Places Study on Rephidim

Places Study on Rephidim

Exodus 17: And all the congregation of the children of Israel journeyed from the wilderness of Sin, after their journeys, according to the commandment of the LORD, and pitched in Rephidim: and there was no water for the people to drink.
Exodus 17: Then came Amalek, and fought with Israel in Rephidim.
Exodus 19: For they were departed from Rephidim, and were come to the desert of Sinai, and had pitched in the wilderness; and there Israel camped before the mount.
Numbers 33: And they removed from Alush, and encamped at Rephidim, where was no water for the people to drink.
Numbers 33: And they departed from Rephidim, and pitched in the wilderness of Sinai.

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Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Rephidim
(rehf' ih dihm) Site in the wilderness where the Hebrews stopped on their way to Canaan just prior to reaching Sinai (Exodus 17:1 ; Exodus 19:2 ). There the people complained of thirst, and God commanded Moses to strike the rock out of which would come water. While the Hebrews were encamped at Rephidim, the Amalekites came against them and were defeated by Israel under Joshua's leadership. Moses' father-in-law, Jethro, came to Rephidim and helped the leader delegate his authority over the people (Exodus 18:13-26 ). The exact location is unknown.



Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Rephidim
("rests" or "stays") (Exodus 17:1; Exodus 17:8; Exodus 19:2). Here Israel first suffered from want of water, and here they defeated Amalek. Captains Wilson and Palmer make the battle in wady Feiran, near the ancient city of Feiran (amidst traces of building and cultivation) under Mount Serbal. But Holland (Canon Cook's essay on Exodus 16; 17; 19; Speaker's Commentary) places Rephidim after Israel traversed the wady es Sheikh at the pass el Watiyeh shut in by perpendicular rocks on either side; a choice position for Amalek as it commands the entrance to the wadies round the central group of Sinai. On the N. is a plain without water, Israel's encampment. N. of the defile is a hill and bore cliff such as Moses struck with his rod. S. of the pass is another plain, Amalek's encampment, within reach of abundant water. At the foot of the hill whereon Moses sat (Exodus 17:12 or else Exodus 18:13) the Arabs call a rock "the seat of the prophet Moses." (See EXODUS.)

The fertility of Feiran is Stanley's argument for it as the site of Rephidim, Amalek being likely to contend for it against Israel. The "hill" in Exodus 17:9-10, he identifies with that on which the church of Paran stood (Numbers 33:12-13). Holland's view is probably the truer one, for wady es Sheikh is the only open broad way from the N.W. into the "wilderness of Sinai", Ras Sufsafeh before the open er Rahah or "desert of Sinai" being the true Mount Sinai, not Serbal. The Βir Μusa , "well of Moses," in the wide part of wady es Sheykh, is immediately outside or N. of the pass out of Horeb. Wady es Sheykh , "the valley of the chiefs," may allude to the elders appointed at Jethro's suggestion to be rulers and judges under Moses (Exodus 18:21-26). Forster (if his reading be correct: Voice of Israel, p. 118) interprets an inscription with a man's figure with uplifted hands on a rock, "the prophet upon a hard great stone prayeth unto God, Aaron and Hur sustaining his hands." It was after receiving the water supply at Rephidim from God that Israel conquered Amalek.

So it is only after the Christian receives the living water front Christ the smitten Rock that he can effectively conquer his spiritual foes (1 John 5:4). Faith and prayer go together, as at Rephidim. Lift up, not an empty hand, but like Moses grasping the rod hold fast God's word of promise, filling the hand with this effectual plea (Exodus 17:9; Exodus 17:11-12; Job 23:4; Psalms 119:49; Isaiah 43:26; James 5:16). (See MASSAH; MERIBAH.) Moses struck the rock in Horeb at some point not in the people's sight, therefore not near the summit, but in the presence of selected witnesses, the elders (Exodus 17:5-6). The "spiritual rock, Christ, followed all the Israelites" (1 Corinthians 10:4). The repetition of the miracle (Numbers 20:11) at Kadesh shows that the rabbinical tradition is incorrect, that the rock or the stream followed them literally in all their journeys. Rather He of whom the rock was type accompanied them and supplied all their needs (1 Corinthians 10:4).

The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Rephidim
An encampment of Israel in the wilderness, Exodus 17:1 remarkable for the murmurings of the people grace in giving them water. See Rock. The word is derived from Raphad, rest—hence in the plural, Rephidim, rests.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Rephidim
Beds; places of rest
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Rephidim
a station or encampment of the Israelites, Exodus 17:1 . At this station, adjoining to Mount Horeb, the people again murmured for want of water; and they chid Moses, saying, "Give us water that we may drink." And "they tempted the Lord, saying, Is the Lord among us or not?" Moses, therefore, to convince them that he was, by a more obvious miracle than at Marah, smote the rock with his rod, by the divine command, and brought water out of it for the people to drink: wherefore, he called the place Meribah, "chiding," and the rock Massah, "temptation." On their way to Rephidim, the Amalekites, the original inhabitants of the country, who are noticed in Abraham's days, Genesis 14:7 , not having the fear of God before their eyes, nor regarding the judgments recently inflicted on the Egyptians, attacked the rear of the Israelites when they were faint and weary; but were defeated by a chosen party, under the command of Joshua, the faithful lieutenant of Moses, who is first noticed on this occasion, and even then pointed out by the Lord as his successor. This victory was miraculous; for while Moses held up his hand Israel prevailed, but when he let it down Amalek prevailed. So Aaron and Hur (the husband of Miriam, according to Josephus) held up both his hands steadily till sunset, and thereby gave a decided victory to Israel. This unprovoked aggression of the Amalekites drew down upon them from the Lord the sentence of "war from generation to generation," between them and the Israelites, and of final extermination, which was commanded go be written or registered in a book, for a memorial to Joshua and his successors, the judges and kings of Israel, and was carried into execution by Saul, 1 Samuel 15:8 , by David, 1 Samuel 30:17 , and finally accomplished by the Simeonites in Hezekiah's reign, Exodus 17:8-13 ; Deuteronomy 25:17 ; 1 Chronicles 4:43 . While the Israelites were encamped at Rephidim, on the western side of Horeb, the mount of God, Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses, who lived in that neighbourhood, and was priest and prince of Midian, came to visit him, with his wife Zipporah, and his two sons, Eleazar and Gershom, who had accompanied him part of the way to Egypt, but returned home again; and they rejoiced with him "for all the goodness which the Lord had done for Israel, whom he had delivered out of the hand of the Egyptians;" and upon this occasion, Jethro, as "a priest of the most high God," of the order of Melchizedek, "offered a burnt-offering and sacrifices of thanksgiving to God, at which Aaron and all the elders of Israel ate bread with Jethro before God," by a repetition of the eucharistic feast upon a sacrifice which Melchizedek formerly administered to Abraham, Genesis 14:18 ; Exodus 18:1-12 . Thus was fulfilled the prophetic sign which the Lord had given to Moses when he first appeared to him in the burning bush: "This shall be a token unto thee that I have sent thee: when thou hast brought forth the people out of Egypt, ye shall serve God upon this mountain," Exodus 3:12 . The speedy accomplishment, therefore, of this sign, at the beginning of their journey, was well calculated to strengthen their faith or reliance on the divine protection throughout. Jethro appears to have been distinguished not only for his piety, but also for his political wisdom. By his advice, which also was approved by the Lord, Moses, to relieve himself from the fatigue of administering justice to the people, the whole day, from morning until evening, instituted inferior judges or magistrates over thousands, hundreds, fifties, and tens, as his deputies, who were to relieve him from the burden of judging the smaller causes, but to refer the greater or more difficult to Moses, for his decision.

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Rephidim
Rephidim (rĕf'i-dĭm), resting-place. A station of the Hebrews before reaching Sinai. Numbers 33:14-15. Near it was the fountain which flowed from the rock in Horeb, called "Meribah," and "Massah," whence they were miraculously supplied with water. Exodus 17:1-16; Exodus 19:2. It may have been in Wady Feiran or in some part of Wady esh-Sheikh. See Journeys of Israel.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Rephidim
(rehf' ih dihm) Site in the wilderness where the Hebrews stopped on their way to Canaan just prior to reaching Sinai (Exodus 17:1 ; Exodus 19:2 ). There the people complained of thirst, and God commanded Moses to strike the rock out of which would come water. While the Hebrews were encamped at Rephidim, the Amalekites came against them and were defeated by Israel under Joshua's leadership. Moses' father-in-law, Jethro, came to Rephidim and helped the leader delegate his authority over the people (Exodus 18:13-26 ). The exact location is unknown.



American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Rephidim
An encampment of the Israelites between the wilderness of Sin and mount Sinai, where the people murmured, and God gave them water from the rock. Here also the Amalekites attacked them, and were defeated, Exodus 17:1-16 . It is thought to have been in the valley now called esh-Sheikh, a day's march northwest of Sinai, and near the western border of the Horeb group of mountains. SEE SINAI.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Rephidim
REPHIDIM . A stage in the Wanderings, between the wilderness of Sin and the wilderness of Sinai ( Exodus 17:1 ; Exodus 17:8 ; Exodus 19:2 ; cf. Numbers 33:14 f.). Here water was miraculously supplied, and Israel fought with Amalek. Those who accept the traditional Sinal generally place Elim in Wâdy Gharandel , and Rephidim in Wâdy Feirân , about four miles N. of Mt. Serbal (Palmer, Desert of the Exodus , Index). The tribesmen would naturally wish to defend the springs in the valley against such a host as Israel. Moses might have surveyed the conflict from the height of Jebel Tahûneh, on the N. of the valley. Only we should hardly expect the Amalekites so far to the south. If the scholars who place Sinai east of the Gulf of ‘Akabah, identifying Elath and Elim, are right, then Rephidim must be sought somewhere in that district. (Sayce, HCM [Note: CM Higher Criticism and the Monuments.] , p. 269.)

W. Ewing.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Rephidim
Place near Horeb, where the Israelites encamped; water gushed from the rock when Moses had smitten it, and there Joshua fought with Amalek, while Moses lifted up his hands to heaven, assisted by Aaron and Hur. Exodus 17:1,8 ; Exodus 19:2 ; Numbers 33:14,15 . Not identified.

Sentence search

Alush - The station of the Israelites before Rephidim
Dophkah - A station in the wilderness (Numbers 33:12) between Rephidim and the sea
a'Lush - (a crowd of men ) one of the stations of the Israelites on their journey to Sinai, the last before Rephidim
Rephidim - While the Hebrews were encamped at Rephidim, the Amalekites came against them and were defeated by Israel under Joshua's leadership. Moses' father-in-law, Jethro, came to Rephidim and helped the leader delegate his authority over the people (Exodus 18:13-26 )
Rephidim - While the Hebrews were encamped at Rephidim, the Amalekites came against them and were defeated by Israel under Joshua's leadership. Moses' father-in-law, Jethro, came to Rephidim and helped the leader delegate his authority over the people (Exodus 18:13-26 )
Rephidim - Rephidim . Those who accept the traditional Sinal generally place Elim in Wâdy Gharandel , and Rephidim in Wâdy Feirân , about four miles N. If the scholars who place Sinai east of the Gulf of ‘Akabah, identifying Elath and Elim, are right, then Rephidim must be sought somewhere in that district
Alush - The last station before Rephidim, of Israel's journey to Sinai (Numbers 33:18; Numbers 33:14)
Alush - One of the places, the last before Rephidim, at which the Hebrews rested on their way to Sinai (Numbers 33:13,14 )
Sin, Wilderness of, - (Numbers 33:11,23 ) Their next halting-place, (Exodus 16:1 ; 17:1 ) was Rephidim, probably the Wady Feiran [ Rephidim ]; on which supposition it would follow that Sin must lie between that way and the coast of the Gulf of Suez, and of course west of Sinai
Hur - A chief man among the Hebrews in the desert, associated with Aaron in upholding the hands of Moses at Rephidim, and in supplying his place while on the summit of Sinai, Exodus 17:10 ; 24:14
Dophkah - ” Station in the wilderness between wilderness of Sin and Rephidim where Israel camped (Numbers 33:12 )
Rephidim - The word is derived from Raphad, rest—hence in the plural, Rephidim, rests
Mer'Ibah - [For the situation see Rephidim ] The name is also given to Kadesh, (Numbers 20:13,24 ; 27:14 ; 32:51) (Meribah-kadesh), because there also the people, when in want of water, strove with God
Rephidim - Rephidim (rĕf'i-dĭm), resting-place
Sin - A region between Elim and Rephidim
Dophkah - This station and the next one, Alush , which lie between the ‘encampment by the sea’ and Rephidim, have not been identified, and they are not alluded to in Exodus
Horeb - ) The designation of the northern part of the Sinaitic range, so Rephidim is made to be situated in it (Exodus 17:6)
Rephidim - But Holland (Canon Cook's essay on Exodus 16; 17; 19; Speaker's Commentary) places Rephidim after Israel traversed the wady es Sheikh at the pass el Watiyeh shut in by perpendicular rocks on either side; a choice position for Amalek as it commands the entrance to the wadies round the central group of Sinai. )... The fertility of Feiran is Stanley's argument for it as the site of Rephidim, Amalek being likely to contend for it against Israel. " It was after receiving the water supply at Rephidim from God that Israel conquered Amalek. Faith and prayer go together, as at Rephidim
Meribah - ) The designation which Moses gave the place at Rephidim where Israel, just before they reached Sinai in the second year after leaving Egypt, did chide with Moses, "give us water that we may drink," and tempted (from whence came the other name Massah) Jehovah, saying "is Jehovah among us or not?" (Exodus 17:7; compare as to the sin, Matthew 4:7. This repetition of the miracle disproves the notion from 1 Corinthians 10:4 that the stream literally "followed" them from Rephidim (Exodus 17) to Canaan; all that is meant is a supply of water from time to time was provided naturally or miraculously, so that they never perished from thirst (so Exodus 15:24-25; Numbers 21:16). The Hebrew for "rock" in Exodus 17 at Rephidim is tsur , but in Numbers 20 cela' at Kadesh, marking undesignedly the distinctness of the miracles
Meribali - The fountain near Rephidim which Moses smote by the divine command; also called "Massah" ("temptation, trial")
Sin, Wilderness of - Their next stage was Rephidim
Horeb - (Exodus 17:6-8) And Rephidim was near at hand. The name of Rephidim, which is in the plural number, and signifies places of rest, from Raphab, rest, is esentation of our nature resting in itself, without any thing in our own power to give satisfaction to the dry soul
Meribah -
One of the names given by Moses to the fountain in the desert of Sin, near Rephidim, which issued from the rock in Horeb, which he smote by the divine command, "because of the chiding of the children of Israel" (Exodus 17:1-7 )
am'Alekites, - The Amalekites first came in contact with the Israelites at Rephidim, but were signally defeated
Amalekite - (am' ay lehk ite) A nomadic tribe of formidable people that first attacked the Israelites after the Exodus at Rephidim
Amalekite - They attempted to stop the Israelites when they marched through their territory (Deuteronomy 25:18 ), attacking them at Rephidim (Exodus 17:8-13 ; Compare Deuteronomy 25:17 ; 1 Samuel 15:2 )
Amalekites - On Israel's route from Egypt to Palestine, Amalek in guerrilla warfare tried to stop their progress, and was defeated by Joshua, under Moses, whose hands were stayed up by Aaron and Hur, at Rephidim (Exodus 17:8-16). " The occasion of Amalek's attack was significant: at Rephidim, when there was no water for the people to drink, and God by miracle made it gush from the rock... Contentions for possession of a well were of common occurrence (Genesis 21:25; Genesis 26:22; Exodus 2:17); in Moses' message asking Edom and Sihon the Amorite for leave of passage, water is a prominent topic (Numbers 20:17; Numbers 21:22; compare Judges 5:11). The execution was delayed; but the original sentence at Rephidim was repeated by Balaam, and 400 years subsequently its execution was enjoined at the very beginning of the regal government as a test of obedience; compare 1 Samuel 12:12-15
Amalekites - The Israelites had scarcely passed the Red sea, when the Amelikites attacked them in the desert of Rephidim, and slew those who, through fatigue or weakness, lagged behind; and for this unprovoked assault on the people of God, the doom of extermination was passed upon them, Exodus 17:8-16
Joshua - He is first mentioned as the leader of Israel against the Amalekites at Rephidim, ... Exodus 17:8-16
Rephidim - " On their way to Rephidim, the Amalekites, the original inhabitants of the country, who are noticed in Abraham's days, Genesis 14:7 , not having the fear of God before their eyes, nor regarding the judgments recently inflicted on the Egyptians, attacked the rear of the Israelites when they were faint and weary; but were defeated by a chosen party, under the command of Joshua, the faithful lieutenant of Moses, who is first noticed on this occasion, and even then pointed out by the Lord as his successor. While the Israelites were encamped at Rephidim, on the western side of Horeb, the mount of God, Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses, who lived in that neighbourhood, and was priest and prince of Midian, came to visit him, with his wife Zipporah, and his two sons, Eleazar and Gershom, who had accompanied him part of the way to Egypt, but returned home again; and they rejoiced with him "for all the goodness which the Lord had done for Israel, whom he had delivered out of the hand of the Egyptians;" and upon this occasion, Jethro, as "a priest of the most high God," of the order of Melchizedek, "offered a burnt-offering and sacrifices of thanksgiving to God, at which Aaron and all the elders of Israel ate bread with Jethro before God," by a repetition of the eucharistic feast upon a sacrifice which Melchizedek formerly administered to Abraham, Genesis 14:18 ; Exodus 18:1-12
Kadesh - Here the people murmured for want of water, as their forefathers had done formerly at Rephidim; and Moses, irritated by their chidings, "with his rod smote the rock twice," instead of "speaking to the rock before their eyes," as the Lord had commanded him (Compare Numbers 27:14 ; Deuteronomy 9:23 ; Psalm 106:32,33 )
Kadesh - Here the people murmured for want of water, as their forefathers had done formerly at Rephidim; and Moses, irritated by their chidings, "with his rod smote the rock twice," instead of "speaking to the rock before their eyes," as the Lord had commanded him (Compare Numbers 27:14 ; Deuteronomy 9:23 ; Psalm 106:32,33 )
Josh'ua - He is mentioned first in connection with the fight against Amalek at Rephidim, when he was chosen by Moses to lead the Israelites
Camp - Rephidim... 12
Sinai - From Rephidim (Exodus 17:8-13 ) the Israelites journeyed forward through the Wady Solaf and Wady esh-Sheikh into the plain of er-Rahah, "the desert of Sinai," about 2 miles long and half a mile broad, and encamped there "before the mountain
Joshua - He is mentioned first in connection with the fight against Amalek at Rephidim, when he was chosen by Moses to lead the Israelites
Joshua - He shared in all the events of the Exodus, and held the place of commander of the host of the Israelites at their great battle against the Amalekites in Rephidim ( Exodus 17:8-16 )
Exodus, the - Thence to Rephidim, where God gave them water from the rock of Horeb; there Amalek attacked them. "... Rephidim is probably at the pass el Watiyeh, shut in by perpendicular rocks, to Amalek a capital point for attack on Israel, commanding the entrance to the wadies surrounding the central Sinai. But the Ordnance Survey of Sinai by Captain Palmer and Captain Wilson identifies Rephidim with the part of wady Feiran N. , meeting the wady es Sheikh (close by Rephidim), and in front the wider plain er Rahah, 400 acres, abundantly large enough for the Israelite host
Sil'Oam - It was to Siloam that the Levite was sent with the golden pitcher on the "last and great day of the feast" of Tabernacles; it was from Siloam that he brought the water which was then poured over the sacrifice, in memory of the water from the rock of Rephidim; and it was to this Siloam water that the Lord pointed when he stood in the temple on that day and cried, "If any man thirst let him come unto me and drink
Arabia - The desert of mount Sinai (Burr et tur Sinai), where Israel wandered, Kadesh Barnea, Pharan, Rephidim, Ezion Geber, Rithmah, Oboth, Arad, Heshbon, were in it. The wady Leja (perhaps the valley of Rephidim), near jebel Mousa, and the wady Feiran (Paran, Numbers 13:3), are most luxuriant
Siloam, the Pool of - From Siloam he brought the water to be poured over the sacrifice in memory of the water at Rephidim
Sinai - The region appears more suitable for the occupation of a large host than the neighbourhood of Jebel Mûsa, and it accords better with the probable site of Rephidim
Wanderings in the Wilderness - This route is identified with Marah (Exodus 15:23 ), Elim (Exodus 15:27 ), the Wilderness of Sin (Exodus 16:1 ), Rephidim (Exodus 17:1 ), the Wilderness of Sinai (Exodus 18:5 ; Exodus 19:1 ), Sinai (Exodus 19:2 ), the wilderness of Paran (Numbers 10:12 ), Taberah (Numbers 11:3 ) or Kibroth-hattaavah (“the cemetery of the lusters,” Numbers 11:34 ), Hazeroth (“corrals,” Numbers 11:35 ; Numbers 12:16 ) where the mention of enclosures for the livestock and a series of events in the biblical account suggest an extended stay, and, ultimately, Kadesh (Numbers 20:1 )
Wanderings of the Israelites - ... Rephidim, Exodus 17:1 . | Rephidim, Numbers 33:14
Temptation - ] rightly keeps ‘ Massah ’ as a proper name, the reference being to the historic murmuring at Rephidim ( Exodus 17:1 ff
Amalekites - Hence they did not wait for their near approach to that country, but came down from their settlements, on its southern borders, to attack them unawares at Rephidim
Aaron - When the ransomed tribes fought their first battle with Amalek in Rephidim, Moses stood on a hill overlooking the scene of the conflict with the rod of God in his outstretched hand
Rock - , to the effect that the rock of Rephidim (Exodus 17:6; cf
Wilderness of the Wanderings - God often besides at Rephidim and Kadesh (Exodus 17:1, etc. Rephidim ("places of refreshment") with its water from the smitten rock typifies Christ, by being smitten yielding the living water (John 7:37-39; John 4:14)
Exodus - They now turned inland, and after three encampments came to the rich and fertile valley of Rephidim, in the Wady Feiran
Typology - He rehearsed the experiences of the people of Israel in the Exodus and in their forty years in the desert: the destruction of Pharaoh's army in the sea (Exodus 14-15 ); the eating of manna (Exodus 16:1 ); their conduct when thirsty—Rephidim—striking the rock (Exodus 17:1 ); Kadesh—speaking to the rock (Numbers 20:1 ); sin of the gold calf (Exodus 32:1 ); fornication with the daughters of Moab at Baal of Peor (Numbers 25:1 ); murmuring when going from Mount Hor around the land of Edom (Numbers 21:1 )
Exodus - Rephidim near Mount Sinai, and Taberah, Kibroth-hattaaveh, and Hazerorh, on their journey north, were the scenes of incidents, which may be found, described under their several heads
Miracles - ... Curing the waters of Marah Exodus 15:23-25 ... Manna from heaven Exodus 16:14-35 ... Water from the rock at Rephidim Exodus 17:5-7 ... Death of Nadab and Abihu Leviticus 10:1 - 2 ... The earth swallows the murmurers, and... the death of Korah, Dathan and Abiram Numbers 16:31-40 ... Budding of Aaron's rod at Kadesh Numbers 17:8 ... Water from the rock at Meribah Numbers 20:7-11 ... The brazen serpent: Israel healed Numbers 21:8 - 9 ... Balaam's ass speaking Numbers 22:21-35 ... Parting the Jordan Joshua 3:14-17 ... In the Land
Joshua - Probably he even in Egypt was recognized as an officer among his brethren; for at his first public act, choosing and leading picked men of Israel against the attacking Amalekites at Rephidim (Exodus 17:9) he is introduced abruptly without description as one already well known by the designation Joshua (not Hoshea) given by anticipation
Epiphanius, Bishop of Salamis - "Know, my beloved son," he writes to Jerome, "that Amalek is destroyed to the very root; on the hill of Rephidim has been erected the banner of the cross
Exodus, Theology of - When they suffer from bitter water at Marah and no water at Rephidim, God provides (Exodus 15:22-27 ; 17:1-7 )
Golgotha - ’ Other sites shown to pilgrims in that uncritical age were impossible, such as that of Rephidim in Moab
Moses - He distrusted or disbelieved that water could be produced from the rock only by speaking to it; which was a higher miracle than he had performed before at Rephidim, Exodus 17:6