The Meaning of 1 Corinthians 12:1 Explained

1 Corinthians 12:1

KJV: Now concerning spiritual gifts, brethren, I would not have you ignorant.

YLT: And concerning the spiritual things, brethren, I do not wish you to be ignorant;

Darby: But concerning spiritual manifestations, brethren, I do not wish you to be ignorant.

ASV: Now concerning spiritual gifts , brethren, I would not have you ignorant.

What does 1 Corinthians 12:1 Mean?

Study Notes

spiritual gifts
The word pneumatika, lit. "spirituals," i.e. matters of or from the Holy Spirit, gives the key to Chapters 12, 13, 14. Chapter 12. concerns the Spirit in relation to the body of Christ. This relation is twofold:
(1) The baptism with the Spirit forms the body by uniting believers to Christ the risen and glorified Head, and to each other ( 1 Corinthians 12:12 ; 1 Corinthians 12:13 ). The symbol of the body thus formed is the natural, human body ( 1 Corinthians 12:12 ), and all the analogies are freely used ( 1 Corinthians 12:14-26 ).
(2) To each believer is given a spiritual enablement and capacity for specific service. No believer is destitute of such gift ( 1 Corinthians 12:7 ; 1 Corinthians 12:11 ; 1 Corinthians 12:27 ), but in their distribution the Spirit acts in free sovereignty ( 1 Corinthians 12:11 ). There is no room for self-choosing, and Christian service is simply the ministry of such gift as the individual may have received (cf) Romans 12:4-8 . The gifts are diverse ( 1 Corinthians 12:6 ; 1 Corinthians 12:8-10 ; 1 Corinthians 12:28-30 ), but all are equally honourable because bestowed by the same Spirit, administered under the same Lord, and energized by the same God.

Verse Meaning

The presence of the phrase peri de ("Now concerning" or "Now about") plus the change in subject mark another matter about which the Corinthians had written Paul with a question (cf. 1 Corinthians 7:1; 1 Corinthians 8:1). It had to do with the gifts (abilities) the Holy Spirit gives those believers He indwells. [1] This subject is the focus of all that Paul wrote in chapters12-14 , including the famous thirteenth chapter on love.
As in 1 Corinthians 10:1, Paul implied that what followed was instruction his readers needed. "Spiritual gifts" is literally "the spirituals" (Gr. ton pneumatikon). Paul used pneumatika when he wanted to emphasize the Spirit, and he used charismata when he wanted to stress the gift. Pneumatikon is a broader term than the gifts themselves, though it includes them. It appears to refer primarily to the people who are spiritual (cf. 1 Corinthians 2:15; 1 Corinthians 3:1). Evidently the Corinthians" question dealt with the marks of a spiritual Christian. A spiritual Christian is a believer under the control of the Holy Spirit compared with one under the control of his or her flesh ( Galatians 5:16) or a demonic spirit ( 1 Corinthians 10:20-21). In 1 Corinthians 2:15 Paul described mature Christians as "spiritual" (Gr. pneumatikos, having the Spirit) in contrast to "natural" (i.e, unsaved, not having the Spirit). However, he proceeded immediately to clarify that it is not only possession of the Spirit but also control by the Spirit that marks one as truly spiritual ( 1 Corinthians 3:3).

Context Summary

1 Corinthians 12:1-11 - Differing Spiritual Gifts
Each believer, being an heir of God, has the same amount of grace placed to his credit in the heavenly bank, on which he can draw in time of need. This is the parable of the pounds. Each servant received the same amount. But there are great diversities in the gifts with which we are endowed. Some have five talents, others two, and large numbers only one. A full enumeration of these gifts is made in 1 Corinthians 12:8-11, and it is a comfort to learn that to everyone something is allotted, 1 Corinthians 12:7; 1 Corinthians 12:11.
Notice that the allotment is made by the Holy Spirit acting sovereignly as He will, 1 Corinthians 12:11. We are not informed when it is made-perhaps it is at the moment of our regeneration or adoption-but it is important to bear in mind that our gifts will probably correspond with our natural endowment. Hence our Lord tells us that to every man was given according to his several ability, Matthew 25:15.
Mark the allusion to the Divine Trinity: the same Spirit, 1 Corinthians 12:4; the same Lord, 1 Corinthians 12:5; the same God, 1 Corinthians 12:6. The Spirit directs, the Savior is the channel of supply, and the Father is the fountain of all. [source]

Chapter Summary: 1 Corinthians 12

1  Spiritual gifts,
4  are diverse,
7  yet to profit all
8  And to that end are diversely bestowed;
12  as the members of a natural body tend all to the mutual decency,
22  service,
26  and helpfulness of the same body;
27  so we should do for one another, to make up the body of Christ

Greek Commentary for 1 Corinthians 12:1

Now concerning spiritual gifts [περι δε των πνευματικων]
Clearly one of the items asked about in the letter to Paul (1 Corinthians 7:1) and introduced precisely as the problem of meats offered to idols (1 Corinthians 8:1). This question runs to the end of chapter 14. Plainly much trouble had arisen in Corinth in the exercise of these gifts. [source]
Spiritual gifts []
The charismata or special endowments of supernatural energy, such as prophecy and speaking with tongues. “Before this consciousness of a higher power than their own, the ordinary and natural faculties of the human mind seemed to retire, to make way for loftier aspirations, more immediate intimations of the divine will, more visible manifestations of the divine power … . It resembled in some degree the inspiration of the Jewish judges, psalmists, and prophets; it may be illustrated by the ecstasies and visions of prophets in all religions; but in its energy and universality it was peculiar to the christian society of the apostolic age” (Stanley). [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for 1 Corinthians 12:1

Luke 15:12 And he divided [ο δε διειλεν]
The second aorist active indicative of διαιρεω — diaireō an old and common verb to part in two, cut asunder, divide, but in the N.T. only here and 1 Corinthians 12:11. The elder son got his share also of the “substance” or property or estate (της ουσιας — tēs ousias), “the living” (τον βιον — ton bion) as in Mark 12:44, not “life” as in Luke 8:14. [source]
Luke 7:1 In the ears of the people [Ακοη]
ακουω — Akoē from akouō to hear, is used of the sense of hearing (1 Corinthians 12:17), the ear with which one hears (Mark 7:35; Hebrews 5:11), the thing heard or the report (Romans 10:16) or oral instruction (Galatians 3:2, Galatians 3:5). Both Matthew 8:5-13; Luke 7:1-10 locate the healing of the centurion‘s servant in Capernaum where Jesus was after the Sermon on the Mount. [source]
Luke 7:1 Had ended [εις τας ακοας του λαου]
First aorist active indicative. There is here a reference to the conclusion of the Sermon on the Mount, but with nothing concerning the impression produced by the discourse such as is seen in Matthew 7:28. This verse really belongs as the conclusion of Chapter 6, not as the beginning of Chapter 7.In the ears of the people (Ακοη — eis tas akoas tou laou). ακουω — Akoē from akouō to hear, is used of the sense of hearing (1 Corinthians 12:17), the ear with which one hears (Mark 7:35; Hebrews 5:11), the thing heard or the report (Romans 10:16) or oral instruction (Galatians 3:2, Galatians 3:5). Both Matthew 8:5-13; Luke 7:1-10 locate the healing of the centurion‘s servant in Capernaum where Jesus was after the Sermon on the Mount. [source]
John 3:8 Where it listeth [ὅπου θέλει]
On the verb θέλω , to will or determine, see on Matthew 1:19. Listeth is old English for pleasure or willeth, from the Anglo-Saxon lust, meaning pleasure. Chaucer has the forms leste, lust, and list.“Strong was the wyn, and wel to drynke us leste (pleased ).”“Canterbury Tales,” 752.“Love if thee lust.”“Canterbury Tales,” 1185.“She walketh up and down wher as hire list (wherever she pleases ).”“Canterbury Tales,” 1054.“A wretch by fear, not force, like Hannibal, Drives back our troops, and conquers as she lists.”-DIVIDER-
Shakespeare, “Henry VI.,” Pt. I., i., v., 22. Hence listless is devoid of desire. The statement of Jesus is not meant to be scientifically precise, but is rather thrown into a poetic mold, akin to the familiar expression “free as the wind.” Compare 1 Corinthians 12:11; and for the more prosaic description of the course of the wind, see Ecclesiastes 1:6. [source]

Acts 2:4 As the Spirit gave them utterance [κατως το πνευμα εδιδου αποπτεγγεσται αυτοις]
This is precisely what Paul claims in 1 Corinthians 12:10, 1 Corinthians 12:28, but all the same without an interpreter the gift was not to be exercised (1 Corinthians 14:6-19). Paul had the gift of tongues, but refused to exercise it except as it would be understood. Note the imperfect tense here Perhaps they did not all speak at once, but one after another. Αποπτεγγεσται — Apophtheggesthai is a late verb (lxx of prophesying, papyri). Lucian uses it of the ring of a vessel when it strikes a reef. It is used of eager, elevated, impassioned utterance. In the N.T. only here, Acts 2:14; Acts 26:25. Αποπτεγμ — Apophthegm is from this verb. [source]
Romans 8:4 The Spirit [πνεῦμα]
From πνέω tobreathe or blow. The primary conception is wind or breath. Breath being the sign and condition of life in man, it comes to signify life. In this sense, physiologically considered, it is frequent in the classics. In the psychological sense, never. In the Old Testament it is ordinarily the translation of ruach It is also used to translate chai life, Isaiah 38:12; nbreath, 1 Kings 17:17. In the New Testament it occurs in the sense of wind or breath, John 3:8; 2 Thessalonians 2:8; Hebrews 1:7. Closely related to the physiological sense are such passages as Luke 8:55; James 2:26; Revelation 13:15. Pauline Usage: 1. Breath, 2 Thessalonians 2:8. 2. The spirit or mind of man; the inward, self-conscious principle which feels and thinks and wills (1 Corinthians 2:11; 1 Corinthians 5:3; 1 Corinthians 7:34; Colossians 2:5). In this sense it is distinguished from σῶμα bodyor accompanied with a personal pronoun in the genitive, as my, our, his spirit (Romans 1:9; Romans 8:16; 1 Corinthians 5:4; 1 Corinthians 16:18, etc.). It is used as parallel with ψυχή souland καρδία heartSee 1 Corinthians 5:3; 1 Thessalonians 2:17; and compare John 13:21and John 12:27; Matthew 26:38and Luke 1:46, Luke 1:47. But while ψυχή soulis represented as the subject of life, πνεύμα spiritrepresents the principle of life, having independent activity in all circumstances of the perceptive and emotional life, and never as the subject. Generally, πνεύμα spiritmay be described as the principle, ψυχή soulas the subject, and καρδία heartas the organ of life. 3. The spiritual nature of Christ. Romans 1:4; 1 Corinthians 15:45; 1 Timothy 3:16. 4. The divine power or influence belonging to God, and communicated in Christ to men, in virtue of which they become πνευματικοί spiritual - recipientsand organs of the Spirit. This is Paul's most common use of the word. Romans 8:9; 1 Corinthians 2:13; Galatians 4:6; Galatians 6:1; 1 Thessalonians 4:8. In this sense it appears as: a. Spirit of God. Romans 8:9, Romans 8:11, Romans 8:14; 1 Corinthians 2:10, 1 Corinthians 2:11, 1 Corinthians 2:12, 1 Corinthians 2:14; 1 Corinthians 3:16; 1 Corinthians 6:11; 1 Corinthians 7:40; 2 Corinthians 3:3; Ephesians 3:16. b. Spirit of Christ. Romans 8:9; 2 Corinthians 3:17, 2 Corinthians 3:18; Galatians 4:6; Philemon 1:19. c. Holy Spirit. Romans 5:5; 1 Corinthians 6:19; 1 Corinthians 12:3; Ephesians 1:13; 1 Thessalonians 1:5, 1 Thessalonians 1:6; 1 Thessalonians 4:8, etc. d. Spirit. With or without the article, but with its reference to the Spirit of God or Holy Spirit indicated by the context. Romans 8:16, Romans 8:23, Romans 8:26, Romans 8:27; 1 Corinthians 2:4, 1 Corinthians 2:10; 1 Corinthians 12:4, 1 Corinthians 12:7, 1 Corinthians 12:8, 1 Corinthians 12:9; Ephesians 4:3; 2 Thessalonians 2:13, etc. 5. A power or influence, the character, manifestations, or results of which are more peculiarly defined by qualifying genitives. Thus spirit of meekness, faith, power, wisdom. Romans 8:2, Romans 8:15; 1 Corinthians 4:21; 2 Corinthians 4:13; Galatians 6:1; Ephesians 1:17; 2 Timothy 1:7, etc. These combinations with the genitives are not mere periphrases for a faculty or disposition of man. By the spirit of meekness or wisdom, for instance, is not meant merely a meek or wise spirit; but that meekness, wisdom, power, etc., are gifts of the Spirit of God. This usage is according to Old Testament analogy. Compare Exodus 28:3; Exodus 31:3; Exodus 35:31; Isaiah 11:2. 6. In the plural, used of spiritual gifts or of those who profess to be under spiritual influence, 1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 14:12. 7. Powers or influences alien or averse from the divine Spirit, but with some qualifying word. Thus, the spirit of the world; another spirit; spirit of slumber. Romans 11:8; 1 Corinthians 2:12; 2 Corinthians 11:4; Ephesians 2:2; 2 Timothy 1:7. Where these expressions are in negative form they are framed after the analogy of the positive counterpart with which they are placed in contrast. Thus Romans 8:15: “Ye have not received the spirit of bondage, but of adoption. In other cases, as Ephesians 2:2, where the expression is positive, the conception is shaped according to Old-Testament usage, where spirits of evil are conceived as issuing from, and dependent upon, God, so far as He permits their operation and makes them subservient to His own ends. See Judges 9:23; 1 Samuel 16:14-16, 1 Samuel 16:23; 1 Samuel 18:10; 1 Kings 22:21sqq.; Isaiah 19:4. Spirit is found contrasted with letter, Romans 2:29; Romans 7:6; 2 Corinthians 3:6. With flesh, Romans 8:1-13; Galatians 5:16, Galatians 5:24. It is frequently associated with the idea of power (Romans 1:4; Romans 15:13, Romans 15:19; 1 Corinthians 2:4; Galatians 3:5; Ephesians 3:16; 2 Timothy 1:7); and the verb ἐνεργεῖν , denoting to work efficaciously, is used to mark its special operation (1 Corinthians 12:11; Ephesians 3:20; Philemon 2:13; Colossians 1:29). It is also closely associated with life, Romans 8:2, Romans 8:6, Romans 8:11, Romans 8:13; 1 Corinthians 15:4, 1 Corinthians 15:5; 2 Corinthians 3:6; Galatians 5:25; Galatians 6:8. It is the common possession of the Church and its members; not an occasional gift, but an essential element and mark of the christian life; not appearing merely or mainly in exceptional, marvelous, ecstatic demonstrations, but as the motive and mainspring of all christian action and feeling. It reveals itself in confession (1 Corinthians 12:3); in the consciousness of sonship (Romans 8:16); in the knowledge of the love of God (Romans 5:5); in the peace and joy of faith (Romans 14:17; 1 Thessalonians 1:6); in hope (Romans 5:5; Romans 15:13). It leads believers (Romans 8:14; Galatians 5:18): they serve in newness of the Spirit (Romans 7:6) They walk after the Spirit (Romans 8:4, Romans 8:5; Galatians 5:16-25). Through the Spirit they are sanctified (2 Thessalonians 2:13). It manifests itself in the diversity of forms and operations, appearing under two main aspects: a difference of gifts, and a difference of functions. See Romans 8:9; 1 Corinthians 3:16; 1 Corinthians 5:1, 1 Corinthians 5:11; 1 Corinthians 12:13; Ephesians 1:13; Ephesians 4:3, Ephesians 4:4, Ephesians 4:30; Philemon 2:1; [source]
Romans 6:3 Baptized into [εἶς]
See on Matthew 28:19. The preposition. denotes inward union, participation; not in order to bring about the union, for that has been effected. Compare 1 Corinthians 12:12, 1 Corinthians 12:13, 1 Corinthians 12:27. [source]
Romans 14:1 Doubtful disputations [διακρίσεις διαλογισμῶν]
Lit., judgings of thoughts. The primary meaning of διαλογισμός is a thinking-through or over. Hence of those speculations or reasonings in one's mind which take the form of scruples. See on Mark 7:21. Διάκρισις has the same sense as in the other two passages where it occurs (1 Corinthians 12:10; Hebrews 5:14); discerning with a view to forming a judgment. Hence the meaning is, “receive these weak brethren, but not for the purpose of passing judgment upon their scruples.” [source]
Romans 6:6 The body of sin [τὸ σῶμα τῆς ἁμαρτίας]
Σῶμα in earlier classical usage signifies a corpse. So always in Homer and often in later Greek. So in the New Testament, Matthew 6:25; Mark 5:29; Mark 14:8; Mark 15:43. It is used of men as slaves, Revelation 18:13. Also in classical Greek of the sum-total. So Plato: τὸ τοῦ κόσμου σῶμα thesum-total of the world (“Timaeus,” 31). The meaning is tinged in some cases by the fact of the vital union of the body with the immaterial nature, as being animated by the ψυξή soulthe principle of individual life. Thus Matthew 6:25, where the two are conceived as forming one organism, so that the material ministries which are predicated of the one are predicated of the other, and the meanings of the two merge into one another. -DIVIDER-
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In Paul it can scarcely be said to be used of a dead body, except in a figurative sense, as Romans 8:10, or by inference, 2 Corinthians 5:8. Commonly of a living body. It occurs with ψυχή soulonly 1 Thessalonians 5:23, and there its distinction from ψυχή rather than its union with it is implied. So in Matthew 10:28, though even there the distinction includes the two as one personality. It is used by Paul:-DIVIDER-
1. Of the living human body, Romans 4:19; 1 Corinthians 6:13; 1 Corinthians 9:27; 1 Corinthians 12:12-26. -DIVIDER-
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2. Of the Church as the body of Christ, Romans 12:5; 1 Corinthians 12:27; Ephesians 1:23; Colossians 1:18, etc. Σάρξ fleshnever in this sense. -DIVIDER-
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3. Of plants and heavenly bodies, 1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:40. -DIVIDER-
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4. Of the glorified body of Christ, Philemon 3:21. -DIVIDER-
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5. Of the spiritual body of risen believers, 1 Corinthians 15:44. -DIVIDER-
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It is distinguished from σάρξ fleshas not being limited to the organism of an earthly, living body, 1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:38. It is the material organism apart from any definite matter. It is however sometimes used as practically synonymous with σάρξ , 1 Corinthians 7:16, 1 Corinthians 7:17; Ephesians 5:28, Ephesians 5:31; 2 Corinthians 4:10, 2 Corinthians 4:11. Compare 1 Corinthians 5:3with Colossians 2:5. An ethical conception attaches to it. It is alternated with μέλη membersand the two are associated with sin (Romans 1:24; Romans 6:6; Romans 7:5, Romans 7:24; Romans 8:13; Colossians 3:5), and with sanctification (Romans 12:1; 1 Corinthians 6:19sq.; compare 1 Thessalonians 4:4; 1 Thessalonians 5:23). It is represented as mortal, Romans 8:11; 2 Corinthians 10:10; and as capable of life, 1 Corinthians 13:3; 2 Corinthians 4:10. -DIVIDER-
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In common with μέλη membersit is the instrument of feeling and willing rather than σάρξ , because the object in such cases is to designate the body not definitely as earthly, but generally as organic, Romans 6:12, Romans 6:13, Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:10. Hence, wherever it is viewed with reference to sin or sanctification, it is the outward organ for the execution of the good or bad resolves of the will. -DIVIDER-
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The phrase body of sin denotes the body belonging to, or ruled by, the power of sin, in which the members are instruments of unrighteousness (Romans 6:13). Not the body as containing the principle of evil in our humanity, since Paul does not regard sin as inherent in, and inseparable from, the body (see Romans 6:13; 2 Corinthians 4:10-12; 2 Corinthians 7:1. Compare Matthew 15:19), nor as precisely identical with the old man, an organism or system of evil dispositions, which does not harmonize with Romans 6:12, Romans 6:13, where Paul uses body in the strict sense. “Sin is conceived as the master, to whom the body as slave belongs and is obedient to execute its will. As the slave must perform his definite functions, not because he in himself can perform no others, but because of His actually subsistent relationship of service he may perform no others, while of himself he might belong as well to another master and render other services; so the earthly σῶμα bodybelongs not of itself to the ἁμαρτία sinbut may just as well belong to the Lord (1 Corinthians 6:13), and doubtless it is de facto enslaved to sin, so long as a redemption from this state has not set in by virtue of the divine Spirit” (Romans 7:24: Dickson).DestroyedSee on Romans 3:3.He that is dead ( ὁ ἀποθανὼν )Rev., literally, he that hath died. In a physical sense. Death and its consequences are used as the general illustration of the spiritual truth. It is a habit of Paul to throw in such general illustrations. See Romans 7:2. [source]

Romans 14:1 Receive ye [προσλαμβανεστε]
Present middle imperative (indirect), “take to yourselves.” Yet not to doubtful disputations (μη εις διακρισεις διαλογισμων — mē eis diakriseis dialogismōn). “Not for decisions of opinions.” Note δια — dia (between, two or δυο — duo) in both words. Discriminations between doubts or hesitations. For διακρισις — diakrisis see note on 1 Corinthians 12:10; Hebrews 5:14 (only N.T. examples). For διαλογισμος — dialogismos see note on Luke 2:35; on Luke 24:38; and note on Philemon 2:14. The “strong” brother is not called upon to settle all the scruples of the “weak” brother. But each takes it on himself to do it. [source]
Romans 14:1 Yet not to doubtful disputations [μη εις διακρισεις διαλογισμων]
“Not for decisions of opinions.” Note δια — dia (between, two or δυο — duo) in both words. Discriminations between doubts or hesitations. For διακρισις — diakrisis see note on 1 Corinthians 12:10; Hebrews 5:14 (only N.T. examples). For διαλογισμος — dialogismos see note on Luke 2:35; on Luke 24:38; and note on Philemon 2:14. The “strong” brother is not called upon to settle all the scruples of the “weak” brother. But each takes it on himself to do it. [source]
1 Corinthians 14:32 The spirits []
The movements and manifestations of the divine Spirit in the human spirit, as in 1 Corinthians 12:10. [source]
1 Corinthians 14:29 Judge []
See on 1 Corinthians 11:29. Referring to the gift of the discernment of spirits. See on 1 Corinthians 12:10. [source]
1 Corinthians 12:28 Hath set [ἔθετο]
See on 1 Corinthians 12:18. The middle voice implies for His own use. [source]
1 Corinthians 12:4 Diversities [διαιρέσεις]
Only here in the New Testament. It may also be rendered distributions. There is no objection to combining both meanings, a distribution of gifts implying a diversity. 1 Corinthians 12:11, however, seems to favor distributions. [source]
1 Corinthians 10:17 Who are many [οι πολλοι]
The many. We all (οι παντες — hoi pantes). We the all, the whole number, οι παντες — hoi pantes being in apposition with the subject we (ημεις — hēmeis unexpressed). Partake Have a part with or in, share in. See 1 Corinthians 9:12; Hebrews 2:14; Hebrews 5:13 (partaking of milk). Of the one bread (του ενος αρτου — tou henos artou). Of the one loaf, the article του — tou referring to one loaf already mentioned. One body Here the mystical spiritual body of Christ as in 1 Corinthians 12:12., the spiritual kingdom or church of which Christ is head (Colossians 1:18; Ephesians 5:23). [source]
1 Corinthians 7:21 Use it rather []
Whether the apostle means, use the bondage or use the freedom - whether, take advantage of the offer of freedom, or, remain in slavery - is, as Dean Stanley remarks, one of the most evenly balanced questions in the interpretation of the New Testament. The force of καὶ evenand the positive injunction of the apostle in 1 Corinthians 7:20and 1 Corinthians 7:24, seem to favor the meaning, remain in slavery. The injunction is to be read in the light of 1 Corinthians 7:22, and of Galatians 3:28; Colossians 3:11; 1 Corinthians 12:13, that freeman and slave are one in Christ; and also of the feeling pervading the Church of the speedy termination of the present economy by the second coming of the Lord. See 1 Corinthians 7:26, 1 Corinthians 7:29. We must be careful to avoid basing our conclusion on the modern sentiment respecting freedom and slavery. [source]
1 Corinthians 12:10 Divers kinds of tongues [γένη γλωσσῶν]
I. Passages Relating to the Gift of Tongues. Mark 16:17; Acts href="/desk/?q=ac+10:46&sr=1">Acts 10:46; Acts 19:6; 1 Corinthians 12:10, 1 Corinthians 12:28; 1 Corinthians 13:1; 14. Possibly Ephesians 5:18; 1 Peter 4:11. II. Terms Employed. New tongues (Mark 16:17): other or different tongues ( ἕτεραι , Acts 2:4): kinds ( γένη ) of tongues (1 Corinthians 12:10): simply tongues or tongue ( γλῶσσαι γλῶσσα , Acts href="/desk/?q=ac+2:4&sr=1">Acts 2:4; Acts 10:46; Acts 19:6; 1 Corinthians 14:2, 1 Corinthians 14:4, 1 Corinthians 14:13, 1 Corinthians 14:14, 1 Corinthians 14:19, 1 Corinthians 14:27): to pray in a tongue ( προσεύχεσθαι γλώσσῃ , 1 Corinthians 14:14, 1 Corinthians 14:15), equivalent to praying in the spirit as distinguished from praying with the understanding: tongues of men and angels (1 Corinthians 13:1). -DIVIDER-
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III. Recorded Facts in the New Testament. (1.) The first recorded bestowment of the gift was at Pentecost (Acts href="/desk/?q=ac+10:44-46&sr=1">Acts 10:44-46. (3.) Certain disciples at Ephesus, who received the Holy Spirit in the laying on of Paul's hands, spake with tongues and prophesied, Acts 19:6. -DIVIDER-
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IV. Meaning of the Term “Tongue.” The various explanations are: the tongue alone, inarticulately: rare, provincial, poetic, or archaic words: language or dialect. The last is the correct definition. It does not necessarily mean any of the known languages of men, but may mean the speaker's own tongue, shaped in a peculiar manner by the Spirit's influence; or an entirely new spiritual language. -DIVIDER-
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V. Nature of the Gift in the Corinthian Church. (1.) The gift itself was identical with that at Pentecost, at Caesarea, and at Ephesus, but differed in its manifestations, in that it required an interpreter. 1 Corinthians 12:10, 1 Corinthians 12:30; 1 Corinthians 14:5, 1 Corinthians 14:13, 1 Corinthians 14:26, 1 Corinthians 14:27. (2.) It was closely connected with prophesying: 1 Corinthians 14:1-6, 1 Corinthians 14:22, 1 Corinthians 14:25; Acts 2:16-18; Acts 19:6. Compare 1 Thessalonians 5:19, 1 Thessalonians 5:20. It was distinguished from prophesying as an inferior gift, 1 Corinthians 14:4, 1 Corinthians 14:5; and as consisting in expressions of praise or devotion rather than of exhortation, warning, or prediction, 1 Corinthians 14:14-16. (3.) It was an ecstatic utterance, unintelligible to the hearers, and requiring interpretation, or a corresponding ecstatic condition on the part of the hearer in order to understand it. It was not for the edification of the hearer but of the speaker, and even the speaker did not always understand it, 1 Corinthians 14:2, 1 Corinthians 14:19. It therefore impressed unchristian bystanders as a barbarous utterance, the effect of madness or drunkenness, Acts 2:13, Acts 2:15; 1 Corinthians 14:11, 1 Corinthians 14:23. Hence it is distinguished from the utterance of the understanding, 1 Corinthians 14:4, 1 Corinthians 14:14-16, 1 Corinthians 14:19, 1 Corinthians 14:27. -DIVIDER-
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VI. Paul's Estimate of the Gift. He himself was a master of the gift (1 Corinthians 14:18), but he assigned it an inferior position (1 Corinthians 14:4, 1 Corinthians 14:5), and distinctly gave prophesying and speaking with the understanding the preference (1 Corinthians 14:2, 1 Corinthians 14:3, 1 Corinthians 14:5, 1 Corinthians 14:19, 1 Corinthians 14:22). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
VII. Results and Permanence. Being recognized distinctly as a gift of the Spirit, it must be inferred that it contributed in some way to the edification of the Church; but it led to occasional disorderly outbreaks (1 Corinthians 14:9, 1 Corinthians 14:11, 1 Corinthians 14:17, 1 Corinthians 14:20-23, 1 Corinthians 14:26-28, 1 Corinthians 14:33, 1 Corinthians 14:40). As a fact it soon passed away from the Church. It is not mentioned in the Catholic or Pastoral Epistles. A few allusions to it occur in the writings of the fathers of the second century. Ecstatic conditions and manifestations marked the Montanists at the close of the second century, and an account of such a case, in which a woman was the subject, is given by Tertullian. Similar phenomena have emerged at intervals in various sects, at times of great religious excitement, as among the Camisards in France, the early Quakers and Methodists, and especially the Irvingites. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
[source]

1 Corinthians 10:17 Partake [μετεχομεν]
Have a part with or in, share in. See 1 Corinthians 9:12; Hebrews 2:14; Hebrews 5:13 (partaking of milk). Of the one bread (του ενος αρτου — tou henos artou). Of the one loaf, the article του — tou referring to one loaf already mentioned. One body Here the mystical spiritual body of Christ as in 1 Corinthians 12:12., the spiritual kingdom or church of which Christ is head (Colossians 1:18; Ephesians 5:23). [source]
1 Corinthians 10:17 One body [εν σωμα]
Here the mystical spiritual body of Christ as in 1 Corinthians 12:12., the spiritual kingdom or church of which Christ is head (Colossians 1:18; Ephesians 5:23). [source]
1 Corinthians 12:4 Diversities [διαιρεσεις]
Old word for distinctions, differences, distributions, from διαιρεω — diaireō to distribute, as διαιρουν — diairoun (dividing, distributing) in 1 Corinthians 12:11. Only here in the N.T. [source]
1 Corinthians 12:8 To one [ωι μεν]
Demonstrative ος — hos with μεν — men in dative case, to this one. The distribution or correlation is carried on by αλλωι δε — allōi de (1 Corinthians 12:8, 1 Corinthians 12:9, 1 Corinthians 12:10), ετερωι δε — heterōi de (1 Corinthians 12:9, 1 Corinthians 12:10) for variety, nine manifestations of the Spirit‘s work in 1 Corinthians 12:8-10. [source]
1 Corinthians 12:16  []
Points explained precisely as in 1 Corinthians 12:15 . [source]
1 Corinthians 12:19 One member [εν μελος]
Paul applies the logic of 1 Corinthians 12:17 to any member of the body. The application to members of the church is obvious. It is particularly pertinent in the case of a “church boss.” [source]
1 Corinthians 12:28 God hath set some [ους μεν ετετο ο τεος]
See 1 Corinthians 12:18 for ετετο ο τεος — etheto ho theos Note middle voice (for his own use). Paul begins as if he means to say ους μεν αποστολουσ ους δε προπητας — hous men apostolousclass="normal greek">ους δε — hous de prophētas (some apostles, some prophets), but he changes the construction and has no πρωτον δευτερον επειτα — hous de but instead εν τηι εκκλησιαι — prōtonεκκλησια — deuteronepeita (first, second, then, etc.). [source]
1 Corinthians 12:28 In the church [en tēi ekklēsiāi)]
The general sense of αποστολους — ekklēsia as in Matthew 16:18 and later in Colossians 1:18, Colossians 1:24; Ephesians 5:23, Ephesians 5:32; Hebrews 12:23. See list also in Ephesians 4:11. See note on Matthew 10:2 for προπητας — apostolous the official title given the twelve by Jesus, and claimed by Paul though not one of the twelve. Prophets (διδασκαλους — prophētas). For-speakers for God and Christ. See the list of prophets and teachers in Acts 13:1 with Barnabas first and Saul last. Prophets are needed today if men will let God‘s Spirit use them, men moved to utter the deep things of God. Teachers Old word from αποστολος — didaskō to teach. Used to the Baptist (Luke 3:12), to Jesus (John 3:10; John 13:13), and of Paul by himself along with επειτα δυναμεις — apostolos (1 Timothy 2:7). It is a calamity when the preacher is no longer a teacher, but only an exhorter. See note on Ephesians 4:11. Then miracles (δυναμεισ ιαμητων γλωσσων — epeita dunameis). Here a change is made from the concrete to the abstract. See the reverse in Romans 12:7. See these words (γλωσσων — dunameisαντιλημπσεις — iamētōnαντιλαμβανομαι — glōssōn) in 1 Corinthians 12:9, 1 Corinthians 12:10 with κυβερνησεις — glōssōn last again. But these two new terms (helps, governments). Helps Old word, from Κυβερνητης — antilambanomai to lay hold of. In lxx, common in papyri, here only in N.T. Probably refers to the work of the deacons, help rendered to the poor and the sick. Governments (επισχοποι — kubernēseis). Old word from πρεσβυτεροι — kubernaō (cf. οι προισταμενοι — Kubernētēs in Acts 27:11) like Latin gubernare, our govern. So a governing. Probably Paul has in mind bishops (οι ηγουμενοι — episcopoi) or elders (presbuteroi), the outstanding leaders (hoi proistamenoi in 1 Thessalonians 5:12; Romans 12:8; hoi hēgoumenoi in Acts 15:22; Hebrews 13:7, Hebrews 13:17, Hebrews 13:24). Curiously enough, these two offices (pastors and deacons) which are not named specifically are the two that survive today. See note on Philemon 1:1 for both officers. [source]
1 Corinthians 12:28 Teachers [διδασκω]
Old word from αποστολος — didaskō to teach. Used to the Baptist (Luke 3:12), to Jesus (John 3:10; John 13:13), and of Paul by himself along with επειτα δυναμεις — apostolos (1 Timothy 2:7). It is a calamity when the preacher is no longer a teacher, but only an exhorter. See note on Ephesians 4:11. Then miracles (δυναμεισ ιαμητων γλωσσων — epeita dunameis). Here a change is made from the concrete to the abstract. See the reverse in Romans 12:7. See these words (γλωσσων — dunameisαντιλημπσεις — iamētōnαντιλαμβανομαι — glōssōn) in 1 Corinthians 12:9, 1 Corinthians 12:10 with κυβερνησεις — glōssōn last again. But these two new terms (helps, governments). Helps Old word, from Κυβερνητης — antilambanomai to lay hold of. In lxx, common in papyri, here only in N.T. Probably refers to the work of the deacons, help rendered to the poor and the sick. Governments (επισχοποι — kubernēseis). Old word from πρεσβυτεροι — kubernaō (cf. οι προισταμενοι — Kubernētēs in Acts 27:11) like Latin gubernare, our govern. So a governing. Probably Paul has in mind bishops (οι ηγουμενοι — episcopoi) or elders (presbuteroi), the outstanding leaders (hoi proistamenoi in 1 Thessalonians 5:12; Romans 12:8; hoi hēgoumenoi in Acts 15:22; Hebrews 13:7, Hebrews 13:17, Hebrews 13:24). Curiously enough, these two offices (pastors and deacons) which are not named specifically are the two that survive today. See note on Philemon 1:1 for both officers. [source]
1 Corinthians 12:28 Then miracles [δυναμεισ ιαμητων γλωσσων]
Here a change is made from the concrete to the abstract. See the reverse in Romans 12:7. See these words (γλωσσων — dunameisαντιλημπσεις — iamētōnαντιλαμβανομαι — glōssōn) in 1 Corinthians 12:9, 1 Corinthians 12:10 with κυβερνησεις — glōssōn last again. But these two new terms (helps, governments). [source]
1 Corinthians 12:30 Do all interpret? [μη παντες διερμηνευουσιν]
He adds this query to the list in 1 Corinthians 12:28, but it is in 1 Corinthians 12:10. [source]
1 Corinthians 14:29 Let the others discern [οι αλλοι διακρινετωσαν]
Whether what is said is really of the Spirit. Cf. 1 Corinthians 12:10 διακρισεις πνευματων — diakriseis pneumatōn f0). [source]
1 Corinthians 15:20 But now [νυνι δε]
Emphatic form of νυν — nun with ι — ̇i added (cf. 1 Corinthians 12:18). It is the logical triumph of Paul after the reductio ad impossibile (Findlay) of the preceding argument. [source]
Galatians 4:6 Because ye are sons [ὅτι]
For ὅτι in this sense at the beginning of a clause see Romans 9:7; 1 Corinthians 12:15; John 15:19; John 20:29. The emphasis is on sons. The spirit would not be given is ye were not sons. Others take ὅτι as demonstrative, as a proof that ye are sons; but examples of such usage are wanting. It is not a proof of the fact of sonship that the apostle is giving, but a consequence of it. Comp. Romans 8:16, where the witness of the Spirit attests the sonship. [source]
Galatians 3:5 Miracles [δυνάμεις]
See on Matthew 11:20. Either miracles, as Mark 6:2; 1 Corinthians 12:10, or miraculous powers, as 1 Corinthians 12:6; Philemon 2:13; Ephesians 2:2. The analogy of these latter passages favors the second meaning. [source]
Galatians 3:28  []
d With this putting on of Christ, the distinctions of your ordinary social relations - of nation, condition, sex - vanish. Comp. Romans 10:12; 1 Corinthians 12:13; Colossians 3:11. [source]
Galatians 3:27 Were baptized into Christ [εἰς Χριστὸν ἐβαπτίσθητε]
See on Matthew 28:19. Not in relation to Christ (Meyer), but into spiritual union and communion with him. Comp. Romans 6:3(see note); 1 Corinthians 12:12, 1 Corinthians 12:13, 1 Corinthians 12:27. Paul here conceives baptism, not as a mere symbolical transaction, but as an act in which believers are put into mystical union with the crucified and risen Lord. Comp. Romans 6:3-11. [source]
Galatians 4:6 Because ye are sons [οτι εστε υιοι]
This is the reason for sending forth the Son (Galatians 4:4 and here). We were “sons” in God‘s elective purpose and love. οτι — Hoti is causal (1 Corinthians 12:15; Romans 9:7). [source]
Ephesians 4:25 Members one of another []
Compare Romans 12:5; 1 Corinthians 12:12-27. Chrysostom says: “Let not the eye lie to the foot, nor the foot to the eye. If there be a deep pit, and its mouth covered with reeds shall present to the eye the appearance of solid ground, will not the eye use the foot to ascertain whether it is hollow underneath, or whether it is firm and resists? Will the foot tell a lie, and not the truth as it is? And what, again, if the eye were to spy a serpent or a wild beast, will it lie to the foot?” [source]
Ephesians 4:11 Prophets []
Preachers and expounders under the immediate influence of the Spirit, and thus distinguished from teachers. 1 Corinthians 12:10. [source]
Ephesians 2:20 Of the apostles and prophets []
The foundation laid by them. Prophets are New-Testament prophets. See Ephesians 3:5; Ephesians 4:11. See on 1 Corinthians 12:10. [source]
Colossians 1:28 Every []
Thrice repeated, in order to emphasize the universality of the Gospel against the intellectual exclusiveness encouraged by the false teachers. For similar emphatic repetitions of all or every, compare 1 Corinthians 10:1, 1 Corinthians 10:2; 1 Corinthians 12:13; Romans 9:6, Romans 9:7; Romans 11:32, etc. [source]
Colossians 1:18 The head of the body [η κεπαλη του σωματος]
Jesus is first also in the spiritual realm as he is in nature (Colossians 1:18-20). Paul is fond of the metaphor of the body (σωμα — sōma) for believers of which body Christ is the head (κεπαλη — kephalē) as seen already in 1 Corinthians 11:3; 1 Corinthians 12:12, 1 Corinthians 12:27; Romans 12:5. See further Colossians 1:24: Colossians 2:19; Ephesians 1:22.; Ephesians 4:2, Ephesians 4:15; Ephesians 5:30. [source]
1 Thessalonians 5:21 Prove all things [πάντα δοκιμάζετε]
A general exhortation, not confined to prophesyings; but Paul elsewhere insists that a test be applied to phenomena which claim to be supernatural. See on discerning of spirits, 1 Corinthians 12:10; see on 1 Corinthians 14:29, and comp. 2 Thessalonians 2:2, and 1 John 4:1-3. For δοκιμάζετε prove, see on 1 Peter 1:7. In lxx, Proverbs 27:21; Psalm 11:6, δοκίμιον is a crucible or furnace. [source]
1 Thessalonians 2:13 When ye received the word of God which ye heard of us [παραλαβόντες λόγον ἀκοῆς παρ ' ἡμῶν τοῦ θεοῦ]
Rend. when ye received the word of the message (which came ) from us, even the word of God. The words the word of the message from us form one conception, governed by παραλαβόντες havingreceived or when ye received; therefore from us is not to be taken as depending on having received, as Rev. when ye received from us the word, etc. Of God (supply the word ) is added in order to correct any possible false impression made by from us. Ἁκοή in N.T. means the sense of hearing, as Matthew 13:14; 1 Corinthians 12:17; 2 Peter 2:8: or the organ of hearing = ear, as Mark 7:35; Luke 7:1: or a thing heard, a report, rumor, as John 12:38; Romans 10:16. The phrase λόγος ἀκοῆς or τῆς ἀκοῆς theword of hearing, or word of the message, signifies the word which is heard. Comp. Hebrews 4:2. See on the fame, Luke 4:37. [source]
1 Thessalonians 5:21 Prove all things [παντα δε δοκιμαζετε]
Probably δε — de (but) is genuine. Even the gift of prophecy has to be tested (1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 14:29) to avoid error. Paul shows fine balance here. [source]
1 Timothy 1:18 According to the prophecies which went before on thee [κατὰ τὰς προαγούσας ἐπὶ σὲ προφητείας]
Const, according to with I commit: which went before is to be taken absolutely, and not with on thee: const. prophecies with on these. On thee means concerning thee. The sense of the whole passage is: “I commit this charge unto thee in accordance with prophetic intimations which I formerly received concerning thee.” Prophecy is ranked among the foremost of the special spiritual endowments enumerated by Paul. See Romans 12:6; 1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 13:2, 1 Corinthians 13:8; 1 Corinthians 14:6, 1 Corinthians 14:22. In 1 Corinthians 12:28; Ephesians 4:11, prophets come next after apostles in the list of those whom God has appointed in the church. In Ephesians 2:20, believers, Jew and Gentile, are built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets. According to 1 Timothy 4:14, prophecy has previously designated Timothy as the recipient of a special spiritual gift; and the prophecies in our passage are the single expressions or detailed contents of the prophecy mentioned there. Προαγεῖν togo before is not used by Paul. In the Pastorals and Hebrews it appears only as an intransitive verb, and so in the only instance in Luke, Luke 18:39. In Acts always transitive, to bring forth. See Acts 12:6; Acts 16:30; Acts 17:5; Acts 25:26. [source]
1 Timothy 1:12 That enabled me [τωι ενδυναμωσαντι με]
First aorist active articular participle of ενδυναμοω — endunamoō Late verb, but regular Pauline idiom (Romans 4:20; Philemon 4:13; Ephesians 6:10; 1 Timothy 1:12; 2 Timothy 4:17). Appointing me to his service (τεμενος εις διακονιαν — themenos eis diakonian). Second aorist middle participle. Pauline phrase and atmosphere (Acts 20:24; 1 Corinthians 3:5; 1 Corinthians 12:18, 1 Corinthians 12:28; 2 Corinthians 3:6; 2 Corinthians 4:1; Colossians 1:23; Ephesians 3:7; 1 Timothy 4:6; 2 Timothy 4:5, 2 Timothy 4:11). [source]
1 Timothy 1:12 Appointing me to his service [τεμενος εις διακονιαν]
Second aorist middle participle. Pauline phrase and atmosphere (Acts 20:24; 1 Corinthians 3:5; 1 Corinthians 12:18, 1 Corinthians 12:28; 2 Corinthians 3:6; 2 Corinthians 4:1; Colossians 1:23; Ephesians 3:7; 1 Timothy 4:6; 2 Timothy 4:5, 2 Timothy 4:11). [source]
2 Timothy 4:3 Having itching ears [κνηθόμενοι τὴν ἀκοήν]
Or, being tickled in their hearing. Κνήθειν totickle, N.T.oolxx. Κνηθόμενοι itchingHesychius explains, “hearing for mere gratification.” Clement of Alexandria describes certain teachers as “scratching and tickling, in no human way, the ears of those who eagerly desire to be scratched” (Strom. v.). Seneca says: “Some come to hear, not to learn, just as we go to the theater, for pleasure, to delight our ears with the speaking or the voice or the plays” (Ep. 108). Ἁκοή , A.V. ears, in N.T. a report, as Matthew 4:24; Matthew 14:1; Matthew 24:6: in the plural, ears (never ear in singular), as Mark 7:35; Luke 7:1: hearing, either the act, as Acts 28:26; Romans 10:17, or the sense, 1 Corinthians 12:17, here, and 2 Timothy 4:4. [source]
2 Timothy 4:4 Will turn away their ears [την ακοην αποστρεπσουσιν]
Future active of old verb αποστρεπω — apostrephō See 1 Corinthians 12:17 for this use of ακοη — akoē The people stopped their ears and rushed at Stephen in Acts 7:57. [source]
Philemon 1:6 May become effectual [ἐνεργὴς]
See on James 5:16. This adjective, and the kindred ἐνεργέω towork, be effectual, ἐνέργημα workingoperation, and ἐνέργεια energypower in exercise, are used in the New Testament only of superhuman power, good or evil. Compare Ephesians 1:19; Matthew 14:2; Philemon 2:13; 1 Corinthians 12:10; Hebrews 4:12. [source]
Hebrews 13:3 As bound with them [ὡς συνδεδεμένοι]
N.T.oAs if you were fellow-prisoners. Comp. 1 Corinthians 12:14-26; 2 Corinthians 11:29. Public intercession for prisoners has formed a part of the service of the church from the earliest times. See the prayer at the close of Clem. Rom Ad Corinth. lix. It also occurs in the daily morning service of the synagogue. [source]
Hebrews 5:14 For full-grown men [τελειων]
Predicate genitive. The word is for adults, relative perfection Their senses The organs of perception (Stoic term for sense organs) from αιστανομαι — aisthanomai (Luke 9:45), in Plato, Galen, Hippocrates, here only in N.T. Exercised Perfect passive participle of γυμναζω — gumnazō to exercise (naked, γυμνος — gumnos). Galen uses αιστητηρια γεγυμνασμενα — aisthētēria gegumnasmena together after εχω — echō as we have here. For this predicate use of the participle with εχω — echō see Luke 13:6; Luke 14:19. “By reason of use” one gains such skill. To discern “For deciding between” (from διακρινω — diakrinō), old word with ablative καλου τε και κακου — kalou te kai kakou (between good and evil). See 1 Corinthians 12:1; Romans 14:1. [source]
James 3:5 A little member [μικρον μελος]
Μελος — Melos is old and common word for members of the human body (1 Corinthians 12:12, etc.; Romans 6:13, etc.). [source]
1 Peter 3:13 If ye be [εαν γενηστε]
Rather, “if ye become” (condition of third class with εαν — ean and second aorist middle subjunctive of γινομαι — ginomai).Zealous of that which is good (του αγατου ζηλωται — tou agathou zēlōtai). “Zealots for the good” (objective genitive after ζηλωται — zēlōtai (zealots, not zealous), old word from ζηλοω — zēloō (1 Corinthians 12:12). [source]
1 Peter 3:13 Zealous of that which is good [του αγατου ζηλωται]
“Zealots for the good” (objective genitive after ζηλωται — zēlōtai (zealots, not zealous), old word from ζηλοω — zēloō (1 Corinthians 12:12). [source]
2 Peter 1:20 Interpretation [ἐπιλύσεως]
Only here in New Testament. Compare the cognate verb expounded (Mark 4:34:) and determined (Acts 19:39). The usual word is ἑρμηνεία (1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 14:26). Literally, it means loosening, untying, as of hard knots of scripture. [source]
1 John 4:1 Try [δοκιμάζετε]
Better, as Rev., prove. See on 1 Peter 1:7; see on Luke 12:55. Compare the phrase discerning of spirits, 1 Corinthians 12:10. [source]
Revelation 2:2 Hast tried [ἐπειράσω]
Rev., didst try. See on tried, 1 Peter 1:7; and compare 1 John 4:1; 1 Corinthians 12:10. [source]
Revelation 11:6 That it rain not [ινα μη υετος βρεχηι]
Sub-final use of ινα μη — hina mē with the present active subjunctive of βρεχω — brechō old verb to rain (Matthew 5:45), here with υετος — huetos as subject.During the days (τας ημερας — tas hēmeras). Accusative of extent of time. In Luke 4:25; James 5:17 the period of the drouth in Elijah‘s time was three and a half years, just the period here.Of their prophecy Not here the gift of prophecy (1 Corinthians 12:10) or a particular prophecy or collection of prophecies (Revelation 1:3; Revelation 22:7.), but “the execution of the prophetic office” (Swete).Over the waters (επι των υδατων — epi tōn hudatōn). “Upon the waters.” As Moses had (Exodus 7:20).Into blood As already stated in Revelation 8:8 about the third trumpet and now again here.To smite (παταχαι — pataxai). First aorist active infinitive of πατασσω — patassō used here with εχουσιαν εχουσιν — exousian echousin (they have power), as is στρεπειν — strephein (to turn).With every plague In 1 Kings 4:8, but with reference to the plagues in Egypt.As often as they shall desire (οσακις εαν τελησωσιν — hosakis ean thelēsōsin). Indefinite temporal clause with οσακις — hosakis and modal εαν — ean (= αν — an) and the first aorist active subjunctive of τελω — thelō “as often as they will.” [source]
Revelation 11:6 Of their prophecy [της προπητειας αυτων]
Not here the gift of prophecy (1 Corinthians 12:10) or a particular prophecy or collection of prophecies (Revelation 1:3; Revelation 22:7.), but “the execution of the prophetic office” (Swete).Over the waters (επι των υδατων — epi tōn hudatōn). “Upon the waters.” As Moses had (Exodus 7:20).Into blood As already stated in Revelation 8:8 about the third trumpet and now again here.To smite (παταχαι — pataxai). First aorist active infinitive of πατασσω — patassō used here with εχουσιαν εχουσιν — exousian echousin (they have power), as is στρεπειν — strephein (to turn).With every plague In 1 Kings 4:8, but with reference to the plagues in Egypt.As often as they shall desire (οσακις εαν τελησωσιν — hosakis ean thelēsōsin). Indefinite temporal clause with οσακις — hosakis and modal εαν — ean (= αν — an) and the first aorist active subjunctive of τελω — thelō “as often as they will.” [source]

What do the individual words in 1 Corinthians 12:1 mean?

Concerning now - spiritual [gifts] brothers not I do want you to be ignorant
Περὶ δὲ τῶν πνευματικῶν ἀδελφοί οὐ θέλω ὑμᾶς ἀγνοεῖν

Περὶ  Concerning 
Parse: Preposition
Root: περί 
Sense: about, concerning, on account of, because of, around, near.
δὲ  now 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: δέ  
Sense: but, moreover, and, etc.
τῶν  - 
Parse: Article, Genitive Neuter Plural
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
πνευματικῶν  spiritual  [gifts] 
Parse: Adjective, Genitive Neuter Plural
Root: πνευματικός  
Sense: relating to the human spirit, or rational soul, as part of the man which is akin to God and serves as his instrument or organ.
ἀδελφοί  brothers 
Parse: Noun, Vocative Masculine Plural
Root: ἀδελφός  
Sense: a brother, whether born of the same two parents or only of the same father or mother.
θέλω  I  do  want 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 1st Person Singular
Root: θέλω  
Sense: to will, have in mind, intend.
ἀγνοεῖν  to  be  ignorant 
Parse: Verb, Present Infinitive Active
Root: ἀγνοέω  
Sense: to be ignorant, not to know.