Places Study on Thebes

Places Study on Thebes

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Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Thebes
THEBES . See No.

Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Thebes
The city of Thebes was situated on the Nile River, over five hundred kilometres from its mouth. It was the most important city in Upper Egypt, and from 1570 to 1085 BC, the period of Egypt’s greatest power and splendour, it was the country’s capital. Its Hebrew name was No, and its god was Amon (Jeremiah 46:25; Nahum 3:8). The wealth that poured into Thebes during those five hundred years helped to make the city the most magnificent in all Egypt.

One reason for Thebes’ lengthy supremacy was the strong defence that the Nile River provided against enemy invasion. But these defences were not able to withstand the Assyrians, who in 663 BC plundered and destroyed the city (Ezekiel 30:14-16; Nahum 3:8-10). (For map and other details see EGYPT.)

Holman Bible Dictionary - Thebes
(theebess) The capital of Egypt's Upper Kingdom for most of its history (about 2000-661 B.C.). The city waned only during the brief Hyksos period (about 1750-1550 B.C.). Thebes (called No in KJV) was the center of worship for the god Amon, a chief deity in Egyptian religion. Majestic temples remain as monuments to the city's dedication to Amon. See Egypt .



Smith's Bible Dictionary - Thebes
(Authorized Version No, the multitude of No. populous No), a chief cite of ancient Egypt, long the capital of the upper country, and the seat of the Diospolitan dynasties, that ruled over all Egypt at the era of its highest splendor. It was situated on both sides of the Nile, 400 or 500 miles from its mouth. The sacred name of Thebes was P-amen "the abode of Amon," which the Greeks reproduced in their Diospolis , especially with the addition the Great . No-amon is the name of Thebes in the Hebrew Scriptures. ( Jeremiah 46:25 ; Nahum 3:8 ) Ezekiel uses No simply to designate the Egyptian seat of Amon. ( Ezekiel 30:14,16 ) [NO-AMON] its origin and early allusions to it. --The origin of the city is lost in antiquity. Niebuhr is of opinion that Thebes was much older than Memphis, and that, "after the centre of Egyptian life was transferred to lower Egypt, Memphis acquired its greatness through the ruin of Thebes." But both cities date from our earliest authentic knowledge of Egyptian history. The first allusion to Thebes in classical literature is the familiar passage of the Iliad (ix. 381-385): "Egyptian Thebes, were are vast treasures laid up in the houses; where are a hundred gates, and from each two hundred men to forth with horses and chariots." In the first century before Christ, Diodorus visited Thebes, and he devotes several sections of his general work to its history and appearance. Though he saw the city when it had sunk to quite secondary importance, he confirms the tradition of its early grandeur --its circuit of 140 stadia, the size of its public edifices, the magnificence of its temples, the number of its monuments, the dimensions of its private houses, some of them four or five stories high --all giving it an air of grandeur and beauty surpassing not only all other cities of Egypt, but of the world. Monuments. --The monuments of Thebes are the most reliable witnesses for the ancient splendor of the city. These are found in almost equal proportions upon both sides of the river. The plan of the city, as indicated by the principal monuments, was nearly quadrangular, measuring two miles from north to south and four from east to west. Its four great landmarks were, Karnak and Luxor upon the eastern or Arabian side, and Qoornah and Medeenet Haboo upon the western or Libyan side. There are indications that each of these temples may have been connected with those facing it upon two sides by grand dromoi , lined with sphinxes and other colossal figures. Upon the western bank there was almost a continuous line of temples and public edifices for a distance of two miles,from Qoonah to Medeenet Haboo; and Wilkinson conjectures that from a point near the latter, perhaps in the line of the colossi, the "Royal street" ran down to the river, which was crossed by a ferry terminating at Luxor, on the eastern side. Behind this long range of temples and palaces are the Libyan hills, which for a distance of five miles are excavated to the depth of several hundred feet for sepulchral chambers. Some of these, in the number and variety of their chambers, the finish of their sculptures, and the beauty and freshness of their frescoes, are among the most remarkable monuments of Egyptian grandeur and skill. The eastern side of the river is distinguished by the remains of Lurer and Karnak, the latter being of itself a city of temples. The approach to Karnak from the south is marked by a series of majestic gateways and towers, which were the appendages of later times to the original structure. The temple properly faces the river, i.e. toward the northwest. The courts land properly connected with this structure occupy a space nearly 1800 feet square, and the buildings represent almost very dynasty of Egypt. Ezekiel proclaims the destruction of Thebes by the arm of Babylon, ( Ezekiel 30:14-16 ) and Jeremiah predicted the same overthrow, (Jeremiah 46:25,26 ) The city lies to-day a nest of Arab hovels amid crumbling columns and drifting sands. The Persian invader (Cambyses, B.C. 525) completed the destruction that the Babylonian had begun.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Thebes
(See NO.)

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Thebes
See No.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Thebes
See AMMON, or No-Ammon, or No.

Sentence search

Thebes - Thebes
Thebaid - ) A Latin epic poem by Statius about Thebes in Boeotia
No - or NO-AMMON, a city of Egypt, supposed to be Thebes
Alexandria, Patriarchate of - In the Coptic Rite, Hermopolis and Thebes are suffragan sees; patriarchal residence, Cairo; present administrator Apostolic, Bishop Mark Kouzam of Thebes
no, no-Amon - (noh, noh-ay' mahn) Ancient name for Egyptian city of Thebes (modern Luxor). ... Although Thebes existed before the Middle Kingdom (about 2040-1750 B. ) Thebes became the worship and cultural center of Egypt. Deir el-Bahri (Hatshepsut), the Memnon Colossi (Amenhotep III), the Ramasseum (Rameses II), and Medinet Habu (Rameses III) are just a few sites still witnessing to the past glory of Thebes. As Nahum indicated, Thebes was not invincible
no-a'Mon - (temple of Amon ) ( Nahum 3:8 ) No, (Jeremiah 46:25 ; Ezekiel 30:14,16 ) a city of Egypt, better known under the name of Thebes or Diospolis Magna, the ancient and splendid metropolis of upper Egypt The second part of the first form as the name of Amen , the chief divinity of Thebes, mentioned or alluded to in connection with this place in Jeremiah. ) to distinguish Thebes from some other place bearing the same name or on account of the connection of Amen with that city. ), remarkably characterizes Thebes. Thebes was destroyed by Ptolemy, B
No - Jeremiah 46:25 , Ezekiel 30:14-16 , the name of Thebes (Diospolis Magna), Egyp. Nahum seems to imagine Thebes as resembling the cities of the less remote Delta surrounded by canals, which were their chief protection; in reality it lay on both banks of the Nile, with desert bounding it on either side, and water probably played little part in its defence. Thebes was of no importance until the Middle Kingdom (Dyns. enriched Thebes with the spoils of conquest, built temples there that surpassed all others in size and magnificence, and made it the greatest city of the Empire. Under the 19th and 20th Dynasties, Ammon was still the national god, and Thebes the capital of Egypt. Later, Memphis again took the first place, but Thebes was at least the religious centre of the wide-spread Ammon worship, and the temples retained much of their wealth until the sack of the city by king Ashurbanipal (about b. The temples of Thebes continued to be added to until insurrections under the Ptolemys led to its destruction and final abandonment as a city. : the passage rather indicates the completeness of Egypt’s fall by the punishment of the remote Thebes, which could not be accomplished till Lower Egypt was prostrate
Memnon - ) A celebrated Egyptian statue near Thebes, said to have the property of emitting a harplike sound at sunrise
Thebes - The city of Thebes was situated on the Nile River, over five hundred kilometres from its mouth. The wealth that poured into Thebes during those five hundred years helped to make the city the most magnificent in all Egypt. ... One reason for Thebes’ lengthy supremacy was the strong defence that the Nile River provided against enemy invasion
Cadmean - ) Of or pertaining to Cadmus, a fabulous prince of Thebes, who was said to have introduced into Greece the sixteen simple letters of the alphabet - /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /
Thebaic - ) Of or pertaining to Thebes in Egypt; specifically, designating a version of the Bible preserved by the Copts, and esteemed of great value by biblical scholars
Re - The chief Egyptian god, worshiped at his Temple in Thebes, credited with creating the universe and believed to have been the first pharaoh
Thebes - The sacred name of Thebes was P-amen "the abode of Amon," which the Greeks reproduced in their Diospolis , especially with the addition the Great . No-amon is the name of Thebes in the Hebrew Scriptures. Niebuhr is of opinion that Thebes was much older than Memphis, and that, "after the centre of Egyptian life was transferred to lower Egypt, Memphis acquired its greatness through the ruin of Thebes. The first allusion to Thebes in classical literature is the familiar passage of the Iliad (ix. 381-385): "Egyptian Thebes, were are vast treasures laid up in the houses; where are a hundred gates, and from each two hundred men to forth with horses and chariots. " In the first century before Christ, Diodorus visited Thebes, and he devotes several sections of his general work to its history and appearance. --The monuments of Thebes are the most reliable witnesses for the ancient splendor of the city. Ezekiel proclaims the destruction of Thebes by the arm of Babylon, ( Ezekiel 30:14-16 ) and Jeremiah predicted the same overthrow, (Jeremiah 46:25,26 ) The city lies to-day a nest of Arab hovels amid crumbling columns and drifting sands
a'Mon, or a'Men - ( Nahum 3:8 ) Amen was one of the eight gods of the first order and chief of the triad of Thebes
Amon - An Egyptian divinity, who, primarily worshipped as the god of fertility, and later as Amen-ra-setn-nteru (‘Amon, the sun-god, the king of the gods’), was the local deity of Thebes. of Thebes ( c [Note: circa, about. ) and the destruction of Thebes by Ashurbanipal ( c [Note: circa, about
Kadmonites - It has been conjectured that the celebrated Cadmus, the founder of Thebes in Boeotia, was originally a Kadmonite; and that his wife, Hermione, was so named from Mount Hermon
Overthrow - When the walls of Thebes he overthrew
Amon - "populous No," or Thebes, also called No. Amen was one of the eight gods of the first order, and chief of the triad of Thebes
no-Amon - There can be no doubt that the city intended was that called Thebes, in upper Egypt, seated on both banks of the Nile, renowned for its hundred gates and vast population, and as being the principal seat of the worship of the god Amon. Some of the mightiest Egyptian dynasties reigned at Thebes, and embellished it with crowds of unrivalled palaces and temples. It is evident from the words of Nahum that Thebes fell earlier than Nineveh. Rawlinson, Esar-haddon and his son Assur-bani-pal both conquered Egypt, and the latter took Thebes twice
Pathros - A district of Egypt near Thebes
Thebes - Thebes (called No in KJV) was the center of worship for the god Amon, a chief deity in Egyptian religion
Lubim - ) The Rebu or Lebu of the monumental temple at Thebes (the Medeenet Haboo) of Rameses III, who conquered them
Tel-el-Amarna - ) A station on the Nile, midway between Thebes and Memphis, forming the site of the capital of Amenophis IV
No - Named from Amen, Thebes' chief god (from whence the Greeks call it "the city of Zeus" or "Diospolis". ) Nahum describes Thebes as "situate among the rivers" (including the canals watering the city) on both sides of the Nile, which no other town of ancient Egypt is. Sargon after destroying Samaria attacked Hoshea's ally, So or Sabacho II, and destroyed in part No-Amon or Thebes (Isaiah 20). Asshur-bani-pal twice took Thebes. "No," if Semitic, is related to naah , "abode," "pasture," answering to Thebes' low situation on a plain. " The feminine article prefixed made it Tape, Thape, Coptic Thabu, Greek Thebes. , the Hyksos or shepherd kings, invaded Egypt and fixed their capital at Memphis, a native dynasty was maintained in Thebes. Ultimately, the Hyksos were expelled and Thebes became the capital of all Egypt under the 18th dynasty, the city's golden era. Thebes then swayed Libya and Ethiopia, and carried its victorious arms into Syria, Media, and Persia. Sargon's blow upon Thebes was inflicted early in Hezekiah's reign
Ammon, or no-Ammon, or no - " The name designates, beyond all reasonable doubt, the city of Thebes, the ancient and renowned capital of Upper Egypt. The ruins of the ancient city of Thebes are the wonder and delight of modern travellers, for their extent, their vastness, and their sad and solitary grandeur
Syene - A city on the southern frontiers of Egypt, towards Ethiopia, between Thebes and the cataracts of the Nile, and now called Assouan
lu'Bim - (dwellers in a thirsty land ),a nation mentioned as contributing, together with Cushites and Sukkiim, to Shishak's army, ( 2 Chronicles 12:3 ) and apparently as forming with Cushites the bulk of Zerah's army, (2 Chronicles 16:8 ) spoken of by Nahum, (Nahum 3:9 ) with Put or Phut, as helping No-amon (Thebes), of which Cush and Egypt were the strength
Path'Ros - (Ezekiel 29:14 ; 30:13-18 ) It was probably part or all of upper Egypt, and we may trace its name in the Pathyrite name, in which Thebes was situated
Nahum, Book of - , when Assurbanipal took Thebes, and the fall of Ninive (606)
Amon (1) - Thebes, or No, the city of Amon, an Egyptian god (Jeremiah 46:25), "the multitude of No," else "Amon of No" ("the nourisher", Hebrew)
Rameses - It became his special residence, and ranked next in importance and magnificance to Thebes
Adore - Portrayed in the sculptures of Persepolis and Thebes
Akhenaton - He moved his capital northwards from Thebes to Akhentaton at Tell El-Amarna
Amon - Egyptian god whose worship center at Thebes Jeremiah threatened with divine destruction (Jeremiah 46:25 )
No - Or No-A'mon, the home of Amon, the name of Thebes, the ancient capital of what is called the Middle Empire, in Upper or Southern Egypt. " It was the Diospolis or Thebes of the Greeks, celebrated for its hundred gates and its vast population
Thutmose - The tribute from his conquests allowed Eneni, his architect, to restore and add to the temples of Thebes. See Egypt ; Thebes
Shishak i - His reign was one of great national success, and a record of his wars and conquests adorns the portico of what are called the "Bubastite kings" at Karnak, the ancient Thebes
Tirhakah - Tirhakah was quite unable to resist the attacks of Esarhaddon and Ashurbanipal; even Thebes was sacked, but the Assyrians were equally unable to hold the country they bad won
First-Born - The son's tomb has been found at Thebes unfinished, showing it was needed earlier than was expected
Memphis - During later dynasties Thebes and Avaris-Tanis served as the capital
Sin (1) - in contrast to No or Thebes at the far S
Pathros - A "district" (the Ρathyrite nome ) of Egypt near Thebes; named from a town called by the Egyptians Ηa-Ηather or with the article Ρha-Ηat-her , "the abode of Hather" the Egyptian Venus
Libya - They were also allies of ancient Thebes, Nahum 3:9
Bithiah - beloved of Amun (god of Thebes)
Corn - It is possible Indian grain or maize was known and used in Palestine as it was at Thebes in Egypt, where grains and leaves of it have been found under mummies
Mem'Phis - Though some regard Thebes as the more ancient city, the monuments of Memphis are of higher antiquity than those of Thebus. It stood opposite the southern portico of the temple of Ptah; and Psammetichus, who built that gateway, also erected in front of the sanctuary of Apis a magnificent colonnade, supported by colossal statues or Osiride pillars, such as may still be seen at the temple of Medeenet Habou at Thebes
Mule - An Egyptian monument from Thebes in British Museum represents them yoked to a chariot
no - This is the scripture name of Thebes,a noted city in Egypt, built on both sides of the river Nile, having a hundred gates, situate about 25 46' N
Glass - was found at Thebes, of the same specific gravity as crown glass in England. The luster of some mirrors found at Thebes, though buried for centuries, has been partially restored
Ethiopians - As far south as Aboo-Simbel, about 22 20' N, are two temples hewn in the rock, which rank in interest next to the ruins at Thebes; these are attributed to Rameses 2 king of Egypt, with colossal statues of himself cut out of the solid rock
Paradise - Earthly cities, Nineveh, Babylon, and Thebes, rested on mere force; Athens and Corinth on intellect, art, and refinement, divorced from morality; Tyre on gain; even Jerusalem on religious privileges more than on love, truth, righteousness, and holiness of heart before God
Egypt - As Thebes was dominated by the powerful priesthood of Amen-Re, Akhenaton moved the capital over two hundred miles north to Akhetaton, modern tell el-Amarna. His second successor made clear his loyalties to Amen-Re by changing his name from Tutankhaton to Tutankhamen and abandoning the new capital in favor of Thebes. Thebes would remain the national religious and traditional capital. Impressive additions were made to sanctuaries in Thebes and Memphis, a gigantic temple of Ramses II was built at Abu Simbel in Nubia, and his mortuary temple and tomb were prepared in Western Thebes. While the high priesthood of Amen-Re controlled Thebes, the Twenty-first Dynasty ruled from the east Delta city of Tanis, biblical Zoan (Numbers 13:22 ; Psalm 78:12 ; Ezekiel 30:14 ; Isaiah 19:11 ; Isaiah 30:4 ). , driving the Ethiopians southward and eventually sacking Thebes (biblical No-Amon; Nahum 3:8 ) in 664 B. Thus the god Amen, later called Amen-Re, became the chief god of the Empire because of the position of Thebes
Egypt - In some of these the kings reigned at Memphis, and in others at Thebes, so that it cannot now be ascertained whether some of the dynasties were contemporaneous or not. At Thebes. At Thebes. At Thebes. Vassal kings under Hyksos rule, reigned at Thebes. At Thebes. Thothmes III, the greatest warrior king; built the grand temple of Ammon at Thebes. Amenhotep, or Amenophis III erected the twin Colossi of himself at Thebes. At Thebes. At Thebes. Thebes destroyed by the Assyrians
Temple - The most celebrated of the ancient pagan temples were that of Belus in Babylon, that of Vulcan at Memphis, that of Jupiter at Thebes, that of Diana at Ephesus, that of Apollo in Miletus,that of Jupiter Olympius in Athens, and that of Apollo at Delphi
on (2) - Reputed the oldest capital in Egypt, it and Memphis are mentioned in very early inscriptions as the two seats of justice; Thebes is added in hieroglyphics of the 18th dynasty; "the three seats of justice of both Egypts. " Under the Greek rulers, On, Memphis, and Thebes sent forth ten justices to the surrounding districts
Egypt - The capital of the Middle Empire was Thebes, in Upper Egypt. 1600, by the hereditary princes of Thebes, who founded the Eighteenth Dynasty, and carried the war into Asia. The attempt led to religious and civil war, and the Pharaoh retreated from Thebes to Central Egypt, where he built a new capital, on the site of the present Tell-el-Amarna. ... Under the Old Empire, Ptah, the Creator, the god of Memphis, was at the head of the Pantheon; afterwards Amon, the god of Thebes, took his place. When the Old Empire of Menes came to an end, the seat of empire was shifted to Thebes, some 300 miles farther up the Nile
Syria - The third, and to us most interesting, period is that during which the kings of Assyria were dominant over the plains of Syria; when Tyre, Sidon, Ashdod, and Jerusalem bowed beneath the conquering armies of Shalmaneser, Sargon, and Sennacherib; and when at last Memphis and Thebes yielded to the power of the rulers of Nineveh and Babylon, and the kings of Assyria completed with terrible fulness the bruising of the reed of Egypt so clearly foretold by the Hebrew prophets
Memphis - Kings and dynasties might make their principal residences in the cities from which they sprang, but until Alexandria was founded as the capital of the Greek dynasty, no Egyptian city, except Thebes, under the New Kingdom equalled Memphis in size and importance
Shishak - An inscription in the Silsilis quarries mentions the cutting of stone for the chief temple of Thebes in Shishak's 22nd year. He appears in the temple at Thebes as "lord of both Upper and Lower Egypt
Memphis - Second only to Thebes in all Egypt; the residence of the kings until the Ptolemies moved to Alexandria. " The monuments of Memphis are more ancient than those of Thebes. ... "Menes" in hieroglyphics is written as the founder of Memphis on the roof of the Rameseum near Gournon in western Thebes, at the head of the ancestors of Rameses the Great; the earliest mention of the name is on a ruined tomb at Gizeh, "the royal governor Menes," a descendant probably of the first Menes, and living under the fifth dynasty
Hyksos - ”... While the Hyksos pharaohs ruled northern Egypt from Avaris in the eastern Delta, the native Egyptian Seventeenth Dynasty ruled southern Egypt from Thebes
Ethiopia - Thus Ethiopia and Egypt are said (Nahum 3:9) to be the "strength" of "populous No" or Thebes. The inscriptions tell us Sargon destroyed No-Amon or Thebes in part, which was the capital of Upper Egypt, with which Ethiopia was joined
Nahum - Nahum 3:8 refers to the destruction of the Egyptian capital, No-amon or Thebes, in 663 B. Ironically, as Assyria had destroyed Thebes in 663 B
Pottery - , such as are depicted in the sepulchral vaults at Thebes (Exodus 5:6-12; 2 Chronicles 16:6)
Egypt - 9 17), we see the rise of Thebes; but the 9th and 10th Dyns. are almost confined to the neighbourhood of Thebes. The princes of Thebes, becoming more or less independent, formed the 17th Dyn. His are the colossi at Thebes named Memnon by the Greeks. He changed his own name to Akhenaton, built a new capital, the ‘Horizon of Aton,’ in place of Thebes, and erased the name and figure of Ammon wherever they were seen. Thebes was no longer the metropolis. 21 was from Tanis (Zoan); parallel with and apparently subject to it was a dynasty of priest-kings at Thebes. The pitiful report of a certain Unamun, sent from Thebes to obtain wood from Lebanon, shows how completely Egypt’s influence in Syria and the Levant had passed away at the beginning of this dynasty. Ashurbanipal succeeding, reinstated the governors, and his army reached Thebes. Soon after this failure Tahrak died: his nephew Tandamane recovered Memphis, but was speedily expelled by Ashurbanipal, who advanced up the river to Thebes and plundered it. side of the Delta, is not once mentioned, and the situation of Thebes (No-Amon) is quite misunderstood by Nahum. Of localities in Upper Egypt only Syene and Thebes (No) are mentioned; in Middle Egypt, Hanes; while on the eastern border and the route to Memphis (Noph) are Shihor, Shur, Sin, Migdol, Tahpanhes, Pi-beseth, On; and by the southern route, Goshen, Pithom, Succoth, Rameses, besides lesser places in the Exodus
Heliopolis - "They are like those of Athens for lightness, but far surpass them in vastness; they are vast and massive, like those of Thebes, but far excel them in airiness and grace
Ethiopia - , driving the Ethiopian pharaohs southward and eventually sacking the Egyptian capital Thebes (biblical No-Amon; Nahum 3:8 ) in 664 B
Cush - Cush's strength could not help Thebes escape from Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria, in 663 B
Pharaoh - , stone and metal imitations of the beetle (symbols of immortality), originally worn as amulets by royal personages, which were evidently genuine relics of the time of the ancient Pharaohs, were being sold at Thebes and different places along the Nile. The result was that a party was conducted in 1881 to Dier el-Bahari, near Thebes, when the wonderful discovery was made of thirty-six mummies of kings, queens, princes, and high priests hidden away in a cavern prepared for them, where they had lain undisturbed for thirty centuries. The sculptors of Thebes and Abydos did not flatter this Pharaoh when they gave him that delicate, sweet, and smiling profile which is the admiration of travellers. "In the spring of 1896, Professor Flinders Petrie discovered, among the ruins of the temple of Menephtah at Thebes, a large granite stela, on which is engraved a hymn of victory commemorating the defeat of Libyan invaders who had overrun the Delta
Iron (2) - In the tombs of Thebes butchers are represented sharpening their knives on a blue bar of metal
Sargon - ) Then, according to the inscriptions, he invaded Egypt and Ethiopia, and received tribute from a Pharaoh of Egypt, besides destroying in part the Ethiopian No-Amon or Thebes (Nahum 3:8); confirming Isaiah 20:2-4, "as Isaiah hath walked naked and barefoot three years for a sign and wonder upon Egypt and upon Ethiopia, so shall the king of Assyria lead away the Egyptians and the Ethiopians captives, young and old, naked and barefoot," etc
Nineveh - Other cities which had perished, as Palmyra, Persepolis, and Thebes, had left ruins to mark their sites and tell of their former greatness; but of this city, imperial Nineveh, not a single vestige seemed to remain, and the very place on which it had stood was only matter of conjecture. Sargon has taken what remained to the Hittites; Sennacherib overcame Chaldea, and the treasures of Babylon were transferred to his coffers; Esarhaddon and Assur-bani-pal himself have pillaged Egypt and her great cities, Sais, Memphis, and Thebes of the hundred gates
Joppa - ... The earliest historical reference to Joppa is found in inscriptions on the walls of the Temple of Karnak at Thebes (Luxor)
Frontlets - Charms consisting of words written on papyrus folds, tightly sewed up in linen, were found at Thebes (Wilkinson)
Nahum - Nahum 3:8-10 show that as 'populous No' (the renowned Thebes, with its hundred gates), had been brought to nought (probably by Sargon, king of Assyria), so should Nineveh fall
Nahum, Theology of - because it mentions the fall of Thebes (3:8), which took place at that time. Nineveh feels invulnerable, but then so did Thebes and look what happened to that bastion of Egyptian strength (3:8-10)
Gods - ) Among birds, the stork, raven, sparrow hawk, ibis, eagle, grisson, and lapwing have had divine honours; the last in Mexico, the rest in Egypt and at Thebes. ) Four-footed beasts have had their altars; as the bull, dog, cat, wolf, baboon, lion, and crocodile, in Egypt and elsewhere; the hog in the island of Crete; rats and mice in the Troas, and at Tenedos; weasels at Thebes; and the porcupine throughout all Zoroaster's school
Egypt - (b) Thebes "of the hundred gates," one of the most famous cities of antiquity, is identified with No or No-Ammon of Scripture. The ruins are very extensive, and the city in its glory stretched over thirty miles along the banks of the Nile, covering the places now known as Luxor, Karnak, and Thebes. Among the noted tombs are those at Thebes, Beni-Hassan, and Osiout, and among the obelisks are those at Luxor, Karnak, Heliopolis, and Alexandria. In a cave near Thebes 39 royal mummies and various other objects were discovered in 1881
Assyria, History And Religion of - He defeated Pharaoh Taharqa and took the ancient capital of Thebes. This time Ashurbanipal destroyed Thebes, also called No-Amon (Nahum 3:8 , NAS). Ten years after the destruction of Thebes, Egypt rebelled yet again
Nag Hammadi - (nuhg ham ma' di) Modern Egyptian village 300 miles south of Cairo and about 60 miles north of Luxor, or ancient Thebes
Games - A beautifully preserved example from Thebes has ivory playing pieces and three knucklebones with it
Vine - A wall painting found in a tomb at Thebes in Egypt, dating from before 1400 B
Nahum - The analogy of No-amon (Thebes) makes it certain that a similar fate is awaiting the Assyrian city ( Nahum 3:8 ff. Nahum prophesied after the capture of No-amon or Thebes ( Nahum 3:8-10 ) by Ashurbanipal in b
Bible, Egypt in the - The Anamim (Anu of the Egyptian texts) appear to be the remnant of early settlers who, driven back by newcomers, roamed in the desert above the second cataract; the Phetrusim (southerners) inhabited the neighborhood of Thebes; the Capthorim and Chasluim are late invaders established on the Mediterranean shore
Nahum (2) - ... The historical facts presupposed in Nahum are Judah's and Israel's humiliation by Assyria (Nahum 2:2); the invasion of Judah (Nahum 1:9-11); the conquest of No-Amon or Thebes in Upper Egypt, probably by Sargon (Isaiah 20) who, fearing lest Egypt should join Palestine against him, undertook an expedition against it, 717-715 B
Philistines, the - Sea and land battles between the Egyptians and Sea Peoples are depicted on large panels at the temple of Ramses III at Medinet Habu in Thebes
Egypt in the Bible - The Anamim (Anu of the Egyptian texts) appear to be the remnant of early settlers who, driven back by newcomers, roamed in the desert above the second cataract; the Phetrusim (southerners) inhabited the neighborhood of Thebes; the Capthorim and Chasluim are late invaders established on the Mediterranean shore
Pha'Raoh, - (In the summer of 1881 a large number of the mummies of the Pharaohs were found in a tomb near Thebes --among them Raskenen, of the seventeenth dynasty, Ahmes I
Egypt - The Bible mentions here only two cities, namely, No, or more fully No-Ammon, for which the Seventy put Diospolis, the Greek name for Thebes, the most ancient capital of Egypt, (see AMMON, or No-Ammon, or No;) and Syene, the southern city and limit of Egypt. ... But besides these imperishable monuments of kings long forgotten, Egypt abounds in other structures hardly less wonderful; on the beautiful islands above the cataracts, near Syene, and at other places in Upper Egypt; and especially in the whole valley of the Nile near Thebes, including Carnac, Luxor, etc
Debt, Debtor - ἀπέχω for a tax-receipt on an ostracon from Thebes [Deissmann, p
Gods, Pagan - Thus the god Amen, later called Amen-Re, became the chief god of the empire because of the position of Thebes. His second successor made clear his loyalties to Amen-Re by changing his name from Tutankhaton to Tutankhamen and abandoning the new capital in favor of Thebes
Serpent - There was a legend about a serpent at Colchis, at Thebes, and at Delphi; and likewise in other places. The same learned writer discovers traces of the serpent worship among the Hyperboreans, at Rhodes, named Ophiusa, in Phrygia, and upon the Hellespont, in the island Cyprus, in Crete, among the Athenians, in the name of Cecrops, among the natives of Thebes in Boeotia, among the Lacedaemonians, in Italy, in Syria, &c, and in the names of many places, as well as the people where the Ophites settled
Commerce - ... Places of Business Metropolitan centers, like Babylon and Thebes, had open areas or market squares where commerce took place
Name, Names - ) in his inscription at Thebes
Upper Room (2) - ’... Hippolytus of Thebes, Chronicle, (usually assigned to 10th cent
Greece - Wasting their strength and resources in fratricidal wars which gave now Athens, now Sparta, now Thebes, a temporary hegemony, they proved in the day of reckoning too feeble to resist the military power either of the Macedonian monarchy or of the Roman republic
Egypt - Limestone is the formation as far as above Thebes, where sandstone begins. Joseph was quite young at his introduction to Pharaoh, and lived 110 years; but if Apophis, the contemporary of Rasekenen, the predecessor of Aahmes I who took Avaris and drove out the Hyksos, were Joseph's Pharaoh, Joseph would have long outlived Apophis; how then after his patron's expulsion could he have continued prosperous? Moreover, Apophis was not master of all Egypt, as Joseph's Pharaoh was; Rasekenen retained the Thebaid, and after Apophis' defeat erected large buildings in Memphis and Thebes
Music And Musical Instruments - A tomb at Thebes in the same country (dating between the 12th and 18th dynasties) exhibits a similar form, which was sometimes modified later in the direction of more artistic construction and sloping of the crossbar downwards, so as to vary the pitch of the strings
Chronology - ... An inscription on the quarries of Silsilis in Upper Egypt records the cutting of stone in the 22nd year of Sheshonk I, or Shishak, for the chief temple of Thebes, where still is to be seen a record of his conquest of Judah; thus confirming the Scripture account of his synchronism with Rehoboam whom he conquered
Canaanites - ) The colonies which Cadmus carried to Thebes in Baeotia, and his brother Cilix into Cilicia, are said to have proceeded from the stock of Canaan
Greece, Religion And Society of - ... Throughout the history of Greece there were important cities: Athens, Sparta, Corinth, Argos, Pylos, Delphi, Eretria, Thebes, Pella, Olynthus, and others
Egypt - The truth is, that this pretended succession of princes, if all of them can be supposed to have existed at all, constituted several distinct dynasties, ruling in different cities at the same time; thus these were the kingdoms of Thebes, Thin, Memphis, and Tanis
Oracle - Jupiter, beside that of Dodona and some others, the honour of which he shared with Apollo, had one in Boeotia under the name of Jupiter the Thunderer, and another in Elis, one at Thebes and at Meroe, one near Antioch, and several others
Gregorius (51) i, (the Great), Bishop of Rome - Hadrianus of Thebes had been deposed by a provincial synod under his metropolitan the bp
Archaeology And Biblical Study - A monument found in his mortuary chamber at Thebes contains a record of this venture and includes the oldest reference to Israel outside of the Bible