Places Study on Troas

Places Study on Troas

Acts 16: And they passing by Mysia came down to Troas.
Acts 16: Therefore loosing from Troas, we came with a straight course to Samothracia, and the next day to Neapolis;
Acts 20: These going before tarried for us at Troas.
Acts 20: And we sailed away from Philippi after the days of unleavened bread, and came unto them to Troas in five days; where we abode seven days.
2 Corinthians 2: Furthermore, when I came to Troas to preach Christ's gospel, and a door was opened unto me of the Lord,
2 Timothy 4: The cloke that I left at Troas with Carpus, when thou comest, bring with thee, and the books, but especially the parchments.

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Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Troas
TROAS . A city of Mysia on the N.W. coast of Asia Minor. It was in the Roman province Asia. It was founded by Antigonus, and re-founded in b.c. 300 by Lysimachus, who named it Alexandria Troas. For a time under the Seleucid kings of Syria, it gained its freedom, and began to strike its own coins (examples exist from b.c. 164 to 65). Its freedom continued under Pergamenian and afterwards, from b.c. 133, under Roman rule. Augustus made it a Roman colony, and it became one of the greatest cities of N.W. Asia. The Roman preference was partly explained by their belief in the early connexion between Troy and their own capital. This place was a regular port of call on coasting voyages between Macedonia and Asia (cf. Acts 16:8 ; Acts 20:5 , 2 Corinthians 2:12 ). St. Paul, with Silas and Timothy, approached Troas from the Asian-Bithynian frontier near Dorylæum or Cotiæum ( Acts 16:6-8 ). He did not preach in Mysia on the first visit, though the Western text at Acts 16:5 makes him do so.

A. Souter.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Troas
A city on the coast of Mysia, in the north-west of Asia Minor, named after ancient Troy, which was at some little distance from it (about 4 miles) to the north. Here Paul, on his second missionary journey, saw the vision of a "man of Macedonia," who appeared to him, saying, "Come over, and help us" (Acts 16:8-11 ). He visited this place also on other occasions, and on one of these visits he left his cloak and some books there (2 Corinthians 2:12 ; 2 Timothy 4:13 ). The ruins of Troas extend over many miles, the site being now mostly covered with a forest of oak trees. The modern name of the ruins is Eski Stamboul i.e., Old Constantinople.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Troas
Alexandria Troas, now Eshki Stamboul, "old Constantinople." A city of Mysia, S. of ancient Troy, opposite the island Tenedos. The country was called the Troad. Antigonus built and Lysimachus enlarged. Troas. It was the chief port between Macedonia and Asia Minor. The roads to the interior were good. Suetonius says Julius Caesar designed to establish there the seat of his empire (Caesar, 79); Augustus and Constantine meditated the same project. Roman sentiment attracted them to Troas, the alleged seat from whence Aeueas, the fabled progenitor of Rome's founder, originally migrated. The rains are large, and the harbour still traceable, a basin 400 ft. by 200 ft. Here on his second missionary tour Paul saw the vision of the man of Macedon praying, "come over and help us" (Acts 16:8-12).

During his next missionary tour Paul rested a while in his northward journey from Ephesus, hoping to meet Titus (2 Corinthians 2:12-13). On his return from this his first gospel preaching in Europe, he met at Troas those who went before him front Philippi; he stayed at T. seven days, and here restored to life Eutychus who had fallen from the third loft, being overwhelmed with sleep during Paul's long sermon: a reproof of carelessness and drowsiness in church on the one hand, and of long and late preaching on the other (Acts 20:5-13). Here after his first imprisonment he left his cloak, books, and parchments in Carpus' house (2 Timothy 4:13). Troas had then the jus Italicum. Beautiful coins of Troas are extant, the oldest bearing the head of Apollo Sminthius. The walls enclose a rectangle, one mile from E. to W. and one mile from N. to S.

Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Troas
The city of Troas was situated close by the site of ancient Troy in the region once known as Mysia. In New Testament times this region was part of the Roman province of Asia, and Troas was the main port in the province’s north-west. (For map see ASIA.)

From Troas travellers sailed across the Aegean Sea to Macedonia, from where a major road led to Rome (Acts 16:8-11; Acts 20:6-13). Troas therefore became an important town on the main route from Rome to Asia, and the Roman government gave it the status of a Roman colony. (Concerning Roman colonies see ROME, sub-heading ‘Provinces of the Empire’.) Paul visited Troas several times on his journeys to and from Rome (Acts 16:8-11; Acts 20:6-13; 2 Corinthians 2:12-13; 2 Timothy 4:13).

Holman Bible Dictionary - Troas
(troh ass) A city in northwest Asia Minor visited by Paul during his second and third missionary journeys (Acts 16:8 ,Acts 16:8,16:11 ; Acts 20:5-6 ; 2 Corinthians 2:12 ; 2 Timothy 4:13 ). Troas was founded before 300 B.C. by Antigonus, a successor of Alexander the Great and was located about ten miles south of the city of Troy. The emperor Augustus (31 B.C.—14 A.D.) made it a Roman colony. It served as an important seaport in the Roman Empire for those traveling between Asia Minor and Macedonia. Today, ruins of the city wall (about six miles in circumference), a theater, and an aqueduct remain. See Asia Minor; Paul .

Scott Langston



Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Troas
(Τρῳάς)

Troas was a seaport on the N.W. coast of Asia Minor, opposite the island of Tenedos, midway between the Hellespont and Cape Lectum, and about ten miles south of the much more ancient Troja (Ilium). The name was an abbreviation of ‘Trojan Alexandria’ (Ἀλεξάνδρεια ἡ Τρῳάς, Strabo, XIII. i. 2, Ptol. V. ii. 4; or Ἀλεξάνδρεια τῆς Τρῳάδος, Strabo, II. v. 36; or Ἀλεξάνδρεια ἡ ἐν τῇ Τρῳάδι, Paus. X. xii. 2). The qualifying adj., Τρῳάς, which was needed to differentiate this Alexandria from the many other cities of the same name, came to be used sometimes alone (as in Pliny, Historia Naturalis (Pliny) v. 33, ipsaque Troas), though this led to ambiguity, Troas (ἡ Τρῳάς, the Troad) being properly the whole territory once ruled by the kings of Troy.

The city, which was founded by Antigonus and named Antigonia Troas, was enlarged and improved by Lysimachus and renamed Alexandria. The names are found together on some coins. ‘It appeared to be an act of pious duty in the successors of Alexander first to found cities which should bear his name, and afterwards those which should be called after their own. Alexandria continued to exist, and became a large place; at present’ [i.e. under Augustus] ‘it has received a Roman colony, and is reckoned among celebrated cities’ (Strabo, XIII. i. 26). Troas was under the power of the Seleucids till the defeat of Antiochus the Great at Magnesia in 190 b.c., after which it was a free city of the kings of Pergamos, the last of whom bequeathed his realm to the Roman Republic in 133 b.c. The Troad had a romantic interest for the Romans as the traditional motherland of their race, and the honours which they lavished upon the city were the expression of a kind of filial devotion. As a colony with the ius Italicum, and as the seaport of a fruitful country, Troas rose to the front rank among the cities of Asia Minor. According to Suetonius (Jul. 79), Julius Caesar had thoughts of making it the capital of the Empire instead of Rome, and Augustus may have played with the same idea (Hor. Od. III. iii. 61 f.), which finally presented itself as a possibility to Constantine three centuries later, before he decided to make Byzantium the future seat of the Empire (Zosim. ii. 30).

St. Paul’s connexion with Troas illustrates the high pressure at which he habitually worked. He was at least three times in the city, and could not but earnestly desire to stay and plant a church in a place of such importance, but each time he was torn away from it to some other sphere of labour. To Troas he came down from the borders of Bithynia, and received the vision which made him ‘immediately’ embark for Europe (Acts 16:7-10). To Troas he came again, after his flight from Ephesus (Acts 20:1-6), ‘for the gospel of Christ,’ eager to preach to willing hearers, yet restlessly preoccupied by thoughts of Corinth, and soon compelled to turn his back upon ‘an open door’ (2 Corinthians 2:12-13). On a third visit he ‘tarried sevendays,’ on the last of which-a Sunday-he took no sleep, but preached till midnight, breaking bread, and talking ‘till break of day,’ knowing that his ship was waiting him in the harbour (Acts 20:6-12). On the Monday morning his companions went on board to rest, but the wakeful Apostle discovered that he could give a few more hours to Troas, take the short overland route-doubtless not on foot, if Christian courtesy and gratitude meant anything-to Assos, 20 miles distant, and there catch his ship after she had rounded Cape Lectum. And meanwhile how much could be done in the last flying hours of intimate and unforgettable fellowship!

On the theory that St. Paul never again visited Troas, it must be assumed that this was the occasion on which he left behind him the cloak and the parchments which Timothy was afterwards requested to bring to Rome (2 Timothy 4:13). But those who believe in the Apostle’s release from prison hold that Troas was one of the places to which he returned. The point is fully discussed in A. C. McGiffert, History of Christianity in the Apostolic Age, Edinburgh, 1897, p. 407 f.

Troas is now almost deserted. It bears the Turkish name of Eski Stambul or Old Constantinople, and its former greatness is attested by the extent of its ruins, including the old walls, which are six miles in circumference, and the supports of an aqueduct which conveyed water down from Mount Ida.

Literature.-R. Chandler, Travels in Asia Minor and Greece3, London, 1817; Murray’s Handbook to Asia Minor, do., 1895.

James Strahan.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Troas
Penetrated
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Troas
Seaport town and district in Mysia, in the north-west of Asia Minor: it was visited by Paul on his journeys to and from Macedonia. On one occasion he abode there seven days, and raised Eutychus to life when, the disciples having come together 'to break bread,' Paul preached till midnight. Acts 16:8,11 ; Acts 20:5,6 ; 2 Corinthians 2:12 ; 2 Timothy 4:13 . It is now called Eski-Stamboul: there are many ruins of the ancient city (called Alexandria Troas), which was the chief port of the traffic from Macedonia.

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Troas
Troas (trô'ăs). A city in the northwestern part of Asia Minor, on the sea-coast, six miles south of the entrance to the Hellespont, and four miles south of the Homeric Troy. Alexandria Troas, as its name implies, owed its origin to Alexander the Great. Its port was excellent, and made Troas for many centuries the key of the commerce between Asia and Europe. Paul visited Troas twice, and perhaps three times. The first visit was on his second missionary journey. It was from Troas that, after the visit of the "man of Macedonia," he sailed to carry the gospel into Europe. Acts 16:8-11. On his return journey he stopped at Troas for eight days and restored Eutychus to life. Acts 20:5-10. Upon one visit he left his cloak and some books there. 2 Timothy 4:13.

Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Troas
a city of Phrygia, or of Mysia, upon the Hellespont, having the old city of Troy to the north, and that of Assos to the south. Sometimes the name of Troas is put for the province, wherein the city of Troy stood. St. Paul was at Troas, when he had the vision of the Macedonian inviting him to come and preach in that kingdom, Acts 16:8 . Beside this, the Apostle was several times at Troas; but we know nothing particular of his transactions there, Acts 20:5-6 ; 2 Corinthians 2:14 ; 2 Timothy 4:13 .

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Troas
A maritime city of Mysia, in the northwest part of Asia Minor, situated on the Egean coast, at some distance south of the supposed site of ancient Troy. The adjacent region, including all the coast south of the Hellespont, is also called Troas, or the Troad. The city was a Macedonian and Roman colony of much promise, and was called Alexandria Troas. The Turks call its ruins Eski Stamboul, the old Constantinople. Its remains, in the center of a forest of oaks, are still grand and imposing. The apostle Paul was first at Troas for a short time in A. D. 52, and sailed thence into Macedonia, Acts 16:8-11 . At his second visit, in A. D. 57, he labored with success, 2 Corinthians 2:12-13 . At his third recorded visit he tarried but a week; at the close of which the miraculous raising of Eutychus to life took place, Acts 20:5-14 , A. D. 58. See also 2 Timothy 4:13 .

A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Pegasius, Bishop of Troas
Pegasius (1) , bp. of Troas c. 350–360. His name was found in a previously unknown letter of the emperor Julian, first published in Hermes (1875), pp. 257–266. This letter gives a very interesting description of a visit paid by Julian to Troy before he became emperor. It describes the graves of Hector and Achilles, and the temple of Minerva as being still honoured with sacrifices; while the bishop of the place Pegasius seems to have acted as custodian of the temple and of the images which were in their places and in good order. He had evidently discerned Julian's tendency to paganism. Julian, upon entering the temple, recognized traces of sacrifices, and asked if the people still sacrificed to the gods. The bishop defended the practice on the analogy of the honour paid by Christians to the martyrs. The bishop turned pagan on the accession of Julian, whose letter was written to plead his cause on the ground that such converts needed encouragement. This letter is of great interest in view of modern explorations of the site of Troy. Cf. Boissier's art. on Julian in Revue des deux mondes , July 1880, pp. 106–108.

[G.T.S.]

Sentence search

Troas - Troas (trô'ăs). Alexandria Troas, as its name implies, owed its origin to Alexander the Great. Its port was excellent, and made Troas for many centuries the key of the commerce between Asia and Europe. Paul visited Troas twice, and perhaps three times. It was from Troas that, after the visit of the "man of Macedonia," he sailed to carry the gospel into Europe. On his return journey he stopped at Troas for eight days and restored Eutychus to life
Troas - The city of Troas was situated close by the site of ancient Troy in the region once known as Mysia. In New Testament times this region was part of the Roman province of Asia, and Troas was the main port in the province’s north-west. )... From Troas travellers sailed across the Aegean Sea to Macedonia, from where a major road led to Rome (Acts 16:8-11; Acts 20:6-13). Troas therefore became an important town on the main route from Rome to Asia, and the Roman government gave it the status of a Roman colony. ) Paul visited Troas several times on his journeys to and from Rome (Acts 16:8-11; Acts 20:6-13; 2 Corinthians 2:12-13; 2 Timothy 4:13)
Car'Pus, - a Christian at Troas
Troas - Sometimes the name of Troas is put for the province, wherein the city of Troy stood. Paul was at Troas, when he had the vision of the Macedonian inviting him to come and preach in that kingdom, Acts 16:8 . Beside this, the Apostle was several times at Troas; but we know nothing particular of his transactions there, Acts 20:5-6 ; 2 Corinthians 2:14 ; 2 Timothy 4:13
Tro'as, - (Acts 20:5,6 ; 2 Corinthians 2:12,13 ; 2 Timothy 4:13 ) Its full name was Alexandria Troas (Liv. 42), and sometimes it was called simply Alexandria sometimes simply Troas. It was first built by Antigonus under the name of Antigonea Troas, and peopled with the inhabitants of some neighboring cities. Afterward it was embellished by Lysimachus, and named Alexandria Troas
Assos - Paul came hither on foot along the Roman road from Troas (Acts 20:13,14 ), a distance of 20 miles. It was about 30 miles distant from Troas by sea
Carpus - One at Troas with whom Paul left a cloak
Carpus - A disciple and friend of Paul, who lived in Troas, 2 Timothy 4:13
Assos - Seaport in Mysia, in the west of Asia Minor, on the north shore of the Gulf of Adramyttium 20 miles from Troas. A glance at a map will show that Paul in walking from Troas to Assos could be there as soon as the ship
Troas - Alexandria Troas, now Eshki Stamboul, "old Constantinople. Troas. Roman sentiment attracted them to Troas, the alleged seat from whence Aeueas, the fabled progenitor of Rome's founder, originally migrated. On his return from this his first gospel preaching in Europe, he met at Troas those who went before him front Philippi; he stayed at T. Troas had then the jus Italicum. Beautiful coins of Troas are extant, the oldest bearing the head of Apollo Sminthius
Mysia - Paul visited it, but 'passed by' and went to Troas
Chios - Island in the Aegean Sea, passed by Paul in his voyage from Troas to Caesarea, Acts 20:15 : now named Scio
Samothracia - Here the apostle Paul arrived after his departing from Troas, (Acts 16:11) It was an island in the Ægean Sea
Secundus - Along with Aristarchus accompanied Paul in his last journey from Greece to Jerusalem as far as Troas (Acts 20:4)
Neapolis - Paul landed ( Acts 16:11 ) after sailing from Troas. The Via Egnatia from Dyrrhachium, after passing through Thessalonica, Amphipolis, and Philippi, reached the coast again at Neapolis, and the regular course of travellers to Asia was not to continue farther by land, but to cross by ship to Troas
Carpus - (Κάρπος)... Carpus was an inhabitant of Troas in whose house St. Paul writes from his prison to Timothy, and asks him to bring the cloak, books, and parchments which he had left at Troas with Carpus (2 Timothy 4:13). Possibly the Apostle was arrested in Troas and compelled to leave these articles behind
Troas - The adjacent region, including all the coast south of the Hellespont, is also called Troas, or the Troad. The city was a Macedonian and Roman colony of much promise, and was called Alexandria Troas. The apostle Paul was first at Troas for a short time in A
Troas - (Τρῳάς)... Troas was a seaport on the N. 33, ipsaque Troas), though this led to ambiguity, Troas (ἡ Τρῳάς, the Troad) being properly the whole territory once ruled by the kings of Troy. ... The city, which was founded by Antigonus and named Antigonia Troas, was enlarged and improved by Lysimachus and renamed Alexandria. Troas was under the power of the Seleucids till the defeat of Antiochus the Great at Magnesia in 190 b. As a colony with the ius Italicum, and as the seaport of a fruitful country, Troas rose to the front rank among the cities of Asia Minor. Paul’s connexion with Troas illustrates the high pressure at which he habitually worked. To Troas he came down from the borders of Bithynia, and received the vision which made him ‘immediately’ embark for Europe (Acts 16:7-10). To Troas he came again, after his flight from Ephesus (Acts 20:1-6), ‘for the gospel of Christ,’ eager to preach to willing hearers, yet restlessly preoccupied by thoughts of Corinth, and soon compelled to turn his back upon ‘an open door’ (2 Corinthians 2:12-13). On the Monday morning his companions went on board to rest, but the wakeful Apostle discovered that he could give a few more hours to Troas, take the short overland route-doubtless not on foot, if Christian courtesy and gratitude meant anything-to Assos, 20 miles distant, and there catch his ship after she had rounded Cape Lectum. Paul never again visited Troas, it must be assumed that this was the occasion on which he left behind him the cloak and the parchments which Timothy was afterwards requested to bring to Rome (2 Timothy 4:13). But those who believe in the Apostle’s release from prison hold that Troas was one of the places to which he returned. ... Troas is now almost deserted
Eutychus - A young man who was killed at Troas by falling from the window of a room in the third story, where Paul was preaching
Assos - A Greek city of Mysia in "Asia,"19 miles southeast of Troas, and on the Mediterranean Sea
Troas - Troas . 300 by Lysimachus, who named it Alexandria Troas. Paul, with Silas and Timothy, approached Troas from the Asian-Bithynian frontier near Dorylæum or Cotiæum ( Acts 16:6-8 )
Patrial - Thus Romanus, a Roman, and Troas, a woman of Troy, are patrial nouns, or patrials
eu'Tychus - (fortunate ), a youth at Troas, ( Acts 20:9 ) who sitting in a window, and having fallen asleep while St
Eutychus - ” A young man who listened to Paul the apostle preach in Troas (Acts 20:9-10 )
Asses - Seven miles from the island Lesbos opposite, near Methymna; 20 miles from Troas (Acts 20:13-14). , from Troas, went round cape Lectum, while he went the shorter way (20 Roman miles) by land on foot to Asses, where he reached the ship in time for her to arrive that evening at Mitylene
Samothracia - This Thracian Samos was passed by Paul on his voyage from Troas to Neapolis (Acts 16:11 ) on his first missionary journey
Samothra'Cia - (Acts 16:11 ; 20:6 ) Being very lofty and conspicuous, it is an excellent landmark for sailors, and must have been full in view, if the weather was clear throughout that voyage from Troas to Neapolis
Chi'os - Paul passed it on his return voyage from Troas to Caesarea
Attalia - The city was founded by and named from Attalus Philadelphus, king of Pergamus, as a port at the mouth of the river Catarrhactes, for the commerce of Egypt and Syria, as Troas was for that of the AEgean
Carpus - A Christian at Troas, with whom Paul left his cloak (2 Timothy 4:13) on his last hurried journey previous to his second captivity and martyrdom at Rome
Eutychus - Fortunate, (Acts 20:9-12 ), a young man of Troas who fell through drowsiness from the open window of the third floor of the house where Paul was preaching, and was "taken up dead
Secundus - The Greek of the verse is obscure, but the meaning probably is that Aristarchus and Secundus and those mentioned afterwards went direct to Troas from Corinth and waited there for the Apostle, who came with Sopater by way of Macedonia
Eutychus - Paul’s sermon at Troas, and was ‘taken up dead’ ( Acts 20:9 )
Samothracia - A conspicuous landmark to sailors; in Paul's first voyage to Europe from Troas to Neapolis (Acts 16:11)
Troas - It is now called Eski-Stamboul: there are many ruins of the ancient city (called Alexandria Troas), which was the chief port of the traffic from Macedonia
Adramyttium - Its gulf is opposite the isle Lesbos, on the Roman route between Troas and the Hellespont, and Pergames, Ephesus and Miletus
Assos - Paul went from Troas to Assos by the land-route on his last visit to Asia ( Acts 20:13 f
Troas - Troas was founded before 300 B
Colony - Augustus founded colonies in Antioch (Psidian), Lystra, Troas, and Syracuse (all mentioned in Acts)
Samothracia - An island in the North-Aegean Sea, on the coast of Thrace, nearly midway between Troas and Philippi
ne-ap'Olis - ( Acts 16:11 ) where, no doubt, he landed also on his second visit to Macedonia, (Acts 20:1 ) and whence certainly he embarked on his last journey through that province to Troas and Jerusalem
Sopater, Sosipater - Troas [see Secundus]
Troas - The ruins of Troas extend over many miles, the site being now mostly covered with a forest of oak trees
Trophimus - Paul in Macedonia and accompanied him to Asia, and thence preceded him to Troas, where they were joined by the delegates from the other churches-Sopater of Berœa, Aristarchus and Secundus from Thessalonica, Gaius of Derbe, and Timothy. After the Apostle’s arrival at Troas the whole company seem to have journeyed together to Jerusalem
Ignatius of Antioch, Saint - Trajan sent him in chains to Rome; during this last journey he was welcomed by the faithful of Smyrna, Troas, and other places along the way; he addressed epistles, of supreme interest and value, to various congregations, for, as a disciple of the Apostles, Ignatius testifies to the dogmatic character of Apostolic Christianity
Antioch, Ignatius of, Saint - Trajan sent him in chains to Rome; during this last journey he was welcomed by the faithful of Smyrna, Troas, and other places along the way; he addressed epistles, of supreme interest and value, to various congregations, for, as a disciple of the Apostles, Ignatius testifies to the dogmatic character of Apostolic Christianity
Aristarchus - From Troas, Aristarchus accompanied St
Timothy - He was designated to the office of an evangelist (1 Timothy 4:14 ), and went with Paul in his journey through Phrygia, Galatia, and Mysia; also to Troas and Philippi and Berea (Acts 17:14 ). During the apostle's second imprisonment he wrote to Timothy, asking him to rejoin him as soon as possible, and to bring with him certain things which he had left at Troas, his cloak and parchments (2 Timothy 4:13 )
Titus - ... Next, Titus went to Macedon, where he rejoined Paul who had been eagerly looking for him at Troas (Acts 20:1; Acts 20:6; 2 Corinthians 2:12-13); "Titus my brother" (2 Corinthians 7:6; 2 Corinthians 8:23), also "my partner and fellow helper concerning you. " The history (Acts 20) does not record Paul's passing through Troas in going from Ephesus to Macedon, but it does in coming from that country; also that he had disciples there (Acts 20:6-7) which accords with the epistle (2 Corinthians 2:12): an undesigned coincidence confirming genuineness. Paul had fixed a time with Titus to meet him at Troas, and had desired him, if detained so as not to be able to be at Troas in time, to proceed at once to Macedon to Philippi, the next stage on his own journey. Hence, though a wide door of usefulness opened to Paul at Troas, his eagerness to hear from Titus about the Corinthian church led him not to stay longer there, when the time fixed was past, but to hasten on to Macedon to meet Titus there
Lycaonia - through Lycaonia to Troas (Acts 16:1-8); on the third, in the same direction, to Ephesus (Acts 18:23; Acts 19:1)
Macedonia - Paul was invited by an angel of the Lord, who appeared to him at Troas, to come and preach the Gospel in Macedonia, Acts 16:9
Corinthians, Second Epistle to the - Pursuing the usual route, he reached Troas, the port of departure for Europe. He then left Troas and proceeded to Macedonia; and at Philippi, where he tarried, he was soon joined by Titus (2 Corinthians 7:6,7 ), who brought him good news from Corinth, and also by Timothy
Timotheus, Timothy - When Paul returned to Asia through Macedonia, Timothy waited for him at Troas. Paul besought him to remain at Ephesus to warn the brethren against false teachers, 1 Timothy 1:3 ; and in the Second Epistle he begs him to use diligence to come to him, to bring with him Mark, and the cloak he had left at Troas, the books and the parchments
Cloak - ... The cloak which Paul "left at Troas" ( 2 Timothy 4:13 ) was the Roman paenula, a thick upper garment used chiefly in travelling as a protection from the weather
Titus - )... Paul’s plan was for Titus to return from Corinth via Troas. Being eager to hear of the Corinthians’ response to his letter, Paul went to Troas to meet Titus
Luke - " It is probable that he was a physician in Troas, and was there converted by Paul, to whom he attached himself
Luke - His history in Acts is first joined with that of Paul at Troas (Acts 16:10), where the "we" implies that the writer was then Paul's companion
Secundus - It is more probable, however, that they had been previously instructed to join the Apostle at Troas, where we find them along with deputies from Asia (Acts 20:5)
Luke - Thus, in Acts 16:11 , he first uses the word "we," and shows that he was with Paul at Troas and in his first Macedonian tour
Samothrace - ... The Apostle and his companions, sailing from Troas, ‘made a straight course,’ running before the wind (εὐθυδρομήσαμεν, Acts 16:11), to Samothrace, where they cast anchor, and next day reached Neapolis
Luke, Lucas - ... In Acts 16:10 Luke uses the word 'we,' showing that he was then with the apostle Paul at Troas, and accompanied him to Philippi, where apparently Luke remained
Pergamus - a city of Troas, very considerable in the time of John the evangelist, Revelation 2:12-13
Titus - He did not rejoin the apostle at Troas, as was expected, but at Philippi, 2 Corinthians 2:12,13 7:6 ; and soon after resumed his labors at Corinth in connection with a general effort for the relief of poor Christians in Judea, taking with him Paul's second epistle, 2 Corinthians 8:6,16,17
Mysia - Paul and Silas, having in the second missionary tour ‘come over against Mysia’ (ἐλθόντες κατὰ τὴν Μυσίαν), were restrained by the Spirit of Jesus from going into Bithynia; whereupon they turned westward, and ‘passing by Mysia (παρελθόντες τὴν Μυσίαν) they came down to Troas’ (Acts 16:7-8). The distance from Dorylaeum to Troas is about 240 miles
Luke, Saint - He met Saint Paul at Troas and journeyed with him to Neapolis and Philippi as evangelist (Acts 16)
Luke (Evangelist) - Paul on his Second Missionary Journey, apparently for the first time, at Troas
Assos - Paul, having torn himself away from the Christiana of Troas, walked or rode the 20 miles of Roman highway which connected that city with Assos, first passing along the western side of Mt
Philippi - 52, having been led hither from Troas by a heavenly vision
Neapolis - Paul, sailing from Troas in answer to the call of the man of Macedonia, directed his course, and he reached it after a quick passage-a straight run (εὐθυδρομήσαμεν, Acts 16:11) before a southerly breeze
Rhodes - Paul touched here on his way from Troas to Cæsarea ( Acts 21:1 ), as it was a regular port of call on that route
Philippi - ... Paul appears to have visited Philippi twice on his third missionary journey – once when travelling through Macedonia south to Achaia (Acts 20:1-2), and once when returning through Macedonia to Troas (Acts 20:6)
Window - Paul was preaching in the upper room of a house at Troas, Eutychus sat on the window-sill (ἐπὶ τῆς θυρίδος), and, falling asleep and losing his balance, fell down from the third story (ἀπὸ τοῦ τριστέγου) (Acts 20:9)
Eutychus - preaching at Troas on his final journey to Jerusalem (Acts 20:7-12)
Luke - Paul at Troas, and shared his Journey into Macedonia
Patara - The coaster in which he had sailed from Troas had either reached her destination or else was about to continue her course along the south coast, whereas larger vessels bound from Lycia for Syria struck right across the high sea, passing Cyprus on the left (Acts 21:3)
Lord's Day - Here Paul joined the Christians of Troas on the evening of the first day of the week for the breaking of bread (probably a reference to the Lord's Supper). This pattern, perhaps, is reflected in the service at Troas in Acts 20:1
Phrygia - ] ‘and were forbidden’] of the Holy Ghost to speak the word in Asia; and when they were come over against Mysia they assayed to go into Bithynia; and the Spirit of Jesus suffered them not; and passing by Mysia they came down to Troas. to Troas
Asia Minor, Cities of - Cities of Asia Minor important to the New Testament accounts included Alexandria Troas, Assos, Ephesus, Miletus, Patara, Smyrna, Pergamum, Sardis, Thyatira, Philadelphia, Laodicea, Colassae, Attalia, Antioch, Iconium, Lystra, Derbe, and Tarsus. ... Coastal Cities The name Troas described both the northwest region of Asia Minor as well as the port city. Located ten miles south of the site of ancient Troy, Alexandria Troas was founded as a Roman colony during the period of Augustus (27 B. Paul once set sail from Troas to Greece in response to his vision of the “Macedonian Man” ( Acts 16:11 ). At Assos, Paul joined the ship carrying Luke and several others after journeying on foot from Troas
Luke - The first instance of this kind is in the eleventh verse of the sixteenth chapter; he there says, "Loosing from Troas, we came up with a straight course to Samothracia. Luke, mentioning certain persons, says, "These going before tarried for us at Troas; and we sailed away from Philippi," Acts 20:5-6 . Paul out of Greece, through Macedonia to Troas; and the sequel of St
Tychicus - Paul from Macedonia to Asia and preceded him to Troas (Acts 20:4)
Timothy - ... Timothy at once accompanied Paul through Asia to Troas, and thence into Macedonia. Paul and he, after a three months’ sojourn, returned by land to Troas ( Acts 20:4-5 )
Luke - ... Luke first appears in the biblical record when he joined Paul and his party in Troas during Paul’s second missionary journey
Lord's Day, the - Similarly, Luke notes that when Paul arrived at Troas near the end of his third missionary journey, the church gathered together to break bread "on the first day of the week" (Acts 20:6-7 ). Luke's description of the meeting of believers at Troas is the first clear indication of a special gathering as taking place in the evening, by which he probably means Sunday, using Roman reckoning from midnight to midnight, rather than the Jewish system. Luke records that the Christians at Troas came together to break bread, which may well denote a meal that included the Lord's Supper (cf
Philippi - They and his companions sailed from Troas across the Aegean Sea to Neapolis, on the eastern shore of Macedonia (Acts 16:11 )
Mediterranean Sea, the - Paul's work involved such Mediterranean cities as Caesarea, Antioch, Troas, Corinth, Tyre, Sidon, Syracuse, Rome, and Ephesus
Silas - Galatia to Troas, Philippi (where he was imprisoned), Thessalonica, and Berœa
Cloke - )... The most important passage in which this word figures is 2 Timothy 4:18, where the cloke, left behind at Troas with Carpus, is mentioned together with the books, especially the parchments
Cloke - )... The most important passage in which this word figures is 2 Timothy 4:18, where the cloke, left behind at Troas with Carpus, is mentioned together with the books, especially the parchments
Luke (2) - Paul in a dream at Troas, and inviting him to cross over into Macedonia. ’ The Macedonians did not differ from other Greeks in their appearance or dress, and why should the author conceal the name of the Macedonian, if not from modesty? The present writer can feel no doubt that Luke and Paul met in Troas, and conversed together, expectant of a sign of the Spirit’s will; that, as the result of their impressive talk, St. They met first at Troas, and journeyed together from there by Samothrace and Neapolis to Philippi (Acts 16:10-12)
Sabbath - Paul preached at Troas on the first day of the week—evidently, among those Christians, the day of religious service
Rhodes - Paul, in his voyage from Troas to Caesarea, touched at the island of Rhodes (Acts 21:1), 12 miles from the S
Corinth - 57, when Paul left Ephesus for Troas. Having stayed for a time at Troas preaching with success (2 Corinthians 2:12-13), he went on to Macedonia to meet Titus there, since he was disappointed in not finding him at Troas as he had expected. ... Thence he passed by way of Troas to Philippi, the first city that would meet him in entering Macedonia (Acts 20:1), and the seat of the important Philippian church
Titus - Paul anxiously awaited at Troas the return of Titus ( 2 Corinthians 2:12 ); but the journey took longer than was expected; and so the Apostle moved on into Macedonia, with a view to meeting him the sooner on his road
Colony - ), Troas (between 27 and 12 b
Paul - They therefore went into Mysia; and, not being permitted by the Holy Ghost to go into Bithynia as they had intended, they went to Troas. Paul knew this vision to be a command from Heaven, and in obedience to it immediately sailed from Troas to Samothracia, and the next day to Neapolis, a city of Thrace; and thence he went to Philippi, the principal city of that part of Macedonia. 56; and having taken an affectionate leave of the disciples, he set out for Troas, 2 Corinthians 2:12-13 , where he expected to meet Titus. Titus, however, from some cause which is not known, did not come to Troas; and Paul was encouraged to pass over into Macedonia, with the hope of making converts. Paul's intention was to have sailed from Corinth into Syria; but being informed that some unbelieving Jews, who had discovered his intention, lay in wait for him, he changed his plan, passed through Macedonia, and sailed from Philippi to Troas in five days, A. He stayed at Troas seven days, and preached to the Christians on the first day of the week, the day on which they were accustomed to meet for the purpose of religious worship. From Troas he went by land to Assos; and thence he sailed to Mitylene; and from Mitylene to Miletus
Atticus, Archbaptist of Constantinople - of Philippolis, and afterwards removed to Troas
Timothy - On Paul's return to Asia through Macedonia he went forward and waited for the apostle at Troas (Acts 20:3-5). " The last notice of Timothy is Paul's request (2 Timothy 4:13; 2 Timothy 4:21) that he should "do his diligence to come before winter" and should "bring the cloak" left with Carpus at Troas, which in the winter Paul would so much need in his dungeon: about A
Paul - ... The Jews seeking his life, Paul went through Macedonia, sailed from Philippi, and preached at Troas. His movements from that time are not definitely recorded; apparently he visited Ephesus and Macedonia, 1 Timothy 1:3 ; wrote the FIRST EPISTLE TO TIMOTHY; visited Crete, Titus 1:5 ; and Nicopolis, Titus 3:12 ; wrote the EPISTLE TO TITUS (the early writers say that he went to Spain, which we know he desired to do, Romans 15:24,28 ); visited Troas and Miletus, 2 Timothy 4:13,20 ; wrote the EPISTLE TO THE HEBREWS; and when a prisoner at Rome the second time, wrote the SECOND EPISTLE TO TIMOTHY, when expecting his death
ti'Tus - , (Acts 18:23 ) and spending a long time at Ephesus, (Acts 19:1 ; 20:1 ) the apostle proceeded to Macedonia by way of Troas
Eucharist - ... In Acts 20:7-11 we rend that the Christians of Troas met together on the first day of the week in the evening to ‘break broad. Paul, who is leaving Troas the next day, discourses until midnight. Paul’s language to the Corinthians makes it certain that he must have given similar teaching to his converts elsewhere, and indeed the account of the ‘breaking of bread’ at Troas, when read in the light of the passage in 1 Cor. In fact, the language of Acts 20:11, where it is said that at Troas St. And, though there is no mention of a Eucharistic cup, it is extremely unlikely that at Troas there was no such cup, in view of the fact that Troas was a Pauline church
Macedonia - Acts 16:9-10 describes the dream vision that came to Paul in Troas: a Macedonian appeared to him and invited him to Macedonia. Paul and his associates, sailing from Troas via Samothrace, arrived in Neapolis (today Kavalla), the most important port of eastern Macedonia, and went inland to Philippi where, according to the account of Acts 16:14-15 , they were received by Lydia, a God-fearer from Thyatira, and founded the first Christian community in Europe, probably in the year A
Paul - ... 45-49... Apostolic Council at Jerusalem; conflict between Jewish and Gentile Christianity; Paul's third journey to Jerusalem, with Barnabas and Titus; settlement of the difficulty: agreement between the Jewish and Gentile apostles; Paul's return to Antioch; his difference with Peter and Barnabas at Antioch, and temporary separation from the latter... Paul's second missionary journey from Antioch to Asia Minor, Cilicia, Lycaonia, Galatia, Troas, and Greece (Philippi, Thessalonica, Beræa, Athens, and Corinth)
Timotheus - Paul desires him to bring the cloak with him which he had left at Troas, 2 Timothy 4:13 ; and also at the end of the first chapter, he speaks of several persons whose residence was in Asia. Many have thought that he was at Ephesus; but others have rejected that opinion, because Troas does not lie in the way from Ephesus to Rome, whither he was directed to go as quickly as he could
Paul - Then, being on the borders of Mysia, they thought of going back to the northeast into Bithynia; but again the Spirit of Jesus "suffered them not," so they passed by Mysia and came down to Troas. Paul at Troas. The party thus reinforced, immediately set sail from Troas, touched at Samothrace, then landed on the continent at Neapolis, and thence journeyed to Philippi. These were sent on by sea, and probably the money with them, to Troas, where they were to await Paul. Whilst the vessel which conveyed the rest of the party sailed from Troas to Assos, Paul gained some time by making the journey by land
Miletus - At the end of his third journey, when he was hastening to Jerusalem to attend the Feast of Pentecost, he deliberately chose at Troas a ship which was not to touch at Ephesus, where it was probably still unsafe for him to appear, and where in any case his time would have been very short (Acts 20:16)
Ship - That the voyage between Troas and Philippi, accomplished on one occasion, ( Acts 16:11,12 ) in two days, occupied on another occasion, (Acts 20:6 ) five days
Spirit - Apollos was characterized as speaking with "great fervor" (Acts 18:25 ) and Paul "had no peace of mind" when Titus did not meet him at Troas (2 Corinthians 2:13 )
Macedonia - Paul down to Troas and across the aegean (Acts 16:1-11), after which his style of narration at once becomes leisurely and expansive (see Luke)
Paul - Bithynia, a populous province on the shore of the Black Sea, lay now before him, and he wished to enter it; but the way was shut, the Spirit in some manner guiding him in another direction, till he came down to the shores of the AEgean and arrived at Troas, on the north-western coast of Asia Minor (Acts 16:8 ). Of this long journey from Antioch to Troas we have no account except some references to it in his Epistle to the (Galatians 4:13 ). ... As he waited at Troas for indications of the will of God as to his future movements, he saw, in the vision of the night, a man from the opposite shores of Macedonia standing before him, and heard him cry, "Come over, and help us" (Acts 16:9 )
Timothy - ... Missionary travels... After travelling with Paul through Troas, Philippi, Thessalonica and Berea to Athens, Timothy was entrusted with his first individual mission
Macedonia - Ships from the port of Troas in Asia Minor connected with the port of Neapolis in Macedonia, from where the main highway led through the Macedonian town of Philippi, Amphipolis, Apollonia and Thessalonica towards Rome (Acts 16:11-12; Acts 17:1)
Ignatius - on his arrival in Troas-Ignatius seems to have given up all anxiety about the Church of Antioch: ‘Seeing that in answer to your prayer and to the tender sympathy which ye have in Christ Jesus, it hath been reported to me that the church which is in Antioch of Syria hath peace, it is becoming for you as a church of God, to appoint a deacon to go thither as God’s ambassador, that he may congratulate them when they are assembled together, and may glorify the Name’ (Philad. ... From Smyrna, Ignatius and his guard Journey to Troas, probably by sea. From there Ignatius dispatches three letters: the first to the Church of Philadelphia (‘The love of the brethren which are in Troas saluteth you,’ xi. ... Before leaving Troas, Ignatius receives comforting news of his beloved Church of Antioch
Chronology of the New Testament - Second Missionary Journey, from Antioch through Syria-Cilicia to Derbe and Lystra, Acts 15:41 ; Acts 16:1 ; through the ‘Phrygo-Galatic’ region of the province Galatia to Troas, Acts 16:6-8 ; to Macedonia, Acts 16:11 ; Athens, Acts 17:15 ; and Corinth, Acts 18:1 , where 18 months are spent; thence by sea to Ephesus, Acts 18:19 ; Jerusalem (fourth visit), Acts 18:22 ; and Antioch, where ‘some time’ is spent, Acts 18:23 . Third Missionary Journey, from Antioch by the ‘Galatic region’ and the ‘Phrygian region,’ Acts 18:23 , to Ephesus, Acts 19:1 , where two years and three months are spent, Acts 19:8 ; Acts 19:10 ; by Troas 2 Corinthians 2:12 , to Macedonia, Acts 20:1 ; and Corinth, Sabbath - Paul preaching at Troas, when the disciples came to break bread
Timothy, Letters to - He also visited Miletus, a town near Ephesus in western Asia Minor (2 Timothy 4:20), and Troas, a town farther north (2 Timothy 4:13)
Roman Empire - So Corinth, Troas, and the Pisidian Antioch
Apostolic Fathers - At Troas he learned that persecution had ceased at Antioch and wrote to the churches of Philadelphia and Smyrna as well as to Polycarp, Bishop of Smyrna, entreating them to send messengers to Antioch to congratulate the faithful on the restoration of peace
Corinthians, Second Epistle to - Paul leaves Ephesus owing to riot ( Acts 19:1-41 ), expects to see Titus in Troas, but does not meet him until they reach Macedonia in the summer or autumn of 57 ( 2 Corinthians 2:12-13 ). Paul had left Asia ( 2 Corinthians 1:8 ), and had passed through Troas ( 2 Corinthians 2:12 ), and was in Macedonia ( 2 Corinthians 2:13 , 2 Corinthians 9:2 )
Sabbath - Thus in Acts 20:6-11 , we find the Christians at Troas assembled on the first day, to partake of the supper and to receive religious instruction
Galatia - Luke in Troas (Acts 16:11), are alluded to in no there than a single ambiguous sentence (Acts 16:6), which Ramsay characterizes as ‘perhaps the most difficult (certainly the most disputed) passage’ in the whole of Acts (Church in the Roman Empire, 1893, p. Twice he is forbidden to turn aside from the direct route between Antioch and Troas. And just as he includes the Phrygian churches of the Lycus valley-Colossae, Laodicea, and Hierapolis (Colossians 1:2; Colossians 2:1)-the Church of Troas (Acts 20:6-12), and the Churches of the Apocalypse (Revelation 1:11), in the province of ‘Asia,’ so he reckons the Churches founded by St
Calendar, the Christian - At Troas the Christians met together, or held a synaxis (συνηγμένων ἡμῶν), on the first day of the week for worship and the Eucharist (Acts 20:7, where ἐν τῇ μιᾷ τῶν σαββάτων appears to be more than a mere chronological reference, and to indicate a custom), and also probably for the Agape (cf. Ramsay’s view that the service at Troas began on what we should call Sunday night (St. Paul apparently began his journey from Troas (Acts 20) on Sunday
Paul the Aged - The cloke that I left at Troas, when thou comest, bring with thee, and the books, but especially the parchments. You may depend upon it, Paul did not forget his Bible when he was packing his trunk at Troas
Timothy, the Second Epistle to - Paul's leaving of his cloak and parchments at Troas (2 Timothy 4:13) cannot have been at his visit in Acts 20:5-7, for seven years elapsed between this visit and his first imprisonment
Gods - ) Four-footed beasts have had their altars; as the bull, dog, cat, wolf, baboon, lion, and crocodile, in Egypt and elsewhere; the hog in the island of Crete; rats and mice in the Troas, and at Tenedos; weasels at Thebes; and the porcupine throughout all Zoroaster's school
Roads And Travel - to Troas (Acts 16:8). What route was taken by him from Ephesus to Macedonia (Acts 20:1-2) must remain uncertain, but it is probable that he coasted northwards to Troas and then repeated the journey of Acts 16:11 ff. He then returned through Macedonia, no doubt by his former route, and once more back to Troas (Acts 20:3-6)
Church - The same did the church at Troas, Acts 20:7
Love-Feast - In Acts 20:7-11 we read that at Troas on the first day of the week the Christians were gathered together to break bread
Gospels - The second period is from the rise of the Gentile church at Antioch to Paul's passing over to Europe in obedience to the vision at Troas; the second Gospel, Mark, answers to this Judaeo-Gentile transition period, A. , 192), and Luke perhaps published his Gospel at the close of his first connection with Paul, whom he joined at Troas A
Corinthians, Epistles to the - He was at Troas, where there was a door open for the gospel, but he had no rest in his spirit because Titus had not reached him
Acts of the Apostles - ) propounds the ingenious conjecture that Luke, having met Paul at Troas accidentally ( Acts 16:10 ; it could not have been by appointment, as Paul had not meant to go there), was the ‘certain man of Macedonia’ who appeared in the vision ( Acts 16:9 ); it must have been some one whom the Apostle knew by sight, for otherwise he could not have told that he was a Macedonian. Paul was led to Troas, Acts 16:6-8 ); and navigation
Oracle - Apollo had the greatest number: such as those of Claros, of the Branchidae, of the suburbs of Daphne at Antioch, of Delos, of Argos, of Troas, AEolis, &c, of Baiae in Italy, and others in Cilicia, in Egypt, in the Alps, in Thrace, at Corinth, in Arcadia, in Laconia, and in many other places enumerated by Van Dale. The demi-gods and heroes had likewise their oracles, such were those of Castor and Pollux at Lacedaemon, of Amphiaraus, of Mopsus in Cilicia, of Ulysses, Amphilochus, Sarpedon in Troas, Hermione in Macedonia, Pasiphae in Laconia, Chalcas in Italy, Aristaeus in Boeotia, Autolycus at Sinope, Phryxus among the Colchi, Zamolxis among the Getae, Hephaestion the minion of Alexander, and Antinous, &c
Timothy, Epistles to - From other allusions in the Epistles we gather that the Apostle visited not only Ephesus and Macedonia, but also Troas ( 2 Timothy 4:13 ), Corinth and Miletus ( 2 Timothy 4:20 ), and Crete ( Titus 1:5 ), and that he purposed wintering in Nicopolis ( Titus 3:12 )
Heal, Health - We read of "extraordinary miracles" at Ephesus (19:11), the restoration of Eutychus at Troas (20:9-12), and the healing of Publius's father on Malta
Polycarp - We have a letter of Ignatius to the Smyrnaeans, in which the prisoner, on arriving at Troas, thanks them for the kindness with which they received him: ‘You have lavished all kinds of comforts on me: may Jesus Christ reward you for it! Both far and near you have shown me your kindness: I pray God to recompense you’ (ad Smyrn. Before leaving Troas, Ignatius wrote his epistle to ‘Polycarp, bishop of the church of the Smyrnaeans
Thessalonians, First And Second, Theology of - This committed preacher of the gospel was called a god at Lystra, raised a dead man at Troas, and created riots in many places, including Thessalonica (Acts 14:12 ; 20:10-12 ; 17:5-9 )
Philippi - The change from ‘they’ to ‘we’ in the narrative after the departure from Troas (Acts 16:10) indicates that the historian accompanied the Apostle on this journey into Europe
Ignatius, Bishop of Antioch - Then he tells how Ignatius, having left Smyrna and come to Troas, wrote thence to the Philadelphians and Smyrnaeans and to Polycarp. ) are at peace, and in Troas he learns that peace is restored to the church in Antioch
House - In Acts the word used for such an upper room is ὑπερῷον, Acts 1:13; Acts 9:37; Acts 9:39 (Dorcas) Acts 20:8 (at Troas)
Dress - Paul left at Troas ( 2 Timothy 4:13 ) was the Roman pœnula , a circular travelling cape
Peter, the Epistles of - Troas was the scene of Paul's preaching, raising Eutychus, and staying with Carpus long subsequently
Acts of the Apostles - They form together an apparent extract from a diary, which begins in Troas and breaks off in Philippi, on St
Paul - They traveled overland through what is now modern Turkey to the Aegean part of Troas
Timothy And Titus Epistles to - He urges Timothy to hasten and bring Mark to minister to him, also to bring his cloak and parchments from Troas