Places Study on Phoenix

Places Study on Phoenix

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Holman Bible Dictionary - Phoenix
(fee' nihx) Place name perhaps meaning, “date palm.” Port on the southeast coast of Crete where Paul and the ship's crew hoped to reach for winter harbor (Acts 27:12 ). Phoenix is often identified with Port Loutro, which, however, faces the wrong direction to offer shelter from winter storms. Phoenix is better identified with some point on Phinika Bay to the west of Loutro.



Webster's Dictionary - Phoenix
(1):

(n.) Same as Phenix.

(2):

(n.) A genus of palms including the date tree.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Phoenix
PHŒNIX was a good harbour on the S. coast of Crete. It has been identified almost certainly with Loutro , which is said to be the only harbour W. of Fair Havens where a ship of such size as that by which St. Paul travelled (it was a cargo ship, but had crew and passengers on board numbering altogether 276) could find shelter. Strabo speaks of Phœnix as being on an isthmus ( i.e. a narrow part of the island), and apparently as being in the territory of Lappa, which was not far from Loutro. Other authorities speak of it as if it were near Aradena, which is only a mile from Loutro. The identification would therefore be certain but for St. Luke’s description of the harbour of Phœnix as looking ‘towards the S.W. and the N.W.’ ( Acts 27:12 ), whereas the harbour of Loutro looks towards the East. Hence some identified Phœnix with a harbour a little farther W., of which we have no evidence that it could accommodate so large a ship. It is perhaps more probable that St. Luke makes a mistake in his description of a harbour which he never reached. The RV [Note: Revised Version.] understands the Greek to mean ‘in the direction in which the S.W. and N.W. winds blow,’ and therefore translates ‘looking N.E. and S.E.’ This may have been a sailor’s way of expressing it, but we have no authority for it.

A. E. Hillard.

All Dictionary (3)
1910 New Catholic Dictionary
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary
CARM Theological Dictionary
Chabad Knowledge Base
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection
Easton's Bible Dictionary
Fausset's Bible Dictionary
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible (1)
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament
Heresies of the Church Thru the Ages
Hitchcock's Bible Names
Holman Bible Dictionary (1)
King James Dictionary
Morrish Bible Dictionary
People's Dictionary of the Bible
Smith's Bible Dictionary
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary
Webster's Dictionary (1)
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types

Sentence search

Phoenix - Phoenix is often identified with Port Loutro, which, however, faces the wrong direction to offer shelter from winter storms. Phoenix is better identified with some point on Phinika Bay to the west of Loutro
Phenice - Properly Phoenix a palm-tree (as in the RSV), a town with a harbour on the southern side of Crete (Acts 27:12 ), west of the Fair Havens
Santa fe, New Mexico, Archdiocese of - Suffragen dioceses include ...
Gallup, New Mexico

Las Cruces, New Mexico

Phoenix, Arizona

Tucson, Arizona
See also ...
Catholic-Hieararchy
Date - ), the Phoenix dactilifera
Pheni'ce - (Acts 27:12 ) (more properly Phoenix, as it is translated in the Revised Version), the name of a haven in Crete on the south coast
North East, North West - The difficulty is that Lutro (commonly identified with Phoenix) faces E
Phenice - Phenice, or rather Phoenix (derived from the Greek, "palmtree"); a town and harbour S
Bestiaries - The lamb or sheep represented the soul or the believer; the Phoenix, Christ or immortality; the serpent, the devil; the lion, either the devil or Christ
Bestiary - The lamb or sheep represented the soul or the believer; the Phoenix, Christ or immortality; the serpent, the devil; the lion, either the devil or Christ
Dates - The fruit of the date palm (Phoenix dactylifera ), highly valued by desert travelers who consume dates fresh, dry them, or form them into cakes for a portable and easily-storable food
Palm, Palm Tree, - The palm is the Phoenix dactylifera
Palms - The date palm (Phoenix dactylifera ) was among the earliest cultivated trees
Birds in Symbolism -

The Phoenix, said to rise rejuvenated from its own ashes, is the type of resurrection and eternity
Arizona - Catholic influence on place-names in Arizona appears in the following: ...
Christmas

Saint David

Saint Johns

Saint Michaels

San Carlos

San Simon
Ecclesiastical divisions include the following dioceses: ...
Phoenix

Tucson
See also, ...
patron saints index
Symbolism, Birds in -

The Phoenix, said to rise rejuvenated from its own ashes, is the type of resurrection and eternity
On - The legend of the wonder-bird Phoenix, early used to illustrate the doctrine of the resurrection, arose here; to this city Joseph, delivered from prison, came with royal honors to marry the daughter of Potipherah, "dedicated to Ra
Clement - " As an emblem of the resurrection Clement relates the heathen fable of the Phoenix living five hundred years, and then rising again as a fresh bird from its own ashes
Nature - Of a Phoenix we say, there is no such thing in nature
Palm-Tree - From the leaves they make couches, baskets, bags, mats, and brushes: from the branches or stalks, cages for their poultry, and fences for their gardens; from the fiber of the trunk, thread, ropes, and rigging; from the sap is prepared a spirituous liquor; and the body of the tree furnishes fuel: it is even said that from one variety of the palm-tree, the Phoenix farinifera, meal has been extracted, which is found among the fibers of the trunk, and has been used for food
Palm Tree - Under this generic term many species are botanically included; but we have here only to do with the date palm, the Phoenix dactylifera of Linnaeus
on (2) - Shu, son of Atum, and Tafnet his daughter, were worshipped, as well as Ra to whom Mnevis was sacred, also Βennu "the Phoenix", represented by a living bird of the crane kind; the rising from its ashes indicated symbolically a recommencing cycle of time
Crete - There the emergency council called by the centurion and shipmaster overruled Paul's advice, and a risky attempt was made to reach Phoenix, a regular port for servicing the grain ships, some 40 miles further west along the coast
Palm Tree - ... It is even said that from one variety of the palm tree, the Phoenix farinifera, meal has been extracted, which is found among the fibres of the trunk, and has been used for food
Plants in the Bible - ... Only one palm , the date-palm (Phoenix dactylifera ), yielded fruit in biblical times
Canaan - Mythology connects the Phoenicians' ancestors Agenor and Phoenix with Belus and Babylon, also with Egyptus, Danaus (the Ethiop), and Libya
Rufinus of Aquileia - He quotes stories like that of the Phoenix (de Symbolo , ii) without any question