; 1 Corinthians 2:13; Galatians 4:6; Galatians 6:1; 1 Thessalonians 4:8. In this sense it appears as: a. Spirit of God. Romans 8:9, Romans 8:11, Romans 8:14; 1 Corinthians 2:10, 1 Corinthians 2:11, 1 Corinthians 2:12, 1 Corinthians 2:14; 1 Corinthians 3:16; 1 Corinthians 6:11; 1 Corinthians 7:40; 2 Corinthians 3:3; Ephesians 3:16. b. Spirit of Christ. Romans 8:9; 2 Corinthians 3:17, 2 Corinthians 3:18; Galatians 4:6; Philemon 1:19. c. Holy Spirit. Romans 5:5; 1 Corinthians 6:19; 1 Corinthians 12:3; Ephesians 1:13; 1 Thessalonians 1:5, 1 Thessalonians 1:6; 1 Thessalonians 4:8, etc. d. Spirit. With or without the article, but with its reference to the Spirit of God or Holy Spirit indicated by the context. Romans 8:16, Romans 8:23, Romans 8:26, Romans 8:27; 1 Corinthians 2:4, 1 Corinthians 2:10; 1 Corinthians 12:4, 1 Corinthians 12:7, 1 Corinthians 12:8, 1 Corinthians 12:9; Ephesians 4:3; 2 Thessalonians 2:13, etc. 5. A power or influence, the character, manifestations, or results of which are more peculiarly defined by qualifying genitives. Thus spirit of meekness, faith, power, wisdom. Romans 8:2, Romans 8:15; 1 Corinthians 4:21; 2 Corinthians 4:13; Galatians 6:1; Ephesians 1:17; 2 Timothy 1:7, etc. These combinations with the genitives are not mere periphrases for a faculty or disposition of man. By the spirit of meekness or wisdom, for instance, is not meant merely a meek or wise spirit; but that meekness, wisdom, power, etc., are gifts of the Spirit of God. This usage is according to Old Testament analogy. Compare Exodus 28:3; Exodus 31:3; Exodus 35:31; Isaiah 11:2. 6. In the plural, used of spiritual gifts or of those who profess to be under spiritual influence, 1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 14:12. 7. Powers or influences alien or averse from the divine Spirit, but with some qualifying word. Thus, the spirit of the world; another spirit; spirit of slumber. Romans 11:8; 1 Corinthians 2:12; 2 Corinthians 11:4; Ephesians 2:2; 2 Timothy 1:7. Where these expressions are in negative form they are framed after the analogy of the positive counterpart with which they are placed in contrast. Thus Romans 8:15: “Ye have not received the spirit of bondage, but of adoption. In other cases, as Ephesians 2:2, where the expression is positive, the conception is shaped according to Old-Testament usage, where spirits of evil are conceived as issuing from, and dependent upon, God, so far as He permits their operation and makes them subservient to His own ends. See Judges 9:23; 1 Samuel 16:14-16, 1 Samuel 16:23; 1 Samuel 18:10; 1 Kings 22:21sqq.; Isaiah 19:4. Spirit is found contrasted with letter, Romans 2:29; Romans 7:6; 2 Corinthians 3:6. With flesh, Romans 8:1-13; Galatians 5:16, Galatians 5:24. It is frequently associated with the idea of power (Romans 1:4; Romans 15:13, Romans 15:19; 1 Corinthians 2:4; Galatians 3:5; Ephesians 3:16; 2 Timothy 1:7); and the verb ἐνεργεῖν , denoting to work efficaciously, is used to mark its special operation (1 Corinthians 12:11; Ephesians 3:20; Philemon 2:13; Colossians 1:29). It is also closely associated with life, Romans 8:2, Romans 8:6, Romans 8:11, Romans 8:13; 1 Corinthians 15:4, 1 Corinthians 15:5; 2 Corinthians 3:6; Galatians 5:25; Galatians 6:8. It is the common possession of the Church and its members; not an occasional gift, but an essential element and mark of the christian life; not appearing merely or mainly in exceptional, marvelous, ecstatic demonstrations, but as the motive and mainspring of all christian action and feeling. It reveals itself in confession (1 Corinthians 12:3); in the consciousness of sonship (Romans 8:16); in the knowledge of the love of God (Romans 5:5); in the peace and joy of faith (Romans 14:17; 1 Thessalonians 1:6); in hope (Romans 5:5; Romans 15:13). It leads believers (Romans 8:14; Galatians 5:18): they serve in newness of the Spirit (Romans 7:6) They walk after the Spirit (Romans 8:4, Romans 8:5; Galatians 5:16-25). Through the Spirit they are sanctified (2 Thessalonians 2:13). It manifests itself in the diversity of forms and operations, appearing under two main aspects: a difference of gifts, and a difference of functions. See Romans 8:9; 1 Corinthians 3:16; 1 Corinthians 5:1, 1 Corinthians 5:11; 1 Corinthians 12:13; Ephesians 1:13; Ephesians 4:3, Ephesians 4:4, Ephesians 4:30; Philemon 2:1; [source]
Romans 12:13 Given to hospitality [φιλοξενίαν διώκοντες]
Lit., pursuing hospitality. For a similar use of the verb compare 1 Corinthians 14:1; 1 Thessalonians 5:15; Hebrews 12:14; 1 Peter 3:11. A necessary injunction when so many Christians were banished and persecuted. The verb indicates not only that hospitality is to be furnished when sought, but that Christians are to seek opportunities of exercising it. [source]
Romans 7:23 The law of my mind [τῷ νόμῳ τοῦ νοός μου]
Νοῦς mindis a term distinctively characteristic of Paul, though not confined to him. See Luke 24:45; Revelation 13:18; Revelation 17:9. Paul's usage of this term is not based, like that of spirit and flesh, on the Septuagint, though the word occurs six times as the rendering of lebh heart, and once of ruach spirit. -DIVIDER-
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He uses it to throw into sharper relief the function of reflective intelligence and moral judgment which is expressed generally by καρδία heartkey to its Pauline usage is furnished by the contrast in 1 Corinthians 14:14-19, between speaking with a tongue and with the understanding ( τῷ νοΐ́ ), and between the spirit and the understanding (1 Corinthians 14:14). There it is the faculty of reflective intelligence which receives and is wrought upon by the Spirit. It is associated with γνωμή opinionresulting from its exercise, in 1 Corinthians 1:10; and with κρίνει judgethin Romans 14:5. -DIVIDER-
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Paul uses it mainly with an ethical reference - moral judgment as related to action. See Romans 12:2, where the renewing of the νοῦς mindis urged as a necessary preliminary to a right moral judgment (“that ye may prove,” etc.,). The νοῦς which does not exercise this judgment is ἀδόκιμος notapproved, reprobate. See note on reprobate, Romans 1:28, and compare note on 2 Timothy 3:8; note on Titus 1:15, where the νοῦς is associated with the conscience. See also on Ephesians 4:23. -DIVIDER-
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It stands related to πνεῦμα spiritas the faculty to the efficient power. It is “the faculty of moral judgment which perceives and approves what is good, but has not the power of practically controlling the life in conformity with its theoretical requirements.” In the portrayal of the struggle in this chapter there is no reference to the πνεῦμα spiritwhich, on the other hand, distinctively characterizes the christian state in ch. 8. In this chapter Paul employs only terms pertaining to the natural faculties of the human mind, and of these νοῦς mindis in the foreground. [source]

Romans 1:14 Both to Greeks and to Barbarians [ελλησιν τε και βαρβαροις]
The whole human race from the Greek point of view, Jews coming under βαρβαροις — barbarois On this word see note on Acts 28:2, Acts 28:4; note on 1 Corinthians 14:11; and note on Colossians 3:11 (only N.T. instances). The Greeks called all others barbarians and the Jews termed all others Gentiles. Did Paul consider the Romans as Greeks? They had absorbed the Greek language and culture. [source]
Romans 15:9 I will sing [πσαλω]
Future active of πσαλλω — psallō for which verb see note on 1 Corinthians 14:15. [source]
Romans 2:17 Approvest the things that are excellent [κατηχουμενος εκ του νομου]
Originally, “Thou testest the things that differ,” and then as a result comes the approval for the excellent things. As in Philemon 1:10 it is difficult to tell which stage of the process Paul has in mind. Instructed out of the law (κατηχεω — katēchoumenos ek tou nomou). Present passive participle of katēcheō a rare verb to instruct, though occurring in the papyri for legal instruction. See note on Luke 1:4 and note on 1 Corinthians 14:19. The Jew‘s “ethical discernment was the fruit of catechetical and synagogical instruction in the Old Testament” (Shedd). [source]
Romans 2:17 Restest upon the law [επαναπαυηι νομωι]
Late and rare double compound, in lxx and once in the Didache. In N.T. only here and Luke 10:6 which see. It means to lean upon, to refresh oneself back upon anything, here with locative case It is the picture of blind and mechanical reliance on the Mosaic law. Gloriest in God (καυχασαι εν τεωι — kauchāsai en theōi). Koiné{[28928]}š vernacular form for καυχαι — kauchāi (καυχαεσαι καυχασαι — kauchaesaiκαυχαομαι — kauchāsai) of κατακαυχασαι — kauchaomai as in Romans 2:23; 1 Corinthians 4:7 and δοκιμαζεις τα διαπεροντα — katakauchāsai in Romans 11:18. The Jew gloried in God as a national asset and private prerogative (2 Corinthians 10:15; Galatians 6:13). Approvest the things that are excellent Originally, “Thou testest the things that differ,” and then as a result comes the approval for the excellent things. As in Philemon 1:10 it is difficult to tell which stage of the process Paul has in mind. Instructed out of the law (κατηχεω — katēchoumenos ek tou nomou). Present passive participle of katēcheō a rare verb to instruct, though occurring in the papyri for legal instruction. See note on Luke 1:4 and note on 1 Corinthians 14:19. The Jew‘s “ethical discernment was the fruit of catechetical and synagogical instruction in the Old Testament” (Shedd). [source]
Romans 2:17 Instructed out of the law [κατηχεω]
Present passive participle of katēcheō a rare verb to instruct, though occurring in the papyri for legal instruction. See note on Luke 1:4 and note on 1 Corinthians 14:19. The Jew‘s “ethical discernment was the fruit of catechetical and synagogical instruction in the Old Testament” (Shedd). [source]
1 Corinthians 14:20 Understanding [σρεσίν]
Only here in the New Testament. Originally, in a physical sense, the diaphragm. Denoting the reasoning power on the reflective side, and perhaps intentionally used instead of νοῦς (1 Corinthians 14:15), which emphasizes the distinction from ecstasy. [source]
1 Corinthians 10:16 The cup of blessing [τὸ ποτήριον τῆς εὐλογίας]
Lit., the blessing: the cup over which the familiar formula of blessing is pronounced. Hence the Holy Supper was often styled Eulogia (Blessing). For blessing, see on blessed, 1 Peter 1:3. It is the same as eucharistia (thanksgiving ), applied as the designation of the Lord's Supper: Eucharist. See 1 Corinthians 14:16; 1 Timothy 4:4, 1 Timothy 4:5. The cup is first mentioned, perhaps, because Paul wishes to dwell more at length on the bread; or possibly, because drinking rather than eating characterized the idol-feasts. [source]
1 Corinthians 14:16 He that filleth the place of the unlearned [ο αναπληρων τον τοπον του ιδιωτου]
Not a special part of the room, but the position of the ιδιωτου — idiōtou (from ιδιος — idios one‘s own), common from Herodotus for private person (Acts 4:13), unskilled (2 Corinthians 11:6), uninitiated (unlearned) in the gift of tongues as here and 1 Corinthians 14:23. At thy giving of thanks (επι τηι σηι ευχαριστιαι — epi tēi sēi eucharistiāi). Just the prayer, not the Eucharist or the Lord‘s Supper, as is plain from 1 Corinthians 14:17. [source]
1 Corinthians 14:16 At thy giving of thanks [επι τηι σηι ευχαριστιαι]
Just the prayer, not the Eucharist or the Lord‘s Supper, as is plain from 1 Corinthians 14:17. [source]
1 Corinthians 15:37 It may chance [ει τυχοι]
Fourth class condition as in 1 Corinthians 14:10 which see. Paul is rich in metaphors here, though usually not so (Howson, Metaphors of St. Paul). Paul was a city man. We sow seeds, not plants (bodies). The butterfly comes out of the dying worm. [source]
1 Corinthians 12:10 Divers kinds of tongues [γένη γλωσσῶν]
I. Passages Relating to the Gift of Tongues. Mark 16:17; Acts href="/desk/?q=ac+10:46&sr=1">Acts 10:46; Acts 19:6; 1 Corinthians 12:10, Acts 2:16-188; 1 Corinthians 13:1; 14. Possibly Ephesians 5:18; 1 Peter 4:11. II. Terms Employed. New tongues (Mark 16:17): other or different tongues ( ἕτεραι , Acts 2:4): kinds ( γένη ) of tongues (1 Corinthians 12:10): simply tongues or tongue ( γλῶσσαι γλῶσσα , Acts href="/desk/?q=ac+2:4&sr=1">Acts 2:4; Acts 10:46; Acts 19:6; 1 Corinthians 14:2, 1 Corinthians 14:4, 1 Corinthians 14:13, 1 Corinthians 14:14, 1 Corinthians 14:19, 1 Corinthians 14:27): to pray in a tongue ( προσεύχεσθαι γλώσσῃ , 1 Corinthians 14:14, 1 Corinthians 14:15), equivalent to praying in the spirit as distinguished from praying with the understanding: tongues of men and angels (1 Corinthians 13:1). -DIVIDER-
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III. Recorded Facts in the New Testament. (1.) The first recorded bestowment of the gift was at Pentecost (Acts href="/desk/?q=ac+10:44-46&sr=1">Acts 10:44-46. (3.) Certain disciples at Ephesus, who received the Holy Spirit in the laying on of Paul's hands, spake with tongues and prophesied, Acts 19:6. -DIVIDER-
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IV. Meaning of the Term “Tongue.” The various explanations are: the tongue alone, inarticulately: rare, provincial, poetic, or archaic words: language or dialect. The last is the correct definition. It does not necessarily mean any of the known languages of men, but may mean the speaker's own tongue, shaped in a peculiar manner by the Spirit's influence; or an entirely new spiritual language. -DIVIDER-
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V. Nature of the Gift in the Corinthian Church. (1.) The gift itself was identical with that at Pentecost, at Caesarea, and at Ephesus, but differed in its manifestations, in that it required an interpreter. 1 Corinthians 12:10, 1 Corinthians 12:30; 1 Corinthians 14:5, 1 Corinthians 14:13, 1 Corinthians 14:26, 1 Corinthians 14:27. (2.) It was closely connected with prophesying: 1 Corinthians 14:1-6, 1 Corinthians 14:22, 1 Corinthians 14:25; 1642405522_22; Acts 19:6. Compare 1 Thessalonians 5:19, 1 Thessalonians 5:20. It was distinguished from prophesying as an inferior gift, 1 Corinthians 14:4, 1 Corinthians 14:5; and as consisting in expressions of praise or devotion rather than of exhortation, warning, or prediction, 1 Corinthians 14:14-16. (3.) It was an ecstatic utterance, unintelligible to the hearers, and requiring interpretation, or a corresponding ecstatic condition on the part of the hearer in order to understand it. It was not for the edification of the hearer but of the speaker, and even the speaker did not always understand it, 1 Corinthians 14:2, 1 Corinthians 14:19. It therefore impressed unchristian bystanders as a barbarous utterance, the effect of madness or drunkenness, Acts 2:13, Acts 2:15; 1 Corinthians 14:11, 1 Corinthians 14:23. Hence it is distinguished from the utterance of the understanding, 1 Corinthians 14:4, 1 Corinthians 14:14-16, 1 Corinthians 14:19, 1 Corinthians 14:27. -DIVIDER-
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VI. Paul's Estimate of the Gift. He himself was a master of the gift (1 Corinthians 14:18), but he assigned it an inferior position (1 Corinthians 14:4, 1 Corinthians 14:5), and distinctly gave prophesying and speaking with the understanding the preference (1 Corinthians 14:2, 1 Corinthians 14:3, 1 Corinthians 14:5, 1 Corinthians 14:19, 1 Corinthians 14:22). -DIVIDER-
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VII. Results and Permanence. Being recognized distinctly as a gift of the Spirit, it must be inferred that it contributed in some way to the edification of the Church; but it led to occasional disorderly outbreaks (1 Corinthians 14:9, 1 Corinthians 14:11, 1 Corinthians 14:17, 1 Corinthians 14:20-23, 1 Corinthians 14:26-28, 1 Corinthians 14:33, 1 Corinthians 14:40). As a fact it soon passed away from the Church. It is not mentioned in the Catholic or Pastoral Epistles. A few allusions to it occur in the writings of the fathers of the second century. Ecstatic conditions and manifestations marked the Montanists at the close of the second century, and an account of such a case, in which a woman was the subject, is given by Tertullian. Similar phenomena have emerged at intervals in various sects, at times of great religious excitement, as among the Camisards in France, the early Quakers and Methodists, and especially the Irvingites. -DIVIDER-
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[source]

1 Corinthians 12:10 Prophecy [προπητεια]
Late word from προπητης — prophētēs and προπημι — prophēmi to speak forth. Common in papyri. This gift Paul will praise most (chapter 1 Corinthians 14). Not always prediction, but a speaking forth of God‘s message under the guidance of the Holy Spirit. Discernings of spirits (διακρισεις πνευματων — diakriseis pneumatōn). Διακρισις — Diakrisis is old word from διακρινω — diakrinō (see note on 1 Corinthians 11:29) and in N.T. only here; Romans 14:1; Hebrews 5:14. A most needed gift to tell whether the gifts were really of the Holy Spirit and supernatural (cf. so-called “gifts” today) or merely strange though natural or even diabolical (1 Timothy 4:1; 1 John 4:1.). Divers kinds of tongues No word for “divers” in the Greek. There has arisen a great deal of confusion concerning the gift of tongues as found in Corinth. They prided themselves chiefly on this gift which had become a source of confusion and disorder. There were varieties (kinds, γενη — genē) in this gift, but the gift was essentially an ecstatic utterance of highly wrought emotion that edified the speaker (1 Corinthians 14:4) and was intelligible to God (1 Corinthians 14:2, 1 Corinthians 14:28). It was not always true that the speaker in tongues could make clear what he had said to those who did not know the tongue (1 Corinthians 14:13): It was not mere gibberish or jargon like the modern “tongues,” but in a real language that could be understood by one familiar with that tongue as was seen on the great Day of Pentecost when people who spoke different languages were present. In Corinth, where no such variety of people existed, it required an interpreter to explain the tongue to those who knew it not. Hence Paul placed this gift lowest of all. It created wonder, but did little real good. This is the error of the Irvingites and others who have tried to reproduce this early gift of the Holy Spirit which was clearly for a special emergency and which was not designed to help spread the gospel among men. See notes on Acts 2:13-21; notes on Acts Acts 10:44-46; and note on Acts 19:6. The interpretation of tongues (ερμηνεια γλωσσων — hermēneia glōssōn). Old word, here only and 1 Corinthians 14:26 in N.T., from ερμηνευω — hermēneuō from ερμης — Hermēs (the god of speech). Cf. on διερμηνευω — diermēneuō in Luke 24:27; Acts 9:36. In case there was no one present who understood the particular tongue it required a special gift of the Spirit to some one to interpret it if any one was to receive benefit from it. [source]
1 Corinthians 12:10 Divers kinds of tongues [γενη γλωσσων]
No word for “divers” in the Greek. There has arisen a great deal of confusion concerning the gift of tongues as found in Corinth. They prided themselves chiefly on this gift which had become a source of confusion and disorder. There were varieties (kinds, γενη — genē) in this gift, but the gift was essentially an ecstatic utterance of highly wrought emotion that edified the speaker (1 Corinthians 14:4) and was intelligible to God (1 Corinthians 14:2, 1 Corinthians 14:28). It was not always true that the speaker in tongues could make clear what he had said to those who did not know the tongue (1 Corinthians 14:13): It was not mere gibberish or jargon like the modern “tongues,” but in a real language that could be understood by one familiar with that tongue as was seen on the great Day of Pentecost when people who spoke different languages were present. In Corinth, where no such variety of people existed, it required an interpreter to explain the tongue to those who knew it not. Hence Paul placed this gift lowest of all. It created wonder, but did little real good. This is the error of the Irvingites and others who have tried to reproduce this early gift of the Holy Spirit which was clearly for a special emergency and which was not designed to help spread the gospel among men. See notes on Acts 2:13-21; notes on Acts Acts 10:44-46; and note on Acts 19:6. The interpretation of tongues (ερμηνεια γλωσσων — hermēneia glōssōn). Old word, here only and 1 Corinthians 14:26 in N.T., from ερμηνευω — hermēneuō from ερμης — Hermēs (the god of speech). Cf. on διερμηνευω — diermēneuō in Luke 24:27; Acts 9:36. In case there was no one present who understood the particular tongue it required a special gift of the Spirit to some one to interpret it if any one was to receive benefit from it. [source]
1 Corinthians 6:1 Having a matter against his neighbour [πραγμα εχων προς τον ετερον]
Forensic sense of πραγμα — pragma (from πρασσω — prassō to do, to exact, to extort as in Luke 3:13), a case, a suit (Demosthenes 1020, 26), with the other or the neighbour as in 1 Corinthians 10:24; 1 Corinthians 14:17; Galatians 6:4; Romans 2:1. Go to law (κρινεσται — krinesthai). Present middle or passive (ch. Romans 3:4) in the same forensic sense as κριτηναι — krithēnai in Matthew 5:40. Κριτης — Kritēs judge, is from this verb. Before the unrighteous This use of επι — epi with the genitive for “in the presence of” is idiomatic as in 2 Corinthians 7:14, επι Τιτου — epi Titou in the case of Titus. The Jews held that to bring a lawsuit before a court of idolaters was blasphemy against the law. But the Greeks were fond of disputatious lawsuits with each other. Probably the Greek Christians brought cases before pagan judges. [source]
2 Corinthians 11:6 Rude [ἰδίωτης]
See on 1 Corinthians 14:16. [source]
2 Corinthians 1:20 The Amen [το Αμην]
In public worship (1 Corinthians 14:16). [source]
2 Corinthians 11:6 Rude in speech [ιδιωτης τωι λογωι]
Locative case with ιδιωτης — idiōtēs for which word see note on Acts 4:13; note on 1 Corinthians 14:16, note on 1 Corinthians 14:23, and 1 Corinthians 14:24. The Greeks regarded a man as ιδιωτης — idiōtēs who just attended to his own affairs (τα ιδια — ta idia) and took no part in public life. Paul admits that he is not a professional orator (cf. 2 Corinthians 10:10), but denies that he is unskilled in knowledge (αλλ ου τηι γνωσει — all' ou tēi gnōsei). [source]
2 Corinthians 12:6 Of me [εις εμε]
To my credit, almost like dative (cf. εν εμοι — en emoi in 1 Corinthians 14:11). [source]
2 Corinthians 5:13 Whether we are beside ourselves [ειτε εχεστημεν]
Second aorist active indicative of εχιστημι — existēmi old verb, here to stand out of oneself (intransitive) from εκστασις — ekstasis ecstasy, comes as in Mark 5:42. It is literary plural, for Paul is referring only to himself. See note on 2 Corinthians 1:6 for ειτεειτε — eite -eite It is a condition of the first class and Paul assumes as true the charge that he was crazy (if I was crazy) for the sake of argument. Festus made it later (Acts 26:24). He spoke with tongues (1 Corinthians 14:18) and had visions (2 Corinthians 12:1-6) which probably the Judaizers used against him. A like charge was made against Jesus (Mark 3:21). People often accuse those whom they dislike with being a bit off. [source]
Galatians 4:17 They zealously affect you [ζηλοῦσιν ὑμᾶς]
They are zealously paying you court in order to win you over to their side. Affect, in this sense, is obsolete. It is from affectare, to strive after, earnestly desire. So Shaks. Tam. of Shr. I. i. 40:“In brief, sir, study what you most affect.”Ben Johnson, Alchem. iii. 2:“Pray him aloud to name what dish he affects.”As a noun, desire. So Chaucer, Troil. and Cress. iii. 1391:“As Crassus dide for his affectis wronge” (his wrong desires).Comp. 1 Corinthians 12:31; 1 Corinthians 14:1. [source]
Galatians 2:18 I build again the things which I destroyed [ἃ κατέλυσα ταῦτα πάλιν οἰκοδομῶ]
Peter, by his Christian profession, had asserted that justification was by faith alone; and by his eating with Gentiles had declared that the Mosaic law was no longer binding upon him. He had thus, figuratively, destroyed or pulled down the Jewish law as a standard of Christian faith and conduct. By his subsequent refusal to eat with Gentiles he had retracted this declaration, had asserted that the Jewish law was still binding upon Christians, and had thus built again what he had pulled down. Building and pulling down are favorite figures with Paul. See Romans 14:20; Romans 15:20; 1 Corinthians 8:1, 1 Corinthians 8:10; 1 Corinthians 10:23; 1 Corinthians 14:17; Ephesians 2:20f. For καταλύειν destroysee on Romans 14:20; see on 2 Corinthians 5:1. [source]
Galatians 1:14 More exceedingly zealous [περισσοτερως ζηλοτης]
Literally, “more exceedingly a zealot.” See note on Acts 1:13; note on Acts 21:20; and note on 1 Corinthians 14:12. Like Simon Zelotes. [source]
Galatians 1:14 Beyond many of mine own age [υπερ πολλους συνηλικιωτας]
Later compound form for the Attic ηλικιωτης — hēlikiōtēs which occurs in Dion Hal. and inscriptions (from συν — sun with, and ηλικια — hēlikia age). Paul modestly claims that he went “beyond” Literally, “more exceedingly a zealot.” See note on Acts 1:13; note on Acts 21:20; and note on 1 Corinthians 14:12. Like Simon Zelotes. For the traditions of my fathers Objective genitive after ζηλοτης — zēlotēs Πατρικων — Patrikōn only here in N.T., though old word from πατηρ — patēr (father), paternal, descending from one‘s father. For πατρωιος — patrōios see note on Acts 22:3 and Acts 22:14. Tradition Paul now taught the Christian tradition (2 Thessalonians 2:15). [source]
Galatians 1:16 To reveal his Son in me [αποκαλυπσαι τον υιον αυτου εν εμοι]
By “in me” Once (1 Corinthians 14:11) εν εμοι — en emoi is almost equivalent to the dative (to me). On the whole Lightfoot seems correct here in taking it to mean “in my case,” though the following words suit either idea. Certainly Paul could not preach Christ among the Gentiles without the rich inward experience and in the objective vision he was called to that task. [source]
Galatians 6:2 Fulfil [αναπληρωσατε]
First aorist active imperative of αναπληροω — anaplēroō to fill up, old word, and see note on Matthew 23:32; note 1 Thessalonians 2:16; and note 1 Corinthians 14:16. Some MSS. have future indicative (αναπληρωσετε — anaplērōsete). [source]
Galatians 6:6 That is taught [ο κατηχουμενος]
For this late and rare verb κατηχεω — katēcheō see note on Luke 1:4; note on Acts 18:25; and note on 1 Corinthians 14:19. It occurs in the papyri for legal instruction. Here the present passive participle retains the accusative of the thing. The active There was a teaching class thus early (1 Thessalonians 5:12; 1 Corinthians 12:28; Ephesians 4:11; 1 Thessalonians 5:17). [source]
Ephesians 5:19 Psalms []
See on 1 Corinthians 14:15. [source]
Philippians 3:12 I have already obtained [ηδη ελαβον]
Rather, “I did already obtain,” constative second aorist active indicative of λαμβανω — lambanō summing up all his previous experiences as a single event. Or am already made perfect (η ηδη τετελειωμαι — ē ēdē teteleiōmai). Perfect passive indicative (state of completion) of τελειοω — teleioō old verb from τελειος — teleios and that from τελος — telos (end). Paul pointedly denies that he has reached a spiritual impasse of non- development. Certainly he knew nothing of so-called sudden absolute perfection by any single experience. Paul has made great progress in Christlikeness, but the goal is still before him, not behind him. But I press on He is not discouraged, but encouraged. He keeps up the chase (real idea in διωκω — diōkō as in 1 Corinthians 14:1; Romans 9:30; 1 Timothy 6:11). If so be that (ει και — ei kai). “I follow after.” The condition (third class, εικαταλαβω — ei̇̇katalabō second aorist active subjunctive of καταλαμβανω — katalambanō) is really a sort of purpose clause or aim. There are plenty of examples in the Koiné{[28928]}š of the use of ει — ei and the subjunctive as here (Robertson, Grammar, p. 1017), “if I also may lay hold of that for which (επ ωι — Ephesians' hōi purpose expressed by επι — epi) I was laid hold of (κατελημπτην — katelēmphthēn first aorist passive of the same verb καταλαμβανω — katalambanō) by Christ Jesus.” His conversion was the beginning, not the end of the chase. [source]
Philippians 3:12 But I press on [διωκω δε]
He is not discouraged, but encouraged. He keeps up the chase (real idea in διωκω — diōkō as in 1 Corinthians 14:1; Romans 9:30; 1 Timothy 6:11). If so be that (ει και — ei kai). “I follow after.” The condition (third class, εικαταλαβω — ei̇̇katalabō second aorist active subjunctive of καταλαμβανω — katalambanō) is really a sort of purpose clause or aim. There are plenty of examples in the Koiné{[28928]}š of the use of ει — ei and the subjunctive as here (Robertson, Grammar, p. 1017), “if I also may lay hold of that for which (επ ωι — Ephesians' hōi purpose expressed by επι — epi) I was laid hold of (κατελημπτην — katelēmphthēn first aorist passive of the same verb καταλαμβανω — katalambanō) by Christ Jesus.” His conversion was the beginning, not the end of the chase. [source]
Colossians 3:16 Psalms []
See the parallel passage, Ephesians 5:19. A psalm was originally a song accompanied by a stringed instrument. See on 1 Corinthians 14:15. The idea of accompaniment passed away in usage, and the psalm, in New-Testament phraseology, is an Old-Testament psalm, or a composition having that character. A hymn is a song of praise, and a song ( ᾠδή ode) is the general term for a song of any kind. Hymns would probably be distinctively Christian. It is supposed by some that Paul embodies fragments of hymns in his epistles, as 1 Corinthians 13:1-13; Ephesians 5:14; 1 Timothy 3:16; 2 Timothy 2:11-14. James 1:17, and Revelation 1:5, Revelation 1:6; Revelation 15:3, are also supposed to be of this character. In both instances of his use of ᾠδή songPaul adds the term spiritual. The term may, as Trench suggests, denote sacred poems which are neither psalms nor hymns, as Herbert's “Temple,” or Keble's “Christian Year.” This is the more likely, as the use of these different compositions is not restricted to singing nor to public worship. They are to be used in mutual christian teaching and admonition. [source]
Colossians 1:24 Fill up [ἀνταναπληρῶ]
Only here in the New Testament. Lit., fill up in turn. Rev., on my part ( ἀντί ) Ἁναπληρόω tofill up occurs 1 Corinthians 14:16; 1 Corinthians 16:17; Galatians 6:2, and elsewhere. The double compound προσαναπληρόω tofill up by adding, 2 Corinthians 9:12(note); 2 Corinthians 11:9. Ἁντί onmy part offsets Christ in the next clause. Lightfoot explains well: “It signifies that the supply comes from an opposite quarter to the deficiency, and so describes the correspondence of the personal agents,” and not merely the correspondence of the supply with the deficiency. [source]
Colossians 3:11 Barbarian, Scythian []
See on 1 Corinthians 14:11. The distinction is from the Greek and Roman point of view, where the line is drawn by culture, as between the Jew and the Greek it was drawn by religious privilege. From the former stand-point the Jew ranked as a barbarian. Scythian. “More barbarous than the barbarians” (Bengel). Hippocrates describes them as widely different from the rest of mankind, and like to nothing but themselves, and gives an absurd description of their physical peculiarities. Herodotus describes them as living in wagons, offering human sacrifices, scalping and sometimes flaying slain enemies, drinking their blood, and using their skulls for drinking-cups. When a king dies, one of his concubines is strangled and buried with him, and, at the close of a year, fifty of his attendants are strangled, disemboweled, mounted on dead horses, and left in a circle round his tomb. The Scythians passed through Palestine on their road to Egypt, b.c. 600, and a trace of their invasion is supposed to have existed in the name Scythopolis, by which Beth Shean was known in Christ's time. Ezekiel apparently refers to them (38,39) under the name Gog, which reappears in Revelation. See on Revelation 20:8. [source]
1 Thessalonians 5:20 Prophesyings [προφητείας]
The emphasis on prophesyings corresponds with that in 1 Corinthians 14:1-5, 1 Corinthians 14:22ff. Prophecy in the apostolic church was directly inspired instruction, exhortation, or warning. The prophet received the truth into his own spirit which was withdrawn from earthly things and concentrated upon the spiritual world. His higher, spiritual part ( πνεῦμα ), and his moral intelligence ( νοῦς ), and his speech ( λόγος ) worked in harmony. His spirit received a spiritual truth in symbol: his understanding interpreted it in its application to actual events, and his speech uttered the interpretation. He was not ecstatically rapt out of the sphere of human intelligence, although his understanding was intensified and clarified by the phenomenal action of the Spirit upon it. This double action imparted a peculiarly elevated character to his speech. The prophetic influence was thus distinguished from the mystical ecstasy, the ecstasy of Paul when rapt into the third heaven, which affected the subject alone and was incommunicable (2 Corinthians 12:1-4). The gift of tongues carried the subject out of the prophetic condition in which spirit, understanding, and speech operated in concert, and into a condition in which the understanding was overpowered by the communication to the spirit, so that the spirit could not find its natural expression in rational speech, or speech begotten of the understanding, and found supernatural expression in a tongue created by the Spirit. Paul attached great value to prophecy. He places prophets next after apostles in the list of those whom God has set in the Church (1 Corinthians 12:28). He associates apostles and prophets as the foundation of the Church (1 Corinthians 14:1-58). He assigns to prophecy the precedence among spiritual gifts (1642405522_88), and urges his readers to desire the gift (1 Corinthians 14:1, 1 Corinthians 14:39). Hence his exhortation here. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:2 In mind [ἀπὸ τοῦ νοὸς]
More correctly, from your mind. Νοῦς signifies the judgment, sober sense. Comp. 1 Corinthians 14:15, and see on Romans 7:23. They are to “keep their heads” under the temptation to fanatical extravagances concerning the Lord's appearing. [source]
1 Timothy 5:10 Diligently followed [ἐπακο ουθησεν]
Comp. 1 Timothy 5:24. Ἑπὶ afteror close upon. oP. Once in the disputed verses at the end of Mark (Mark 16:20), and 1 Peter 2:21. Comp. the use of διώκειν pursue Romans 9:30; Romans 12:13; 1 Corinthians 14:1; 1 Thessalonians 5:15. [source]
1 Timothy 2:8 I will [βούλομαι]
Better, I desire. See on Matthew 1:19, and comp. Philemon 1:12. Paul's word is θέλω Iwill. See Romans 16:19; 1 Corinthians 7:32; 1 Corinthians 10:20; 1 Corinthians 14:5, 1 Corinthians 14:19, etc. [source]
1 Timothy 4:1 Expressly [ρητως]
Late adverb, here alone in N.T., from verbal adjective ρητος — rētos (from root ρεω — reō). The reference is to the Holy Spirit, but whether to O.T. prophecy (Acts 1:16) or to some Christian utterance (2 Thessalonians 2:2; 1 Corinthians 14:1.) we do not know. Parry recalls the words of Jesus in Matthew 24:10, Matthew 24:24. [source]
2 Timothy 2:22 Follow [δίωκε]
Pursue. Stronger than follow. A favorite word with Paul to denote the pursuit of moral and spiritual ends. See Romans 9:30, Romans 9:31; Romans 12:13; 1 Corinthians 14:1; Philemon 3:12. [source]
Titus 2:14 That he might redeem us [ινα λυτρωσηται]
Final clause, ινα — hina and the aorist middle subjunctive of λυτροω — lutroō old verb from λυτρον — lutron (ransom), in N.T. only here, Luke 24:21; 1 Peter 1:18. Purify to himself (καταρισηι εαυτωι — katharisēi heautōi). Final clause with first aorist active subjunctive of καταριζω — katharizō for which verb see note on Ephesians 5:26. Lawlessness See note on 2 Thessalonians 2:3. A people for his own possession (λαον περιουσιον — laon periousion). A late word (from περιειμι — perieimi to be over and above, in papyri as well as περιουσια — periousia), only in lxx and here, apparently made by the lxx, one‘s possession, and so God‘s chosen people. See note on 1 Peter 2:9 (λαος εις περιποιησιν — laos eis peripoiēsin). Zealous of good works “A zealot for good works.” Substantive for which see note on 1 Corinthians 14:12; Galatians 1:14. Objective genitive εργων — ergōn f0). [source]
Titus 2:14 Lawlessness [ανομιας]
See note on 2 Thessalonians 2:3. A people for his own possession (λαον περιουσιον — laon periousion). A late word (from περιειμι — perieimi to be over and above, in papyri as well as περιουσια — periousia), only in lxx and here, apparently made by the lxx, one‘s possession, and so God‘s chosen people. See note on 1 Peter 2:9 (λαος εις περιποιησιν — laos eis peripoiēsin). Zealous of good works “A zealot for good works.” Substantive for which see note on 1 Corinthians 14:12; Galatians 1:14. Objective genitive εργων — ergōn f0). [source]
Titus 2:14 Zealous of good works [ζηλωτην καλων εργων]
“A zealot for good works.” Substantive for which see note on 1 Corinthians 14:12; Galatians 1:14. Objective genitive εργων — ergōn f0). [source]
Titus 3:14 Let learn [μαντανετωσαν]
Present active imperative, keep on learning how. To maintain See Titus 3:8. For necessary uses (εις αναγκαιας χρειας — eis anagkaias chreias). “For necessary wants.” No idlers wanted. See 1 Thessalonians 4:12; 2 Thessalonians 3:10. -DIVIDER-
Unfruitful (ακαρποι — akarpoi). See note on 1 Corinthians 14:14; Ephesians 5:11. [source]

Titus 3:14 To maintain [προστασται]
See Titus 3:8. For necessary uses (εις αναγκαιας χρειας — eis anagkaias chreias). “For necessary wants.” No idlers wanted. See 1 Thessalonians 4:12; 2 Thessalonians 3:10. -DIVIDER-
Unfruitful (ακαρποι — akarpoi). See note on 1 Corinthians 14:14; Ephesians 5:11. [source]

Titus 2:14 A peculiar people [λαὸν περιούσιον]
Λαός peopleonly here in Pastorals. In Paul ten times, always in citations. Most frequently in Luke and Acts; often in Hebrews and Revelation. Περιούσιος N.T.oA few times in lxx, always with λαός . See Exodus 19:5; Exodus 23:22; Deuteronomy 7:6; Deuteronomy 14:2; Deuteronomy 26:18. The phrase was originally applied to the people of Israel, but is transferred here to believers in the Messiah - Jews and Gentiles. Comp. 1 Peter 2:10. Περιούσιος is from the participle of περιεῖναι tobe over and above: hence περιουσία abundanceplenty. Περιούσιος also means possessed over and above, that is, specially selected for one's own; exempt from ordinary laws of distribution. Hence correctly represented by peculiar, derived from peculium, a private purse, a special acquisition of a member of a family distinct from the property administered for the good of the whole family. Accordingly the sense is given in Ephesians 1:14, where believers are said to have been sealed εἰς ἀπολύτρωσιν τῆς περιποιήσεως witha view to redemption of possession, or redemption which will give possession, thus = acquisition. So 1 Peter 2:9, where Christians are styled λαὸς εἰς περιποίησιν apeople for acquisition, to be acquired by God as his peculiar possession. Comp. 1 Thessalonians 5:9; 2 Thessalonians 2:14, and περιποιεῖσθαι toacquire, Acts 20:28. The phrase καθαρίζειν λαὸν topurify the people, in lxx, Nehemiah 12:30; Acts href="/desk/?q=ac+21:20&sr=1">Acts 21:20; Acts 22:3; 1 Peter 3:13. Only here in Pastorals. In Paul, 1 Corinthians 14:12; Galatians 1:14. For the word as a title, see on the Canaanite, Matthew 10:4, and see on Mark 3:18. [source]
Titus 3:14 Unfruitful [ἄκαρποι]
Only here in Pastorals. In Paul, 1 Corinthians 14:14; Ephesians 5:11. Not only in supplying the needs, but in cultivating Christian graces in themselves by acts of Christian service. [source]
Hebrews 12:14 Follow peace [εἰρήνην διώκετε]
Comp. lxx, Romans href="/desk/?q=ro+14:19&sr=1">Romans 14:19; 1 Peter 3:11. The verb is used of the pursuit of moral and spiritual ends, Romans 9:30, Romans 9:31; Romans 12:13; 1 Corinthians 14:1; Philemon 3:12, Philemon 3:14; 1 Thessalonians 5:15; 1 Timothy 6:11; 2 Timothy 2:22. [source]
James 5:13 Let him sing psalms [ψαλλέτω]
The word means, primarily, to pluck or twitch. Hence of the sharp twang on a bowstring or harp-string, and so to play upon a stringed instrument. Our word psalm, derived from this, is, properly, a tune played upon a stringed instrument. The verb, however, is used in the New Testament of singing praise generally. See 1 Corinthians 14:15; Romans 15:9. [source]
James 5:13 Among you [εν υμιν]
As in James 3:13.Let him pray (προσευχεστω — proseuchesthō). Present middle imperative, “let him keep on praying” (instead of cursing as in James 5:12).Is any cheerful Present active indicative of ευτυμεω — euthumeō old verb from ευτυμος — euthumos (Acts 27:36), in N.T. only here and Acts 27:22, Acts 27:25.Let him sing praise (πσαλλετω — psalletō). Present active imperative of πσαλλω — psallō originally to twang a chord as on a harp, to sing praise to God whether with instrument or without, in N.T. only here, 1 Corinthians 14:15; Romans 15:9; Ephesians 5:19. “Let him keep on making melody.” [source]
James 5:13 Is any cheerful [ευτυμει]
Present active indicative of ευτυμεω — euthumeō old verb from ευτυμος — euthumos (Acts 27:36), in N.T. only here and Acts 27:22, Acts 27:25.Let him sing praise (πσαλλετω — psalletō). Present active imperative of πσαλλω — psallō originally to twang a chord as on a harp, to sing praise to God whether with instrument or without, in N.T. only here, 1 Corinthians 14:15; Romans 15:9; Ephesians 5:19. “Let him keep on making melody.” [source]
James 5:13 Let him sing praise [πσαλλετω]
Present active imperative of πσαλλω — psallō originally to twang a chord as on a harp, to sing praise to God whether with instrument or without, in N.T. only here, 1 Corinthians 14:15; Romans 15:9; Ephesians 5:19. “Let him keep on making melody.” [source]
3 John 1:6 Before the church [ενωπιον εκκλησιας]
Public meeting as the anarthrous use of εκκλησια — ekklēsia indicates, like εν εκκλησιαι — en ekklēsiāi in 1 Corinthians 14:19, 1 Corinthians 14:35. [source]

What do the individual words in 1 Corinthians 14:1 mean?

Earnestly pursue - love earnestly desire now - spiritual gifts especially that you might prophesy
Διώκετε τὴν ἀγάπην ζηλοῦτε δὲ τὰ πνευματικά μᾶλλον ἵνα προφητεύητε

Διώκετε  Earnestly  pursue 
Parse: Verb, Present Imperative Active, 2nd Person Plural
Root: διώκω  
Sense: to make to run or flee, put to flight, drive away.
τὴν  - 
Parse: Article, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
ἀγάπην  love 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: ἀγάπη  
Sense: brotherly love, affection, good will, love, benevolence.
ζηλοῦτε  earnestly  desire 
Parse: Verb, Present Imperative Active, 2nd Person Plural
Root: ζηλεύω 
Sense: to burn with zeal.
δὲ  now 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: δέ  
Sense: but, moreover, and, etc.
τὰ  - 
Parse: Article, Accusative Neuter Plural
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
πνευματικά  spiritual  gifts 
Parse: Adjective, Accusative Neuter Plural
Root: πνευματικός  
Sense: relating to the human spirit, or rational soul, as part of the man which is akin to God and serves as his instrument or organ.
μᾶλλον  especially 
Parse: Adverb
Root: μᾶλλον  
Sense: more, to a greater degree, rather.
ἵνα  that 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: ἵνα  
Sense: that, in order that, so that.
προφητεύητε  you  might  prophesy 
Parse: Verb, Present Subjunctive Active, 2nd Person Plural
Root: προφητεύω  
Sense: to prophesy, to be a prophet, speak forth by divine inspirations, to predict.