Places Study on Spain

Places Study on Spain

Romans 15: Whensoever I take my journey into Spain, I will come to you: for I trust to see you in my journey, and to be brought on my way thitherward by you, if first I be somewhat filled with your company.
Romans 15: When therefore I have performed this, and have sealed to them this fruit, I will come by you into Spain.

Chain Links

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - National Catholic Agricultural Federation of Spain
A non-political cooperative organization of Catholic farmers in Spain. It was founded in 1914 to combat the exactions of the capitalists who controlled small farms and within a few years it included over 500,000 members and 4000 local societies. It has cooperative banks, insurance systems, etc. In its program it encourages the establishment of a small farm system on the ideas contained in Pope Leo XIII's encyclical on labor conditions; and it declares for the maintaining of the high religious and moral principles of its members. It is under the active patronage of the Catholic clergy.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Madrid, Spain
City, capital of Spain. Its early history is largely conjectural, although tradition relates that there were Christians there during the Moorish occupation. There are many interesting monuments, among them the Royal Palace, the palace of La Granja, and the famous Escorial. The first public library was the San Isidro, founded by the Jesuits; the National Museum (Museo del Prado) contains masterpieces of nearly all the European schools of painting and sculpture. Of its churches, San Pedro is the oldest, and San Francisco el Grande the finest. Cervantes, Lope de Vega, and Velazquez are buried here.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - león, Spain
Former kingdom in the northwestern part of the Iberian peninsula, now a civilprovince of Spain. As a Roman military colony in the Asturias, it was called Legio Septima Gemina, which was modified to Leon. Christianity was early introduced, and there were bishops in the 3century. The numerous martyrs in the Roman persecutions included Saint Facundus (from which Sahagun is derived), Saint Marcellus and Saint Nonia with their sons Claudius, Victoricus, and Lupercus, Saint Vincent, and Saint Ramirus. In the 4th century a monastery was built on the site of the death of Claudius and his brothers. Leon fell into the hands of the Moors, but was recovered by Alfonso I the Catholic, and again by Ordofio I (850-866). In the 10th century under Ordoño II Castile was subjugated, the cathedral of Leon founded, and Leon became the leading Christian state of western Spain. In 983 it fell into the power of Almanzor but was recovered by Alfonso V, and given a charter by the politico-ecclesiastical Council of Leon establishing the right of benefactoria by which a vassal could bind himself to any lord. In 1029 Leon and Castile became the possessions of Ferdinand I of Navarre, and from this time the leadership passed to Castile with which Leon was finally incorporated in 1230. In 1063 the relics of Saint Isidore were transferred from Seville to the church of San Juan Bautista which was rebuilt and renamed for the Sevillian Doctor. In 1135 Alfonso VIti was proclaimed Emperor of Spain in the basilica of Santa Maria.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Spain
SPAIN . The extent of country to which in NT times the name Spain, or more strictly ‘the Spains,’ was given, was practically identical with modern Spain. In the earliest times of which we have any knowledge it was inhabited, at least in part, by a race supposed to be a mixture of the aboriginal Iberian population with immigrant Celts. In b.c. 236, Hamilcar, father of the great Hannibal, invaded the country from Carthage, and after nine years of conquest was succeeded by his son-in-law Hasdrubal, who in turn was succeeded by Hannibal, under whom about b.c. 219 the conquest of the country was practically completed. Hannibal used it as his base in the Second Punic War against Rome. The Romans first invaded Spain in 218, and after various successes and reverses constituted two provinces there in 197, known for centuries afterwards as Hispania Citerior (Tarraconensis) and Hispania Ulterior (Bætica), separated from one another by the Ebro. The mountainous districts in the NW. were not actually subdued till the time of the Emperor Augustus (b.c. 20). The country was valued for its agricultural products, as well as its precious metals. It became the most thoroughly Romanized of all the Roman provinces, and in nothing is St. Paul’s Roman attitude more evident than in his determination to proceed from Rome to Spain, rather than to Africa or to Gaul ( Romans 15:24 ). It is not known whether he carried out his plan. Spain claims more honoured names in Roman literature than any other country in the 1st cent. a.d., having been the birthplace of the two Senecas, Columella, Mela, Lucan, Martial, and Quintilian.

A. Souter.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Manresa, Spain
Town near which is the cave to which Ignatius Loyola retired after his conversion and where he began the composition of the "Spiritual Exercises"; now a place of pilgrimage. The name Manresa is frequently used for novitiates Bond houses of retreat.

Smith's Bible Dictionary - Spain
1 Maccabees 8:3 ; (Romans 15:24,28 ) The local designation, Tarshish, representing the Tartessus of the Greeks, probably prevailed until the fame of the Roman wars in that country reached the East, when it was superseded by its classical name. The mere intention of St. Paul to visit Spain (whether he really did visit it is a disputed question. --ED.) implies two interesting facts, viz., the establishment of a Christian community in that country, and that this was done by Hellenistic Jews resident there. The early introduction of Christianity into that country is attested by Irenaeus and Tertullian.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Spain
Paul expresses his intention (Romans 15:24,28 ) to visit Spain. There is, however, no evidence that he ever carried it into effect, although some think that he probably did so between his first and second imprisonment. (See TARSHISH .)
Holman Bible Dictionary - Spain
The country still known by that name in the southwest corner of Europe. It was opened to the Romans just before 200 B.C. Paul wanted to go to Spain (Romans 15:24 ,Romans 15:24,15:28 ). According to Clement (about A.D. 95-96) and the Muratorian Fragment (about A.D. 195-196), he did just that. See Tarshish .



Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Spain
(Σπανία)

Spain was St. Paul’s objective during the later years of his missionary activity. It was characteristic of him that he was always thinking of ‘the parts beyond’ (τὰ ὑπερέκεινα, 2 Corinthians 10:16). Sensitively regardful of ‘the province (κανών) which God apportioned’ him, and determined not to intrude ‘in another’s province’ (2 Corinthians 10:13; 2 Corinthians 10:15-16), he felt drawn to the fresh fields of the distant West. It is in his letter to the Romans (Romans 15:24; Romans 15:28) that he first broaches the idea of evangelizing Spain. Eager as he was to ‘see Rome’ and to preach the gospel in it, he did not purpose to remain there long. The metropolis was not in his κανών, for others had already laboured there, and he intimates that in his visit to the Roman Christians he would be en route (διαπορευόμενος) for his proper sphere. He would ‘go on by’ them (ἀπελεύσομαι διʼ ὑμῶν) as he journeyed westward. The Imperial width of his horizon and boldness of his policy were worthy of his Roman citizenship, and the fact that Spain was the most completely Romanized of all the provinces no doubt made it seem a very attractive and promising mission field. It is true that half a century after St. Paul’s time Juvenal could still write, ‘Horrida vitanda est Hispania’ (Sat. viii. 116), but he was doubtless thinking of the barbarous tribes of the northern mountains. In the beginning of our era Strabo (III. ii. 15) says that the southern Spaniards, ‘especially those who dwell about the Baetis (Guadalquiver), have been so entirely converted to the Roman mode of life as even to have forgotten their own language.’ Carrying over the permanent benefits of an earlier Phcenician and Carthaginian civilization, Spain had become a Roman province at the end of the Second Punic War (201 b.c.), and by the days of Cicero and Caesar the southern districts were almost wholly Italian. ‘If preparation was anywhere made by the republic for the great all-significant work of the imperial period-the Romanising of the West-it was in Spain.… In all Spain under Augustus there were numbered fifty communities with full citizenship; nearly fifty others had up to this time received Latin rights, and stood as to inward organisation on a par with the burgess-communities.… Like the Roman dress, the Roman language was largely diffused even among those Spaniards who had not Italian burgess-rights, and the government favoured the de facto Romanising of the land’ (T. Mommsen, The Provinces of the Roman Empire, 1910, i. 67-70). Many of the writers of Rome’s silver age, notably Lucan, the two Senecas, Martial, and Quintilian, were Spaniards, The Emperors Trajan and Hadrian were born in Spain.

If St. Paul ever reached this goal, he must have made Latin for a time his missionary language, for even when half the population of Rome was speaking Greek, Spain was never in any degree Hellenized. But the question whether the Apostle succeeded in carrying out his purpose cannot be confidently answered. There are only two authorities for a Spanish journey-the Muratorian Fragment on the Canon, and Clement of Rome. The writer of the former (about a.d. 200) may have had independent knowledge, but it is more likely that when he mentions the ‘profectionem Pauli ab urbe ad Spaniam proficiscentis,’ he is merely drawing an inference that the purpose expressed in Romans 15:24; Romans 15:28 was fulfilled. The words of Clement (ad Cor. v.) are well known: ‘Paul … having taught the whole world righteousness, and having come to the bound of the West (ἐπὶ τὸ τέρμα τῆς δύσεως ἐλθών), and having borne witness (μαρτυρήσας) before the rulers, so was released from the world and went to the Holy Place, having become the greatest example of patience.’ Lightfoot interpreted ‘the bound of the West’ as Spain, but, since the next clauses certainly refer to St. Paul’s testimony and martyrdom in Rome, it seems natural to take ἐλθών and μαρτυρήσας together, and difficult to interpolate a journey between them. Sanday-Headlam (‘Romans’5 [International Critical Commentary , 1902], 414) ask: ‘Is it quite certain that a Jew, as Clement probably was, speaking of St. Paul, another Jew, would not look upon Rome relatively to Jerusalem as the τέρμα τῆς δύσεως, “the western limit”?’ It is significant that the Pastoral Epistles contain no suggestion of a campaign, possible or actual, in the West.

Literature.-J. B. Lightfoot, The Apostolic Fathers, 1891, Biblical Essays, 1893, p. 423 f.; A. C. McGiffert, A History of Christianity in the Apostolic Age, 1897, p. 415 f.; C. von Weizsäcker, Apostolic Age, ii. [1895] 137 f.

James Strahan.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Andalusia, Spain
Also written Andalucía. Region of southern Spain comprising the provinces of Almeria, Jaen, Granada, Cordoba, Seville, Malaga, Cadiz, and Helva. It is bounded on the north by the Sierra Morena, on the east by the provinces of Albacete and Murcia and the Mediterranean, on the south by the Mediterranean, Gibraltar, and the Atlantic Ocean, and on the west by Portugal. It is the most populated and second largest of the seventeen autonomous communities that constitute Spain. Its capital is Seville. The valleys and plains grow oranges, olives, sugarcane, wheat, corn, and other grains; the mountains produce lead, silver, copper, mercury and coal.

Andalusia was probably the biblical Tarshish. Carthiginians settled there in the 5th century BC. It was conquered by the Romans who called it Baetica. Catholics have been active in the region since at least the 3century. Overrun by Vandals in the 5th century by Vandals. The Vandals were defeated by the Visigoths, who lost out to the Arabs in 711 when Andalusia became the center of Saracen and Moorish civilization. Lower Andalusia was taken by Christians in 1212, and the remainder merged with other elements of modern Spain in 1492.

See also the patron saints index.

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Spain
Solomon's fleet visited Spain, then named Τarshish (the Greek "Tartessus"). In classic times the name "Spain" came into use, traceable to the Βasque Εzpana , i.e. on the edge of Europe. The Iberian language (from whence the country derived one of its names and its river Iberus or Ebro was designated) was the original of the Basque. Romans 15:24; Romans 15:28, Paul's intention to visit Spain may imply that a Christian church was already founded there. As to the early introduction of Christianity, compare Irenaeus 1:3 and Tertullian, Adv. Judg., 7.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Spain
The well-known country in Europe. It is mentioned in the N.T. only in relation to Paul's purpose to visit it; but it is not known whether he went there between his first and second imprisonments or not. Romans 15:24,28 .

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Seville, Spain, City of
(Latin: Hispalis)

City in southern Spain. The capital of a Roman province, Seville was the seat of a bishop as early as 287. The Moors seized the city in the 8th century, and Christinaity was not restored until the conquest of Ferdinand III in 1248. The cathedral, rebuilt on the site of a mosque (1403 to 1506), is an amazing structure, second only in size to Saint Peter's in Rome. The city was the scene of two provincial councils, 590,690; and it was the home of the holy brothers, Saint Leander and Saint Isidore, 6th century bishops of Seville. It possess many old churches, among them San Ildefonso dating from the Visigothic period, a university founded in 1505,a nd museum containing many priceless Murillos.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Spain
Comprehended, in ancient usage, the modern kingdoms of Spain and Portugal, that is, the whole Spanish peninsula. In the time of Paul, it was subject to the Romans, and was frequented by many Jews. For the supposed origin of its name, see Romans 15:24,28 , Paul expresses his intention of visiting Spain; and many conjecture that he did so between his first and second imprisonments at Rome, about A. D. 64-66.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Seville, Spain, Archdiocese of
Founded as a diocese in the 3century; elevated to an archdiocese in the 4th century. Suffragan dioceses include


Cádiz y Ceuta

Córdoba

Huelva

Islas Canarias (Canary Islands)

Jerez de la Frontera

San Cristóbal de La Laguna o Tenerife
Notable bishops include


Blessed Marcelo Spínola y Maestre

Saint Isidore of Seville

Saint Laurian of Seville

Saint Leander of Seville
See also


New Catholic Dictionary: city of Seville, Spain

Catholic-Hierarchy.Org

archdiocese of Seville
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Spain
Rare; precious

Sentence search

Barrio - ) In Spain and countries colonized by Spain, a village, ward, or district outside a town or city to whose jurisdiction it belongs
Aragonese - ) A native or natives of Aragon, in Spain. ) Of or pertaining to Aragon, in Spain, or to its inhabitants
Alician - ) Of or pertaining to Galicia, in Spain, or to Galicia, the kingdom of Austrian Poland. ) A native of Galicia in Spain; - called also Gallegan
Abarbanel, rabbi don isaac - 1437-1508; Portugal, Spain and Venice; leader of Spanish Jewry and minister to the king of Spain, exiled in the expulsion of 1492; author of commentary on Torah...
Most Catholic King - A title of the Kings of Spain. In their reign Spain had become a united kingdom and a bulwark against Moorish power, since they had driven out the last of the Moors. They had done much to spread the Faith in the new lands discovered by Columbus and the other adventurous explorers of Spain
Moriscos - A name given to Spanish Mohammedans and their descendants who were permitted to remain in Spain under pretence of conversion to Christianity. Philip II tried to make them renounce their dress and language, whereupon they revolted and engaged in a bloody struggle against Spain, 1567-1570. The defeated Moriscos were transplanted to the interior and finally expelled from Spain, 1609
Diaz, Pedro - Jesuit missionary, born Lupia, Spain, 1546; died Mexico, 1618. Sent to Mexico by Saint Francis Borgia, with the first band of Jesuits assigned to that country, he founded the colleges of Oaxaca, Guadalajara and Merida, and started the Jesuit missions among the Indians of New Spain
Trinidad, Vicariate Apostolic of - Elevated to the archdiocese of Port of Spain on April 30, 1850. Org

archdiocese of Port of Spain

patron saints index
Didacus, Saint - Confessor, born San Nicolas del Puerto, Spain; died Alcala, Spain, 1463. Recalled to Spain, 1449, he went to Rome the following year for the canonization of Saint Bernardine of Siena. He returned to Spain and spent the remaining years of his life in solitude and prayer at Alcala
Bertram - ) Pellitory of Spain (Anacyclus pyrethrum)
Leveche - ) A dry sirocco of Spain
Spain - Solomon's fleet visited Spain, then named Τarshish (the Greek "Tartessus"). In classic times the name "Spain" came into use, traceable to the Βasque Εzpana , i. Romans 15:24; Romans 15:28, Paul's intention to visit Spain may imply that a Christian church was already founded there
Merino - ) A breed of sheep originally from Spain, noted for the fineness of its wool. ) Of or pertaining to a variety of sheep with very fine wool, originally bred in Spain
John of Sahagun, Saint - Confessor, hermit, born Sahagun, Spain, 1419; died Salamanca, Spain, 1479. Relics in Spain, Belgium, and Peru
Sahagun, John of, Saint - Confessor, hermit, born Sahagun, Spain, 1419; died Salamanca, Spain, 1479. Relics in Spain, Belgium, and Peru
Juan Mariana - Jesuit, born Talavera, Toledo, Spain, 1536; died Toledo, 1624. He taught theology at Rome and Paris, but from 1574 was engaged in literary work in Spain. His voluminous "History of Spain" is his masterpiece, but his "De rege et regis institutione," dedicated to Philip III of Spain, and "worthy of all respect from kings themselves as from their educators," writes the Protestant Dr Leutbecher, has caused him to be one of the most maligned Jesuits, owing to a misconstrued observation in favor of the assassination of Henry III and the justification under very exceptional circumstances of the deposition and killing of tyrants. No objection was raised in Spain but in France ten years later the work was ordered to be burnt by the Parliament
Mariana, Juan - Jesuit, born Talavera, Toledo, Spain, 1536; died Toledo, 1624. He taught theology at Rome and Paris, but from 1574 was engaged in literary work in Spain. His voluminous "History of Spain" is his masterpiece, but his "De rege et regis institutione," dedicated to Philip III of Spain, and "worthy of all respect from kings themselves as from their educators," writes the Protestant Dr Leutbecher, has caused him to be one of the most maligned Jesuits, owing to a misconstrued observation in favor of the assassination of Henry III and the justification under very exceptional circumstances of the deposition and killing of tyrants. No objection was raised in Spain but in France ten years later the work was ordered to be burnt by the Parliament
Cartist - ) In Spain and Portugal, one who supports the constitution
Allego - ) A native or inhabitant of Galicia, in Spain; a Galician
Tolletane - ) Of or pertaining to Toledo in Spain; made in Toledo
Centesimo - ) A copper coin of Italy and Spain equivalent to a centime
Hispanic - ) Of or pertaining to Spain or its language; as, Hispanic words
Alcalde - ) A magistrate or judge in Spain and in Spanish America, etc
Cantabrian - ) Of or pertaining to Cantabria on the Bay of Biscay in Spain
Torilto - ) A species of Turnix (Turnix sylvatica) native of Spain and Northen Africa
Carlist - of France, or of Don Carlos of Spain
Pyrethrine - ) An alkaloid extracted from the root of the pellitory of Spain (Anacyclus pyrethrum)
Fidalgo - ) The lowest title of nobility in Portugal, corresponding to that of Hidalgo in Spain
Asturian - ) Of or pertaining to Asturias in Spain
Spain - Spain . The extent of country to which in NT times the name Spain, or more strictly ‘the Spains,’ was given, was practically identical with modern Spain. The Romans first invaded Spain in 218, and after various successes and reverses constituted two provinces there in 197, known for centuries afterwards as Hispania Citerior (Tarraconensis) and Hispania Ulterior (Bætica), separated from one another by the Ebro. Paul’s Roman attitude more evident than in his determination to proceed from Rome to Spain, rather than to Africa or to Gaul ( Romans 15:24 ). Spain claims more honoured names in Roman literature than any other country in the 1st cent
Martyr d'Anghiera, Peter - Historian of Spain, born near Anghiera, Italy, 1451; died Granada, Spain, 1526. At Rome he met the Spanish ambassador whom he accompanied to Spain, where he became noted among the humanists, and was patronized by Ferdinand and Isabella
Alicant - ) A kind of wine, formerly much esteemed; - said to have been made near Alicant, in Spain
Biscayan - ) Of or pertaining to Biscay in Spain
Aditanian - ) Of or relating to Cadiz, in Spain
Junta - , the grand council of state in Spain
Malaga - ) A city and a province of Spain, on the Mediterranean
Nolasco, Peter, Saint - 1189;died Barcelona, Spain, c1256 Dividing his wealth among the poor, he took a vow of chastity. He went to Spain and there ransomed the Christians enslaved by the Moors, and in 1218 decided to found a religious order for the redemption of Christian captives, called Mercedarians; it was approved, 1230
Spain - Comprehended, in ancient usage, the modern kingdoms of Spain and Portugal, that is, the whole Spanish peninsula. For the supposed origin of its name, see Romans 15:24,28 , Paul expresses his intention of visiting Spain; and many conjecture that he did so between his first and second imprisonments at Rome, about A
do?a - ) Lady; mistress; madam; - a title of respect used in Spain, prefixed to the Christian name of a lady
Leonese - ) Of or pertaining to Leon, in Spain
Cabrerite - ) An apple-green mineral, a hydrous arseniate of nickel, cobalt, and magnesia; - so named from the Sierra Cabrera, Spain
Pyrenean - ) Of or pertaining to the Pyrenees, a range of mountains separating France and Spain
Fanega - ) A dry measure in Spain and Spanish America, varying from 1/ to 2/ bushels; also, a measure of land
Cancer de Barbastro, Luis - (died 1549) Dominican martyr, born Saragossa, Aragon, Spain; died Tampa Bay, Florida. Returning to Spain, he obtained a vessel to accomplish his mission in Florida
Luis Cancer de Barbastro - (died 1549) Dominican martyr, born Saragossa, Aragon, Spain; died Tampa Bay, Florida. Returning to Spain, he obtained a vessel to accomplish his mission in Florida
Ayuntamiento - ) In Spain and Spanish America, a corporation or body of magistrates in cities and towns, corresponding to mayor and aldermen
Madrilenian - ) Of or pertaining to Madrid in Spain, or to its inhabitants
Tutsan - Androsoemum), from which a healing ointment is prepared in Spain; - called also parkleaves
Francisco Herrera (2) - Son of Francisco the Elder, born Seville, Spain, 1622; died Madrid, Spain, 1685. In 1656 he returned to Spain and soon after founded the Seville Academy
Francisco the Younger - Son of Francisco the Elder, born Seville, Spain, 1622; died Madrid, Spain, 1685. In 1656 he returned to Spain and soon after founded the Seville Academy
Herrera, Francisco (2) - Son of Francisco the Elder, born Seville, Spain, 1622; died Madrid, Spain, 1685. In 1656 he returned to Spain and soon after founded the Seville Academy
el Mozo - Son of Francisco the Elder, born Seville, Spain, 1622; died Madrid, Spain, 1685. In 1656 he returned to Spain and soon after founded the Seville Academy
Younger, Francisco the - Son of Francisco the Elder, born Seville, Spain, 1622; died Madrid, Spain, 1685. In 1656 he returned to Spain and soon after founded the Seville Academy
Leander of Seville, Saint - 534;died Seville, Spain, 601. Spain is greatly indebted to Leander's efforts for her later religious unity, fervent faith, and broad culture
Seville, Leander of, Saint - 534;died Seville, Spain, 601. Spain is greatly indebted to Leander's efforts for her later religious unity, fervent faith, and broad culture
Lapuente, Luis, Venerable - Eminent Jesuit ascetical writer, born Valladolid, Spain, 1554; died there, 1624
Luis Lapuente, Venerable - Eminent Jesuit ascetical writer, born Valladolid, Spain, 1554; died there, 1624
Escurial - ) A palace and mausoleum of the kinds of Spain, being a vast and wonderful structure about twenty-five miles northwest of Madrid
Priscillianist - ) A follower of Priscillian, bishop of Avila in Spain, in the fourth century, who mixed various elements of Gnosticism and Manicheism with Christianity
Maravedi - ) A small copper coin of Spain, equal to three mils American money, less than a farthing sterling
Francisco Herrera - Painter, born Seville, Spain, 1576; died Madrid, Spain, 1656
Francisco the Elder - Painter, born Seville, Spain, 1576; died Madrid, Spain, 1656
Herrera, Francisco - Painter, born Seville, Spain, 1576; died Madrid, Spain, 1656
Elder, Francisco the - Painter, born Seville, Spain, 1576; died Madrid, Spain, 1656
el Viejo - Painter, born Seville, Spain, 1576; died Madrid, Spain, 1656
Scaramouch - ) A personage in the old Italian comedy (derived from Spain) characterized by great boastfulness and poltroonery; hence, a person of like characteristics; a buffoon
Randee - In Spain, a nobleman of the first rank, who may be covered in the king's presence
Sephardic - ) Of, pertaining to, or designating, the Jews (the Sephardim, also called Spanish or Portuguese Jews) descended from Jewish families driven from Spain by the Inquisition
Muzarab - ) One of a denomination of Christians formerly living under the government of the Moors in Spain, and having a liturgy and ritual of their own
Alcala, University of - Madrid, Spain, established at Alcala de Henares as the College of San Ildefonso, 1508, by the Franciscan, Francisco Ximenes de Cisneros, prime minister of Spain
University of Alcala - Madrid, Spain, established at Alcala de Henares as the College of San Ildefonso, 1508, by the Franciscan, Francisco Ximenes de Cisneros, prime minister of Spain
Andalusite - It was first discovered in Andalusia, Spain
Toledo - ) A sword or sword blade made at Toledo in Spain, which city was famous in the 16th and 17th centuries for the excellence of its weapons
Sepharad - The modern Jews think Spain. As Ζarephath , a Phoenician city, was mentioned in the previous clause, Sepharad is probably some Phoenician colony in Spain or some other place in the far West (compare Joel 3:6, to which Obadiah refers). In favor of Spain is the fact that the Spanish Jews are called Sephardim , the German Jews Αshkenazim
Mozarab - ,naturalized, Arab) ... A Christian in Spain who submitted to the Moorish government but retained the practise of his religion
Bullfighting - ) A barbarous sport, of great antiquity, in which men torment, and fight with, a bull or bulls in an arena, for public amusement, - still popular in Spain
Cortes - ) The legislative assembly, composed of nobility, clergy, and representatives of cities, which in Spain and in Portugal answers, in some measure, to the Parliament of Great Britain
Assiento - ) A contract or convention between Spain and other powers for furnishing negro slaves for the Spanish dominions in America, esp
Sephardim - ) Jews who are descendants of the former Jews of Spain and Portugal
Avila, University of - The Dominican College of Saint Thomas at Avila, Spain, was made a university, 1550
University of Avila - The Dominican College of Saint Thomas at Avila, Spain, was made a university, 1550
Maldonado, Juan - Jesuit theologian and exegete, born Casas de Reina, Spain, 1533; died Rome, Italy, 1583
Juan Maldonado - Jesuit theologian and exegete, born Casas de Reina, Spain, 1533; died Rome, Italy, 1583
Flota - ) A fleet; especially, a /eet of Spanish ships which formerly sailed every year from Cadiz to Vera Cruz, in Mexico, to transport to Spain the production of Spanish America
Barcena, Alonzo de - (Barzana, Alonzo de) (1528-1598) Jesuit missionary in Peru, born Baeza, Andalusia, Spain; died Cuzco, Peru
Barzana, Alonzo de - (Barzana, Alonzo de) (1528-1598) Jesuit missionary in Peru, born Baeza, Andalusia, Spain; died Cuzco, Peru
Domonic of Silos, Saint - Abbot, born Canas, Navarra, Spain; died Silos, 1073. To this day his staff is brought by the Abbot of Silos to the bedside of the Queen of Spain where it remains during the birth of the royal children
Isidorian Rite - The rite used in Spain, and in what later became Portugal, from about the 6th to the latter part of the 11th century. It is known also as Gothic, due to its development during the time of the Visigothic Kingdom of Spain; Toletan, from Toledo which was its center; Isidorian, because it probably received a revision by Saint Isidore of Seville
Mozarabic Rite - The rite used in Spain, and in what later became Portugal, from about the 6th to the latter part of the 11th century. It is known also as Gothic, due to its development during the time of the Visigothic Kingdom of Spain; Toletan, from Toledo which was its center; Isidorian, because it probably received a revision by Saint Isidore of Seville
Alva, Fernando Alvarez de Toledo, Duke of - General and statesman; born in 1508; died in 1582, Thomar, Spain. Sent by King Philip II of Spain to subdue the rebellious Netherlands in 1557, his stern measures caused him to be known as the Iron Duke
Gothic Rite - The rite used in Spain, and in what later became Portugal, from about the 6th to the latter part of the 11th century. It is known also as Gothic, due to its development during the time of the Visigothic Kingdom of Spain; Toletan, from Toledo which was its center; Isidorian, because it probably received a revision by Saint Isidore of Seville
Silos, Domonic of, Saint - Abbot, born Canas, Navarra, Spain; died Silos, 1073. To this day his staff is brought by the Abbot of Silos to the bedside of the Queen of Spain where it remains during the birth of the royal children
Toletan Rite - The rite used in Spain, and in what later became Portugal, from about the 6th to the latter part of the 11th century. It is known also as Gothic, due to its development during the time of the Visigothic Kingdom of Spain; Toletan, from Toledo which was its center; Isidorian, because it probably received a revision by Saint Isidore of Seville
Rite, Gothic - The rite used in Spain, and in what later became Portugal, from about the 6th to the latter part of the 11th century. It is known also as Gothic, due to its development during the time of the Visigothic Kingdom of Spain; Toletan, from Toledo which was its center; Isidorian, because it probably received a revision by Saint Isidore of Seville
Rite, Isidorian - The rite used in Spain, and in what later became Portugal, from about the 6th to the latter part of the 11th century. It is known also as Gothic, due to its development during the time of the Visigothic Kingdom of Spain; Toletan, from Toledo which was its center; Isidorian, because it probably received a revision by Saint Isidore of Seville
Rite, Mozarabic - The rite used in Spain, and in what later became Portugal, from about the 6th to the latter part of the 11th century. It is known also as Gothic, due to its development during the time of the Visigothic Kingdom of Spain; Toletan, from Toledo which was its center; Isidorian, because it probably received a revision by Saint Isidore of Seville
Rite, Toletan - The rite used in Spain, and in what later became Portugal, from about the 6th to the latter part of the 11th century. It is known also as Gothic, due to its development during the time of the Visigothic Kingdom of Spain; Toletan, from Toledo which was its center; Isidorian, because it probably received a revision by Saint Isidore of Seville
Padre - ) A Christian priest or monk; - used in Italy, Spain, Portugal, and Spanish America
Parterie - ) Articles made of the blades or fiber of the Lygeum Spartum and Stipa (/ Macrochloa) tenacissima, kinds of grass used in Spain and other countries for making ropes, mats, baskets, nets, and mattresses
Almagra - ) A fine, deep red ocher, somewhat purplish, found in Spain
Luis Beltran, Saint - Confessor (1526-81), Apostle of South America, born Valencia, Spain, 1526; died there 1581. His labors in Panama and Colombia were astonishingly successful, but after seven years he was recalled to Spain to assume a position of responsibility in his order
Marcelino Menendez y Pelayo - Born Santander, Spain, November 3, 1856; died there, May 2, 1912. Author of "Estudios criticos sobre poetas Montafienses," and "Heterodoxes Espanoles," a political and literary history of Spain in relation to the Catholic Church, from the time of Priscillian to the end of the 19th century
Molina, Luis de - Theologian, born Cuenea, Spain, 1535; died Madrid, Spain, October 12, 1600
Beltran, Luis, Saint - Confessor (1526-81), Apostle of South America, born Valencia, Spain, 1526; died there 1581. His labors in Panama and Colombia were astonishingly successful, but after seven years he was recalled to Spain to assume a position of responsibility in his order
Menendez y Pelayo, Marcelino - Born Santander, Spain, November 3, 1856; died there, May 2, 1912. Author of "Estudios criticos sobre poetas Montafienses," and "Heterodoxes Espanoles," a political and literary history of Spain in relation to the Catholic Church, from the time of Priscillian to the end of the 19th century
Luis de Molina - Theologian, born Cuenea, Spain, 1535; died Madrid, Spain, October 12, 1600
Bernardo o'Higgins - He took part in the revolutionary war against Spain, and was hailed as the liberator of Chile
o'Higgins, Bernardo - He took part in the revolutionary war against Spain, and was hailed as the liberator of Chile
Asturias - An ancient province in northern Spain
Vargueno - ) A decorative cabinet, of a form originating in Spain, the body being rectangular and supported on legs or an ornamental framework and the front opening downwards on hinges to serve as a writing desk
Abstinent - ) One of a sect who appeared in France and Spain in the 3d century
Mantilla - ) A kind of veil, covering the head and falling down upon the shoulders; - worn in Spain, Mexico, etc
Celtiberian - ) Of or pertaining to the ancient Celtiberia (a district in Spain lying between the Ebro and the Tagus) or its inhabitants the Celtiberi (Celts of the river Iberus)
Fandango - ) A lively dance, in 3-8 or 6-8 time, much practiced in Spain and Spanish America
Spain - Paul expresses his intention (Romans 15:24,28 ) to visit Spain
Antonio Escobar y Mendoza - Jesuit theologian, born Valladolid, Spain, 1589; died there, 1669
Andalusia, Spain - Region of southern Spain comprising the provinces of Almeria, Jaen, Granada, Cordoba, Seville, Malaga, Cadiz, and Helva. It is the most populated and second largest of the seventeen autonomous communities that constitute Spain. Lower Andalusia was taken by Christians in 1212, and the remainder merged with other elements of modern Spain in 1492
Andorra - Semi-independent republic in the Pyrenees between France and Spain; area, 191 square miles. The country is now under the joint suzerainty of France and the Bishop of Urgel, Spain, who each appoint a civiland a criminal judge. The country is included in the Spanish Diocese of Urgel, founded in the 4th century, of which Seo de Urgel, in Spain, is the cathedral city; the chief town of the republic is Andorra La Vieja
John of Avila, Blessed - Confessor, apostolic preacher of Andalusia, born Almodovar del Campo, Spain, 1500; died Montilla, 1569. During John's apostolate of forty years he attracted by his preaching and by his saintly life notable disciples, as Saint Theresa, Saint John of God, and Saint Francis Borgia, and spread the power of the Jesuits throughout Spain
Isidore of Seville, Saint - Confessor, Doctor of the Church, Bishop of Seville, born Cartagena, Spain, 560; died Seville, Spain, 636
Avila, John of, Blessed - Confessor, apostolic preacher of Andalusia, born Almodovar del Campo, Spain, 1500; died Montilla, 1569. During John's apostolate of forty years he attracted by his preaching and by his saintly life notable disciples, as Saint Theresa, Saint John of God, and Saint Francis Borgia, and spread the power of the Jesuits throughout Spain
Seville, Isidore of, Saint - Confessor, Doctor of the Church, Bishop of Seville, born Cartagena, Spain, 560; died Seville, Spain, 636
Missionary Sons of the Immaculate Heart of Mary - Founded at Vich, Spain, 1849, by Saint Antonio Marta Claret; definitely approved, 1870, and again, 1924
Ibraltar - ) A strongly fortified town on the south coast of Spain, held by the British since 1704; hence, an impregnable stronghold
Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Mary - The congregation manages colleges, academies, schools, and orphanages in France, England, Ireland, Spain, Brazil, and the United States
Juan Cabrillo - (Cabrillo, Juan) A Portuguese in the naval service of Spain, died San Bernardo, 1543
Cabrillo, Estevan - (Cabrillo, Juan) A Portuguese in the naval service of Spain, died San Bernardo, 1543
Cabrillo, Juan - (Cabrillo, Juan) A Portuguese in the naval service of Spain, died San Bernardo, 1543
Estevan Cabrillo - (Cabrillo, Juan) A Portuguese in the naval service of Spain, died San Bernardo, 1543
Bilbo - ) A rapier; a sword; so named from Bilbao, in Spain
Exclusion, Right of - A right, now explicitly rejected by the Church but in former times claimed by France, Austria, Spain, and Germany, to veto the election of a particular cardinal as pope
Right of Exclusion - A right, now explicitly rejected by the Church but in former times claimed by France, Austria, Spain, and Germany, to veto the election of a particular cardinal as pope
Habsburgs - A family of sovereigns in Germany, Austria, and Spain. His son married Joanna the Insane, Queen of Aragon and Spain. Their son became King of Spain as Charles I in 1516, and emperor as Charles V in 1519
Index, Expurgatory - of Spain ordered another to be printed at Antwerp in 1571, with considerable enlargements. Another index was published in Spain in 1584, a copy of which was snatched out of the fire when the English plundered Cadiz. Afterwards there were several expurgatory indexes printed at Rome and Naples, and particularly in Spain
Fisher, Philip - Jesuit missionary, born Madrid, Spain, 1595; died Maryland, 1652
Church, Latin or Western - Comprehends all the churches of Italy, Portugal, Spain, Africa, the north, and all other countries whither the Romans carried their language
Queen Olive - Properly, a kind of superior olive grown in the region of Seville, Spain
Averroes - (Ibn Roshd; 1126-1198) Arabian philosopher, born Cordova, Spain; died Morocco
Ice Plant - Its juice is said to be demulcent and diuretic; its ashes are used in Spain in making glass
Thomas Copley - Jesuit missionary, born Madrid, Spain, 1595; died Maryland, 1652
Thomas Sanchez - Born in 1550 Cordova, Spain; died in May 19, 1610 in Granada
Sanchez, Thomas - Born in 1550 Cordova, Spain; died in May 19, 1610 in Granada
Spanish College - Founded in 1893 through the efforts of Pope Leo XIII, the episcopacy, the royal family, and others in Spain
Pistole - In Spain it was equivalent to a quarter doubloon, or about $3
Atilanus, Saint - 939-1009) Confessor, Bishop of Zamora, born Tarazona, Spain; died Zamora
Attilanus, Saint - 939-1009) Confessor, Bishop of Zamora, born Tarazona, Spain; died Zamora
Las Casas, Bartolome de - Dominican, born Seville, Spain, c. 1474;died Madrid, Spain, 1566
Casaus, Bartolome - Dominican, born Seville, Spain, c. 1474;died Madrid, Spain, 1566
Decretal - The first genuine one, acknowledged by all the learned as such, is a letter of Pope Siricius, written in the year 385, to Himerus, bishop of Tarragona, in Spain, concerning some disorders which had crept into the churches of Spain
Bartolome Casaus - Dominican, born Seville, Spain, c. 1474;died Madrid, Spain, 1566
Bartolome de Las Casas - Dominican, born Seville, Spain, c. 1474;died Madrid, Spain, 1566
Alcantara, Peter of, Saint - Confessor; founder of the Reform Congregation of the Spanish Discalceates (Alcantarini); born Alcantara, Spain, 1499; died Arenas, 1562. The order spread through Spain and Portugal, and Peter was elected superior, 1556
Baptist, Peter, Saint - Martyr; born San Esteban, Avila, Spain, 1545; died Nagasaki, Japan, 1597. The indiscreet boast of a Spanish sea captain that the missionaries had been sent to prepare for the conquest of Japan by Spain, aroused the anger of the emperor, and he ordered the missionaries to be imprisoned
Castro Palao, Fernando - (1581-1633) Theologian, born Leon, Spain; died Medina
Caballeria - ) An ancient Spanish land tenure similar to the English knight's fee; hence, in Spain and countries settled by the Spanish, a land measure of varying size
Sisters of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin - The congregation has houses, including schools and academies, in France, Switzerland, England, Spain, Italy, the Madeira Islands, Canada, and the United States
Western Church - , the Church in western Europe,—Italy, Spain,France, etc
Francis Borgia, Saint - Confessor, third general of the Society of Jesus, born Gandia, Spain, 1510; died Ferrara, Italy, 1572. He visited Portugal, 1553, and 1554-1561 was commissary-general of the Society in Spain. He founded missions in Florida, New Spain, and Peru
Our Lady of the Pillar - A celebrated church in Baroque style (1681), and a shrine at Saragossa, Spain, containing a miraculous image of the Blessed Virgin, the object of very special devotion throughout the kingdom
Muscatel - ) A common name for several varieties of rich sweet wine, made in Italy, Spain, and France
Spain - (Σπανία)... Spain was St. It is in his letter to the Romans (Romans 15:24; Romans 15:28) that he first broaches the idea of evangelizing Spain. The Imperial width of his horizon and boldness of his policy were worthy of his Roman citizenship, and the fact that Spain was the most completely Romanized of all the provinces no doubt made it seem a very attractive and promising mission field. ’ Carrying over the permanent benefits of an earlier Phcenician and Carthaginian civilization, Spain had become a Roman province at the end of the Second Punic War (201 b. ‘If preparation was anywhere made by the republic for the great all-significant work of the imperial period-the Romanising of the West-it was in Spain. … In all Spain under Augustus there were numbered fifty communities with full citizenship; nearly fifty others had up to this time received Latin rights, and stood as to inward organisation on a par with the burgess-communities. Many of the writers of Rome’s silver age, notably Lucan, the two Senecas, Martial, and Quintilian, were Spaniards, The Emperors Trajan and Hadrian were born in Spain. Paul ever reached this goal, he must have made Latin for a time his missionary language, for even when half the population of Rome was speaking Greek, Spain was never in any degree Hellenized. ’ Lightfoot interpreted ‘the bound of the West’ as Spain, but, since the next clauses certainly refer to St
John of God, Saint - Confessor, Founder of the Brothers Hospitallers, born Montemor Novo, Portugal, 1495; died Granada, Spain, 1550. After serving in Charles V's army he lived in Africa for some time and later, returning to Spain, peddled religious books and pictures in Gibraltar
God, John of, Saint - Confessor, Founder of the Brothers Hospitallers, born Montemor Novo, Portugal, 1495; died Granada, Spain, 1550. After serving in Charles V's army he lived in Africa for some time and later, returning to Spain, peddled religious books and pictures in Gibraltar
Order of the Most Holy Trinity - The Trinitarians of Spain separated from those of France under Father Juan Bautista of the Immaculate Conception; the latter added fresh austerity to their rule by founding the Discalced Trinitarians of Spain. They have retained a few houses in Italy, Spain, and the Spanish colonies. There are both Calced and Discalced Spanish Trinitarian Nuns with numerous houses in Spain
Trinitarians - The Trinitarians of Spain separated from those of France under Father Juan Bautista of the Immaculate Conception; the latter added fresh austerity to their rule by founding the Discalced Trinitarians of Spain. They have retained a few houses in Italy, Spain, and the Spanish colonies. There are both Calced and Discalced Spanish Trinitarian Nuns with numerous houses in Spain
Fiscal - ) The solicitor in Spain and Portugal; the attorney-general
Patio - ) In Spain, Spanish America, etc
Abstinents - A set of heretics that appeared in France and Spain about the end of the third century
Maimonides - Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon, known by the acronym the �Rambam�, 1135-1204; Cordoba (Spain), Fez (Morocco) and Fostat (old Cairo, Egypt); codifier, philosopher, communal leader, and court physician to Sultan Salamin of Egypt; author of a commentary on the Mishnah, the Book of Mitzvot, Mishneh Torah, the Guide to the Perplexed and many other works ...
Mont de Piete - The institution has been adopted in other countries, as in Spain and France
Rosemary - ) A labiate shrub (Rosmarinus officinalis) with narrow grayish leaves, growing native in the southern part of France, Spain, and Italy, also in Asia Minor and in China
Nonnatus, Raymond, Saint - Born in 1204 in Portello, diocese of Urgel, Spain; died August 31, 1240 at Cardona, Catalonia. Ransomed by his Order, he returned to Spain and was made a cardinal by Pope Gregory IX
Escorial - Famous building, Spain; about 27 miles northwest of Madrid, known as El real Monasterio de San Lorenzo del Escorial, comprising a monastery, church, mausoleum, palace, college, library, and art-galleries. The finest building is the Doric church; under the altar is the royal mausoleum of the kings of Spain
Bernardino de Sahagun - Born 1499 in Sahagun, Spain; died in 1590 in Mexico
Cantarro - ) A liquid measure in Spain, ranging from two and a half to four gallons
Rambam - Acronym for "Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon" 1135-1204; Cordoba (Spain), Fez (Morocco) and Fostat (old Cairo, Egypt); known as Maimonides, he was a codifier, philosopher, communal leader, and court physician to Sultan Salamin of Egypt; author of a commentary on the Mishnah, the Book of Mitzvot, Mishneh Torah, the Guide to the Perplexed and many other works
Spain - Paul wanted to go to Spain (Romans 15:24 ,Romans 15:24,15:28 )
Piaster - ) A silver coin of Spain and various other countries
Duenna - ) The chief lady in waiting on the queen of Spain
Sisters of the Assumption - The congregation has houses and schools in France, Belgium, Italy, Spain, England, Denmark, North America, Central America, South America, and the Philippines
león, Spain - Former kingdom in the northwestern part of the Iberian peninsula, now a civilprovince of Spain. In the 10th century under Ordoño II Castile was subjugated, the cathedral of Leon founded, and Leon became the leading Christian state of western Spain. In 1135 Alfonso VIti was proclaimed Emperor of Spain in the basilica of Santa Maria
Augustinians Hermits - These were united in 1256 through the efforts of Pope Alexander IV, and monasteries were soon established in Germany, France, and Spain. The most important of these were the Hermits Recollects of Saint Augustine, a reform begun in Spain, 1438, established, 1588, and formed into a distinct order in 1912, and the German or Saxon Reformed Congregation, recognized in 1493 and comprising many important convents in Germany afterwards affiliated with the Lombardic Congregation. Most of the French houses were destroyed during the French Revolution, losses resulted from the secularization of religious houses in Germany, Austria, and Italy, and in 1835 nearly all the houses in Spain were suppressed. They conduct academies, coileges, seminaries, and missions in Italy, Spain, Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Malta, England, Ireland, Australia, China, Philippines, Colombia, Peru, Brazil, Argentina, Ecuador, Chile, Cuba, and the United States
Hermits of Saint Augustine - These were united in 1256 through the efforts of Pope Alexander IV, and monasteries were soon established in Germany, France, and Spain. The most important of these were the Hermits Recollects of Saint Augustine, a reform begun in Spain, 1438, established, 1588, and formed into a distinct order in 1912, and the German or Saxon Reformed Congregation, recognized in 1493 and comprising many important convents in Germany afterwards affiliated with the Lombardic Congregation. Most of the French houses were destroyed during the French Revolution, losses resulted from the secularization of religious houses in Germany, Austria, and Italy, and in 1835 nearly all the houses in Spain were suppressed. They conduct academies, coileges, seminaries, and missions in Italy, Spain, Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Malta, England, Ireland, Australia, China, Philippines, Colombia, Peru, Brazil, Argentina, Ecuador, Chile, Cuba, and the United States
Juan de Lugo - Cardinal, theologian, born Madrid, Spain, 1583; died Rome, Italy, 1660
Didacus, Blessed - He was received into the Capuchin Order in Seville, 1759, and labored as a missionary throughout Spain, but chiefly in Andalusia
Diego, Blessed - He was received into the Capuchin Order in Seville, 1759, and labored as a missionary throughout Spain, but chiefly in Andalusia
Jesus-Mary, Congregation of - The congregation has 70 houses, including colleges, normal schools, boarding and day schools, orphanages, dispensaries, and guesthouses, in France, Spain, England, Ireland, Switzerland, Italy, Germany, India, Argentina, Canada, the United States, and Mexico
Institute of Bon Secours (Troyes) - The order has approximately 120 houses, in France, Belgium, England, Italy, Spain, and Africa
Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart - The order includes colleges, schools, nurseries, orphanages, and hospitals, in Italy, France, Spain, England, United States, Argentina, Brazil, Nicaragua, and China
Merida, Eulalia of, Saint - She is very popular in Spain and is patroness of Merida and of Oviedo where her relics are preserved
Lugo, Juan de - Cardinal, theologian, born Madrid, Spain, 1583; died Rome, Italy, 1660
Don - ) Sir; Mr; Signior; - a title in Spain, formerly given to noblemen and gentlemen only, but now common to all classes
Alvarez de Paz - (1560-1620) Mystic, born Toledo, Spain; died Potosi, Bolivia
Creole - ) One born of European parents in the American colonies of France or Spain or in the States which were once such colonies, esp
Hermandad - (Spanish: brotherhood) ... Originally a voluntary organization (Santa Hermandad or Holy Brotherhood) for maintenance of public order, in Spain
Eulalia of Merida, Saint - She is very popular in Spain and is patroness of Merida and of Oviedo where her relics are preserved
Milesian - ) Descended from King Milesius of Spain, whose two sons are said to have conquered Ireland about 1300 b
Moron - ) An inferior olive size having a woody pulp and a large clingstone pit, growing in the mountainous and high-valley districts around the city of Moron, in Spain
Migrate - ) To remove from one country or region to another, with a view to residence; to change one's place of residence; to remove; as, the Moors who migrated from Africa into Spain; to migrate to the West
Little Sisters of the Assumption - The congregation has houses in France, Italy, England, Ireland, Spain, Belgium, the United States, and South America
Margli, Antonio, Venerable - Apostle of Guatemala, and Texas, born Valencia, Spain, 1657; died Mexico, 1726
Douai, University of - Founded by Philip II of Spain, 1562, with five faculties, theology, canon and civillaw, medicine, and arts; sanctioned by Bulls of Paul IV, 1559, and Pius IV, 1560
Basque - ) One of a race, of unknown origin, inhabiting a region on the Bay of Biscay in Spain and France
Assumption, Little Sisters of the - The congregation has houses in France, Italy, England, Ireland, Spain, Belgium, the United States, and South America
Antonio Margli, Venerable - Apostle of Guatemala, and Texas, born Valencia, Spain, 1657; died Mexico, 1726
Expectation of the Blessed Virgin Mary - It originated in Spain, when the feast of the Annunciation (March 25,) was transferFed to December 18, because of the regulation forbidding feasts in Lent, and remained on this date after the Annunciation was again celebrated on its original date
Thyine-Wood - A kind of cedar growing in Spain, and on the coast of Africa
Latin - ... Latin church, the western church the christian church in Italy, France, Spain and other countries where the Latin language was introduced, as distinct from the Greek or eastern church
University of Douai, France - Founded by Philip II of Spain, 1562, with five faculties, theology, canon and civillaw, medicine, and arts; sanctioned by Bulls of Paul IV, 1559, and Pius IV, 1560
Minims, Order of - From France the Minims spread to Spain and in 1497, the Emperor Maximilian introduced them into Germany. At the death of Saint Francis of Paula, 1507, there existed five provinces, spread over Italy, France, Spain, and Germany
Order of Minims - From France the Minims spread to Spain and in 1497, the Emperor Maximilian introduced them into Germany. At the death of Saint Francis of Paula, 1507, there existed five provinces, spread over Italy, France, Spain, and Germany
Mantellate - Education and the instruction of converts also engage the nuns, who have houses in Italy, France, Spain, England, Canada, and the United States
Innocent Xiii, Pope - As pope he regulated abuses in Spain, assisted Venice against the Turks with subsidies, decided against the Jesuits in the Chinese Rites controversy, and continued the pension bestowed by his predecessor on the Stuart Pretender
Calixtus Iii, Pope - Born on December 31, 1378 at Xàtiva, Valencia, Spain as Alphonso de Borgia; died on August 6, 1458 at Rome, Italy
Callistus Iii, Pope - Born on December 31, 1378 at Xàtiva, Valencia, Spain as Alphonso de Borgia; died on August 6, 1458 at Rome, Italy
Amphitheater - Remains of other Roman amphitheaters are at Verona, Capua, Pozzuoli and Pola, Italy; Nimes, Arles, Frejus, and Tours, France; Seville and Tarragona, Spain
Arcadius, Saint - Relics at Medina del Campo, Spain
Sirocco - ) In general, any hot dry wind of cyclonic origin, blowing from arid or heated regions, including the desert wind of Southern California, the harmattan of the west coasts of Africa, the hot winds of Kansas and Texas, the kamsin of Egypt, the leste of the Madeira Islands, and the leveche of Spain
Eutychianus, Saint - Relics at Medina del Campo, Spain
Alcala de Henares - Town in Spain, 22 miles northeast of Madrid, on the Henares River
Santiago de Cuba, Archdiocese of - Founded in 1518 as the diocese of Baracoa, which covered all of Cuba, and was a suffragen of the archdiocese of Seville, Spain
Charles v, Emperor - (1500-1558) Charles I, King of Spain, born Ghent, Belgium; died Yuste, Spain. Charles established legislation which regulated the social and industrial life of the Netherlands, adopted a progressive policy in Spain, and dealt successfully with colonial politics in America
Benedict Xiii, Anti-Pope - Antipope (1394-1417), born Illueca, Aragon, Spain, 1328; died Peftiscola, Spain, 1422 or 1423. The council met, received the submission of Cossa and the abdication by proxy of Gregory XII, but Pedro de Luna fled to Spain still asserting his claim to the see
Luna, Pedro de - Antipope (1394-1417), born Illueca, Aragon, Spain, 1328; died Peftiscola, Spain, 1422 or 1423. The council met, received the submission of Cossa and the abdication by proxy of Gregory XII, but Pedro de Luna fled to Spain still asserting his claim to the see
Emperor Charles v - (1500-1558) Charles I, King of Spain, born Ghent, Belgium; died Yuste, Spain. Charles established legislation which regulated the social and industrial life of the Netherlands, adopted a progressive policy in Spain, and dealt successfully with colonial politics in America
Alphonsus Salmeron - Born in 1515 in Toledo, Spain; died in 1585 in Naples, Italy
Hilarius, Pope - As pope he continued Leo I's vigorous policy, strengthening ecclesiastical government in Gaul and Spain
Hilarus, Pope - As pope he continued Leo I's vigorous policy, strengthening ecclesiastical government in Gaul and Spain
Hilary, Pope - As pope he continued Leo I's vigorous policy, strengthening ecclesiastical government in Gaul and Spain
Uerrilla - ) An irregular mode of carrying on war, by the constant attacks of independent bands, adopted in the north of Spain during the Peninsular war
Alemany, Joseph Sadoc - First Archbishop of San Francisco, born Vich, Spain, 1814; died Valencia, 1888
Carmelite - The Carmelites have four tribes, and they have now thirty-eight provinces, besides the congregation in Mantua, in which are fifty-four monasteries, under a vicar general, and the congregations of barefooted Carmelites in Italy and Spain
Salmeron, Alphonsus - Born in 1515 in Toledo, Spain; died in 1585 in Naples, Italy
Sisters of Saint Joseph of Cluny - The congregation manages schools, hospitals, dispensaries, clinics, sanitariums, insane asylums, and orphanages, in France, England, Ireland, Scotland, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, India, Ceylon, Africa, Madagascar, the Seychelles Islands, Nossi-Be, Reunion, the West Indies, Saint-Pierre and Miquelon, French Guiana, Chile, Peru, and Oceania
Seville, Spain, Archdiocese of - Suffragan dioceses include ...
Cádiz y Ceuta

Córdoba

Huelva

Islas Canarias (Canary Islands)

Jerez de la Frontera

San Cristóbal de La Laguna o Tenerife
Notable bishops include ...
Blessed Marcelo Spínola y Maestre

Saint Isidore of Seville

Saint Laurian of Seville

Saint Leander of Seville
See also ...
New Catholic Dictionary: city of Seville, Spain

Catholic-Hierarchy
Society of Marie Reparatrice - The order includes houses of retreat, schools, lending libraries, study clubs, workrooms for the poor, orphanages, and dispensaries, in Italy, France, Belgium, Spain, England, Ireland, Canada, Africa, the United States, Cuba, and Palestine
Benedict xv, Pope - Nuncio to Spain, privy chamberlain, Archbishop of Bologna, and cardinal, he was elected directly after the outbreak of the World War, and maintained a position of neutrality throughout. At the close of the war France and Spain resumed diplomatic relations with the Vatican, and Great Britain retained permanently the embassy she had established during the war
Sanction, Pragmatic - The name is also given to some famous edicts of the kings of France and Spain.

The Pragmatic Sanction of Charles III of Spain, 1759, which also dealt wIth the question of succession
Friary of la Rabida - Franciscan convent near Palos, Andalusia, Spain, where Columbus stopped with his son Diego on his way to France to seek aid for his expedition to the New World
la Rabida, Friary of - Franciscan convent near Palos, Andalusia, Spain, where Columbus stopped with his son Diego on his way to France to seek aid for his expedition to the New World
Order of Calced Carmelites - Its mother-house is in Rome; it is established in Italy, Spain, England, Ireland, Germany, Austria, Holland, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Malta, Palestine, the United States, Canada, Brazil, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Australia, and Java
Marina de Escobar, Venerable - Mystic and religious foundress, born Valladolid, Spain, 1554; died there, 1633
Calced Carmelite Order - Its mother-house is in Rome; it is established in Italy, Spain, England, Ireland, Germany, Austria, Holland, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Malta, Palestine, the United States, Canada, Brazil, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Australia, and Java
Mary Mediatrix - The feast is also celebrated in Spain
Mary, Mediatrix of All Graces - The feast is also celebrated in Spain
Sepharad - Early Syriac (Peshitta) and Aramaic (Targum) evidence points to Spain, but this is improbable
Pellitory - Called also bertram, and pellitory of Spain
Architecture, Renaissance - A transitional style, which originated in the 15th century in Italy and was copied nearly a century later by France, Germany, and Spain
Renaissance Architecture - A transitional style, which originated in the 15th century in Italy and was copied nearly a century later by France, Germany, and Spain
Beryl - (tarshish ) occurs in ( Exodus 28:20 ) It is generally supposed that the tarshish derives its name from the place so called, in Spain
League, Holy - Supported by Catherine de' Medici, Philip of Spain, Pope Gregory XIII, and led by King Henry III, it was finally disbanded in 1595 after the conversion of Henry IV
Daughters of the Cross And Passion - The order has 10 houses in Italy, Spain, France, Belgium, and the United States
Omer, Saint - Located in the Province of Artois, at that time subject to the King of Spain
Innocent ix, Pope - He ruled only two months and during that time supported the Catholic League and Phillip II of Spain against Henry IV in France
Charles Plumier - Botanist; born on April 20, 1646 in Marseilles, France; died on November 20, 1704 in Puerto de Santa Maria, Spain
Nicholas Sanders - In 1579 he went to Ireland as papal agent through the connivance of Philip II of Spain
Holy League - Supported by Catherine de' Medici, Philip of Spain, Pope Gregory XIII, and led by King Henry III, it was finally disbanded in 1595 after the conversion of Henry IV
Regie - Such monopolies are largely employed in Austria, Italy, France, and Spain
Sisters of the Immaculate Conception - They conduct houses of higher education, day and boarding schools, high and elementary schools, kindergartens, houses of refuge, and workrooms, in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, France, Belgium, Spain, South Africa, and Asia
Saint Omer - Located in the Province of Artois, at that time subject to the King of Spain
Society of the Sacred Heart of Jesus - The society has houses, colleges, academies, elementary and high schools, in Italy, France, Belgium, England, Ireland, Scotland, the Netherlands, Spain, Germany, Austria, Hungary, Poland, the United States, Canada, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Argentine, Uruguay, Brazil, Colombia, Egypt, Congo, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, and China
Sanders, Nicholas - In 1579 he went to Ireland as papal agent through the connivance of Philip II of Spain
Castile - Alfonso VIII (1158-1214) definitely freed New Castile from the Moslem yoke in the battle of Las Navas de Tolosa (1212), commemorated annually by the Church in Spain on July 16, as "El Triumfo de la Santa Cruz" (The Triumph of the Holy Cross). In the reign of Alfonso XI (1310-1350) the last of the Moors attempting reconquest of Spain were vanquished in the battle of Salado. At the instigation of the nobles Henry IV the Impotent declared his daughter Joan illegitimate, and the kingdom passed to his sister Isabella the Catholic (1474) whose marriage with Ferdinand of Aragon united the kingdoms, forming the basis of the modern Kingdom of Spain
Isabella i - Queen of Castile, born Madrigtti de las Altas Torres, 1451; died Castle of La Mota, Medina del Campo (Valladolid), Spain, 1504. Ferdinand had meanwhile succeeded to the throne of Aragon, and thus the definitive unity of the Spanish nation was accomplished in the two monarchs, to whom Alexander VI gave the title of "Catholic" which the Kings of Spain still bear
Isabella the Catholic - Queen of Castile, born Madrigtti de las Altas Torres, 1451; died Castle of La Mota, Medina del Campo (Valladolid), Spain, 1504. Ferdinand had meanwhile succeeded to the throne of Aragon, and thus the definitive unity of the Spanish nation was accomplished in the two monarchs, to whom Alexander VI gave the title of "Catholic" which the Kings of Spain still bear
Armada, the Spanish - The naval and military force sent by Spain to invade England, 1588. Spain, however, was unwise to attempt to prohibit all traffic to her colonies; and the cruelties of Alva in the Netherlands embittered the struggle. On account of Spain's slowness, he did neither
Catholic, Isabella the - Queen of Castile, born Madrigtti de las Altas Torres, 1451; died Castle of La Mota, Medina del Campo (Valladolid), Spain, 1504. Ferdinand had meanwhile succeeded to the throne of Aragon, and thus the definitive unity of the Spanish nation was accomplished in the two monarchs, to whom Alexander VI gave the title of "Catholic" which the Kings of Spain still bear
Spanish Armada, the - The naval and military force sent by Spain to invade England, 1588. Spain, however, was unwise to attempt to prohibit all traffic to her colonies; and the cruelties of Alva in the Netherlands embittered the struggle. On account of Spain's slowness, he did neither
Bernabe Cobo - (1582-1657) Naturalist, born Lopera, Spain; died Lima, Peru
Institute of Our Lady of Charity of the Refuge - The order has establishments in France, England, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Austria, Canada, and the United States
Lainez, James - Second General of the Society of Jesus, theologian, born Castile, Spain, 1512; died Rome, Italy, 1565
Chartreuse, la Grande - After losing most of its land in the French Revolution the monastery supported itself largely by manufacturiug the famous cordial, now made at Tarragona, Spain
James Lainez - Second General of the Society of Jesus, theologian, born Castile, Spain, 1512; died Rome, Italy, 1565
Silver - It was brought in large quantities by foreign merchants from abroad, from Spain and India and other countries probably
Hussey, Thomas - Twenty-five years later, when Spain and France broke with England, he took care of the Spanish interests in England; subsequently he was entrusted by the British with diplomatic missions in Madrid and Ireland
Grande Chartreuse, la - After losing most of its land in the French Revolution the monastery supported itself largely by manufacturiug the famous cordial, now made at Tarragona, Spain
Antonio Espejo - (16th century) Explorer, born probably Cordoba, Spain
Espejo, Antonio - (16th century) Explorer, born probably Cordoba, Spain
Balmes, Jaime Luciano - (1810-1848) Priest and philosopher, born Vich, Spain; died there
Thomas Hussey - Twenty-five years later, when Spain and France broke with England, he took care of the Spanish interests in England; subsequently he was entrusted by the British with diplomatic missions in Madrid and Ireland
Gibraltar - Crown colony of the British Empire, in the south of Spain
Order of Saint Saviour - In the 17th century a society following modified form of the rule of the Brigittines was founded by Maria de Escobar, a Carmelite, in Spain
Madrid, Spain - City, capital of Spain
Laborer, Isidore the, Saint - Confessor, born near Madrid, Spain, 1070; died there, 1130
Isidore the Laborer, Saint - Confessor, born near Madrid, Spain, 1070; died there, 1130
Feast of the Holy Name of Mary - It was first observed at Cuenca, Spain, 1513, then extended to the universal Church and assigned to its present place and rank by Innocent XI (1683) in thanksgiving to God and the Blessed Virgin for the liberation of Vienna and the signal victory over the Turks, September 12, 1683
Moors - Moors seized and settled Spain in the early 8th century, introducing a civilisation much more advanced than that of Europe
Quinones, Francis Cardinal - 1482in Leon, Spain; died in 1540 in Veroli, Italy
Penance - In Italy and Spain it is usual to see Christians, almost naked, loaded with chains, and lashing themselves at every step
Holy Name of Mary, Feast of the - It was first observed at Cuenca, Spain, 1513, then extended to the universal Church and assigned to its present place and rank by Innocent XI (1683) in thanksgiving to God and the Blessed Virgin for the liberation of Vienna and the signal victory over the Turks, September 12, 1683
Gregory of Valencia - Jesuit theologian, surnamed "Doctor doctorum," born Medina, Spain, c
Ypsy - ) One of a vagabond race, whose tribes, coming originally from India, entered Europe in 14th or 15th centry, and are now scattered over Turkey, Russia, Hungary, Spain, England, etc
Siricius, Pope Saint - His letter to Bishop Himerius of Spain, in which he exercised his supreme ecclesiastical authority on fifteen points of Catholic dogma, is the oldest and most completely preserved papal decretal
Valencia, Gregory of - Jesuit theologian, surnamed "Doctor doctorum," born Medina, Spain, c
Society of the Divine Savior - In the 17th century a society following modified form of the rule of the Brigittines was founded by Maria de Escobar, a Carmelite, in Spain
Salvatorian Order - In the 17th century a society following modified form of the rule of the Brigittines was founded by Maria de Escobar, a Carmelite, in Spain
Salvatorians - In the 17th century a society following modified form of the rule of the Brigittines was founded by Maria de Escobar, a Carmelite, in Spain
Ecuador - It was seized by Spain in 1533. Independence from Spain was achieved in 1822, and Ecuador, was separated from New Granada and Venezuela and established as a republic in 1830
Reductions of Paraguay - The colonists opposed the movement, but Philip III of Spain aided the Jesuits with subsidies and legal measures. The first disastrous blow suffered by the Reductions occurred in 1750, when, in consequence of a treaty between Spain and Portugal, seven communities were compelled to move into new territory. The treaty was rescinded, 1761, but six years later Charles III of Spain dealt the fatal blow to the Reductions when he signed the edict exiling the Jesuits from Spanish colonies in America
National Catholic Agricultural Federation of Spain - A non-political cooperative organization of Catholic farmers in Spain
Innocent Xii, Pope - He inadvertently furnished the cause for the war of the Spanish Succession when, annoyed by the arrogance of the imperial ambassador, Count Martinitz, he advised Charles II of Spain to name the Duke of Anjou, a Frenchman, his testamentary successor
Innocent i, Pope Saint - Another, to the bishops constituting the Council of Toledo in Spain, attacks Priscillianism
Innocent Viii, Pope - He confirmed the legitimacy of the sovereignty of Henry VII in England, opposed the Hussites, attacked those who sold papal Bulls, issued a Bull against witchcraft and lived to see the Moorish power in Spain broken by the conquest of Granada, 1492
Adrian vi, Pope - In 1506 he became tutor to Charles V, later Grand Inquisitor, and in 1520 regent of Spain
Dedel, Adrian - In 1506 he became tutor to Charles V, later Grand Inquisitor, and in 1520 regent of Spain
Spain - Paul to visit Spain (whether he really did visit it is a disputed question
Cascia, Rita of, Saint - She is specially honored in Spain, where she is called the "Saint of the Impossible," owing to the wonderful favors obtained through her intercession
Antonio de Sedella - Born in 1730 in Spain; died in 1829
Ichneumon - ichneumon), which ranges to Spain and Palestine, is noted for destroying the eggs and young of the crocodile as well as various snakes and lizards, and hence was considered sacred by the ancient Egyptians
Adrian Dedel - In 1506 he became tutor to Charles V, later Grand Inquisitor, and in 1520 regent of Spain
Rita of Cascia, Saint - She is specially honored in Spain, where she is called the "Saint of the Impossible," owing to the wonderful favors obtained through her intercession
Order de Santiago de la Espada - The order waged war separately and with the royal army, finally joining the maritime expeditions; the unhappy part it took in the dissensions among the Christians of Spain caused several schisms among its members. In 1499 the pope made Ferdinand the Catholic administrator of the order, and under Charles V the three orders, Alcantara, Calatrava, and Santiago, were united to the crown of Spain
Order of Saint James of Compostela - The order waged war separately and with the royal army, finally joining the maritime expeditions; the unhappy part it took in the dissensions among the Christians of Spain caused several schisms among its members. In 1499 the pope made Ferdinand the Catholic administrator of the order, and under Charles V the three orders, Alcantara, Calatrava, and Santiago, were united to the crown of Spain
Rubens, Peter Paul - He studied art from his fourteenth year and went to Italy in 1600 for eight years of study and travel, including a diplomatic mission to Spain. On a mission to Spain, 1628, he met Velasquez, and painted the portrait of Philip IV
Tarshish - of Spain; the portion of Spain known to the Hebrew (Psalms 72:10). "... Tarshish was famed for various metals exported to Tyre; most of them were drawn from Spain and Portugal, tin possibly from Cornwall or from Lusitania or Portugal
Chapelle, Placide-Louis - Appointed Apostolic Delegate to Cuba and Puerto Rico and Envoy Extraordinary to the Philippine Islands, he helped to have inserted in the treaty of peace between the United States and Spain the clause confirming to the Catholic Church the possession of the property she controlled under the Spanish government
Catherine of Aragon - Fourth daughter of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain
Anise - It grows naturally in Egypt, and is cultivated in Spain and Malta, whence the seeds are imported
Aragon, Catherine of - Fourth daughter of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain
Luciferians - The Luciferians were numerous in Gaul, Spain, Egypt, &c
Yew - It is preferred to all other kinds of wood for bows and whipstocks, the best for these purposes coming from Spain
Era - 38, in honour of Augustus, when Spain was allotted to him in the distribution of the provinces among the second triumvirate, Augustus, Anthony, and Lepidus
Redemptoristines - Convents of the society now exist in Austria, Belgium, Bavaria, France, Holland, Ireland, England, Spain, Canada, and the Tyrol
Illuminati (2) - Was also the name of a sect which appeared in Spain about the year 1575. After the suppression of the Illuminati in Spain, there appeared a denomination in France which took the same name
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra - (1547-1616) Author, born Alcala de Henares, Spain; died Madrid
Palmarian Catholic Church - Established in 1975 by Clemente Domínguez y Gómez, an insurance broker from Seville, Spain, who claimed the Virgin Mary appeared to him at a shrine outside the small village of El Palmar de Troya in Andalucia
Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de - (1547-1616) Author, born Alcala de Henares, Spain; died Madrid
Dollar - ) A coin of the same general weight and value, though differing slightly in different countries, current in Mexico, Canada, parts of South America, also in Spain, and several other European countries
Magister Disciplinae - It was a custom in some places, particularly in Spain, in the time of the Gothic kings, about the end of the fifth century, for parents to dedicate their children very young to the service of the church
Advent - It was observed in Spain in the 7th century
Bottle - These bottles are still in constant use in Syria and the adjacent countries, and are very common also in Spain
Alexander vi, Pope - Born Xativa, near Valencia, Spain in 1431 as Rodrigo Borgia; died in Rome in 1503. Gradually, by effective alliances with Milan, Venice, and Spain, he recovered the territories of the Papal States which had fallen under the control of petty tyrants, and finally overcame the Roman barons who were the causes of perpetual disorder in and about the city
Tarshish - Tartessus, an ancient city between two mouths of the Guadalquiver, in the south of Spain. Whether the ships fitted out by Solomon at Ezion-geber on the Red sea, sailed around Africa to Tarshish in Spain, or gave the name of Tarshish to some place in India of Ethiopia, as the discovers of America gave it the eastern names India and Indians, cannot now be determined, 1 Kings 10:22 22:48,49 2 Chronicles 9:21 20:26 Isaiah 23:1,14 60:9
Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary - ... Patronage Alzano Scrivia, Italy... Belfiore, Italy... Belforte Monferrato, Italy... Bergamasco, Italy... Casasco, Italy... chefs... Citta Invicta, Malta... coffee house keepers... coffee house owners... cooks... distillers... drapers... fish dealers... fishmongers... Fornalutx, Spain... Fresonara, Italy... gold workers... goldsmiths... Loreto, Italy... needle makers... pin makers... potters... restauranteurs... Senglea, Malta... silk workers... silver workers... silversmiths... tile makers... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Feast of the - ... Patronage Alzano Scrivia, Italy... Belfiore, Italy... Belforte Monferrato, Italy... Bergamasco, Italy... Casasco, Italy... chefs... Citta Invicta, Malta... coffee house keepers... coffee house owners... cooks... distillers... drapers... fish dealers... fishmongers... Fornalutx, Spain... Fresonara, Italy... gold workers... goldsmiths... Loreto, Italy... needle makers... pin makers... potters... restauranteurs... Senglea, Malta... silk workers... silver workers... silversmiths... tile makers... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions
Dancing - It has been employed often in religious functions, as in places in Spain today, to add splendor to the ceremonial
Little Sisters of the Poor - The congregation has homes in France, Italy, Sicily, Spain, Belgium, Portugal, Turkey, Hungary, Switzerland, England, Scotland, Ireland, Jersey, Gibraltar, Malta, Canada, the United States, India, Ceylon, Burma, China, New Zealand, Australia, Africa, Argentina, Chile, and Colombia
Maas, Anthony j - He was educated at public and private schools and the gymnasium at Arnsberg, Westphalia; the Jesuit scholasticates at Manresa, New York, Woodstock, Maryland, and Manresa, Spain
Oddone Colonna - He concluded concordats with Germany, France, England, and Spain, and was able to reach Rome with the aid of Queen Joanna of Naples
Martin v, Pope - He concluded concordats with Germany, France, England, and Spain, and was able to reach Rome with the aid of Queen Joanna of Naples
Japheth - coast of Spain
Herbert of Lea, Elizabeth, Lady - , and producing several original works: "Impressions of Spain" (1866), "Wives and Mothers of the Olden Time" (1871), "Wayside Tales" (1880), etc
Anthony Maas - He was educated at public and private schools and the gymnasium at Arnsberg, Westphalia; the Jesuit scholasticates at Manresa, New York, Woodstock, Maryland, and Manresa, Spain
Elizabeth, Lady Herbert of Lea - , and producing several original works: "Impressions of Spain" (1866), "Wives and Mothers of the Olden Time" (1871), "Wayside Tales" (1880), etc
Seville, Spain, City of - (Latin: Hispalis) ... City in southern Spain
el Salvador - After its emancipation from Spain in 1821, Salvador joined the Federation of Central America, and in 1839, with the dissolution of the Federation, became an independent republic
Aragon - Former kingdom in the Iberian peninsula, now forming the provinces of Huesca, Saragossa, and Teruel in Spain. To check the invasion of Albigensian heretics the Inquisition was introduced into Spain by Jaime I the Conqueror who recovered Valencia from the Moors, 1238
Apostles Other Than the Twelve - Central America... Saint Ceadda Mercia, Saxon England... Saint Christian Portugal ... Saint Columba The Highlanders... Scotland... the Picts... Cyril and Methodius, Saints The Slavs... Saint Denis The French... Father Elisha John Durbin Western Kentucky... Saint Eloi Tournai, Belgium... Saint Ephesus Sardinia... Saint Euphrasius Spain... Saint Felix East Anglia... Valencia, Spain... Edward Fenwick, O. The Ries, district in South Germany... Saint John of Avila Andalusia, Spain... Saint Kilian Franconia (now Bavaria, etc
Tar'Shish -
Probably Tartessus, a city and emporium of the Phoenicians in the south of Spain, represented as one of the sons of Javan. For even not when countries in Europe or on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea where tin is found are very few; and in reference to ancient times, it would be difficult to name any such countries except Iberia or Spain, Lusitania, which was somewhat less in extent than Portugal, and Cornwall in Great Britain. ... From the book of Chronicles there would seem to have been a Tarshish accessible from the Red Sea, in addition to the Tarshish of the south of Spain. It is not to be supposed that the author of these passages in the Chronicles contemplated a voyage to Tarshish in the south of Spain by going round what has since been called the Cape of Good Hope
Justinian i - During his reign of 38 years, the most brilliant period of the Byzantine Empire, he warred against the Persians, overcame the Goths and Vandals, conquered Spain, Italy, Sicily, Dalmatia, and Africa, and crushed the Nika revolt in Constantinople
Marianists - The order spread rapidly, establishing houses in France, Belgium, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, Africa, China, Japan, Hawaiian Islands, Canada, Mexico, and the United States
Fight, Bull - The national sport of Spain
Michael Servetus - Born September 29, 1511 at Tudela, Navarre, Spain; burned at the stake on October 27, 1553 at Geneva, Switzerland
Jean Besse - In 1895 he was appointed professor of history and director of the Apostolic school at the monastery in Silos, Spain
Sepharad - The modern Jews think that Spain is meant, and hence they designate the Spanish Jews "Sephardim," as they do the German Jews by the name "Ashkenazim," because the rabbis call Germany Ashkenaz
Italy - (iht' uh lee) The boot-shaped peninsula between Greece and Spain which extends from the Alps on the north to the Mediterranean Sea on the south
Lorenzo Hervas y Panduro - Famous Jesuit philologist, born Horcajo, Spain, 1735; died Rome, Italy, 1809
Audience - The word in Spain also signifies certain law-officers, appointed to institute a judicial inquiry
Aloysius Gonzaga, Saint - The son of a princely family, he was educated at the courts of the Medici of Florence and of Philip II of Spain
Gonzaga, Aloysius, Saint - The son of a princely family, he was educated at the courts of the Medici of Florence and of Philip II of Spain
Hervas y Panduro, Lorenzo - Famous Jesuit philologist, born Horcajo, Spain, 1735; died Rome, Italy, 1809
Hall - An edifice in which courts of justice are held as Westminster Hall, which was originally a royal palace,the kings of England formerly holding their parliaments and courts of judicature in their own dwellings, as is still the practice in Spain
Hermengild, Saint - Relics at Seville, Spain
Carpenter - The word is never applied, as in Italy and Spain, to a coach-maker
Society of Mary, of Paris - The order spread rapidly, establishing houses in France, Belgium, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, Africa, China, Japan, Hawaiian Islands, Canada, Mexico, and the United States
Servetus, Michael - Born September 29, 1511 at Tudela, Navarre, Spain; burned at the stake on October 27, 1553 at Geneva, Switzerland
James (st.) the Great - James is variously represented as a pilgrimwith staff; with staff and shell; as a child with staff and walletwith shell upon it; on a white charger conquering the Saracens;this last with reference to his being regarded as the Patron Saintof Spain, Santiago, "St
Maria of Jesus - ... Born April 2, 1602 in her family castle at Agreda, Spain ... Died May 24, 1665 in Ágreda, Soria, Spain of natural causes; body incorrupt ... Venerated; pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Sister Mary, contact... MM. Concepcionistas... C/ Vozmediano, 27... 42100 Ágreda (Soria), Spain ... Works The Mystical City of God, the Divine History of the Virgin Mother of God (abridged) ... Readings Not only was the Word conceived before all these by eternal generation from the Father, but His temporal generation from the Virgin Mother full of grace, had already been decreed and conceived in the divine mind
Agreda, Maria de - ... Born April 2, 1602 in her family castle at Agreda, Spain ... Died May 24, 1665 in Ágreda, Soria, Spain of natural causes; body incorrupt ... Venerated; pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Sister Mary, contact... MM. Concepcionistas... C/ Vozmediano, 27... 42100 Ágreda (Soria), Spain ... Works The Mystical City of God, the Divine History of the Virgin Mother of God (abridged) ... Readings Not only was the Word conceived before all these by eternal generation from the Father, but His temporal generation from the Virgin Mother full of grace, had already been decreed and conceived in the divine mind
Priscillianus And Priscillianism, Priscillian - The sect sprang up and flourished in Spain during the last third of the 4th cent. Where the heresy first appeared in Spain is unrecorded. It lingered in Spain till the middle of the 5th cent. Nothing is known of his life beyond his Egyptian origin, his coming to Spain, and his teaching. The Gnostic mysticism spread rapidly and widely in all Spain. of Spain. Spain became agitated by the controversy. It was proposed to gather there the bishops of Spain and Aquitaine. Instantius and Priscillian, returning to Spain, regained their sees and churches. At Trèves resided the Caesar who ruled Gaul, Spain, and Britain. Ithacius escaped thither from Spain. The cause was taken out of the hands of Gregory and transferred to the court of Volventius the vicar of Spain. In Spain the Priscillianist enthusiasm was for a while intensified. The bodies of those who had suffered at Trèves were brought to Spain and their obsequies celebrated with great pomp. Maximus resolved to send military tribunes to Spain with unlimited powers. Tidings reached Martin that the tribunes had been really sent to Spain. The violent means had certainly not extinguished the heresy, which seemed even to take deeper root in Spain
Calderon de la Barca, Pedro - His dramatic labors mark the second half of the golden age of Spanish literature and are typical of the sentiments and ideas of 17th-century Spain
Quietists - Molinos, a Spanish priest, is the reputed author of Quietism; though the Illuminati, in Spain, had certainly taught something like it before. Molinos had numerous disciples in Italy, Spain, France, and the Netherlands
Padilla, Juan de - Friar Minor, protomartyr of the United States, born Andalusia, Spain; died Hall County, Nebraska, c1544He joined the Franciscan Order and c
Juan de Padilla - Friar Minor, protomartyr of the United States, born Andalusia, Spain; died Hall County, Nebraska, c1544He joined the Franciscan Order and c
Catholici, Pauperes - The organization spread through Southern France and Spain and founded a school at Milan in 1209
Catholics, Poor - The organization spread through Southern France and Spain and founded a school at Milan in 1209
Anise - The common dill, the Anethum graveolens, is an annual growing wild in the cornfields of Spain and Portugal and the south of Europe generally
Prince - In Italy a prince is inferior to a duke as a member of a particular order of nobility; in Spain he is always one of the royal family
Lotus - ) The lotus of the lotuseaters, probably a tree found in Northern Africa, Sicily, Portugal, and Spain (Zizyphus Lotus), the fruit of which is mildly sweet
Semaine - It brought together a great many priests and lay-people, and the idea was imitated in Spain and Italy, and meetings were sometimes held in London
Tent - A kind of wine of a deep red color, chiefly from Galicia or Malaga in Spain
Melchior Cano - (1509-1560) Dominican theologian, born Tarancón, Spain; died Toledo
Filioque - The "Filioque," which expresses the ancient Christian tradition of even the Greek Fathers, first crept into the Nicene Creed in the liturgy of Spain, in the 6th century, and gradually prevailed in Western Christianity as the official and liturgical expression of the revealed truth, that the Holy Ghost proceeds at once from the Father and the Son, as He is the Spirit of the Son as well as the Father
Dome - Medieval builders rarely used it except in Spain and Italy
Order of Our Lady of Mercy For the Ransom of Capti - The development of the order was immediate and widespread throughout France, England, Germany, Portugal, and Spain
Dominic de Guzman, Saint - He traveled extensively, personally supervising the establishment of houses in Spain, Italy, and France
Felix of Valois, Saint - Here he was joined by Saint John of Matha, with whom he founded the Order of Trinitarians for the ransom of Christians held as slaves by the Moors of Spain and Northern Africa
John of the Cross, Saint - Doctor of mystic theology, founder with Saint Teresa of the Discalced Carmelites, born Hontiveros, Spain, 1542; died Andalusia, 1591
Institute of the Holy Family - The seven distinct branches of the association are: ...
Sisters of the Holy Family proper, or Solitary Sisters, devoted to contemplation

Sisters of Saint Joseph, in charge of orphanages

Sisters of Loreto, conducting private day schools and boarding schools

Sisters of the Immaculate Conception, educational and nursing

Sisters of Hope, care of the sick

Field Sisters, maintaining agricultural orphanages

Sisters of Saint Martha, the lay sisters of the above congregations
The Institute has over 200 houses, in France, England, Italy, Spain, Ceylon, India, South Africa, Canada, the United States, and South America
Miguel de Molinos - Founder of Quietism, born Muniesa, Spain, c
Molinos, Miguel de - Founder of Quietism, born Muniesa, Spain, c
Lawrence, Saint - Probably a native of Spain, he became one of the seven deacons of the Roman Church, and distributed alms from the monastery of Saint Cyriaca
Feast of the Holy Rosary - Clement X granted it to all Spain, and Clement XI extended it to the universal Church after the victory of Prince Eugene over the Turks at Peterwardein, Hungary, in 1116
Cano, Melchior - (1509-1560) Dominican theologian, born Tarancón, Spain; died Toledo
Canonesses Regular of the Holy Sepulcher - The Order has, approximately, 20 houses, including schools, in England, Holland, Spain, Germany, Belgium, and Africa
Cathedral Schools - They flourished in France, Germany, England, and Spain, especially from the 11th or 12th century; and continued to be, with modifications, the public schools of western Europe down to the 18th century
Tarshish - It is thought that Tarshish was a land in the western Mediterranean region, probably in Spain
Mercedarians - The development of the order was immediate and widespread throughout France, England, Germany, Portugal, and Spain
Ludovisi, Alessandro - War in the Valtelline, Italy, was averted when Gregory's army seized possession of it before Spain and Austria could open hostilities, and held it until its status was settled
Defender of the Faith - (Fidei Defensor, ) A peculiar title belonging to the king of England; as Catholicus to the king of Spain, and Christianissimus to the king of France
Holy Rosary, Feast of the - Clement X granted it to all Spain, and Clement XI extended it to the universal Church after the victory of Prince Eugene over the Turks at Peterwardein, Hungary, in 1116
Greater, James the, Saint - Patron of Spain and Chile, of druggists, pilgrims, wax chandlers, laborers; invoked against rheumatism and in war
Gregory xv, Pope - War in the Valtelline, Italy, was averted when Gregory's army seized possession of it before Spain and Austria could open hostilities, and held it until its status was settled
Hermit - Individual hermits were numerous in the 17th century in Italy, Spain, France, and Flanders, but it has ever been the wish of the Church that the hermits be united into communities
Abbey, Solesmes - " Branches were founded at Liguge; Silos, Spain; Glanfeuil; Fontenelle; Marseilles; Farnborough, England; Wisque; Paris; and Kergonan
Eucharistic Congress - Other congresses: ...
Avignon, France, 1882

Liege, Belgium, 1883

Fribourg, Switzerland, 1885

Toulouse, France, 1886

Paris, France, 1887

Antwerp, Belgium, 1890

Jerusalem, 1893

Rheims, France, 1894

Paray-le-Monial, France, 1897

Brussels, Belgium, 1898

Lourdes, France, 1899

Angers, France, 1901

Namur, Belgium, 1902

Angouleme, France, 1904

Rome, 1905

Tournai, Belgium, 1906

Metz, Lorraine, Germany, 1907

London, 1908

Cologne, Germany, 1909

Montreal, Canada, 1910

Madrid, Spain, 1911

Vienna, Austria, 1912

Malta, 1913

Lourdes, France, 1914

Rome, Italy, 1922

Amsterdam, Holland, 1924

Chicago, Illinois, 1926

Sydney, Australia, 1928

Washington, DC, 2004
Alessandro Ludovisi - War in the Valtelline, Italy, was averted when Gregory's army seized possession of it before Spain and Austria could open hostilities, and held it until its status was settled
Solesmes Abbey - " Branches were founded at Liguge; Silos, Spain; Glanfeuil; Fontenelle; Marseilles; Farnborough, England; Wisque; Paris; and Kergonan
Trophimus - It is therefore one of the circumstances which prove that Paul was released, and revisited Asia Minor, Crete, Macedonia, and perhaps Spain, before his second imprisonment and death
Sisters of the Holy Family -(Bordeaux) - The seven distinct branches of the association are: ...
Sisters of the Holy Family proper, or Solitary Sisters, devoted to contemplation

Sisters of Saint Joseph, in charge of orphanages

Sisters of Loreto, conducting private day schools and boarding schools

Sisters of the Immaculate Conception, educational and nursing

Sisters of Hope, care of the sick

Field Sisters, maintaining agricultural orphanages

Sisters of Saint Martha, the lay sisters of the above congregations
The Institute has over 200 houses, in France, England, Italy, Spain, Ceylon, India, South Africa, Canada, the United States, and South America
Valois, Felix of, Saint - Here he was joined by Saint John of Matha, with whom he founded the Order of Trinitarians for the ransom of Christians held as slaves by the Moors of Spain and Northern Africa
Gregorius, Bishop of Merida - 400, which readmitted to communion the once Priscillianist bishops, Symphosius and Dictinius, and partly with certain irregularities in the manner of ordination then prevalent in Spain. It was probably during Gregory's pontificate that the irruption of Vandals, Alani, and Suevi into Spain took place (in the autumn of 409, Idat. Spain, "submitted to the rule of the barbarians who lorded it over the Roman provinces
Lima, Peru - Two precious crosses, one formerly belonging to Saint Rose and the other brought from Spain by Pizarro were displayed
Double Monasteries - The idea spread to Belgium, Germany, and Spain, and came into favor in England with the monastery of Saint Hilda at Whitby in the 7th century
Monasteries, Double - The idea spread to Belgium, Germany, and Spain, and came into favor in England with the monastery of Saint Hilda at Whitby in the 7th century
Institute of Mary - The institute has 228 houses, including training colleges, boarding and day schools, technical schools, an institute for the deaf and dumb, and orphanages in England, Ireland, Germany, Rumania, Hungary, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Spain, Africa, India, Australia, the United States, and Canada
Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary - The institute has 228 houses, including training colleges, boarding and day schools, technical schools, an institute for the deaf and dumb, and orphanages in England, Ireland, Germany, Rumania, Hungary, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Spain, Africa, India, Australia, the United States, and Canada
Madeleine Sophie Barat, Saint - During her life Mother Barat established over 80 foundations in France, North America, Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, Algiers, England, Ireland, Spain, Holland, Germany, South America, Austria, and Poland
Felix Lope de Vega Carpio - Priest, poet, and dramatist, born Madrid, Spain, 1562; died there, 1635
Innocent ii, Pope - Innocent summoned the Tenth Æcumenical Council, 1139, to remove the consequences of the schism; and acted as mediator in a controversy between Alfonso of Spain and Alfonso Henrique of Portugal
Caesarius of Arles, Saint - He visited Pope Symmachus at Rome, received from him the pallium and the use of the dalmatic for the deacons of his diocese, and was made Apostolic Vicar of Gaul and Spain
Catholic Congresses - They have also been held in France, since 1868, and in Belgium, Holland, Hungary, Spain, Argentina, Switzerland, Denmark, Ireland, England, and the United States
Loretto Nuns - The institute has 228 houses, including training colleges, boarding and day schools, technical schools, an institute for the deaf and dumb, and orphanages in England, Ireland, Germany, Rumania, Hungary, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Spain, Africa, India, Australia, the United States, and Canada
Lope de Vega Carpio, Felix - Priest, poet, and dramatist, born Madrid, Spain, 1562; died there, 1635
Tin - did the ancient Hebrews obtain their supply "Only three countries are known to contain any considerable quantity of it: Spain and Portugal, Cornwall and the adjacent parts of Devonshire, and the islands of Junk, Ceylon and Banca, in the Straits of Malacca
Creed, Athanasian - 850, and was received in Spain and Germany about 180 years later
Iron - Rome was supplied with iron from India, the shores of the Black Sea, Spain, Elba, and the province of Noricum
Gratian, Decree of - A collection of canonical decrees and excerpts from the Fathers and from Roman Law, published on his private authority by John Gratian, a monk and professor at the University of Bologna, c1150 Before his time there were many decrees of particular councils in the East, in Africa, Spain, and Gaul
Arles, Caesarius of, Saint - He visited Pope Symmachus at Rome, received from him the pallium and the use of the dalmatic for the deacons of his diocese, and was made Apostolic Vicar of Gaul and Spain
Gregorio Papareschi - Innocent summoned the Tenth Æcumenical Council, 1139, to remove the consequences of the schism; and acted as mediator in a controversy between Alfonso of Spain and Alfonso Henrique of Portugal
Barat, Madeleine Sophie, Saint - During her life Mother Barat established over 80 foundations in France, North America, Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, Algiers, England, Ireland, Spain, Holland, Germany, South America, Austria, and Poland
Tent - ) A kind of wine of a deep red color, chiefly from Galicia or Malaga in Spain; - called also tent wine, and tinta
English Ladies, the - The institute has 228 houses, including training colleges, boarding and day schools, technical schools, an institute for the deaf and dumb, and orphanages in England, Ireland, Germany, Rumania, Hungary, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Spain, Africa, India, Australia, the United States, and Canada
Scarlet - This color was obtained from the Coccus Ilicis of Linnaeus, a small insect found on the leaves of a species of oak, the Quercus Cocciferus, in Spain and the countries on the eastern part of the Mediterranean, which was used by the ancients for dyeing a beautiful crimson or deep scarlet color, and was supposed by them to be the berry of a plant or tree
Coney - The name of Spain is said to have been given to it by Phoenician voyagers, who seeing its western coast overrun with animals resembling the shaphan, called it Hispania, or Coley-land
Kingdom - Thus we speak of the kingdom of England, of France or of Spain, without including the East or West Indies
Spagnoletto - Born in 1588 in Jativa, Spain; died in 1656 in Naples, Italy
Ribera, Josef - Born in 1588 in Jativa, Spain; died in 1656 in Naples, Italy
Ribera, Juseppe de - Born in 1588 in Jativa, Spain; died in 1656 in Naples, Italy
Francis Xavier, Saint - Confessor, apostle of the Indies and of Japan, born Castle of Xavier, near Sanguesa, Navarre, Spain, 1506; died Island of Sancian, near the coast of China, 1552. After a preliminary education in Spain, Francis Xavier went to the College de Sainte-Barbe in Paris, 1525
Tarshish (1) - Spain, watered by the Baetis (mod. 24) referring to a city of the Carthaginians in Spain
League, German Catholic - In 1611 the league won the support of Spain and the Pope, and began to gather an army, but its foundation was shaken by the formation in 1617 of a separate confederation of Bamberg, Eichstadt, W¨rzburg and the Provost of Ellwangen by Archduke Maximilian of Austria, a war-director of the league
Montes Pietatis - Consequent to this the institution spread rapidly throughout France, Italy, and Spain
Silver - Spain appears to have been the chief source whence silver was obtained by the ancients
Canons, White - The Norbertine Nuns form a Second Order of Premonstratensians, established in the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Spain, Poland, and Switzerland
Norbertines - The Norbertine Nuns form a Second Order of Premonstratensians, established in the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Spain, Poland, and Switzerland
Apostleship of the Sea - Apostleship publicity, broadcast in many languages to the Catholic press throughout the world, has results in the formation of national section in Holland and Spain, regional headquarters in Australia, Canada, India, Italy, New Zealand, and South America
German Catholic League - In 1611 the league won the support of Spain and the Pope, and began to gather an army, but its foundation was shaken by the formation in 1617 of a separate confederation of Bamberg, Eichstadt, W¨rzburg and the Provost of Ellwangen by Archduke Maximilian of Austria, a war-director of the league
Saint Augustine, Florida, City of - Partially revived in 1720, Florida's ancient Catholicism was obliterated in 1763 when Spain ceded Florida to England
White Canons - The Norbertine Nuns form a Second Order of Premonstratensians, established in the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Spain, Poland, and Switzerland
Sea, Apostleship of the - Apostleship publicity, broadcast in many languages to the Catholic press throughout the world, has results in the formation of national section in Holland and Spain, regional headquarters in Australia, Canada, India, Italy, New Zealand, and South America
Birgitta, Saint - About 1320 she made a pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela in Spain
Canonesses Regular - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Canonesses Regular of Saint Augustine of the Congr - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Canonesses Regular of the Lateran - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Canons, Augustinian - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Canons, Austin - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Canons Regular - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Northern Baptist Convention - Foreign missionary work was carried on in India (including Burma and Assam), China, Japan, Africa, and the Philippine Islands; in Europe, in Sweden, Germany, France, Belgium, Spain, Finland, Denmark, Norway, and Russia
Hugh the Great, Saint - The improvement he effected in Cluny induced many cloisters to seek affiliation with his abbey, and these together with the monasteries he founded in Spain formed a powerful weapon in the hands of the popes in their struggle against imperial interference
Honorius Iii, Pope - His activities in behalf of peace brought him in touch with France, Bohemia, Denmark, Sweden, Hungary, Greece, and Spain
Great, Hugh the, Saint - The improvement he effected in Cluny induced many cloisters to seek affiliation with his abbey, and these together with the monasteries he founded in Spain formed a powerful weapon in the hands of the popes in their struggle against imperial interference
Augustinian Canons - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Augustinians Canons - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Austin Canons - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Mule - Mules are much used in Spain and South America, for transporting goods across the mountains
Savelli, Cencio - His activities in behalf of peace brought him in touch with France, Bohemia, Denmark, Sweden, Hungary, Greece, and Spain
Regular, Canonesses - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Regular, Canons - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Viatorians - All important houses in France have been suppressed, but flourishing schools exist in Spain and in Belgium, where the superior-general resides
Sweden, Bridget of, Saint - About 1320 she made a pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela in Spain
Theodoricus i., King of the Visigoths - On his accession the Visigoths held nothing in Spain, but occupied in Gaul Aquitania Secunda, the region lying, roughly speaking, between the Loire and the Garonne, with some neighbouring cities, of which Toulouse, their capital, was the most important
Independency - Foreign missionary work of the Congregational Church is carried on through the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions in Southern and West Central Africa, the Turkish Empire, India, Ceylon, China, Japan, Philippine Islands, Pacific Islands, Mexico, Spain, Austria, and the Balkans
Fathers, Pilgrim - Foreign missionary work of the Congregational Church is carried on through the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions in Southern and West Central Africa, the Turkish Empire, India, Ceylon, China, Japan, Philippine Islands, Pacific Islands, Mexico, Spain, Austria, and the Balkans
National Council of Congregational Churches in the - Foreign missionary work of the Congregational Church is carried on through the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions in Southern and West Central Africa, the Turkish Empire, India, Ceylon, China, Japan, Philippine Islands, Pacific Islands, Mexico, Spain, Austria, and the Balkans
Jules Mazarin - After being in turn a captain in the pontifical troops, and a diplomat, he was recommended to Louis XIII by Richelieu for having ably seconded the cardinal's policy against Spain
Mazarin, Jules - After being in turn a captain in the pontifical troops, and a diplomat, he was recommended to Louis XIII by Richelieu for having ably seconded the cardinal's policy against Spain
Jesus And Mary, Congregation - Besides scholasticates in Belgium and Spain, the society conducts seminaries at Cartagena, Antioquia, Pamplona, and Panama, South America; and San Domingo, West Indies
Fathers, Eudist - Besides scholasticates in Belgium and Spain, the society conducts seminaries at Cartagena, Antioquia, Pamplona, and Panama, South America; and San Domingo, West Indies
Discalced Carmelite Order - Its mother-house is in Rome and is established in Spain, Italy, England, Ireland, Portugal, France, Belgium, Germany, Holland, Poland, Hungary, Austria, Yugoslavia, Malta, Palestine, Syria, Mount Lebanon, Mesopotamia, Persia, British India (in the Kingdoms of Travancore and Cochin), Egypt, the United States, Cuba, Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, Uruguay, Brazil, Argentina, and Bolivia
Order of Discalced Carmelites - Its mother-house is in Rome and is established in Spain, Italy, England, Ireland, Portugal, France, Belgium, Germany, Holland, Poland, Hungary, Austria, Yugoslavia, Malta, Palestine, Syria, Mount Lebanon, Mesopotamia, Persia, British India (in the Kingdoms of Travancore and Cochin), Egypt, the United States, Cuba, Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, Uruguay, Brazil, Argentina, and Bolivia
Indians, Maya - They were not conquered by Spain until 1542
Maya Indians - They were not conquered by Spain until 1542
Fraternity - Italy, Spain, and Portugal, are the countries where are seen the greatest number of these fraternities, some of which assume the name of arch- fraternity
Willows - Another tradition makes Pope to have raised the first specimen from green twigs of a basket sent to Lady Suffolk from Spain (Linnaean Transactions, 10:275)
Mary Tudor - She was popular at first, but her projected marriage with Philip II of Spain excited discontent culminating in Wyatt's rebellion
Tarshish - Geographic designation, most likely of Tartessus at the southern tip of Spain but possibly of Tarsus in Cilisia
Sin: Mans Readiness to Invent Excuse For - After many fruitless efforts he lay down in his hammock, and soliloquized aloud, 'Well, I have travelled all the world over; I lived five years in Cuba, four in Jamaica, five in Brazil, I have travelled through Spain and Portugal, and been in Africa, but I never yet was in such an abominable country as this, where a man is obliged to go to bed with his boots on
Gregory Xvi, Pope - In Germany he condemned Hermesianism; in Portugal, Spain, Poland, and France, he combated anti-clerical legislation; and attacked two Protestant societies for promoting anti-clerical free thought in Italy
Bartolomeo Alberto Cappellari Colomba - In Germany he condemned Hermesianism; in Portugal, Spain, Poland, and France, he combated anti-clerical legislation; and attacked two Protestant societies for promoting anti-clerical free thought in Italy
Eudist Fathers - Besides scholasticates in Belgium and Spain, the society conducts seminaries at Cartagena, Antioquia, Pamplona, and Panama, South America; and San Domingo, West Indies
Tudor, Mary - She was popular at first, but her projected marriage with Philip II of Spain excited discontent culminating in Wyatt's rebellion
Lazarists - They established themselves at Barcelona, Spain, and from there made several other settlements. At the outbreak of the French Revolution there were in France, Spain, Portugal, and the Palatinate, along with the missions outside Europe, about 150 Vincentian establishments
Hermenigild, a Saint - , Visigoth Catholic prince in Spain, son of the Arian king Leovigild. 381) Ingunthis, then 12 years old, reached Spain, and, owing to dissensions between her and her Arian grandmother, Leovigild sent the newly married pair to a distance, assigning to Hermenigild the government of Baetica, or part of it, with Seville for a capital ( ib
Vincentians - They established themselves at Barcelona, Spain, and from there made several other settlements. At the outbreak of the French Revolution there were in France, Spain, Portugal, and the Palatinate, along with the missions outside Europe, about 150 Vincentian establishments
America (Land) - Spain began colonization of the larger Antilles in 1493. Within sixty years of discovery, all Central and South America, except Brazil, and a large part of North America belonged to Spain. The Brazilian coast was discovered by Pedro Alvarez Cabral in 1500, and the methods of Portuguese colonists, though more commercial, resembled those of Spain, but in the 17th and 18th centuries they became dangerous to Jesuit missions through their practise of enslaving the Indians
Orders of Knighthood - In Austria and Spain there flourished the Order of the Golden Fleece, and in Piedmont, the Order of the Annunziata
Fontevrault, Abbey of - In the 17th century the order comprised the provinces of France, Brittany, Gascony, and Auvergne, besides houses in Spain and England
Fontevrault, Order of - In the 17th century the order comprised the provinces of France, Brittany, Gascony, and Auvergne, besides houses in Spain and England
Order of Fontevrault - In the 17th century the order comprised the provinces of France, Brittany, Gascony, and Auvergne, besides houses in Spain and England
Tarshish - There can be little doubt, however, that this is the name of a Phoenician port in Spain, between the two mouths of the Guadalquivir (the name given to the river by the Arabs, and meaning "the great wady" or water-course)
Barb - ) The Barbary horse, a superior breed introduced from Barbary into Spain by the Moors
Holy Childhood, Association of the - At present the association is known throughout Austria, Asia, Africa, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, England, France, Germany, Greece, Holland, Italy, Ireland, Malta, Norway, Oceania, Portugal, South America, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States
Dispatch - He dispatched orders or letters to the commander of the forces in Spain
Belgium - After passing through the hands of Lorraine, Burgundy, Austria, Spain, Austria again, France, and, after the fall of Napoleon, Holland, the Belgian provinces revolted in 1830, proclaimed their independence, and were recognized as a constitutional monarchy in 1831
Abbey of Fontevrault - In the 17th century the order comprised the provinces of France, Brittany, Gascony, and Auvergne, besides houses in Spain and England
Association of the Holy Childhood - At present the association is known throughout Austria, Asia, Africa, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, England, France, Germany, Greece, Holland, Italy, Ireland, Malta, Norway, Oceania, Portugal, South America, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States
Plains - Ηa shephelah , the undulating, rolling, "low hills" between the mountainous part of Judah and the coast plain of the Mediterranean (Deuteronomy 1:7, "the vale"; 2 Chronicles 28:18, "the low country"); Seville in Spain is derived from it
Tin - In Ezekiel 27:12 , Tarshish is mentioned as furnishing בדיל ; and Bochart proves from the testimonies of Diodorus, Pliny, and Stephanus, that Tartessus in Spain, which he supposes the ancient Tarshish, anciently furnished tin
Magnentius, , Flavius Popilius, Emperor - Gaul and all the Western Empire, including Italy, Sicily, Spain, and Africa, submitted to the new emperor
Miro - Miro ( Mirio, Mirus ), king of the Suevi in Spain, 570–583. Spain
Mohammedanism - At one time they extended their conquests to Western Asia, Spain and North Africa
Ambrose, Saint - (Greek: immortal) ... (340-397) Father and Doctor of the Church, bishop of Milan, born in Gaul, his father being Prefect of Gaul (modern France, Britain, Spain, and part of Africa), Ambrose distinguished himself as a lawyer and as consular governor of Liguria and Æmilia, with residence in Milan
Azure Vestments - According to a decree of the Congregation of Rites, February 12, 1884, by special indult some dioceses of Spain must use blue vestments instead of white on the feast of the Immaculate Conception, during its octave, and during the year whenever the Mass of the Immaculate Conception is said
Gregory Vii, Pope Saint - The corrupt clergy of Italy, France, and Spain protested, and Henry IV broke his word and promoted unworthy clerics
Arizona - This and nine other missions, including Guevavi, later replaced by Tumacacori, were given over to the Franciscans after Spain had ordered the expulsion of the Jesuits in 1767
Hildebrand - The corrupt clergy of Italy, France, and Spain protested, and Henry IV broke his word and promoted unworthy clerics
Vestments, Azure - According to a decree of the Congregation of Rites, February 12, 1884, by special indult some dioceses of Spain must use blue vestments instead of white on the feast of the Immaculate Conception, during its octave, and during the year whenever the Mass of the Immaculate Conception is said
Vestments, Blue - According to a decree of the Congregation of Rites, February 12, 1884, by special indult some dioceses of Spain must use blue vestments instead of white on the feast of the Immaculate Conception, during its octave, and during the year whenever the Mass of the Immaculate Conception is said
Triumph - Hercules from Spain ... Arriv'd in triumph, from Geryon slain
Leander (2) - Before 579, the date of the outbreak of the Hermenigild rebellion, he had been a monk, and then raised to the metropolitan see of Seville, perhaps at that time the most important ecclesiastical post in Spain. 497) in answer to his old friend, who had congratulated him on his elevation, reported the Visigothic conversion and the third council of Toledo, and inquired as to the form of baptism to be thenceforward observed in Spain, whether by single or threefold immersion. head; but as in Spain the Arian mode of baptism had been by threefold immersion, it would be well henceforward to allow one immersion only, lest the heretics be supposed to have triumphed and confusion ensue. Gams, however, holds that in Gregory's mind at any rate the pallium carried with it the vicariate, and that the phrase antiquae consuetudini is to be taken as referring to the vicariates of Zeno and Sallustius, and as implying the recognition by Gregory of an ancient claim on behalf of the see of Seville to represent the apostolic see in Spain. , seem to have been then in Spain a distinguishing mark of the Catholic as opposed to the Arian clergy. 41) speaks of three controversial treatises against the Arians, composed by him during his exile from Spain under Leovigild
Theatines - In France they built the church of Saint Anne la Royale; in Spain under Philip II, the Theatine cardinal Paolo Burali d'Arezzo filled various embassies at the command of the vIceroy of Naples; in Portugal John IV, 1648, gave them a house and a college for the education of noble youth; in England, under Henry VIII, Thomas Goldwell, bishop of Saint Asaph, entered the order
Order of Clerks Regular - In France they built the church of Saint Anne la Royale; in Spain under Philip II, the Theatine cardinal Paolo Burali d'Arezzo filled various embassies at the command of the vIceroy of Naples; in Portugal John IV, 1648, gave them a house and a college for the education of noble youth; in England, under Henry VIII, Thomas Goldwell, bishop of Saint Asaph, entered the order
Order, Carthusian - There are now houses in Spain, Italy, England, Germany, Austria, and Switzerland
Carthusian Order - There are now houses in Spain, Italy, England, Germany, Austria, and Switzerland
Loyola, Ignatius, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Society of Jesus, born Loyola Castle, Guipuzcoa, Spain, 1491; died Rome, Italy, 1556
Ignatius Loyola, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Society of Jesus, born Loyola Castle, Guipuzcoa, Spain, 1491; died Rome, Italy, 1556
Ambassador - The Holy See has nuncios Apostolic in Argentina, Austria, Bavaria, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Rumania, Spain, Switzerland, Venezuela, and Yugoslavia; internuncios in Central
Baronius, Cesare - After the appearance of the 11th volume, containing a treatise on the Sicilian monarchy proving the papacy's claim to the suzerainty of Naples and Sicily as prior to that of Spain, the whole work was condemned by the Spanish Inquisition
Pute'Oli - Scipio sailed from this place to Spain; Cicero had a villa in the neighborhood; here Nero planned the murder of his mother; Vespasian gave to this city peculiar privileges; and here Adrian was buried
Hosius (1), a Confessor Under Maximian - of Corduba, the capital of the province of Baetica in Spain. There seems no reason to doubt Eusebius, Athanasius, and others, who make him a native of Spain. § 45) that when Hosius was more than 100 years old, and had been more than 60 years a bishop, he was summoned by Constantius from Spain to Sirmium, and there subscribed an Arian formula about the middle of a. These facts shew that in the division of the empire Spain was always an appendage of Gaul, and under the same administration. It is very probable that between 286 and 292, while Maximian was sole ruler of the West, there were many martyrdoms in Spain as well as in Gaul and Italy. Nineteen bishops from different parts of Spain were present, hence it may be regarded as representing the whole church of Spain. We infer, therefore, that Corduba then held the first place among the cities of Spain. Spain reached a very high development in the social system of Rome. For nearly two centuries Spain produced men remarkable in all kinds of culture. Bishops from Italy, Gaul, Spain, and Britain were assembled as representatives of the whole Western church. of Corduba in Spain, whom the emperor greatly loved and held in the highest estimation," urging them not to contend about matters of small importance (Eus. It would be difficult to understand how the bishop of a see in Spain took precedence over the great patriarchs of the East if he had not been appointed by the emperor. 383 or 384) that on the return of Hosius to Spain, Gregory, bp. Migne) from Eusebius of Vercelli to Gregory of Spain ( c. ... There is some doubt whether Hosius succumbed to the violence used against him at Sirmium and died there in 357, or whether, after subscribing the Arian formula, he was permitted to end his days in Spain. The story told by the Luciferians and the charges brought against his memory by his old enemies the Donatists serve at least to shew that, according to ecclesiastical tradition, he died in Spain
Milan, Italy - From 1500 the city was successively under the dominion of France, Spain, and Austria and finally in 1859 was annexed to the kingdom of Italy
Florida - The early Spanish explorers of Florida, from Ponce de Leon, 1521, to Tristan de Luna, 1559, were accompanied by missionaries by order of the kings of Spain
Pomegranate - The rind abounds in tannin, which the Moors used in preparing "morocco" leather; the Cordovaners of Spain learned the art from the Moors; hence our word "cordwainers
Partridge - Forskal mentions a partridge whose name in Arabic is kurr; and Latham says, that, in the province of Andalusia in Spain, the name of the partridge is churr; both taken, no doubt, like the Hebrew, from its note
Saint Bartholomew's Day - Then he demanded war with Spain, saying that if it were not declared, another war might be expected
Thin - ... Spain is thin sown as people
Mines, Mining - There seems to be reference to the latter in (Psalm 12:6 ; Jeremiah 6:28-30 ; Ezekiel 22:18-22 ) The chief supply of silver in the ancient world appears to have been brought from Spain
Lucius (1) i - Six decreta, addressed to the churches of Gaul and Spain, are assigned to Lucius by the Pseudo-Isidore, and three others by Gratian—all undoubtedly spurious
Idatius (3), Author of Well-Known Chronicle - 386), the Priscillianists, falling back on Spain after the death of their chief, took a special hold on the province of Gallicia. For about 24 years GaIlicia enjoyed tranquillity compared with the rest of Spain, and the Gallician bishops found themselves to some extent free to deal with the prevalent Priscillianist and Manichean doctrines, which had even infected some of the episcopate ( Ep. Turribius on the Gallician heresies, Leo sent a long decretal letter to Spain to be circulated by him, urging the assembly of a national council, or at least of a Gallician synod, in which, by the efforts of Turribius and of Idatius and Ceponius, "fratres vestri," a remedy might be devised for the prevailing disorder. in Spain. branches off from the Fasti Idatiani , a copy of the Constantinople Fasti came westward, received certain additions in Italy and then reached Spain, where a Spanish reviser and continuator gave them the shape under which we now know them as the Fasti Idatiani
Euric, King of Toulouse - Euric (1) ( Evarich, Evorich, Euthorik, Evarix ), king of the Visigothic kingdom of Toulouse from 466 to 484, and from 477 onwards master of almost the whole of Spain. 7), and in 468 he attacked the newly made Western emperor Anthemius simultaneously in Gaul and Spain, with the result that by 474 the Gothic dominion in Gaul would have extended from the Atlantic to the Rhone and Mediterranean, and from the Pyrenees to the Loire, but for one obstacle—the vigorous defence of Auvergne by Ecdicius, son of the emperor Avitus, and the famous bp. The Gothic territory in Gaul was now bounded by the Loire, the Rhone, and the two seas, while in Spain a great many towns were already held by Gothic garrisons. The news aroused all the barbarian races in Gaul and Spain. But the persecution has a special interest as one of the earliest instances of that oppression in the name of religion, of which the later history of the Goths in conquered Spain is everywhere full (Dahn, v
Epistles - But the case was different when the Christian Church came to consist of a number of scattered parts, stretching from Mesopotamia in the east to Rome or even Spain in the far west
Greece - Thus a portion of the Crimea, much of the west coast of Asia Minor, settlements in Cyrene, Sicily, Gaul, and Spain, and above all the southern half of Italy, were parts of Hellas in this wide sense. When, about three centuries after Alexander’s death, practically all his former dominions had become Roman provinces, Greek was the one language which could carry the traveller from the Euphrates to Spain
Leprosy - Bad nutrition and insanitary conditions are favorable to its generation and propagation, and it is endemic in certain localities, as parts of Africa, Arabia, China, Japan, India, Italy, Spain, etc
Kabbala - It attained prominence in Spain in the 13th century, was disseminated at the time of the expulsion of the Jews from that country, and became identified with Palestine
Catholic Association - Since then pilgrimages have been organized in increasing numbers to Antwerp, Bruges, the Holy Land, Lourdes, Spain, Rome, and other places of special Catholic interest in Europe, as well as to many of the homeland shrines
Bottle - " Skins for wine are still used in Spain, called borrachas
Golden Rose - Among the noted recipients of the ornament have been Charles VII of France, James III of Scotland, Isabella I of Spain, Henry VIII of England (prior to 1525), Mary Queen of Scots "who like a most fair rose among thorns diffuses far and wide the sweet odor of her faith and good works", and Eugenie, ex-Empress of the French
Command - Lord Wellington commanded an army in Spain he commanded the army at the battle of Waterloo
Association, Catholic - Since then pilgrimages have been organized in increasing numbers to Antwerp, Bruges, the Holy Land, Lourdes, Spain, Rome, and other places of special Catholic interest in Europe, as well as to many of the homeland shrines
Dionysius, Saint, Apostle of France - This is the tradition of the Greek church, and of those of Gaul, Germany, Spain, and Italy
Emilianus (8), Solitary - Emilianus (8) ( Aemilianus, San Millan ), solitary; claimed by the Spanish Benedictines as joint patron of Spain with St
Rose, Golden - Among the noted recipients of the ornament have been Charles VII of France, James III of Scotland, Isabella I of Spain, Henry VIII of England (prior to 1525), Mary Queen of Scots "who like a most fair rose among thorns diffuses far and wide the sweet odor of her faith and good works", and Eugenie, ex-Empress of the French
Sisters of Saint Clare - The Order has houses in Italy, Corsica, Palestine, Prussia, Bavaria, Holland, Belgium, Ireland, England, France, Spain, Peru, Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Canada, and the United States
Second Order of Saint Francis - The Order has houses in Italy, Corsica, Palestine, Prussia, Bavaria, Holland, Belgium, Ireland, England, France, Spain, Peru, Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Canada, and the United States
Order of Saint Benedict - Since that time another revival has taken place, though later in the same century houses were closed in Spain, Italy, and France. The nuns engage principally in educational work, and have monasteries in the United States, British Isles, and Malta, Australia, Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Switzerland, Spain, Holland, Italy, and Poland
Benedictine Order - Since that time another revival has taken place, though later in the same century houses were closed in Spain, Italy, and France. The nuns engage principally in educational work, and have monasteries in the United States, British Isles, and Malta, Australia, Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Switzerland, Spain, Holland, Italy, and Poland
Benedictines - Since that time another revival has taken place, though later in the same century houses were closed in Spain, Italy, and France. The nuns engage principally in educational work, and have monasteries in the United States, British Isles, and Malta, Australia, Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Switzerland, Spain, Holland, Italy, and Poland
Messiah - 721, arose another false messiah in Spain; his name was Serenus. A false messiah stirred up the Jews at Corduba in Spain, A. On this occasion nearly all the Jews in Spain were destroyed
Navarre - Former kingdom in the northeastern part of the Iberian peninsula, now forming part of the department of Basses Pyrenees, France, and the districts of Pamplona, Aoiz, Estella, Tafalla, and Tudela in Spain
Inquisition, the - In Spain the evil was in large measure due to the great influence which the civilpower had in the administration of the Inquisition
Liguorians - Since that time the French province has been divided into three provinces and two vice-provinces, Spain has become a province, the Austrian province has been divided, and provincee have been created for Poland, Canada, Bavaria, Holland, and England
Hesychius (3), Egyptian bp - 216) as additions to the original decree "made at the time it was republished in Spain under the name of Hormisdas, c
Vinegar - They make great use of it in Spain and Italy, in harvest time
Roman Rite - At first it was used in the Roman Province only, but by degrees, from the 8th century, it spread throughout the West, until in the 12th century it was used wherever Latin was used, except at Milan and parts of Spain
Rite, Roman - At first it was used in the Roman Province only, but by degrees, from the 8th century, it spread throughout the West, until in the 12th century it was used wherever Latin was used, except at Milan and parts of Spain
Redemptorists - Since that time the French province has been divided into three provinces and two vice-provinces, Spain has become a province, the Austrian province has been divided, and provincee have been created for Poland, Canada, Bavaria, Holland, and England
Jesuits - After 1544 their success in Spain was rapid and the province established in 1547 was subdivided into three in 1554. In the separate countries (Portugal, France, Spain) the Jesuits had been already expelled some years before
Jesus, Company of - After 1544 their success in Spain was rapid and the province established in 1547 was subdivided into three in 1554. In the separate countries (Portugal, France, Spain) the Jesuits had been already expelled some years before
Jesus, Society of - After 1544 their success in Spain was rapid and the province established in 1547 was subdivided into three in 1554. In the separate countries (Portugal, France, Spain) the Jesuits had been already expelled some years before
Society of Jesus - After 1544 their success in Spain was rapid and the province established in 1547 was subdivided into three in 1554. In the separate countries (Portugal, France, Spain) the Jesuits had been already expelled some years before
Penitents - Penitents, or Converts of the name of Jesus, a congregation of religious at Seville, in Spain, consisting of women who have led a licentious life, founded in 1550
Melania the Younger, Daughter of Publicola - She gave away those in Gaul and Italy, but kept those in Sicily, Spain, and Africa; and this led to the attempt of the people of Hippo to induce PINIANUS to become a priest of their church
Nicetius, Archbaptist of Treves - His orthodoxy is illustrated by two extant letters: one from him to Clodosinda, the wife of Alboin the Lombard, urging her to turn her husband to Catholicism; the other to the emperor Justinian, whose lapse in his latter days into a form of Eutychianism, Nicetius declares, is lamented by all Italy, Africa, Spain, and Gaul ( Patr
Mines - Tartessus of Spain was near the silver mountain Orospeda, where the metal workers had the art of "spreading silver into plates" (Jeremiah 10:9). ... Tin is mentioned among Midianite spoils; doubtless obtained from Cornwall and Spain through the Phoenicians
Jews - In the 10th century Spain became the principal center of Jewish activity, where in addition to further commentaries on the Law, books of philosophy, medicine, mathematics, astronomy, and poetry appeared. In the course of the 13th century the Jews were exiled from France and England, and in the 14th, severe laws were passed against them and bloody assaults made on them in France (where they had been readmitted), in Spain, Germany, and Bohemia. In 1492 all Jews were banished from Spain, and in 1496 from Portugal
Leo Xiii, Pope - In 1885 he acted as arbitrator between Spain and Germany regarding the Caroline Islands
Francis of Assisi, Saint - Francis journeyed through Italy, southern France, and Spain, preaching and performing miracles
Fulgentius (4) Ferrandus, , Disciple And Companion of Ruspe - Ferrandus appears to have had his knowledge of the Greek councils through a translation and digest of such canons as had been previously in use in Spain
Germanus, Bishop of Paris - Vincent to receive the stole of that martyr which he had brought from Spain
Assisi, Francis of, Saint - Francis journeyed through Italy, southern France, and Spain, preaching and performing miracles
Constantius i, Flavius Valerius, Emperor - As his share of the empire, Constantius received the provinces Gaul, Spain, and Britain
Reason - Spain in thin sown of people, partly by reason of its sterility of soil ... The reason of the motion of the balance in a wheel-watch is by motion of the next wheel
Isidorus, Archbaptist of Seville - Leocadia, and was composed of prelates from Gaul and Narbonne, and from all the provinces of Spain. They were signed by the six metropolitan archbishops of Spain. It presents a vivid picture of the church of Spain at that period. ... Isidore was undoubtedly the greatest man of his time in the church of Spain. 612), one of the best kings of Spain, whose death was universally lamented by the Goths. The Vandals entered Spain under Gunderic and were destroyed on the fall of Gelimer; the Suevi entered under Hermeric in 409 and became incorporated with the Gothic nation in 585. Upon the histories in general was based all the later medieval history-writing of Spain
Architecture, Gothic - In Italy, Burgundy, Aquitaine, and Spain the fundamental principles of Gothic were never accepted, although it influenced decoration and design
Gothic Architecture - In Italy, Burgundy, Aquitaine, and Spain the fundamental principles of Gothic were never accepted, although it influenced decoration and design
Capreolus, Bishop of Carthage - There is also extant an other letter by Capreolus on this controversy, written in answer to inquiries addressed to him from Spain, by Vitalis and Constantius
Deposing Power, Papal - Fidelity to the Catholic Faith was a condition for holding power in certain hereditary and elective governments as England and Spain, whilst the constitution of the Holy Roman Empire contained the solemn injunction on the chosen ruler to maintain and defend the Christian religion of his subjects
Charlemagne - The invasion of Moslem Spain in 777 was without significant result
Charles the Great - The invasion of Moslem Spain in 777 was without significant result
Ophir - No gold is now found there; whether it has been exhausted as in Spain, or we know not the interior sufficiently to be sure there is no gold left
Justina, Empress - ... After the murder of Gratian and the seizure by Maximus of Spain, Gaul, and Britain in 383, Justina (who, with her infant son, was residing in the imperial palace at Milan) had recourse to her former opponent St
Monasteries, Suppression of - In Spain, the government established by Napoleon authorized the suppression of all religious congregations, 1812
Habibus, Deacon, Martyr at Edessa - The Christians were more numerous than their persecutors, and word reached Edessa that even Constantine "in Gaul and Spain" had become Christian and did not sacrifice
Adultery - In Spain and Poland they were almost as severe
Mass - There is still a farther distinction of masses, denominated from the countries in which they were used; thus the Gothic mass, or missa mosarabum, is that used among the Goths, when they were masters of Spain, and which is still observed at Toledo and Salamanca; the Ambrosian mass is that composed by St
Suppression of Monasteries - In Spain, the government established by Napoleon authorized the suppression of all religious congregations, 1812
Media - It covered a territory larger than that of Spain, lying between 32 degrees and 40 degrees of north latitude, and was one of the most fertile and earliest cultivated among the kingdoms of Asia
Puteoli - 5)-but the haven for the merchant-ships of Syria and Egypt in the east, of Carthage and Spain in the west
Sigebert i - About this time he married the famous Brunichild (Brunehaut), a daughter of Athanagild, the Visigothic king in Spain, she having first renounced Arianism for orthodoxy (Greg
Prudentius, Marcus (?) Aurelius Clemens Prudentius - of Spain, near the Pyrenees (Peristeph. Returning to Spain, he wrote his poems on St. Hippolytus, requesting his bishop to introduce the observance of the latter saint's festival into Spain (xi. Half are connected with his own native church of Spain (i
Roman Empire - In the interval Carthage had conquered Spain and thus had a new base of operations, and the second war was fought on land. A Roman attempt to divert Hannibal’s attention by attacking Spain was attended with disaster, but Hasdrubal, who came from Spain to join his brother Hannibal, was signally defeated by the Romans at the Metaurus (207). Scipio had conquered a great part of Spain. -The possession of Sicily, Sardinia and Corsica, and Spain (or rather the Spains, for the Romans always distinguished between Hither and Further Spain), the last of which was made into two provinces in 197, made the Romans the greatest power in the ancient world. Though the greater part of Spain had long been part of the provincial system, the hardy tribes of the north-west, the Cantabri and Astures, had never been subdued
Trajan - Spain, which had contributed during the 1st cent. From 89 to 97 he was in command of a legion serving successively in Spain and Germany, and in the latter country he quelled a revolt of two legions at Vindonissa (modern Windisch)
Siricius, Bishop of Rome - of Tarragona in Spain, addressed to Damasus but received by Siricius, asking the pope's advice on matters of discipline and with regard to abuses prevalent in the Spanish church. Siricius, having taken counsel in a Roman synod, issued this decretal in reply, to be communicated by Himerius to all bishops of Spain and neighbouring provinces with a view to universal observance
Catholic And Protestant Countries Compared - ... POLITICS Forgetting the earlier history of Europe, proponents of this claim used to point to the supremacy of England, Germany, the United States, and the secondary position of France, Italy, Spain, and the South and Central American republics
Illyricum - Paul contemplated a journey by Rome to Spain, he justified his desire for fresh fields by saying that from Jerusalem and round unto Illyricum (καὶ κύκλῳ μέχρι τοῦ Ἰλλυρικοῦ) he had fully preached the gospel of Christ (Romans 15:19)
But - ... There is no question but the King of Spain will reform most of the abuses
Seismology - Six of these stations are supervised by the Philippine Weather Bureau, two are located in Spain, and one in the following countries: Syria, England, Cuba, Hungary, Australia, Madagascar, Italy, Bolivia, Colombia, and Canada
Leovigild, Arian King of the Visigoths - Leovigild (LEUVICHILD), Arian king of the Visigoths in Spain from 569 to Apr. Its fall (early in 572?) was a heavy blow to the imperial cause in Spain (Joannes Bicl
Directions (Geographical) - In a biblical world reaching about 5300 kilometers from Persia in the east to Spain in the west and about 3000 kilometers from Armenia in the north to Yemen in the south, Israel was a small strip of land with geographical unity
Mass - There is still a further distinction of masses, denominated from the countries in which they were used: thus the Gothic mass, or missa mosarabum, is that used among the Goths when they were masters of Spain, and which is still kept up at Toledo and Salamanca; the Ambrosian mass is that composed by St
Japheth - It is supposed that Gomer peopled Galatia, and that from him the Cimmerians, or Cimbrians, and also the Phrygians, derived their origin; that Magog was the father of the Scythians, and Tartars, or Tatars; that Madai was the progenitor of the Medes, though some make him the founder of a people in Macedonia, called Macdi; that from Javan sprung the Ionians and Greeks; that Tubal was the father of the Iberians, and that at least a part of Spain was peopled by him and his descendants; that Meshech was the founder of the Cappadocians, from whom proceeded the Muscovites, or Russians; and that from Tiras the Thracians derived their origin
Roman Empire - The generals of Augustus overran the northwest Portion of Spain and the country between the Alps and the Danube
Onesimus - ] ) represents him as journeying to Spain; and the apocryphal Acts of the Spanish Xanthippe and Polyxena are written in his name (see Texts and Studies ii
Simeon Stylites - His extraordinary life made a great impression; large numbers of Arabians, Armenians, and other pagans were converted by him, while emperors, bishops, and pilgrims from distant lands, even Spain and Britain, consulted him most reverently
Symmachus, Bishop of Rome - Symmachus then wrote to this effect to the bishops of Gaul, and in 514 to Caesarius, warning him to respect the ancient rights of other metropolitans and to report anything amiss in Gaul or Spain to Rome
Timothy, Epistles to - When, therefore, we add the further facts, that the Muratorian Fragment states that the Apostle fulfilled his expressed wish of visiting Spain ( Romans 15:24 ; Romans 15:28 ), a journey which certainly necessitates his release from his Roman imprisonment and that Clement of Rome tells of his reaching ‘the bounds of the West,’ a phrase which, used by one resident, as Clement, in Rome, can only mean Spain we may hold without misgiving that St. 64?), that between these dates he visited Spain in the West, and various Churches in the Eastern Mediterranean, and that during this period he wrote the Pastoral Epistles
Romans, Book of - Paul now planned to continue his ministry to the western limit of the empire and go to Spain (Romans 15:24 ). He shared his plans to stop and visit the Romans on his way and expressed the hope that they would provide support for his journey on to Spain (Romans 15:24 ). ... Paul's description of his purpose led earlier students of the Bible to see Romans as an outline of Paul's theology, composed at greater leisure, to acquaint the Romans with his views so they would fully support him in his mission to Spain. Taking these facts seriously, scholars now feel that Paul knew much more about the Roman Christians than earlier scholars realized and wrote to the church with several purposes in mind: (1) to request their prayers as he faced the threatening situation in Jerusalem, (2) to alert them to his intended visit, (3) to acquaint them with some of his understanding of what God had done in Christ, (4) to instruct them in areas where the church faced specific problems, and (5) to enlist their support in his planned missionary venture to Spain
Commerce - The Phenicians had ports of their own in almost every country; the most distinguished of which were Carthage and Tarshish, or Tartessus, in Spain. Joppa, though not a very convenient one, was properly the port of Jerusalem; and some of the large vessels which went to Spain sailed from it, Jonah 1:3
Theodoricus, the Ostrogoth - When his negotiations failed to prevent a breach between Clovis and his son-in-law Alaric, and when the rout and death of Alaric threatened that all Gaul, and perhaps Spain, would pass into the hands of the Franks, he felt compelled to interpose. The result was the preservation of Spain and the district of Narbonne or Septimania for the Visigoths, and the acquisition by Theodoric of a territory corresponding with the modern Provence, including Arles and Marseilles
Feast of the Immaculate Conception - ... Name Meaning stainless (immaculata) (Latin) ... Patronage Agra, India, archdiocese of... Albany, New York, diocese of... Argentina... Austin, Texas, diocese of... Baltimore, Maryland, archdiocese of... barrel makers... Bismarck, North Dakota, diocese of... Brazil... Brooklyn, New York, diocese of... Burlington, Vermont, diocese of... Calgary, Alberta, Canada... Camden, New Jersey, diocese of... Cerva, Catanzaro, Italy... Chicago, Illinois, archdiocese of... cloth makers... cloth workers... Congo... coopers... Corsica, France... Crookston, Minnesota, diocese of... Denver, Colorado, archdiocese of... Dhaka, Bangladesh, archdiocese of... Elphin, Ireland, diocese of... Equatorial Guinea... Fort Wayne-South Bend, Indiana, diocese of... Galveston-Houston>, Texas, archdiocese of... Guam... Is-Swieqi, Malta... Johannesburg, South Africa, diocese of... Kansas City, Kansas, archdiocese of... Kansas City - Saint Joseph, Missouri, diocese of... Keimoes-Upington, South Africa, diocese of... Lafayette, Louisiana, diocese of... Malolos, Philippines, diocese of... military ordinariate of the Philippines... Mobile, Alabama, archdiocese of... Nicaragua... Nueva Segovia, Philippines... Ogdensburg, New York, diocese of... Ozamiz, Philippines, archdiocese of... Panama... Pasig, Philippines... Peoria, Illinois, diocese of... Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, archdiocese of... Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, diocese of... Pondicherry and Cuddalore, India... Portland, Maine, diocese of... Portland, Oregon, archdiocese of... Portugal... Pueblo, Colorado, diocese of... Rockford, Illinois, diocese of... Seattle, Washington, archdiocese of... Shreveport, Louisiana, diocese of... soldiers of the United States... Southwark, England, archdiocese of... Spanish infantry... Spokane, Washington, diocese of... Springfield, Illinois, diocese of... Swieqi, Malta... Syracuse, New York, diocese of... Tanzania... tapestry workers... Toa Alto, Puerto Rico... Torrevieja, Spain... Tunisia... Tyler, Texas, diocese of... United States... upholsterers... Virac, Philippines... Wichita, Kansas, diocese of... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions... Ad Diem Illum Laetissiumum: On the Immaculate Conception, by Pope Saint Pius X... Fulgens Corona: Proclaiming a Marian year to Commemorate the Centenary of the Definition of the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception, Venerable Pope Pius XII... Ineffabilis Deus: The Immaculate Conception, by Blessed Pope Pius IX... Ubi Primum: On The Immaculate Conception, by Blessed Pope Pius IX... Translate español | français | deutsch | italiano | português ...
New Orleans, Louisiana, City of - Subsequent to the cession of Louisiana to Spain the Spanish Capuchins came to New Orleans where they caused difficulty by their severe censure of the laxity of the French Capuchins
Catholic Indian Missions of the United States - From the discovery of the western continent, the conversion of the American tribes was a subject of deep concern to Catholic France and Spain
Gate - The gate of judgment is a term still common to the Arabians to express a court of justice, and even introduced by the Saracens into Spain
Immaculate Conception - ... Name Meaning stainless (immaculata) (Latin) ... Patronage Agra, India, archdiocese of... Albany, New York, diocese of... Argentina... Austin, Texas, diocese of... Baltimore, Maryland, archdiocese of... barrel makers... Bismarck, North Dakota, diocese of... Brazil... Brooklyn, New York, diocese of... Burlington, Vermont, diocese of... Calgary, Alberta, Canada... Camden, New Jersey, diocese of... Cerva, Catanzaro, Italy... Chicago, Illinois, archdiocese of... cloth makers... cloth workers... Congo... coopers... Corsica, France... Crookston, Minnesota, diocese of... Denver, Colorado, archdiocese of... Dhaka, Bangladesh, archdiocese of... Elphin, Ireland, diocese of... Equatorial Guinea... Fort Wayne-South Bend, Indiana, diocese of... Galveston-Houston>, Texas, archdiocese of... Guam... Is-Swieqi, Malta... Johannesburg, South Africa, diocese of... Kansas City, Kansas, archdiocese of... Kansas City - Saint Joseph, Missouri, diocese of... Keimoes-Upington, South Africa, diocese of... Lafayette, Louisiana, diocese of... Malolos, Philippines, diocese of... military ordinariate of the Philippines... Mobile, Alabama, archdiocese of... Nicaragua... Nueva Segovia, Philippines... Ogdensburg, New York, diocese of... Ozamiz, Philippines, archdiocese of... Panama... Pasig, Philippines... Peoria, Illinois, diocese of... Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, archdiocese of... Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, diocese of... Pondicherry and Cuddalore, India... Portland, Maine, diocese of... Portland, Oregon, archdiocese of... Portugal... Pueblo, Colorado, diocese of... Rockford, Illinois, diocese of... Seattle, Washington, archdiocese of... Shreveport, Louisiana, diocese of... soldiers of the United States... Southwark, England, archdiocese of... Spanish infantry... Spokane, Washington, diocese of... Springfield, Illinois, diocese of... Swieqi, Malta... Syracuse, New York, diocese of... Tanzania... tapestry workers... Toa Alto, Puerto Rico... Torrevieja, Spain... Tunisia... Tyler, Texas, diocese of... United States... upholsterers... Virac, Philippines... Wichita, Kansas, diocese of... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions... Ad Diem Illum Laetissiumum: On the Immaculate Conception, by Pope Saint Pius X... Fulgens Corona: Proclaiming a Marian year to Commemorate the Centenary of the Definition of the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception, Venerable Pope Pius XII... Ineffabilis Deus: The Immaculate Conception, by Blessed Pope Pius IX... Ubi Primum: On The Immaculate Conception, by Blessed Pope Pius IX... Translate español | français | deutsch | italiano | português ...
Immaculate Conception, Feast of the - ... Name Meaning stainless (immaculata) (Latin) ... Patronage Agra, India, archdiocese of... Albany, New York, diocese of... Argentina... Austin, Texas, diocese of... Baltimore, Maryland, archdiocese of... barrel makers... Bismarck, North Dakota, diocese of... Brazil... Brooklyn, New York, diocese of... Burlington, Vermont, diocese of... Calgary, Alberta, Canada... Camden, New Jersey, diocese of... Cerva, Catanzaro, Italy... Chicago, Illinois, archdiocese of... cloth makers... cloth workers... Congo... coopers... Corsica, France... Crookston, Minnesota, diocese of... Denver, Colorado, archdiocese of... Dhaka, Bangladesh, archdiocese of... Elphin, Ireland, diocese of... Equatorial Guinea... Fort Wayne-South Bend, Indiana, diocese of... Galveston-Houston>, Texas, archdiocese of... Guam... Is-Swieqi, Malta... Johannesburg, South Africa, diocese of... Kansas City, Kansas, archdiocese of... Kansas City - Saint Joseph, Missouri, diocese of... Keimoes-Upington, South Africa, diocese of... Lafayette, Louisiana, diocese of... Malolos, Philippines, diocese of... military ordinariate of the Philippines... Mobile, Alabama, archdiocese of... Nicaragua... Nueva Segovia, Philippines... Ogdensburg, New York, diocese of... Ozamiz, Philippines, archdiocese of... Panama... Pasig, Philippines... Peoria, Illinois, diocese of... Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, archdiocese of... Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, diocese of... Pondicherry and Cuddalore, India... Portland, Maine, diocese of... Portland, Oregon, archdiocese of... Portugal... Pueblo, Colorado, diocese of... Rockford, Illinois, diocese of... Seattle, Washington, archdiocese of... Shreveport, Louisiana, diocese of... soldiers of the United States... Southwark, England, archdiocese of... Spanish infantry... Spokane, Washington, diocese of... Springfield, Illinois, diocese of... Swieqi, Malta... Syracuse, New York, diocese of... Tanzania... tapestry workers... Toa Alto, Puerto Rico... Torrevieja, Spain... Tunisia... Tyler, Texas, diocese of... United States... upholsterers... Virac, Philippines... Wichita, Kansas, diocese of... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions... Ad Diem Illum Laetissiumum: On the Immaculate Conception, by Pope Saint Pius X... Fulgens Corona: Proclaiming a Marian year to Commemorate the Centenary of the Definition of the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception, Venerable Pope Pius XII... Ineffabilis Deus: The Immaculate Conception, by Blessed Pope Pius IX... Ubi Primum: On The Immaculate Conception, by Blessed Pope Pius IX... Translate español | français | deutsch | italiano | português ...
Arians - ... Italy, Gaul and Spain, were also deeply infected with it; and towards the commencement of the sixth century, it was triumphant in many parts of Asia, Africa, and Europe; but it sunk almost at once when the Vandals were driven out of Africa, and the Goths out of Italy, by the arms of Justinian
Martyr - " A like answer was given at the martyrdom of Fructuosus in Spain; for when the judge asked Eulogius, his deacon, whether he would not worship Fructuosus, as thinking, that, though he refused to worship the heathen idols, he might yet be inclined to worship a Christian martyr, Eulogius replied, "I do not worship Fructuosus, but him whom Fructuosus worships
Romans, Epistle to the - Paul had long purposed visiting Rome, and still retained this purpose, wishing also to extend his journey to Spain
Valerianus, Emperor - In Spain Fructuosus, bp
Jews - In Spain, in 700, they were ordered to be enslaved. In France and Spain they were much insulted. In Spain, Ferdinand persecuted them furiously. In Portugal and Spain they have been miserably handled. About 1392, six or eight hundred thousand were banished from Spain. Except in Portugal and Spain, their present condition is generally tolerable
Paul - Testimony before Felix, Festus, and Agrippa (the Gospel of Luke and the Acts commenced at Cæsarea, and concluded at Rome)... 58-60... Paul's voyage to Rome (autumn); shipwreck at Malta; arrival at... 60,61... Paul's first captivity at Rome, Epistles to the Colossians, Ephesians, Philippians, Philemon... 61-63... Conflagration at Rome (July); Neronian persecution of the Christians; martyrdom of Paul (?)... Hypothesis of a second Roman captivity and preceding missionary journeys to the East, and possibly to Spain
Salim - We may add that αινων η εγγυς του σαλι‹μ› is entered already on the mosaic map of Madeba on the left bank of the Jordan, and that the oldest and most explicit discussion of these sites is found in the pilgrimage of the so-called Silvia of Aquitania (or Etheria of Spain), about 385
Germany - The first appearance of Christianity in Germany is uncertain, but Saint Irenaeus in the 2century reports that the Germans have the same faith as Spain, Gaul, the Orient, Egypt, and Africa
Masona, Bishop of Merida - Spain, and therefore would have considerable influence upon the position assumed by Merida in the contest
Jesuits - After performing a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, and pursuing a multitude of visionary schemes, he returned to prosecute his theological studies in the universities of Spain, when he was about thirty- three years of age. ... In Spain, where they conceived their establishment to be perfectly secure, they experienced an overthrow equally complete, and much more unexpected. The necessary measures were concerted under the direction of De Choiseul, by the Marquis D'Ossun, the French ambassador at Madrid, with Charles III, king of Spain, and his prime minister, the Count D'Aranda. The example of the king of Spain was immediately followed by Ferdinand VI, of Naples, and soon after by the prince of Parma
Mines And Mining - Phoenicians established colonies in Spain and Portugal to mine the vast local supplies of copper and tin. ) spoke in later periods of rich gold deposits in Spain
Vulgate - ] ; while in France, Italy, and Spain the supremacy of the Vulgate lasts to this day. Outside Italy, only Visigothic Spain (Arian, but still Christian, until about 596) and Celtic Ireland were freely open at first to the access of the Scriptures; and in these two countries (cut off, as they subsequently were, from central Christendom by the Moorish invasion of Spain and the English conquest of Britain) the two principal types of text came into being, which, in various combinations with purer texts from Italy, are found in the different MSS which have come down to the present day. Theodulf was a Visigoth, probably from Septimania, the large district of southern France which then formed part of the Visigothic kingdom of Spain; and it was to Spain that he looked for materials for his revision of the Latin Bible. Spain and Ireland had by this time ceased to be of primary importance in the circulation of Bible texts
Art, Christian - In Spain religious art flourished early in architecture and handicraft, and reached its climax in painting, later than the rest of Europe, with Velasquez and Murillo
Christian Art - In Spain religious art flourished early in architecture and handicraft, and reached its climax in painting, later than the rest of Europe, with Velasquez and Murillo
Painting, Religious - Few of the early religious painters of Spain won lasting fame; after 1500, however, there are several great names
Mexico - The first seven dioceses were suffragan to the Archdiocese of Seville, Spain, until 1545; in that year the Diocese of Mexico was made an archdiocese with authority over the other six and those subsequently formed, including, in 1581, the Diocese of Manila in the Philippines
Eusebius, Bishop of Vercellae - of Elvira in Spain, praising his anti-Arian constancy
Anitipas - Josephus says, that he died in Spain, whither Caius, on his coming into Gaul the first year of his banishment, might order him to be sent
Religious Painting - Few of the early religious painters of Spain won lasting fame; after 1500, however, there are several great names
Sculpture - In Spain religious art flourished early in architecture and handicraft, and reached its climax in painting, later than the rest of Europe, with Velasquez and Murillo
Genseric, King of the Vandals - Genseric, king of the Vandals, the illegitimate son of king Godigiselus, reigned in Spain jointly with his legitimate brother GUNDERIC, and on the death of the latter, a. Spain, Italy, Dalmatia, Campania, Calabria, Apulia, Bruttium, Venetia, Lucania, Epirus, and the Peloponnese all suffered from his ravages
Messiah - About the year 721, in the time of Leo Isaurus, arose another false Messiah in Spain; his name was Serenus. In the year 1157, a false Messiah stirred up the Jews at Corduba, in Spain. On this occasion almost all the Jews in Spain were destroyed. In the year 1497, we find another false Christ, whose name was Ismael Sophus, who deluded the Jews in Spain. In the year 1534, Rabbi Salomo Malcho, giving out that he was the Messiah, was burnt to death by Charles the Fifth of Spain
Gratianus, Emperor - Justina fixed her court at Sirmium; and the Western empire was perhaps nominally divided between the two brothers, Gratian having Gaul, Spain, and Britain, and Valentinian, Italy, Illyricum, and Africa (Zos. Gratian shewed his judgment by sending for the younger Theodosius, son of the late count Theodosius and about 13 years older than himself, who after his father's execution was living in retirement upon his estates in Spain (Victor, Ep. On the strong representations of Idacius of Merida, the Priscillianists, an enthusiastic sect of Gnostics numerous in Spain (Sulpicius Severus, Chron
Image - the use of images in churches, as ornaments, was first introduced by some Christians in Spain, in the beginning of the fourth century; but the practice was condemned as a dangerous innovation, in a council held at Eliberis, in 305
Paulinus, Bishop of Nola - Not long after he began to think of retiring from the world, and in 389 or ago went to Spain, residing chiefly at Barcelona. It was perhaps partly due to these events that during his stay in Spain he was led to give up the senate and worldly business and refused to take any further interest in "profane" literature ( Ep. It does not appear that he ever saw Sulpicius after his visit to Spain but the love of the two for each other never failed. ) was written in Spain, but when fully intending to retire to Nola, a
Babylon, Mystical - Already this is taking place in Spain, Italy, Austria, and France (Revelation 17:16)
Thorn - Perhaps it is the rhamnus paliurus, a deciduous plant or tree, a native of Palestine, Spain, and Italy
Silvester, Bishop of Rome - ), who says only that Hosius from Spain, "qui Silvestri episcopi maximae Romae locum obtinebat," together with the Roman presbyters Bito and Vincentius, was present (Gelas
Arabia - Hovering troops of Arabs confined the intruders within their walls, and cut off their supplies; and the possession of this fortress gave as little reason to the Romans to exult as the conquerors of Arabia Petraea, as that of Gibraltar does to us to boast of the conquest of Spain. During the whole of the succeeding century, their rapid career was unchecked; the disciplined armies of the Greeks and Romans were unable to stand against them; the Christian churches of Asia and Africa were annihilated; and from India to the Atlantic, through Persia, Arabia, Syria, Palestine, Asia Minor, Egypt, with the whole of northern Africa, Spain, and part of France, the impostor was acknowledged. The rage for literature extended to Egypt and to Spain. So little, indeed, did the physicians of Europe in that age know of the history of their own science, that they were astonished, on the revival of learning, to find in the ancient Greek authors those systems for which they thought themselves indebted to the Arabians!... The last remnant of Arabian science was found in Spain; from whence it was expelled in the beginning of the seventeenth century, by the intemperate bigots of that country, who have never had any thing of their own with which to supply its place
Tongues, Confusion of - Once they occupied Gaul, northern Italy, large Darts of Spain, Germany, Switzerland. The Basque in Spain has a grammatical, though not a verbal, affinity to the Finnish
Gnostics - The tenets of the ancient Gnostics were revived in Spain, in the fourth century, by a sect called the Priscillianists
Romans, Letter to the - From Rome he planned to move into unevangelized areas farther west, till eventually he reached Spain (Romans 15:20; Romans 15:24; Romans 15:28)
Hilarius, Bishop of Rome - His short pontificate is chiefly memorable for his assertion of the authority of the see of Rome in Gaul and Spain
Cassiodorus (or Rather, Cassiodorius) Magnus Aurelius - It would seem to have been the ambition of Cassiodorus, whose genius for diplomacy was consummate, to bring about a fusion between the Arian conquerors and the conquered Catholic population of Italy, to establish friendly relations with the Eastern empire, and possibly to create at Rome a peaceful centre to which the several barbaric kingdoms which had established themselves in Gaul, Spain, and Africa might be attracted
Leper, Leprosy - It is now undoubted that the "leprosy" of modern Syria, and which has a wide range in Spain, Greece and Norway, is the Elephantiasis graecorum
Muratorian Fragment - Paul's journey to Spain
Vespasian - Three legions in Spain and one in Britain now came over to Vespasian. In recognition of the support which Spain had given to Vespasian, the whole free population of the province was given the partial Roman citizenship known as ius Latii. In the same year important work was done on roads in Italy, Spain, and elsewhere
Hormisdas, Bishop of Rome - of Seville, and the bishops of Spain in general, give the two prelates vicariate jurisdiction over E. Spain, exhort against simony and other irregularities, and direct the regular convention of synods
Jew, Jewess - From Spain in the West to the Persian Gulf in the East Jews had settled in every large city
Diana - Evidence of this cult has been found in numerous cities of Asia Minor as well as in the following places further afield: Autun, Marseilles, Rhone Mouth (France), Emporiae, Hemeroscopeum, Rhode (Spain), Epidaurus, Megalopolis, Corinth, Scillus (Greece), Neapolis (Samaria), Panticapaeum (Crimea), Rome, and Syria
Caesarius, Bishop of Arles - Caesarius was liberal in the loan of sermons, and sent suggestions for discourses to priests and even bishops living in Spain, Italy, Gaul, and France (i
Martinus, Bishop of Dumium - On the general subject of monasticism in Gothic Spain cf
Persecution - SCOTLAND, Spain, &c. Spain, Italy, and the valley of Piedmont, and other places, have been the seats of much persecution. When the Moors conquered Spain, in the eighth century, they allowed the Christians the free exercise of their religion; but in the fifteenth century, when the Moors were overcome, and Ferdinand subdued the Moriscoes, the descendants of the above Moors, many thousands were forced to be baptised, or burnt, massacred, or banished, and the children sold for slaves; besides innumerable Jews, who shared the same cruelties, chiefly by means of the infernal courts of inquisition
Innocentius, Bishop of Rome - ... (iii) Spain. We do not know how this admonitory letter was received in Spain. Peter, the prince of the apostles, and which that church ever preserved—especially as no churches had been founded in Italy, Gaul, Spain, Africa, Sicily, or the interjacent islands, except by St
Acts of the Apostles (Apocryphal) - and Exsuperius, bishop of Toulouse (see the quotation above), shows that the Apocryphal Acts were used in Spain not only by Manichaeans but also by Priscillianists. -Forty years after the time of Innocent, the correspondence between Leo and Turribius, bishop of Astorga in Spain, throws more light on the use of the Apocryphal Acts by the Priscillianists. ’ Turribius found that the Priscillianists and Manichaeans were making great progress in Spain, and for this reason had elicited a letter of condemnation from Leo
Paul the Apostle - Paul went to Spain ( Muratorian Fragment , c. 5; this almost certainly means Spain: see Lightfoot’s note), according to his previous intention ( Romans 15:24 ; Romans 15:28 ). This implies a belief in his acquittal whether or not the journey to Spain actually took place (see below, ii
Solomon - Extensive traffic was carried on by land with Tyre and Egypt and Arabia, and by sea with Spain and India and the coasts of Africa, by which Solomon accumulated vast stores of wealth and of the produce of all nations (1 Kings 9:26-28 ; 10:11,12 ; 2 Chronicles 8:17,18 ; 9:21 )
Holy Spirit, the - " The western churches added "and from the Son," which Scripture sanctions, though originally inserted by Reccared, king of a portion of Spain, A
Paul - His movements from that time are not definitely recorded; apparently he visited Ephesus and Macedonia, 1 Timothy 1:3 ; wrote the FIRST EPISTLE TO TIMOTHY; visited Crete, Titus 1:5 ; and Nicopolis, Titus 3:12 ; wrote the EPISTLE TO TITUS (the early writers say that he went to Spain, which we know he desired to do, Romans 15:24,28 ); visited Troas and Miletus, 2 Timothy 4:13,20 ; wrote the EPISTLE TO THE HEBREWS; and when a prisoner at Rome the second time, wrote the SECOND EPISTLE TO TIMOTHY, when expecting his death
Philaster, Bishop of Brixia - From what country he came we are not told; Spain or Africa has been conjectured
Vigilantius - 370 at Calagurris, near Comminges (Convenae), a station on the great Roman road from Aquitaine to Spain ( Itiner
Division of the Earth - 2614, or five hundred and forty-one years after the deluge, and one hundred and ninety-one years after the death of Noah, in the following order:—"To the sons of Shem was allotted the middle of the earth, namely, Palestine, Syria, Assyria, Samaria, Singar, [or Shinar,] Babel, [or Babylonia,] Persia, and Hegiaz; [Arabia;] to the sons of Ham, Teimen, [or Idumea, Jeremiah 49:7 ,] Africa, Nigritia, Egypt, Nubia, Ethiopia, Scindia, and India; [or India west and east of the river Indus;] to the sons of Japheth, also, Garbia, [the north,] Spain, France, the countries of the Greeks, Sclavonians, Bulgarians, Turks, and Armenians. Of Javan's sons, Elishah and Dodon, may be recognized in Elis and Dodona, the oldest settlements of Greece; Kittim, in the Citium of Macedonia, and Chittim, or maritime coasts of Greece and Italy, ... Numbers 24:24 ; and Tarshish, in the Tarsus of Cilicia, and Tartessus of Spain
Tyre - , and exploited the gold, silver, lead, and other mines of Spain from their emporium Tartessus (prob
Philippians - ” An Ephesian imprisonment and origin for Philippians makes sense of Paul's stated intent to visit Philippi upon his release (Philippians 2:24 ; from Rome Paul intended to go to Spain, Romans 15:23-24 )
Titus (Emperor) - To this year belong also various improvements to roads in Italy, Spain, Galatia, and Lycia
Augustus - He received the dress of manhood at 15, and was allowed to accompany his grand-uncle to Spain (47 b
Hunneric, King of the Vandals. - A former notary of Cyrila's having been consecrated as the Arian bishop of that town, the greater part of the citizens took ship to Spain
Gregorius (51) i, (the Great), Bishop of Rome - Spain had but just, and as yet imperfectly, recovered from Arianism. Reccared, the Visigothic king of Spain, renounced Arianism for Catholicism at the council of Toledo in 589, and Gregory heard of this from Leander, bp. There is no distinct assumption, in these letters, of jurisdiction over the Spanish church, and this is the only known instance of a pallium having been sent to Spain previously to the Saracen invasion
Pope - These cardinals are created by the pope when there happen to be vacancies, and sometimes he names one or two only at a time; but commonly he defers the promotion until there be ten or twelve vacancies, or more; and then at every second such promotion, the emperor, the kings of Spain and France, and of Britain, when Catholic, are allowed to present one each, to be made cardinal, whom the pope always admits, if there be not some very great objection
Inn - 118, 261, 258; Wesley, Journal, under March 1738; Borrow, Bible in Spain, passim)
Clovis, King of Salian Franks - Theodoric the Ostrogoth had proposed an alliance of the Arian German kings for the maintenance of peace; and when the Franks began to pursue their victories in a fresh campaign and laid siege to Arles, Theodoric interfered, sent an army under Ibbas, which defeated the Franks and relieved Arles, and eventually agreed to a peace, by which Provence was annexed by the Ostrogothic power, Septimania adhered to the Visigothic kingdom of Spain, and Clovis's conquest of Aquitaine was acknowledged (Binding, p
Old Testament - After the Brescian, the next primary edition was that contained in the Complutensian Polyglot, published at Complutum (Alcala) in Spain, at the expense of Cardinal Ximenes, dated 1514-17 but not issued till 1522
Honorius, Flavius Augustus, Emperor - Alaric died before the end of the year, and in 412 the Goths under Adolf withdrew into Gaul, where Adolf remained until driven into Spain about 3 years after. Wallia, however, acted in Spain as a feudal ally of the empire, won a succession of victories over the Alani, Vandals, and Suevi, and restored great part of the peninsula to Honorius, who is said by Prosper's Chronicle to have entered Rome in triumph a second time
Romans, the Epistle to the - Intending long to visit Rome and Spain (Romans 1:9-13; Romans 15:22-29), he was for the present unable, being bound for Jerusalem with the alms of the Gentile Christians
the Publican - It was not that Santa Teresa was the very worst and wickedest woman in all Spain in her day
Galatia - Paul was able to carry out his purpose of going westward to evangelize Spain, he might be supposed to have visited Southern Gaul en route, and Crescens might afterwards have gone to this region. A reference to Spain in the next verse might suggest European Gauls, but on the whole it is much more likely that reports of Manlius’s victories over the Celtic invaders of Asia Minor had come to the ear of the Jewish leader
Mahometanism - The successors of the prophet, in the eighth century, directed their steps toward Europe; and having at length crossed the narrow sea which separates Africa from Spain, they dispersed the troops of Roderick, king of the Goths, took possession of the greater part of his dominions, subverted the empire of the Visigoths, which had been established in Spain for upward of three centuries, and planted themselves along the coast of Gaul, from the Pyrenean mountains to the Rhine
Tiberius - Spain (25), and afterwards in the East placed the diadem on the head of Tigranes, king of Armenia (20)
Salutations - ] Spitta claims that the Epistle to Rome is really two Epistles, the second being written from Spain later, after St
James - An untrustworthy tradition represents him as preaching the gospel in Spain, of which country he is patron saint
Constantius ii, Son of Constantius - 360) refers to the synod of Rimini, and the opinion expressed by various bishops from different parts of Italy, and from Spain and Africa
Diocletian, Emperor - In Syria, Palestine, Egypt, Western Africa, Italy, and Spain the passions of men were let loose, and raged without restraint
Jonah - of Spain, called by the Greeks Tartessus , and now represented by Cadiz and the country round ( Jonah 1:3 f
Rome And the Roman Empire - His family roots were in the area of Seville, Spain
Jonah - Jonah embarked at Joppa for the far off Tartessus of Spain or Tarshish in Cilicia; compare as to the folly of the attempt Psalms 139:7-10; Genesis 3:8-10; Jeremiah 23:24
Patricius, or Saint Patrick - Discoveries in Spain last century showed that decurions were established by the Romans in every little mining village, charged with the care of the games, the water supply, sanitary arrangements, education, and the local fortifications; while Hübner in the Corp
Christ in the Middle Ages - ; Adoptianism, which flourished in the immediately post-Apostolic (if not in the Apostolic) times, was vigorously propagated in Armenia, and perpetuated there by the Paulicians even down to the present time, had a vigorous development in Spain during the 8th and 9th cents. A vigorously led Adoptianist movement in Spain during the later years of the 8th century, probably influenced by Saracen thought, led Alcuin, supported by Charlemagne and the Council of Frankfurt (794), to set forth as the Christological teaching of the Frankish Church, in opposition to the Nestorian doctrine, alleged to be involved in the Adoptianism of bishops Elipandus of Toledo and Felix of Urgel, a doctrine scarcely distinguishable from Eutychianism
Justinianus i, Emperor - After Narses had destroyed Butelin and his host in a great battle near Casilinum in Campania, 544, the small remains of the Gothic nation either passed into Spain and Gaul to mingle with other barbarians or were lost among the Roman population of Italy, which now was finally in Justinian's hands. In Gaul and Spain there was great discontent, though not a complete breach with Rome; while in N
Ships And Boats - The phrase ‘ ships of Tarshish ’ which probably meant originally ships accustomed to trade with Tartessus in Spain, had come to be used in a secondary sense, like our ‘East-Indiaman,’ of large vessels suited for such a trade
James - A Roman Catholic legend says that he preached in Spain, and that his remains were transported to Compostella there!... James, surnamed "the Less" or "Little
New Testament - (It was called Complutensian because it was printed at Complutum, in Spain
Greece, Religion And Society of - During this era the Greeks established trade colonies on the shores of the Black Sea, the region of the Dardanelles, on the eastern shore of the Aegean Sea, the islands of Crete, Rhodes, Cyprus, Sidon and Tyre, Naucratis in the Nile delta, Italy, Sicily, and Spain
Rome, Romans - ’ Ere this they had become possessed of most of Spain
Paul the Apostle - Assuming release from imprisonment Paul may have managed a fourth journey, perhaps as far west as Spain and then back into the Aegean area
Jesuits - in 1604; Venice in 1606; Portugal in 1759; France in 1764; Spain and Sicilly in 1767; and totally suppressed and abolished by Pope Clement XIV
Paul - The tradition that he traveled to Spain is problematic
Manicheans - From Africa the sect spread into Spain Gaul and Aquitaine (Philast
Ebionism And Ebionites - Philastrius, Pseudo-Tertullian, Pseudo-Jerome, Isidore of Spain, etc
Marriage - In Spain, Italy, and the East it persisted for some time longer, as it does still among the Jews in Mohammedan countries
Bethlehem - The stream of Messianic hope, as it flows onwards and broadens from age to age, is not unlike that river of Spain which for a considerable part of its course flows underground, and only at intervals miles apart throws up pools to the surface, which the inhabitants call ‘the eyes’ of the Guadiana
Herod - lost his kingdom and was banished to Lyons, thence to Spain, where he died
Romans, Theology of - Finally, Paul discloses the real purpose of his writing such a carefully drawn out and persuasive argument: to enlist his Roman readers in supporting a mission to unreached Gentiles in Spain and the delivery of a love gift to suffering Jewish Christians in Jerusalem (15:14-33)
Oracle - Latona had one at Butis in Egypt; Leucothea had one in Colchis; Memnon in Egypt; Machaon at Gerania in Laconia; Minerva had one in Egypt, in Spain, upon mount AEtna, at Mycenae and Colchis, and in other places
Novatianus And Novatianism - Italy, and Spain the sect seems to have taken as firm root as in Phrygia and central Asia Minor
Calendar, the Christian - The Council of Elvira in Spain (circa (about) 305 a
Romans, Epistle to the - It is to secure fellow-workers that the Apostle explains so fully the gospel which he is eager to proclaim in Spain and in neighbouring provinces
Mss - Contains the whole Bible, written in Spain, and is the best representative of the Spanish family of Vulgate MSS
Roads And Travel - For our purpose, Britain, Germany, Spain, North Africa, Mcesia, and Thrace may be left out of account
Paul - Whether at this time he also preached the Gospel in Spain, as some have imagined, is very uncertain
Paul - He spent some time in visits to Greece, Asia Minor and Spain, and during the latter part of this time wrote the letters (first epistles) to Timothy and Titus from Macedonia, A
Reformation - In consequence of this extraordinary authority which the pope had assumed, he at last granted to the king of Portugal all the countries to the eastward of Cape Non in Africa, and to the king of Spain all the countries to the westward of it
Ambrosius of Milan - Ambrose's birth was prefect of the Galliae, a province which included Britain and Spain, and constituted one of the four great praetorian prefectures of the empire
Jerusalem - Thither they return from Spain and Portugal, from Egypt and Barbary, and other countries among which they have been scattered: and when, after all their longings, and all their struggles up the steeps of life, we see them poor, and blind, and naked, in the streets of their once happy Zion, he must have a cold heart that can remain untouched by their sufferings
Synods - The synods which were held during the remainder of the sixth century were confined to France and Spain
Julianus, Flavius Claudius, Emperor - Spain, Gaul, Britain, and Germany), and especially of the defence of the frontiers ( ad Ath
Leo i, the Great - At this period the Priscillianists were exercising a very disastrous influence in Spain
Palestine - Dale, ‘from the preceding history of the Jewish race … Many people seem to suppose that they may approach the subject as if the Lord Jesus Christ had appeared in Spain or in China, instead of in Judaea and Galilee’ (Living Christ and the Four Gospels, 89)
Pelagianism And Pelagius - In the beginning of 415 Paulus OROSIUS, a presbyter from Tarragona in Spain, came to Africa to consult Augustine as to certain questions, connected with Origenism and Priscillianism, which were rife in his native land