Places Study on Rameses

Places Study on Rameses

Genesis 47: And Joseph placed his father and his brethren, and gave them a possession in the land of Egypt, in the best of the land, in the land of Rameses, as Pharaoh had commanded.
Exodus 12: And the children of Israel journeyed from Rameses to Succoth, about six hundred thousand on foot that were men, beside children.
Numbers 33: And they departed from Rameses in the first month, on the fifteenth day of the first month; on the morrow after the passover the children of Israel went out with an high hand in the sight of all the Egyptians.
Numbers 33: And the children of Israel removed from Rameses, and pitched in Succoth.

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Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Raamses, Rameses
RAAMSES, RAMESES . One of the treasure cities built by the Israelites in Egypt, and the starting-point of the Exodus ( Exodus 1:11 ; Exodus 12:37 , Numbers 33:3 ; Numbers 33:5 ). The site is not quite certain, but it was probably one of the cities called in Egyp. P-Ra’messe , House of Ramesse,’ after Ramesses ii. In Genesis 47:11 Joseph, by Pharaoh’s command, gives to Jacob’s family ‘a possession in the land of Egypt, in the best of the land, in the land of Rameses.’ It thus lay in the Land of Goshen (wh. see), and is to be looked for in the first place in the Wady Tumilat. Petrle identifies it with Tell Rotab , where he has found sculptures of the age of Ramesses ii.

F. Ll. Griffith.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Rameses
RAMESES . See Raamses.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Rameses
"The land of" (Genesis 47:11 ), was probably "the land of Goshen" (q.v.) 45:10. After the Hebrews had built Rameses, one of the "treasure cities," it came to be known as the "land" in which that city was built. The city bearing this name (Exodus 12:37 ) was probably identical with Zoan, which Rameses II. ("son of the sun") rebuilt. It became his special residence, and ranked next in importance and magnificance to Thebes. Huge masses of bricks, made of Nile mud, sun-dried, some of them mixed with stubble, possibly moulded by Jewish hands, still mark the site of Rameses. This was the general rendezvous of the Israelites before they began their march out of Egypt. Called also Raamses (Exodus 1:11 ).

Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Rameses (ra'Amses)
One reason why the Israelites of Moses’ time were slaves in Egypt was that the Pharaoh wanted a cheap work-force to carry out his spectacular building programs. Among the cities that the Israelites built was Rameses (or Ra’amses), where the buildings included a magnificent palace, large storehouses and defence fortifications (Exodus 1:8-11). Rameses was probably the former Hyksos capital, Avaris, rebuilt. (For map and other details see EGYPT.)

Rameses was located in that part of the Nile Delta where the family of Jacob had originally settled (Genesis 47:11). This was the region from which Jacob’s multitude of descendants set out on their flight from Egypt over four hundred years later (in 1280 BC; Exodus 12:37). Rameses was also apparently known as Zoan (Psalms 78:12; Psalms 78:43), which from 1085 to 660 BC was the capital of Egypt (Isaiah 19:11; Isaiah 19:13; Isaiah 30:4; Ezekiel 30:14).

Holman Bible Dictionary - Rameses
(ram' eh ssahss) Egyptian capital city and royal residence during the nineteenth and twentieth dynasties (about 1320-1085 B.C.). The exact location is uncertain, although it appears to have been in the Nile delta and may be the same as Tanis or Zoan. It was near the area where the Hebrews had settled under Joseph's administration (Genesis 47:11 ). After the Israelites became slaves, they were forced to help build Rameses and Pithom (Exodus 1:11 ) as store cities for Pharaoh Rameses II. Rameses accommodated seagoing vessels from the Mediterranean Sea and river traffic from the Nile. Surrounding the city were groves of fruit trees and vineyards. The city was quite prosperous because of the commerce which went through its port. See Egypt ; Exodus ; Pithom .



Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Rameses
There is mentioned in Egyptian monuments RΗΜSS , son of Aahmes I (Lepsius); the new Pharaoh "that knew not Joseph." The Pharaohs of the 19th dynasty of Rama (Rameses ΙΙ was the great conqueror) two centuries later have a final -u , Ramessu. In Genesis 47:11 Rama is the name of a district. In Exodus 1:11 Raamses is the city which already existed, but which the Israelites now strengthened as a treasure city. Rameses II fortified and enlarged it long after. Septuagint make Rama the Heroopolis of later times. It and Pithom were on the canal dug under Osirtasin of the 12th dynasty. Derived from Ra-mes , "child of Ra" the sun god. The Egyptians called themselves "children of Ra" front the earliest times, even "Mizraim" may be from Μis-ra .

The name Rama would fitly apply to Goshen which was especially associated with sun worship. Aahmes I built cities in the Delta, especially on the eastern quarter from whence the invading shepherds had come, and was likely as restorer of the sun (Ra ) worship to have given the name Rama to the treasure city which Israel fortified there, as he gave it also to his son. Besides Ρi ("city") should appear before Rama if it were the Egyptian designation from the name of king Rameses. When Rameses II enlarged it its name was Rama Meiamon, not Rama simply. Moreover, when enlarged by him it was the center of a large Egyptian festive population, whereas in Exodus 1:11 it is in the midst of oppressed Israelites. Lepsius makes Aboo Kesheyd to be on the site.

Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Rameses
or RAAMSES, a city supposed to have been situated in the eastern part of Egypt, called the land of Goshen, which was also hence termed the land of Rameses. It was one of the cities built by the Israelites as a treasure city, as it is translated in our Bibles; probably a store city, or, as others interpret it, a fortress. Its position may be fixed about six or eight miles above the modern Cairo, a little to the south of the Babylon of the Persians, the ancient Letopolis; as Josephus says that the children of Israel, after quitting this place, in their first march to Succoth, passed by the latter city.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Raamses, Rameses
District in Goshen in Lower Egypt, east of the Nile, in which Jacob and his descendants were placed, and in which they built a treasure city of the same name for Pharaoh. It was from thence the Israelites began their march out of Egypt. Genesis 47:11 ; Exodus 1:11 ; Exodus 12:37 ; Numbers 33:3,5 . It is not identified. It is a disputed point as to whether the name of the district or of the city had any connection with the Egyptian kings named Rameses.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Rameses
See RAAMSES.

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Rameses
Rameses (răm'e-sçz or ra-mç'sez), son of the sun). A province and city in Egypt; called also Raamses. Genesis 47:11; Exodus 12:37; Numbers 33:3; Numbers 33:5. The district was, without doubt, identical with Goshen.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Rameses
See RAAMSES .

Sentence search

Rameses - Rameses
ra-am'Ses - (Exodus 1:11 ) [Rameses ]
Raamses - (See Rameses
Raamses - See Rameses
Rameses (ra'Amses) - Among the cities that the Israelites built was Rameses (or Ra’amses), where the buildings included a magnificent palace, large storehouses and defence fortifications (Exodus 1:8-11). Rameses was probably the former Hyksos capital, Avaris, rebuilt. )... Rameses was located in that part of the Nile Delta where the family of Jacob had originally settled (Genesis 47:11). Rameses was also apparently known as Zoan (Psalms 78:12; Psalms 78:43), which from 1085 to 660 BC was the capital of Egypt (Isaiah 19:11; Isaiah 19:13; Isaiah 30:4; Ezekiel 30:14)
Raamses - (ray am' sseez) Alternate form of place name Rameses (Exodus 1:11 )
Rameses - After the Hebrews had built Rameses, one of the "treasure cities," it came to be known as the "land" in which that city was built. The city bearing this name (Exodus 12:37 ) was probably identical with Zoan, which Rameses II. Huge masses of bricks, made of Nile mud, sun-dried, some of them mixed with stubble, possibly moulded by Jewish hands, still mark the site of Rameses
Rameses - After the Israelites became slaves, they were forced to help build Rameses and Pithom (Exodus 1:11 ) as store cities for Pharaoh Rameses II. Rameses accommodated seagoing vessels from the Mediterranean Sea and river traffic from the Nile
Rameses - Rameses (răm'e-sçz or ra-mç'sez), son of the sun)
Rameses - " The Pharaohs of the 19th dynasty of Rama (Rameses ΙΙ was the great conqueror) two centuries later have a final -u , Ramessu. Rameses II fortified and enlarged it long after. Besides Ρi ("city") should appear before Rama if it were the Egyptian designation from the name of king Rameses. When Rameses II enlarged it its name was Rama Meiamon, not Rama simply
Goshen - ” In the latter passage it is equated with the “land of Rameses,” which was probably identical with or near to the “field of Zoan. ” See Avaris; Rameses ; Tanis; Zoan . See Exodus 8:22 ; Exodus 9:26 ), but began their Exodus from Rameses (Exodus 12:37 ; Numbers 33:3 ), which was a city they helped to build (Exodus 1:11 ). Unfortunately little is known of the region prior to Rameses II. Undoubtedly, Goshen, “land of Rameses,” refers to the land around the city of Rameses and in the vicinity of Pithom. (4) Both the two cities which the Hebrews built, Rameses and Pithom, and the Hyksos capital at Zoan are key issues for settling on a date for the Exodus
Tiras - Traditionally, they have been related to Turscha, part of the sea peoples Rameses III (1198-1166 B
Raamses, Rameses - RAAMSES, Rameses . In Genesis 47:11 Joseph, by Pharaoh’s command, gives to Jacob’s family ‘a possession in the land of Egypt, in the best of the land, in the land of Rameses
pi-Hahi'Roth, - a place before or at which the Israelites encamped, at the close of the third march from Rameses (the last place before they crossed the Red Sea), when they went out of Egypt
Rame'Ses, - ( Genesis 47:11 ; Exodus 12:37 ; Numbers 33:3,5 ) This land of Rameses either corresponds to the land of Goshen or was a district of it, more probably the former. Brugsch thinks that it was at Zoan-Tanis, the modern San, on the Tanitic branch of the Nile, and that it was built or enlarged by Rameses II and made his capital
Mixed Multitude - (Exodus 12:38 ), a class who accompanied the Israelites as they journeyed from Rameses to Succoth, the first stage of the Exodus
Pihahiroth - 3:1, section 2), in which the scribe Penbesa describes Rameses' visit; garlands were sent from Pehir on a river. " Israel, after marching from Rameses eastward to Succoth along the old canal, and thence to Etham, were ordered by God to change their direction and go southward to Pihahiroth at, the W
Pharaoh's Daughters - She was in all probability the sister of Rameses, and the daughter of Seti I. It is supposed by some that she was Nefert-ari, the wife as well as sister of Rameses
Chushan-Rishathaim - It is mentioned among the countries which took part in the attack upon Egypt in the reign of Rameses III. As the reign of Rameses III
Lubim - ) The Rebu or Lebu of the monumental temple at Thebes (the Medeenet Haboo) of Rameses III, who conquered them
Goshen - It is called "the land of Goshen" (47:27), and also simply "Goshen" (46:28), and "the land of Rameses" (47:11; Exodus 12:37 ), for the towns Pithom and Rameses lay within its borders; also Zoan or Tanis (Psalm 78:12 )
Raamses - Or Rameses, a city built by the Hebrews during their servitude in Egypt, Exodus 1:11
Merom - Thutmose III and Rameses II of Egypt claimed to have captured the area during their respective reigns
Pelethites - The Egyptian monuments mention Shayretana ("Cherethim" or "Cretans") and Ρelesatu ("Philistines"), whom Rameses III conquered
Raamses, Rameses - It is a disputed point as to whether the name of the district or of the city had any connection with the Egyptian kings named Rameses
Pithom - Coupled with the city of Rameses, it becomes an important clue to the Exodus chronology
Noph - Among the ruins found at this place is a colossal statue of Rameses the Great
Hornet - Sayce has suggested that the reference may be to the armies of Rameses iii
Pharaoh's Daughter, - (Exodus 2:6-10 ) Osborn thinks her name was Thouoris, daughter of Rameses II, others that her name was Merrhis
no, no-Amon - Deir el-Bahri (Hatshepsut), the Memnon Colossi (Amenhotep III), the Ramasseum (Rameses II), and Medinet Habu (Rameses III) are just a few sites still witnessing to the past glory of Thebes
Succoth - First halting place of the Israelites when they left Rameses
Goshen - It is often called 'the land of Goshen,' and is also termed 'the land of Rameses
Goshen - It contained the treasure-cities of Rameses and Pittim
Rameses - or RAAMSES, a city supposed to have been situated in the eastern part of Egypt, called the land of Goshen, which was also hence termed the land of Rameses
Goshen - The royal city of Rameses, which the Egyptians forced the Israelites to build by slave labour, was in Goshen (Genesis 47:6; Genesis 47:11; Genesis 47:27; Exodus 1:11; Exodus 12:37)
Etham - Had Etham been half way between Mukfar and Ajrud (Robinson, Chart), Pharaoh could not have overtaken them, whether he was at Zoan or Rameses, which was two days journey from Etham
Dodanim - A people with a similar name were among the Sea People who fought with Rameses III
Goshen - Also called the land of Rameses, in which Israel built (i. Israel setting out from Rameses in Goshen in two days reached the edge of the Wilderness, and in one day more the Red Sea, i. from Rameses (on the old canal from the Tanitic arm of the Nile to lake Timsah) 30 miles direct to the ancient western shore
Goshen - It contained the treasure-cities Rameses and Pithom
Pharaoh - He associated with him in his government his son, Rameses II. , and Rameses II. (his throne name Merenptah), the father of Rameses II. Most remarkable of all, when compared with the mummy of Rameses II. is, as it were, the idealized type of Rameses II. " ... ... ... Rameses II. During his sojourn in Midian, however, Rameses died, after a reign of sixty-seven years, and his body embalmed and laid in the royal sepulchre in the Valley of the Tombs of Kings beside that of his father. In 1886, the mummy of this king, the "great Rameses," the "Sesostris" of the Greeks, was unwound, and showed the body of what must have been a robust old man. " ... Both on his father's and his mother's side it has been pretty clearly shown that Rameses had Chaldean or Mesopotamian blood in his veins to such a degree that he might be called an Assyrian. , the fourteenth and eldest surviving son of Rameses II. The "Harris papyrus," found at Medinet-Abou in Upper Egypt in 1856, a state document written by Rameses III. ' Menephtah was son and successor of Rameses II
Dor - Its early history shows connections with Egypt under Rameses II and with the Sea Peoples, who are closely related to the Philistines
Steel - The steel weapons in the tomb of Rameses III
Sin (1) - A Sallier papyrus records a great battle at Sin between Rameses and the Sheta; here too was the alleged deliverance of Sethos from Sennacherib, mice gnawing by night the Assyrians' bowstrings and shield straps
Zoan - " This city was also called "the Field of Zoan" (Psalm 78:12,43 ) and "the Town of Rameses" (q
Jannes And Jambres - " It is the name of a writer in papyri of the reign of Rameses II Jambres may mean "scribe of the S
Goshen - It was near Heliopolis and Rameses, and not far from the capital of Egypt, Genesis 45:10 47:11 Exodus 8:1-12:51
Pithom - Egyptian, Pa-Tum, "house of Tum," the sun-god, one of the "treasure" cities built for Pharaoh Rameses II
Pibeseth - The names of Rameses II of the 19th dynasty, etc
Camp - ) There were forty-one encampments, from their first in the month of March, at Rameses, in the land of Goshen, in Egypt, and in the wilderness, until they reached the land of Canaan. Rameses... 2
Ashkelon - It is mentioned on an inscription at Karnak in Egypt as having been taken by king Rameses II
Suc'Coth - Rameses, the starting-place, was probably near the western end of the Wadi-t-Tumeylat
Zoan - , bearing mostly the name of Rameses II
Zoan - This temple was adorned by Rameses H
Camp, Encampments - The names of forty-one encampments are given in Numbers 33:1-56 ; from the first in Rameses, in the month April, B
Pha'Raoh, - One class of Egyptologists think that Amosis (Ahmes), the first sovereign of the eighteenth dynasty, is the Pharaoh of the oppression; but Brugsch and others identify him with Rameses II. , as Wilkinson, or Menephthah son of Rameses II. , and Rameses I. It was first thought that Rameses II, of the nineteenth dynasty, was there, But this was found to be a mistake
Ethiopians - As far south as Aboo-Simbel, about 22 20' N, are two temples hewn in the rock, which rank in interest next to the ruins at Thebes; these are attributed to Rameses 2 king of Egypt, with colossal statues of himself cut out of the solid rock
Pharaoh - The Pharaoh of the Oppression—" the new king over Egypt who knew not Joseph," Exodus 1:8, and under whose reign Moses was born—probably Rameses II. The Pharaoh of the Exodus, Exodus 5:1, before whom Moses wrought his miracles, was Menephtha, son of Rameses II
Hittites - In the reign of Rameses ii. Rameses fought a great battle with them there, and afterwards made a treaty of peace with them (Breasted, op. Meren-Ptah and Rameses iii
Memphis - Near the village of Mitraheny is a colossal statue of Rameses the Great
No - is the so named Memnonium of Amenophis III, called Miamun or "Memnon," really the Ramesseium of Rameses the Great, with his statue of a single block of syenite marble, 75 ft. Ramesseium, the magnificent palace temple of Rameses III, one of the ruins of Medinet Haboo. Colossal statues of Rameses the Great are one on each side of the gateway. " The Persian Cambyses gave the finishing blow to No-Amon's greatness, leveling Rameses' statue and setting fire to the temples and palaces
On - 1500, and inscriptions added by Rameses II
zo'an - Brugsch refers to two statues of colossal size of Mermesha of the thirteenth dynasty, wonderfully perfect in the execution of the individual parts and says that memorials of Rameses the Great lie scattered broadcast like the mouldering bones of generations slain long ago
On - 1500, and inscriptions added by Rameses II
Egypt - ... The national triumph was marked by the rise of the Nineteenth Dynasty, in the founder of which, Rameses I. " His grandson, Rameses II. ... Then came the Twentieth Dynasty, the second Pharaoh of which, Rameses III. But it was during the reign of Rameses III. ... After Rameses III
Syria - and Rameses II
Hittites - A hieroglyphic inscription of Rameses II mentions Astert (Ashtoreth) as their god
Moabite - Rameses II
Jacob - He was presented to Pharaoh and dwelt for 17 years in Rameses and Goshen, and died in his 147th year
Phinehas - An Egyptian name in the time of Rameses II
Egypt - 1322, and his grandson, Rameses the Great, b. That Rameses II. Rameses II is the Sesostris of the Greeks, who blended him with his father, Sethi I. " Among his many structures noted on monuments and in papyri are fortifications along the canal from Goshen to the Bed Sea, and particularly at Pi-tum and Pi-Rameses or Pi-ramessu; these must be the same as the treasure-cities Pithom and Rameses, built or enlarged by the Israelites for Pharaoh. "Nothing is left of its temples and monuments but a colossal statue of Rameses II. " The temples at Karnak and Luxor are the most interesting, the grandest among them all being the magnificent temple of Rameses II. Among the mummies was that of Rameses II
Wanderings of the Israelites - ... The first part of their journey from Egypt was from Rameses to the Red Sea. Rameses was on the east of the Nile, but some place it farther north than others. ... Rameses, Exodus 12:37 . | Rameses, Numbers 33:3
Caphtor - For at Medcenet Haboo the monuments of Rameses III state that the Egyptians were at war with the Philistines, the Tok-karn (the Carians) and the Shayratana (the Cherethim or Cretans) of the sea
ja'Cob - He was presented to Pharaoh, and dwelt for seventeen years in Rameses and Goshen, and died in his 147th year
Lachish - on the basis of a cartouche of Rameses III of Egypt
Succoth - Israel's first camping place after leaving Egypt, half way between Rameses and Etham, Succoth of the Βirket Τimseh ("the lake of crocodiles") on the road which led by the shortest way to the edge of the wilderness
Philistines - The occupation took place during the reign of Rameses III
Part - When followed by the preposition min (or ‘al) the word functions as an adverb meaning “apart from” or “besides”: “And the children of Israel journeyed from Rameses to Succoth, about six hundred thousand on foot that were men, beside children” (Exod
Exodus - Three or four days perhaps elapsed before the whole body of the people were assembled at Rameses, and ready to set out under their leader Moses (Exodus 12:37 ; Numbers 33:3 ). ... From Rameses they journeyed to Succoth (Exodus 12:37 ), identified with Tel-el-Maskhuta, about 12 miles west of Ismailia. , it took fully a month to travel from Rameses to the wilderness of Sin ( Exodus 16:1 ), yet reference is made to only six camping-places during all that time
Iron (2) - The blue blades and the red bronze in the tomb of Rameses III imply that iron and steel were very anciently known in Egypt
Memphis - ... "Menes" in hieroglyphics is written as the founder of Memphis on the roof of the Rameseum near Gournon in western Thebes, at the head of the ancestors of Rameses the Great; the earliest mention of the name is on a ruined tomb at Gizeh, "the royal governor Menes," a descendant probably of the first Menes, and living under the fifth dynasty. Caviglia discovered the colossal statue of Rameses II beautifully sculptured
Succoth - The name of the first encampment in the Exodus, which started from Rameses ( Exodus 12:37 ; Exodus 13:20 , Numbers 33:5-6 )
Hittites - Rameses II
Cloud - According to Jerom, in his Epistle to Fabiola, this cloud attended them from Succoth; or, according to others, from Rameses; or, as the Hebrews say, only from Ethan, till the death of Aaron; or, as the generality of commentators are of opinion, to the passage of Jordan
Moses - mesu, "son;" hence Rameses, royal son). It reached the ears of Pharaoh (the "great Rameses," Rameses II
Sennacherib - He erected memorial tablet at the mouth of the nahr el Kelb on the Syrian coast, beside an inscription recording Rameses the Great's conquests six hundred years before; this answers to his boast that "he had come up to the height of the mountains, to the sides of Lebanon
Ptolemais - , and Rameses ii
Exodus, the, - (Exodus 12:31,32 ) They at once set forth from Rameses, vs
Phoenicia, phNicians - 47), while Rameses ii. In the XXth dynasty Rameses iii. By the end of the dynasty Phœnicia was again free, for in the fifth year of Rameses xii
Exodus, the - ... The people were led from Rameses to Succoth, thence to Etham, and to Pi-hahiroth, between Migdol and the sea, over against Baal-zephon
Shishak - " He married the heiress of the Rameses family; his son and successor took to wife the daughter of the Tanite 21st dynasty
Exodus, Book of - Among the cities built by the Israelite slaves was Rameses (Genesis 15:14; Exodus 1:8-12; see EGYPT; Rameses)
Red Sea - Sesostris (Rameses II) was the "first who, passing the Arabian gulf in a fleet of long war vessels, reduced the inhabitants bordering the Red Sea" (Herodotus)
Egypt - Benihassan, as wife of Chnum, god of cataracts or of the inundation; this was a very old form of nature worship in Egypt, the frog being made the symbol of regeneration; Seti, father of Rameses II, is represented on the monuments offering two vases of wine to an enshrined frog, with the legend "the sovereign lady of both worlds"; the species of frog called now dofda is the one meant by the Hebrew-Egyptian zeparda (Exodus 8:2), they are small, do not leap much, but croak constantly; the ibis rapidly consumes them at their usual appearance in September, saving the land from the "stench" which otherwise arises (Exodus 8:14). The two most valuable papyri are the Turin papyrus published by Lepsius; and the list of kings in the temple of Abydos, discovered By Mariette, which represents Seti I with his son Rameses II worshipping his 76 ancestors, beginning with Menes. Abram's visit (Genesis 12:10-20) was in a time of Egypt's prosperity; nor is Abram's fear lest Sarai should be taken, and he slain for her sake, indicative of a savage state such as would exist under the foreign Hyksos rather than the previous native Egyptian kings; for in the papyrus d'Orbiney in the British Museum, of the age of Rameses II of a native dynasty, the 19th, the story of the two brothers (the wife of the elder of whom acts toward the younger as Potiphar's wife toward Joseph) represents a similar act of violence (the Pharaoh of the time sending two armies to take a beautiful wife and murder her husband on the advice of the royal councilors), at the time of Egypt's highest civilization; and this attributed not to a tyrant, but to one beloved and deified at his decease. The only era on Egyptian monuments distinct from the regnal year of the sovereign is on the tablet of a governor of Tanis under Rameses II, referring back to the Hyksos, namely, the 400th year from the era of Set the Golden under the Hyksos king, Set-a-Pehti, "Set the Mighty. ... From Rameses II (1340 B. Thus the period assigned to the dynasties before Rameses by Lepsius is much reduced
Exodus - From their breaking up at Rameses, to their arrival on the confines of the promised land, there was an interval of forty years, during which one whole generation passed away, and the whole Mosaic law was given, and sanctioned by the thunders and lightnings of Sinai. They are supposed to have been assembled at Rameses, or Heroopolis, in the land of Goshen, about thirty-five miles northwest of Suez, on the ancient canal, which united the Nile with the Red Sea
Joshua, the Book of - A letter, also still extant, from a military officer, "master of the captains of Egypt," dating from near the end of the reign of Rameses II
Red Sea - The earliest navigation of the Red Sea (passing by the pre-historical Phoenicians) is mentioned by Herodotus: --"Seostris (Rameses II. The point from which they started was Rameses, a place certain in the land of Goshen, which we identified with the Wadi-t-Tumeylat
Archaeology And Biblical Study - Steles of Seti I, Rameses II, and Rameses III were found at Beth-shan. Rameses II negotiated peace with the Hittites in 1280 B. ... The Philistines, a part of the “Sea Peoples” who came into the land following their being blocked in Egypt by Rameses III, and who left their name on the land, offered major opposition to the Israelites. Rameses III depicted his battle with them on sea and land on the walls of the temple at Medinet Habu
Zidon - Zidonlan ascendancy succeeded the decline of the Egyptian power after Rameses ii
Philistines - ... Rameses III
Egypt - ... The Pharaoh of the oppression has been thought to be Rameses II of the nineteenth dynasty, and the Pharaoh of the Exodus to be MENEPHTHAH his son. Rameses II attacked the Hittites on the north, but concluded an alliance. Eleven kings named Rameses: they became idle and effeminate, until the priests seized the throne
Exodus, the - Israel set forth from (See Rameses (Genesis 47:11; Aahmes I had a son, RAMSS, distinct from Ramessu two centuries later) at early morn of the 15th day of the first month (Numbers 33:3). ... The first two days' march brought Israel from Rameses (the general name of the district, and the city built by Israel on the canal from the Nile to lake Timsah) by way of Succoth, to Etham or Pithom, the frontier city of Egypt (Heroopolis) near the S
Wilderness of the Wanderings - (On Israel's route from Rameses to Sinai. Spiritually, Rameses (dissolution of evil), Israel's starting point, answers to the penitent soul's first conviction of sin, haste to flee from wrath, and renunciation of evil
Moab, Moabites - 1300, for Rameses ii
Exodus - ... The Number Involved in the Exodus In our English Bibles Exodus 12:37 says, “And the children of Israel journeyed from Rameses to Succoth, about six hundred thousand on foot, that were men, besides children
Exodus, the Book of - The plague of frogs attacked the Egyptian worship of nature under that revolting form (Heka, a female deity with a frog's head, the symbol of regeneration, wife of Chnum, the god of the inundation; Seti, father of Rameses II, is represented offering wine to an enshrined frog, with the legend "the sovereign lady of both worlds"); this was in September, when the inundation is at its height and the frogs (dofda , usually appea ). deep, dug by order of Seti I and Rameses II
Jacob - In Egypt he was met by Joseph, and, after an interview with the Pharaoh, settled in the pastoral district of Goshen ( Genesis 47:6 ), afterwards known as ‘the land of Rameses’ (from Rameses ii
Joseph - The Pharaoh of the oppression is now generally taken to be Rameses ii. The district was long afterwards known as ‘the land of Rameses’ (Genesis 47:11 ) from the care spent upon it by the second king of that name, who often resided there, and founded several cities in the neighbourhood
Hittites And Hivites - ... The geographical reference to “all the land of the Hittites” (Joshua 1:4 ) on the northern frontier of the Promised Land may indicate a recognition of the Hittite/Egyptian border treaty established by Rameses II and the Hittites under King Hattusilis III of about 1270 B
Divination - Jannes or Anna in Egyptian means "scribe," a frequent name in papyri of the time of Rameses II
Palestine - "the land of the Hittites" (Joshua 1:4); so Chita or Cheta means the whole of lower and middle Syria in the Egyptian records of Rameses II. Thus Rameses II marched against the Chitti or Hittites in northern Syria, and Pharaoh Necho fought at Mefiddo in the Esdraelon plain, the battlefield of Palestine; they did not meddle with the central highlands, "The S
Israel - Excavations have shown that these cities were founded by Rameses ii. It has been customary, therefore, to regard Rameses as the Pharaoh of the oppression, and Menephtah (Meren-ptah, 1225 1215) as the Pharaoh of the Exodus
Pentateuch - Pertaour, a scribe under Rameses the Great, in an Iliadlike poem engraved on the walls of Karnak mentions Chirapsar, of the Khota or Hittites, a writer of books
Judges, the Book of - A hieroglyphic inscription of Rameses II mentions Astert as the Cheta or Hittite divinity, so Judges 2:11-13
Ships, Sailors, And Navigation - By the end of the New Kingdom period, the ships used by Rameses III against the invading Sea Peoples (about 1170 B
Red Sea - After they set out from Rameses, in the land of Goshen, in the neighbourhood of Cairo, their first encampment was at Succoth, signifying "booths," or an "enclosure for cattle," after a stage of about thirty miles; their second, at Etham, or Adsjerud, on the edge of the wilderness, about sixty miles farther; "for the Lord led them not by the way of the land of the Philistines, although that was near; for God said, Lest peradventure the people repent when they see war, and they return to Egypt: but God led the people about by the way of the wilderness of the Red Sea," or by a circuitous route to the land of promise, in order to train them and instruct them, in the solitudes of Arabia Petraea, Exodus 13:17-20 ; Deuteronomy 32:10
Egypt - Such were the bricks which the Israelites were employed in making, and of which the cities of Pithom and Rameses were built
Egypt - Of localities in Upper Egypt only Syene and Thebes (No) are mentioned; in Middle Egypt, Hanes; while on the eastern border and the route to Memphis (Noph) are Shihor, Shur, Sin, Migdol, Tahpanhes, Pi-beseth, On; and by the southern route, Goshen, Pithom, Succoth, Rameses, besides lesser places in the Exodus