Places Study on Syene

Places Study on Syene

Ezekiel 29: Behold, therefore I am against thee, and against thy rivers, and I will make the land of Egypt utterly waste and desolate, from the tower of Syene even unto the border of Ethiopia.
Ezekiel 30: Thus saith the LORD; They also that uphold Egypt shall fall; and the pride of her power shall come down: from the tower of Syene shall they fall in it by the sword, saith the Lord GOD.

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Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Syene
SYENE . See Seveneh.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Syene
Opening (Ezekiel 29:10 ; 30:6 ), a town of Egypt, on the borders of Ethiopia, now called Assouan, on the right bank of the Nile, notable for its quarries of beautiful red granite called "syenite." It was the frontier town of Egypt in the south, as Migdol was in the north-east.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Syene
Properly Seveneh or Sebennytus in the eastern delta (the Ηeracleopolis of Manetho, called from Ηercules the "local god"), meaning "a key or opening", a Syene Egyptian town. "From Migdol to Syene," i.e. from the fortress near Pelusium on the N. of Suez to Syene in the far S. toward Ethiopia (Ezekiel 29:10; Ezekiel 30:6); not as KJV "from the tower of Syene." The shepherd kings had Syene for their chief city, from whence they are called Sebennyte Ρharaohs .

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Syene
Town in the south of Egypt, bordering on Ethiopia. Ezekiel 29:10 ; Ezekiel 30:6 . The expression, 'from the tower of Syene,' is better translated 'from Migdol to Syene,' even unto the border of Ethiopia, as it is in the margin. The word is really SEVENEH, as in the R.V. It is now called Assuan, about 24 N, 33 E.

Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Syene
a city of Egypt, now called Assouan, situated at its southern extremity. Ezekiel 29:10 , describing the desolation to be brought upon Egypt, says, "Therefore thus saith the Lord, Behold, I will make the land of Egypt utterly desolate, from the tower of Syene even to the border of Cush," or Arabia or, as some read it, "from Migdol to Syene," implying, according to either version of the passage, the whole length of the country from north to south. The latitude of Syene, according to Bruce is 24 0'

45'; that of Alexandria, 31 11' 33"; difference 7 10' 48", equal to four hundred and thirty geographical miles on the meridian, or about five hundred British miles; but the real length of the valley of Egypt, as it follows the windings of the Nile, is full six hundred miles.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Syene
A city on the southern frontiers of Egypt, towards Ethiopia, between Thebes and the cataracts of the Nile, and now called Assouan. Pliny says it stands in a peninsula on the eastern shore of the Nile; that is was mile in circumference, and had a Rome garrison. "From Migdol," the tower, "unto Syene," denotes the whole length of Egypt from north to south, Ezekiel 29:10 ; 30:6 . Few remains of the ancient city are now extant. In its vicinity are quarries of the Egyptian granite called Syenite, which furnished the material for numerous obelisks and colossal statues.

Sentence search

Syene - Properly Seveneh or Sebennytus in the eastern delta (the Ηeracleopolis of Manetho, called from Ηercules the "local god"), meaning "a key or opening", a Syene Egyptian town. "From Migdol to Syene," i. of Suez to Syene in the far S. toward Ethiopia (Ezekiel 29:10; Ezekiel 30:6); not as KJV "from the tower of Syene. " The shepherd kings had Syene for their chief city, from whence they are called Sebennyte Ρharaohs
Aswan - (a' sswahn) NIV, TEV reading in Ezekiel 29:10 ; Ezekiel 30:6 for Syene. See Syene
Syene - Syene
Migdol - This name is rendered "tower" in the phrase "from the tower of Syene," R. reads "Seveneh," Ezekiel 29:10; Ezekiel 30:6; but the margin correctly has "from Migdol to Syene"—i. , Syene the most southern border of Egypt, and Migdol the most northern
Syene - The expression, 'from the tower of Syene,' is better translated 'from Migdol to Syene,' even unto the border of Ethiopia, as it is in the margin
Syene - Ezekiel 29:10 , describing the desolation to be brought upon Egypt, says, "Therefore thus saith the Lord, Behold, I will make the land of Egypt utterly desolate, from the tower of Syene even to the border of Cush," or Arabia or, as some read it, "from Migdol to Syene," implying, according to either version of the passage, the whole length of the country from north to south. The latitude of Syene, according to Bruce is 24 0'... 45'; that of Alexandria, 31 11' 33"; difference 7 10' 48", equal to four hundred and thirty geographical miles on the meridian, or about five hundred British miles; but the real length of the valley of Egypt, as it follows the windings of the Nile, is full six hundred miles
Migdol - This word is rendered "tower" in Ezekiel 29:10 , but the margin correctly retains the name Migdol, "from Migdol to Syene;" i. , from Migdol in the north to Syene in the south, in other words, the whole of Egypt
Migdol - In Ezekiel 29:10 , margin , 'from Migdol to Syene' implies from north to south of Egypt
Sinim - See Syene
Pathros - The name of Upper Egypt, in Egyptian Pteres , ‘the South Land,’ comprising both the Thebaid and Middle Egypt from somewhat south of Memphis to Syene at the First Cataract. Yet there is abundant evidence in papyri of an important settlement of Jews at the southernmost extremity at Syene before 525 b. So also Greek and Phœnician mercenaries had reached Syene, and even Abu Simhel, far south in Nubia, in the 6th or 7th cent
Towers - Of Babel (Genesis 11:4 ), Edar (Genesis 35:21 ), Penuel (Judges 8:9,17 ), Shechem (9:46), David (Song of Solomon 4:4 ), Lebanon (7:4), Syene (Ezekiel 29:10 ), Hananeel (Zechariah 14:10 ), Siloam (Luke 13:4 )
Sinim - ) and Syene ( Ezekiel 29:10 ; Ezekiel 30:6 ) have been suggested
Migdol - , translated so for 'tower') to Syene" (Seveneh in the farthest S
Syene - "From Migdol," the tower, "unto Syene," denotes the whole length of Egypt from north to south, Ezekiel 29:10 ; 30:6
Naphtuhim - By others, he is supposed to have peopled that part of Ethiopia between Syene and Meroe, the capital of which was called Napata
Pelusium - The REB follows the earliest Greek translation in reading Syene (modern Aswan) at Ezekiel 30:16
Migdol - Ezekiel 29:10 ; Ezekiel 30:6 , where ‘from Migdol to Syene’ is the true reading, instead of ‘from the tower of Seveneh
Ethiopia - Country of burnt faces; the Greek word by which the Hebrew Cush is rendered (Genesis 2:13 ; 2 Kings 19:9 ; Esther 1:1 ; Job 28:19 ; Psalm 68:31 ; 87:4 ), a country which lay to the south of Egypt, beginning at Syene on the First Cataract (Ezekiel 29:10 ; 30:6 ), and extending to beyond the confluence of the White and Blue Nile
Zoan -  ... Psalms 78:43, speaks of "the field of Zoan"... The remains of edifices and obelisks (ten or twelve,) the stone of which was brought from Syene, are numerous covering an area a mile in diameter N
On - The two famous obelisks, long called "Cleopatra's Needles," one of which now stands in London and the other in Central Park in New York city, once stood before this city, and were seen by the children of Israel before the exodus, having been quarried at Syene on the Nile, erected at On (Heliopolis) by Thothmes III
On - The two famous obelisks, long called "Cleopatra's Needles," one of which now stands in London and the other in Central Park in New York city, once stood before this city, and were seen by the children of Israel before the exodus, having been quarried at Syene on the Nile, erected at On (Heliopolis) by Thothmes III
On - The site of this once famous city is now marked with a few ruins of massive walls, fragments of sphinxes, a noted obelisk of red granite of Syene (one of the two which stood before the temple of the Sun), An Obelisk from On is now in Rome, another on the Thames in London, one in Constantinople, and one in Central Park, N
Cush - More specifically, the Egyptian Kash extended southwards from the first Cataract at Syene ( Ezekiel 29:10 ), and in the periods of widest extension of the empire it embraced a portion of the Sudan
Ethiopia - 730 664, and recently discovered papyri prove that Jews were settled on the Ethiopian border at Syene in the 6th cent
Egypt - The prophet Ezekiel describes Egypt as extending from Migdol, that is, Magdolum, not far from the mouth of the Pelusian arm, to Syene, now Essuan, namely, to the border of Ethiopia, Ezekiel 29:10 30:6 . ... The country around Syene and the cataracts is highly picturesque; the other parts of Egypt, and especially the Delta, are uniform and monotonous. The Bible mentions here only two cities, namely, No, or more fully No-Ammon, for which the Seventy put Diospolis, the Greek name for Thebes, the most ancient capital of Egypt, (see AMMON, or No-Ammon, or No;) and Syene, the southern city and limit of Egypt. ... But besides these imperishable monuments of kings long forgotten, Egypt abounds in other structures hardly less wonderful; on the beautiful islands above the cataracts, near Syene, and at other places in Upper Egypt; and especially in the whole valley of the Nile near Thebes, including Carnac, Luxor, etc
Palladius, Bishop of Helenopolis - Palladius appears during this period to have traversed the whole of Upper Egypt as far as Tabenna and Syene, and to have visited all its leading solitaries. All threats and violence proving vain, the bishops were banished to distant and opposite quarters of the empire; Palladius to Syene, on the extreme border of Egypt ( ib
Nile - On the confines of Upper Egypt it forms two cataracts, the lower near Syene. Always diffusing its waters, and never receiving any accession of water from sky or tributary, its volume at Cairo is but half what it is at the cataract of Syene
Ethiopia - Syene on the N
Nile - From the First Cataract, at Syene, the river flows smoothly at the rate of two or three miles an hour with a width of half a mile
Euthalius (5), Deacon of Alexandria - Zacagnius thinks that Sulca may represent Psilca, a city of the Thebaid near Syene; but Galland throws doubt on this, and the point must be left unsolved
Nile - About thirteen hundred miles form the sea it receives its last branch, the Tacazze, a large stream from Abyssinia, and having passed through Nubia, it enters Egypt at the cataracts near Syene, or Essuan, which are formed by a chain of rocks stretching east and west
No - from the tower of Syene (N
Egypt - It may be remarked that there were settlements of Jews in Pathros (Upper Egypt) as early as the days of Jeremiah, and papyri indicate the existence of an important Jewish colony at Syene and Elephantine, on the S. Of localities in Upper Egypt only Syene and Thebes (No) are mentioned; in Middle Egypt, Hanes; while on the eastern border and the route to Memphis (Noph) are Shihor, Shur, Sin, Migdol, Tahpanhes, Pi-beseth, On; and by the southern route, Goshen, Pithom, Succoth, Rameses, besides lesser places in the Exodus
Egypt - Ezekiel indicates that Egypt reached from Migdol, east of the Suez Canal, to Syene, now Assouan, on the border of Nubia, near the First Cataract of the Nile
Egypt - " Egypt should be made desolate from Migdol to Syene (margin ), even to the border of Ethiopia (from the north to the south) 'forty years
Sea of Galilee - These would for the most part be constructed of black stone, but varied at times by buildings of white marble, while even the polished granite of Syene helped to break the monotony; and although, on the whole, the majority of the buildings would be dull and sombre, still, in the midst of waving fields of green and gold, the presence of the humble village, and the beach sparkling with the houses and the palaces, the synagogues and the temples of Jewish and Roman inhabitants, would present a scene of great beauty, so that we can well understand how the wild desolations of the pre-Christian century, and the calm and peaceful years that followed the advent of the Messiah, combined to render the district more beautiful when Christ was a citizen of Capernaum than at any other time during its whole history
Egypt - of Suez) to Syene (in the far S