Places Study on Salmone

Places Study on Salmone

Acts 27: And when we had sailed slowly many days, and scarce were come over against Cnidus, the wind not suffering us, we sailed under Crete, over against Salmone;

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Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Salmone
SALMONE . A promontory at the N.E. end of Crete, now Cape Sidero . St. Paul’s ship, after reaching Cnidus with difficulty, was met by a powerful N.W. wind, which forced the captain to alter the course. Off Salmone ( Acts 27:7 ) he decided to work his way westward under the lee of Crete.

A. Souter.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Salmone
A promontory on the east of Crete, under which Paul sailed on his voyage to Rome (Acts 27:7 ); the modern Cape Sidero.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Salmone
(Σαλμώνη; Strabo usually writes Σαμώνιον, sometimes Σαλμώνἱον; Pliny, Sammonium)

Salmone is a promontory in the east of Crete (Acts 27:7). It is uncertain whether the modern Cape Sidero, in the extreme N.E., or Cape Plaka, about 7 miles farther S., was so named. The map of Crete in Encyclopaedia Britannica 11 gives the latter. It has been surmised that the ancient usage itself varied. On passing Cnidos, the S.E. corner of Asia Minor, St. Paul’s Alexandrian ship was beaten out of her course, which would have taken her straight to Cythera, north of Crete, and obliged to bear S.W. by S. till she came over against (κατά) Salmone, from which point she could work slowly westward under the lee of the island. The season was autumn, during which the Etesian (north-west) winds blow in the aegean for forty days, beginning at the rise of the dog-star (Herodotus, vi. 140, vii. 168); ‘perflant his diebus, quos Etesias vocant’ (Pliny, Historia Naturalis (Pliny) ii. 47). Aristotle describes them as μίξιν ἔχοντες τῶν τε ἀπὸ τῆς ἄρκτου φερομένων καὶ ζεφύρων (de Mundo, iv. 15).

Literature.-J. Smith, The Voyage and Shipwreck of St. Paul4, 1880, pp. 74-81; W. M. Ramsay, St. Paul the Traveller and the Roman Citizen, 1895, p. 320 f.; Conybeare-Howson, St. Paul, new ed., 1877, ii. 392 f.

James Strahan.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Salmone
(ssal' moh' nih) Promontory on northeast coast of Crete; modern Cape Sidero. Temple to Athena Salmonia stood there. Paul sailed by there on way to Rome (Acts 27:7 ).



The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Salmone
A sea-sport in the island of Crete. See Paul's travels, Acts 27:7. Derived from Shalom.

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Salmone
The eastern promontory of Crete. Paul's voyage (Acts 27:7), the wind was "contrary," therefore, we infer, blowing from the N.W. (Acts 27:4), so that they "sailed slowly." Their course was past the southern point of Greece, W. by Salmone. Then we read, when they "scarce were come over against Cnidus," they made cape Salmone which bears S.W. by Salmone from Cnidus. Assuming that the ship could have made good a course of less than seven points from the wind, we arrive at the conclusion that the wind must have been between N.N.W. and W.N.W.

This undesigned coincidence remarkably confirms Luke's accuracy. (See Smith of Jordanhill's Voyage, etc., of Paul, 73-74; Conybeare and Howson's Life of Paul, 2:393.) The ship's direct course from Myra to Italy after reaching Cnidus lay N. of Crete. But the wind blowing W.N.W. (as often in the Archipelago in late summer) forced her to run under the lee of Crete in the direction of Salmone, which is the eastern point of the island. They with difficulty passed that point. From Myra to Cnidus they had been able to work up with N.W. winds, though slowly, because until they reached Cnidus they had the advantage of a weather shore, under the lee of which they had smooth water and a westerly current. But at Cnidus that advantage ceased; thence their only course was under the lee of Crete toward Salmone.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Salmone
The most eastern point of Crete. Acts 27:7 . It still bears the same name.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Salmone
A promontory at the northeast extremity of the island of Crete, now cape Sidero, Acts 27:7 .

Sentence search

Salmone - Salmone . Off Salmone ( Acts 27:7 ) he decided to work his way westward under the lee of Crete
Salmone - by Salmone. Then we read, when they "scarce were come over against Cnidus," they made cape Salmone which bears S. by Salmone from Cnidus. (as often in the Archipelago in late summer) forced her to run under the lee of Crete in the direction of Salmone, which is the eastern point of the island. But at Cnidus that advantage ceased; thence their only course was under the lee of Crete toward Salmone
Salmone - (Σαλμώνη; Strabo usually writes Σαμώνιον, sometimes Σαλμώνἱον; Pliny, Sammonium)... Salmone is a promontory in the east of Crete (Acts 27:7). till she came over against (κατά) Salmone, from which point she could work slowly westward under the lee of the island
Crete - 158 miles long, from cape Salmone on the E. Paul's ship was constrained by contrary winds off Cnidus to sail under the lee of Crete "over against Salmone"; having passed which with difficulty the ship reached FAIR HAVENS, near Lasea
Crete - The ship first made Salmone, the eastern promontory of the island, and took shelter at Fair Havens, a roadstead on the south side, east of cape Matala
Crete - The ship doubled Salmone, the eastern cape of Crete, and with difficulty reached Fair Havens, a small anchorage near the city of Lasea (Acts 27:8 )